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Can Fatty Acids Be Converted To Glucose?

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What is METABOLISM? What does METABOLISM mean? METABOLISM meaning - METABOLISM definition - METABOLISM explanation - How to pronounce METABOLISM? Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license.

Metabolism | Definition, Process, & Biology - Anaplerotic Routes | Britannica.com

See trusted Britannica articles at the top of every search. Download our free Chrome Extension Although the catabolism of carbohydrates can occur via a variety of routes, all give rise to pyruvate. During the catabolism of pyruvate, one carbon atom is lost as carbon dioxide and the remaining two form acetyl coenzyme A (reaction [37]); these two are involved in the TCA cycle ([41] and [42]). Because the TCA cycle is initiated by the condensation of acetyl coenzyme A with oxaloacetate, which is regenerated in each turn of the cycle, the removal of any intermediate from the cycle would cause the cycle to stop. Yet, various essential cell components are derived from -oxoglutarate, succinyl coenzyme A, and oxaloacetate, so that these compounds are, in fact, removed from the cycle. Microbial growth with a carbohydrate as the sole carbon source is thus possible only if a cellular process occurs that effects the net formation of some TCA cycle intermediate from an intermediate of carbohydrate catabolism. Such a process, which replenishes the TCA cycle, has been described as an anaplerotic reaction . The anaplerotic function may be carried out by either of two enzymes that catalyze the fix Continue reading >>

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  1. manohman

    Why can't fat be converted into Glucose?

    So the reason cited is that beta oxidation/metabolism of fats leads to formation of acetyl coa, a 2 carbon molecule, and that because of that it cannot be converted back into glucose.
    Why exactly is that the case?
    If Glucogenic amino acids can be converted into citric acid cycle intermediates and then turn back into glucose via gluconeogensis, then why cant Fatty Acids which yield Acetyl Coa. Can't you just have Acetyl Coa enter the citric acid cycle and produce the same intermediates that the glucogenic amino acids creat?

  2. Czarcasm

    manohman said: ↑
    So the reason cited is that beta oxidation/metabolism of fats leads to formation of acetyl coa, a 2 carbon molecule, and that because of that it cannot be converted back into glucose.
    Why exactly is that the case?
    If Glucogenic amino acids can be converted into citric acid cycle intermediates and then turn back into glucose via gluconeogensis, then why cant Fatty Acids which yield Acetyl Coa. Can't you just have Acetyl Coa enter the citric acid cycle and produce the same intermediates that the glucogenic amino acids creat?
    Click to expand... Both glucose and fatty acids can be stored in the body as either glycogen for glucose (stored mainly in the liver or skeletal cells) or for FA's, as triacylglycerides (stored in adipose cells). We cannot store excess protein. It's either used to make other proteins, or flushed out of the body if in excess; that's generally the case but we try to make use of some of that energy instead of throwing it all away.
    When a person is deprived of nutrition for a period of time and glycogen stores are depleted, the body will immediately seek out alternative energy sources. Fats (stored for use) are the first priority over protein (which requires the breakdown of tissues such as muscle). We can mobilize these FA's to the liver and convert them to Acetyl-CoA to be used in the TCA cycle and generate much needed energy. On the contrary, when a person eats in excess (a fatty meal high in protein), it's more efficient to store fatty acids as TAG's over glycogen simply because glycogen is extremely hydrophilic and attracts excess water weight; fatty acids are largely stored anhydrously and so you essentially get more bang for your buck. This is evolutionary significant and why birds are able to stay light weight but fly for periods at a time, or why bears are able to hibernate for months at a time. Proteins on the other hand may be used anabolically to build up active tissues (such as when your working out those muscles), unless you live a sedentary lifestyle (less anabolism and therefore, less use of the proteins). As part of the excretion process, protein must be broken down to urea to avoid toxic ammonia and in doing so, the Liver can extract some of that usable energy for storage as glycogen.
    Also, it is worth noting that it is indeed possible to convert FA's to glucose but the pathway can be a little complex and so in terms of energy storage, is not very efficient. The process involves converting Acetyl-CoA to Acetone (transported out of mitochondria to cytosol) where it's converted to Pyruvate which can then be used in the Gluconeogenesis pathway to make Glucose and eventually stored as Glycogen. Have a look for yourself if your interested: http://www.ploscompbiol.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002116.g003/originalimage (and this excludes the whole glycogenesis pathway, which hasn't even begun yet).
    TLDR: it's because proteins have no ability to be stored in the body, but we can convert them to glycogen for storage during the breakdown process for excretion. Also, in terms of energy, it's a more efficient process than converting FA's to glycogen for storage.

  3. soccerman93

    This is where biochem comes in handy. Czarcasm gives a really good in depth answer, but a simpler approach is to count carbons. The first step of gluconeogenesis(formation of glucose) requires pyruvate, a 3 carbon molecule. Acetyl Co-A is a 2 carbon molecule, and most animals lack the enzymes (malate synthase and isocitrate lyase) required to convert acetyl co-A into a 3 carbon molecule suitable for the gluconeogenesis pathway. The ketogenic pathway is not efficient, as czarcasm pointed out. While acetyl co-A can indeed be used to form citric acid intermediates, these intermediates will be used in forming ATP, not glucose. Fatty acid oxidation does not yield suitable amounts of pyruvate, which is required for gluconeogenesis. This is part of why losing weight is fairly difficult for those that are overweight, we can't efficiently directly convert fat to glucose, which we need a fairly constant supply of. Sorry, that got a little long-winded

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Fatty acid oxidation lecture - This biochemistry lecture explains the process of beta oxidation of fatty acids. This lectures explains the beta oxidation process of fatty acids step by step. beta-oxidationis the catabolic process by whichfatty acidmolecules are broken down in the cytosol in prokaryotes and in the mitochondria in eukaryotes to generate acetyl-CoA, which enters the citricacidcycle, and NADH and FADH2, which are co-enzymes used in the electron transport to generate ATP molecules. Beta oxidationof fatty acids takes place in the mitochondrial matrix for the most part. However, fatty acids have to be activated for degradation by coenzyme A by forming a fatty acyl-CoA thioester. For short and medium length fatty acids, they undergo this reaction in the mitochondria. When pancreatic lipase acts on the small lipid droplets, it breaks them down into freefatty acidsand monoglycerides, which are the two digestive products of lipids. These small units are able to pass through the intestinal mucosa and enter the epithelial cells of the small intestine. Where are fatty acids stored in the body? Fatty acidsare released, between meals, from the fat depots in adipose tissue, where t

Muscle Physiology - Metabolism Of Fatty Acids

Fat molecules consist of three fatty acid chains connected by a glycerol backbone. Fatty acids are basically long chains of carbon and hydrogen and are the major source of energy during normal activities. Fatty acids are broken down by progressively cleaving two carbon bits and converting these to acetyl coenzyme A. The acetyl CoA is the oxidized by the same citric acid cycle involved in the metabolism of glucose. For every two carbons in a fatty acid, oxidation yields 5 ATP s generating the acetyl CoA and 12 more ATP s oxidizing the coenzyme. This makes fat a terrific molecule in which to store energy, as the body well knows (much to our dismay). The only biological drawback to this, and other, forms of oxidative metabolism is its dependence on oxygen. Thus, if energy is required more rapidly than oxygen can be delivered, muscles switch to the less efficient anaerobic pathways. Interestingly, this implies that an anaerobic workout will not "burn" any fat, but will preferentially deplete the body of glucose. Of course, your body can't survive very long on just anaerobic metabolism...it just can't generate enough energy. Last Updated: Friday, 13-Jan-2006 15:56:16 PST For questions Continue reading >>

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  1. Christian

    I read conflicting views about whether or not the human body can create glucose out of fat. Can it?

  2. David

    Only about 5–6% of triglyceride (fat) can be converted to glucose in humans.
    This is because triglyceride is made up of one 3-carbon glycerol molecule and three 16- or 18-carbon fatty acids. The glycerol (3/51-to-57 = 5.2–5.9%) can be converted to glucose in the liver by gluconeogenesis (after conversion to dihydroxyacetone phosphate).
    The fatty acid chains, however, are oxidized to acetyl-CoA, which cannot be converted to glucose in humans. Acetyl-CoA is a source of ATP when oxidized in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, but the carbon goes to carbon dioxide. (The molecule of oxaloacetate produced in the cycle only balances the one acetyl-CoA condenses with to enter the cycle, and so cannot be tapped off to gluconeogenesis.)
    So triglyceride is a poor source of glucose in starvation, and that is not its primary function. Some Acetyl-CoA is converted to ketone bodies (acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate) in starvation, which can replace part — but not all — of the brain’s requirement for glucose.
    Plants and some bacteria can convert fatty acids to glucose because they possess the glyoxylate shunt enzymes that allow two molecules of Acetyl-CoA to be converted into malate and then oxaloacetate. This is generally lacking in mammals, although it has been reported in hibernating animals (thanks to @Roland for the last piece of info).

  3. blu potatos

    To be more detailed it is the irreversibly of the reaction carried by Pyruvate dehydrogenase that makes the conversion of the fatty acid chains to glucose impossible. The fatty acids chains are converted to acetyl-CoA.
    Acetyl-CoA to be converted into pyruvate need an enzyme that can do the Pyruvate Dehydrogenase's inverse reaction (in humans there is no such enzyme). Than the pyruvete inside the mitochondria is converted into glucose(gluconeogenesis).

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Ohio DECA made an IMPACT on Community Outreach by donating to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation and help make type one diabetes, type none!

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Part 2: The Molecular Biology and Biochemistry With modern high-throughput methods for determining the genes that particular tissues and organs express, it has been possible to look at gene-expression profiles in remarkable detail. From this, we learn that most organs express the gene for hexokinase, the first enzyme of energy metabolism. The liver does not. Instead, it expresses the genes for two different enzymes, glucokinase and fructokinase. This makes a big difference. First, a simplified summary of energy metabolism. First, most cells can metabolize sugars (e.g. glucose), fats (fatty acids), or amino acids. Part of the metabolism occurs in the cytoplasm, and part occurs in the mitochondria. In essence, cytoplasmic enzymes "prepare" sugars and fatty acids to enter mitochondria. Glucose is converted into pyruvate ("compound P" in the diagram on the right), and fatty acids are converted into Acetyl-CoA ("compound A" in the diagram). There is a shuttle system that can move Acetyl-CoA into mitochondria; in the diagram, think of the last part (Compound A complete metabolism) as the mitochondrial processes. Although it is not shown here, the function of all of this is to re-assembl Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Christian

    I read conflicting views about whether or not the human body can create glucose out of fat. Can it?

  2. David

    Only about 5–6% of triglyceride (fat) can be converted to glucose in humans.
    This is because triglyceride is made up of one 3-carbon glycerol molecule and three 16- or 18-carbon fatty acids. The glycerol (3/51-to-57 = 5.2–5.9%) can be converted to glucose in the liver by gluconeogenesis (after conversion to dihydroxyacetone phosphate).
    The fatty acid chains, however, are oxidized to acetyl-CoA, which cannot be converted to glucose in humans. Acetyl-CoA is a source of ATP when oxidized in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, but the carbon goes to carbon dioxide. (The molecule of oxaloacetate produced in the cycle only balances the one acetyl-CoA condenses with to enter the cycle, and so cannot be tapped off to gluconeogenesis.)
    So triglyceride is a poor source of glucose in starvation, and that is not its primary function. Some Acetyl-CoA is converted to ketone bodies (acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate) in starvation, which can replace part — but not all — of the brain’s requirement for glucose.
    Plants and some bacteria can convert fatty acids to glucose because they possess the glyoxylate shunt enzymes that allow two molecules of Acetyl-CoA to be converted into malate and then oxaloacetate. This is generally lacking in mammals, although it has been reported in hibernating animals (thanks to @Roland for the last piece of info).

  3. blu potatos

    To be more detailed it is the irreversibly of the reaction carried by Pyruvate dehydrogenase that makes the conversion of the fatty acid chains to glucose impossible. The fatty acids chains are converted to acetyl-CoA.
    Acetyl-CoA to be converted into pyruvate need an enzyme that can do the Pyruvate Dehydrogenase's inverse reaction (in humans there is no such enzyme). Than the pyruvete inside the mitochondria is converted into glucose(gluconeogenesis).

  4. -> Continue reading
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