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Can Dka Cause Renal Failure?

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Patient professional reference Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find the Pre-diabetes (Impaired Glucose Tolerance) article more useful, or one of our other health articles. See also the separate Childhood Ketoacidosis article. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a medical emergency with a significant morbidity and mortality. It should be diagnosed promptly and managed intensively. DKA is characterised by hyperglycaemia, acidosis and ketonaemia:[1] Ketonaemia (3 mmol/L and over), or significant ketonuria (more than 2+ on standard urine sticks). Blood glucose over 11 mmol/L or known diabetes mellitus (the degree of hyperglycaemia is not a reliable indicator of DKA and the blood glucose may rarely be normal or only slightly elevated in DKA). Bicarbonate below 15 mmol/L and/or venous pH less than 7.3. However, hyperglycaemia may not always be present and low blood ketone levels (<3 mmol/L) do not always exclude DKA.[2] Epidemiology DKA is normally seen in people with type 1 diabetes. Data from the UK National Diabetes Audit show a crude one-year incidence of 3.6% among people with type 1 diabetes. In the UK nearly 4% of people with type 1 diabetes experience DKA each year. About 6% of cases of DKA occur in adults newly presenting with type 1 diabetes. About 8% of episodes occur in hospital patients who did not primarily present with DKA.[2] However, DKA may also occur in people with type 2 diabetes, although people with type 2 diabetes are much more likely to have a hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state. Ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes tends to be more common in older, overweight, non-white people with type 2 diabetes, and DKA may be their Continue reading >>

Outcome Of Acute Renal Failure In Children With Diabetic Keto Acidosis (dka)

Outcome Of Acute Renal Failure In Children With Diabetic Keto Acidosis (dka)

OUTCOME OF ACUTE RENAL FAILURE IN CHILDREN WITH DIABETIC KETO ACIDOSIS (DKA) Poovazhagi V, Prabha Senguttuvan, Padmaraj R Diabetic Clinic, Institute of Child Health and Hospital for Children, Chennai Address for Correspondence Dr V Poovazhagi, 8/11 Manjolai Street, Kalaimagal Nagar, Ekkaduthangal, Chennai. 600 032, India. Email [email protected] Abstract The presentation and outcome of acute renal failure in children with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) were analyzed. Of the 130 DKA episodes treated at the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU), 15 children (11.5%) had renal failure. Sepsis and shock were the common etiological factors. Mortality in ARF complicating DKA was 40%. Persistent acidosis requiring bicarbonate therapy, reduction in intravenous fluid volume, reduced dose of insulin and peritoneal dialysis were the modifications in the treatment for this life-threatening complication. Keywords Acute Renal failure, DKA, infections, shock Introduction Cerebral edema is a life threatening complication of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), other complications include dyselectrolytemia, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), pulmonary edema and renal failure. Chronic renal failure due to diabetic nephropathy and its presentation with DKA is encountered in adults. But children with new onset diabetes mellitus (DM) or known diabetic children presenting with acute renal failure (ARF) is rare. Literature reveals few case reports of DKA with renal failure. (1,2,3) Reported mortality in ARF complicating DKA is about 50%. (1) We are presenting a series of children with DKA and renal failure. Methods & Materials This retrospective study was undertaken to evaluate the outcome of children with ARF in DKA from January 2006 to August 2010 in 130 children who presented with DKA. None w Continue reading >>

About Diabetes

About Diabetes

Complications of diabetes Diabetes complications are divided into microvascular (due to damage to small blood vessels) and macrovascular (due to damage to larger blood vessels). Microvascular complications include damage to eyes (retinopathy) leading to blindness, to kidneys (nephropathy) leading to renal failure and to nerves (neuropathy) leading to impotence and diabetic foot disorders (which include severe infections leading to amputation). Macrovascular complications include cardiovascular diseases such as heart attacks, strokes and insufficiency in blood flow to legs. There is evidence from large randomized-controlled trials that good metabolic control in both type 1 and 2 diabetes can delay the onset and progression of these complications. Diabetic retinopathy (eye disease) Etiology Diabetic retinopathy is a leading cause of blindness and visual disability. It is caused by small blood vessel damage to the back layer of the eye, the retina, leading to progressive loss of vision, even blindness. Symptoms Usually the patient complains of blurred vision, although other visual symptoms may also be present. Diagnosis Diagnosis of early changes in the blood vessels of the retina can be made through regular eye examinations. Treatment Good metabolic control can delay the onset and progression of diabetic retinopathy. As well, early detection and treatment of vision-threatening retinopathy can prevent or delay blindness. This involves regular eye examinations and timely intervention Nephropathy (kidney disease) Etiology Diabetic kidney disease is also caused by damage to small blood vessels in the kidneys. This can cause kidney failure, and eventually lead to death. In developed countries, this is a leading cause of dialysis and kidney transplant. Symptoms Patients usually Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Chronic Kidney Disease Masquerading As Acute Pancreatitis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Chronic Kidney Disease Masquerading As Acute Pancreatitis

Robin George Manappallil Department of Medicine, Mar Baselios Medical Mission Hospital, Kothamangalam, Ernakulam, Kerala, India. Abstract Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life threatening acute complication of type 1 diabetes. Since diabetic patients may have hypertriglyceridemia, they are at risk of developing acute pancreatitis (AP). Hyperamylasemia may suggest a diagnosis of AP, but levels may be elevated in DKA. Hence, serum lipase levels correlate better with the diagnosis of AP. However, pancreatic enzymes are excreted by the kidneys and their levels are elevated in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). This report describes a patient with type 1 diabetes and CKD stage 4, not on hemodialysis, who presented with DKA and had very high levels of pancreatic enzymes in the absence of pancreatitis. Keywords : Diabetes Ketoacidosis, Kidney, Renal Insufficiency, Pancreatitis, Hypertriglyceridemia. Introduction Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an acute inflammatory disorder of the pancreas. In 10-15% cases, the condition is life threatening. Epigastric pain is the predominant symptom, which may radiate to the back, chest, flanks or lower abdomen. Serum amylase and lipase levels are elevated in AP. Abdominal contrast enhanced computed tomography (CT), abdominal ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are radiological methods which aid in diagnosis of AP [1]. However, elevated pancreatic enzyme levels have been noted in CKD patients [2,3]. Features like epigastric pain and elevated pancreatic enzymes are also seen in DKA [4]. Moreover, AP can present or coexist with DKA [5,6]. This case report aims to highlight the importance of elevated pancreatic enzymes in DKA and CKD, and the diagnostic dilemma posed by such elevations in patients with these two illnesses. Case Repo Continue reading >>

Invokana Ketoacidosis, Kidney Failure, Kidney Disease, Heart Attack, Stroke, Amputation Lawsuits

Invokana Ketoacidosis, Kidney Failure, Kidney Disease, Heart Attack, Stroke, Amputation Lawsuits

If you or someone you love have suffered side effects such as Diabetic Ketoacidosis, Kidney Disease, Acute/Kidney Failure, Heart Attack, Stroke or Amputation after starting Invokana, Invokamet, Farxiga, Jardiance, Xigduo XR or Glyxambi, you may be eligible for compensation through a defective drug lawsuit against the manufacturer. Our Invokana attorneys are standing by, waiting to assist. Lawsuits allege that Janssen / Johnson & Johnson, manufacturer of Invokana, a popular type two diabetes drug, failed to warn both the medical community and consumers of serious potential side effects including heart attacks, stroke, amputation, kidney failure, kidney disease and diabetic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition, usually requiring hospitalization due to the possibility of fatal brain swelling, coma, and severe dehydration. It’s also been alleged that had the public been properly warned, doctors and patients may have chosen something other than Invokana for diabetes management or at the very least, monitored for health issues more frequently. New Lawsuit Accuses Johnson & Johnson, Janssen Pharmaceuticals of Failure to Adequately Research Invokana and Failure to Warn of Health Risks July 13, 2017 – In a lawsuit filed July 3, 2017, plaintiff Martha Williams of Tennessee accuses Janssen Pharmaceuticals and parent company Johnson & Johnson of failure to adequately research all potential health risks of its new generation diabetes drug Invokana as well as failure to warn the public and medical community of such risks. The lawsuit blames an onset of acute renal failure, a urinary tract infection, dehydration and hypokalemia suffered by Williams just one month after starting the medication. “Consumers of Invokana and their physicians relied on the Defendants’ f Continue reading >>

I’ll See Your Ketoacidosis And Raise You A Renal Failure

I’ll See Your Ketoacidosis And Raise You A Renal Failure

A while back I posted on a paper that appeared in The Lancet about an obese woman who came to the emergency room with gastroenteritis and was misdiagnosed as being in diabetic ketoacidosis (a life-threatening disorder). She was misdiagnosed because the pinheads covering the ER couldn’t get past the fact that she had been on a low-carb diet. At the time I posted on this travesty I noted that this Lancet paper would from here on out be waved in the face of anyone who was following or advocated a low-carb diet as proof that such a diet is dangerous and can cause diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Well, now we’ve got an answer. Next time someone tells you that it has been proven that low-carb diets are dangerous and can cause ketoacidosis, you can resort to poker terminology and reply that you’ll see their ketoacidosis and raise them a renal failure. A few days ago I got wind of a paper published a few years ago that can be used as a counterpoint to the above mentioned idiotic paper in The Lancet that has given low-carbers such a bad time. This paper, published in the journal Renal Failure in 1998, is, like the other paper, a case report. The short version is as follows: An obese young man arrived comatose in the emergency room. In an effort to lose weight he had been consuming a high-carbohydrate canned beverage as his sole source of nutrition for the two weeks prior. His blood sugar–at about 20 times normal–was extremely elevated and led to a diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis. The physicians on staff treated the patient appropriately, and he, over the next 20 hours or so, regained consciousness as his blood sugar levels and other lab parameters began to normalize. During a lab analysis 22 hours after admission the doctors found the patient to be breaking down and rel Continue reading >>

Acute Pancreatitis With Diabetic Ketoacidosis Associated With Hypermyoglobinemia, Acute Renal Failure, And Dic

Acute Pancreatitis With Diabetic Ketoacidosis Associated With Hypermyoglobinemia, Acute Renal Failure, And Dic

Abstract We report a case of acute pancreatitis with diabetic ketoacidosis associated with increased serum myoglobin concentration, acute renal failure, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. A 49-year-old man suffering from diarrhea, vomiting, and somnolence was admitted to the hospital. He had had flu-like symptoms for 4 days prior to the onset of these symptoms. He was a habitual drinker and had been consuming 360 ml–900 ml of the drink “shochu” (distilled spirits containing 28% alcohol) daily for 30 years. Laboratory data on admission revealed elevated serum levels of pancreatic enzymes, including amylase, trypsin, lipase, pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI), phospholipase A2 (PLA2), and elastase-1, as well as elevated levels of glucose (373 mg/dl), ketone bodies (3675 μmol/l), and myoglobin (229.8 ng/ml). Treatment with subcutaneous insulin and intravenous administration of electrolyte fluid and the systemic protease inhibitor, gabexate mesilate, was begun immediately. Early after the initiation of treatment, there was an increase in serum cretinine (4.9 mg/dl), and thrombocytopenia (15000/μl) was observed. The patient completely recovered from renal failure and acute pancreatitis, but required insulin therapy. Alcohol ingestion and dehydration are thought to have played a major role in the triggering of the acute pancreatitis, We examined the relationship among acute pancreatitis, diabetic ketoacidosis, and hypermyoglobinemia in the literature. Preview Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF. Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Type 1

Diabetes - Type 1

Description An in-depth report on the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of type 1 diabetes. Alternative Names Type 1 diabetes; Insulin-dependent diabetes; Juvenile diabetes Highlights Type 1 Diabetes In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas does not produce insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is involved in regulating how the body converts sugar (glucose) into energy. People with type 1 diabetes need to take daily insulin shots and carefully monitor their blood glucose levels. Type 1 diabetes is much less common than type 2 diabetes. It accounts for 5 - 10% of all diabetes cases. Type 1 diabetes can occur at any age, but it usually first develops in childhood or adolescence. Symptoms of Diabetes Symptoms of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes include: Frequent urination Excessive thirst Extreme hunger Sudden weight loss Extreme fatigue Irritability Blurred vision In general, the symptoms of type 1 diabetes come on more abruptly and are more severe than those of type 2 diabetes. Warning Signs of Hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) occurs when blood sugar (glucose) levels fall below normal. All patients with diabetes should be aware of these symptoms of hypoglycemia: Sweating Trembling Hunger Rapid heartbeat Confusion It is important to quickly treat hypoglycemia and raise blood sugar levels by eating sugar, sucking on hard candy, or drinking fruit juice. Patients who are at risk for hypoglycemia should carry some sugar product, or an emergency glucagon injection kit, in case an attack occurs. In rare and worst cases, hypoglycemia can lead to coma and death. Regular blood sugar monitoring throughout the day can help you avoid hypoglycemia. Patients are also encouraged to wear a medical alert ID bracelet or necklace that states they have diabetes and that they take insulin. Pati Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Also known as: DKA Severe diabetic ketoacidosis is a medical emergency and requires prompt treatment to correct dehydration, electrolyte disturbances and acidosis. It is a complication of insulin dependent Diabetes Mellitus. DKA is the result of marked insulin deficiency, and ketonaemia and ketoacidosis occur approximately 15 days after insulin concentrations are suppressed to fasting levels. Marked insulin suppression occurs on average 4 days after fasting glucose levels reach 30mmol/L. Many cats with DKA have other intercurrent conditions which may precipitate the condition including: infection, pancreatitis or renal insufficiency. Pathophysiology Insulin deficiency leads to increased breakdown of fat that releases fatty acids into the circulation. Free fatty acids are oxidised in the liver to ketones that are used by many tissues as an energy source instead of glucose. This occurs when intracellular levels of glucose are insufficient for energy metabolism as a result of severe insulin deficiency. In the liver, instead of being converted to triglycerides, free fatty acids are oxidised to acetoacetate, which is converted to hydroxybutyrate or acetone. Ketones are acids that cause central nervous system depression and act in the chemoreceptor trigger zone to cause nausea, vomiting and anorexia. They also accelerate osmotic water loss in the urine. Dehydration results from inadequate fluid intake in the face of accelerated water loss due to glucosuria and ketonuria. Dehydration and subsequent reduced tissue perfusion compounds the acidosis through lactic acid production. There is whole body loss of electrolytes including sodium, potassium, magnesium and phosphate and there is also intracellular redistribution of electrolytes following insulin therapy which may compound p Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis-elevated Anion Gap (anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis, Agma)

Metabolic Acidosis-elevated Anion Gap (anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis, Agma)

Ketoacidoses Alcoholic Ketoacidosis (AKA) (see Alcoholic Ketoacidosis, [[Alcoholic Ketoacidosis]] and Ethanol, [[Ethanol]]) Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) (see Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State, [[Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State]]) Starvation Ketoacidosis (see Starvation Ketoacidosis, [[Starvation Ketoacidosis]]) Intoxications Diethylene Glycol Intoxication (see Diethylene Glycol, [[Diethylene Glycol]]) Ethylene Glycol Intoxication (see Ethylene Glycol, [[Ethylene Glycol]]) Formaldehyde Intoxication (see Formaldehyde, [[Formaldehyde]]) Methanol Intoxication (see Methanol, [[Methanol]]) Paraladehyde Intoxication (see Paraldehyde, [[Paraldehyde]]) Propylene Glycol Intoxication (see Propylene Glycol, [[Propylene Glycol]]) Pyroglutamic Acidosis (PCA, Pidolic Acid, Pyroglutamate, 5-Oxoproline) (see Pyroglutamic Acidosis, [[Pyroglutamic Acidosis]]) Salicylate Intoxication (see Salicylates, [[Salicylates]]) Toluene Intoxication (see Toluene, [[Toluene]]) Other Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) (see Acute Kidney Injury, [[Acute Kidney Injury]]) Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) (see Chronic Kidney Disease, [[Chronic Kidney Disease]]) Lactic Acidosis (see Lactic Acidosis, [[Lactic Acidosis]]) Etiology (GOLDMARK Mnemonic) G: Glycols Diethylene Glycol Intoxication (see Diethylene Glycol, [[Diethylene Glycol]]) O: 5-Oxoproline (Pyroglutamic Acid) (see Pyroglutamic Acidosis, [[Pyroglutamic Acidosis]]) L: L-Lactic Acid (see Lactic Acidosis, [[Lactic Acidosis]]) D: D-Lactic Acid (see Lactic Acidosis, [[Lactic Acidosis]]) M: Methanol (see Methanol, [[Methanol]]) A: Aspirin (see Salicylates, [[Salicylates]]) R: Renal Failure Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) (see Acute Kidney Injury, [[Acute Kidney Injury]]) Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) (see Chronic Kidney Di Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis With Acute Kidney Injury In Prepubertal Children: A Report On Two Cases

Diabetic Ketoacidosis With Acute Kidney Injury In Prepubertal Children: A Report On Two Cases

Abstract Type 1 diabetes mellitus is a result of autoimmune damage, in which environmental factors are thought to trigger the autoimmune destruction of pancreatic ß-cells.1,2 Worldwide, an estimated 65,000 children under 15 years of age develop type 1 diabetes mellitus each year.3 Approximately 30% of children who present with newly-diagnosed type 1 diabetes have diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA).4 Himawan et al. reported a DKA prevalence of43.6% in girls.5 The long-term effects of diabetes mellitus include retinopathy, chronic kidney disease (nephropathy), neuropathy, and dyslipidemia.2 References Hay WW, Levin MJ, Deterding RR, Abzug MJ, Sondheimer JM. Current diagnosis and treatment pediatrics. In: Rewers M, Chase HP, Eisenbarth GS, editors. Diabetes Mellitus. 21st ed. New York: McGraw-Hill; 2012. p. 1053 - 59. Aschner P, Horton E, Leiter LA, Munro N, Skyler JS. Practical steps to improving the management of type 1 diabetes : recommendations from the global partnership for effective diabetes management. Int J Clin Pract. 2010;64:295-304. Usher-Smith JA, Thompson MJ, Sharp SJ, Walter FM. Factors associated with the presence of diabetic ketoacidosis at diagnosis of diabetes in children and young adults: a systematic review. BMJ. 2011;343:1-16. Silverstein J, Klingensmith G, Copeland K, Plotnick L, Kaufman F, Laffei L, et al. Care of children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes: a statement of the American Diabetes Association. Diabetes Care. 2005;28:186-212. Himawan IW, Pulungan AB, Tridjaja B, Batubara JRL. Komplikasi jangka pendek dan jangka panjang diabetes mellitus tipe 1. Sari Pediatri. 2009;10:367-72. Al-Matrafi J, Vethamuthu J, Feber J. Severe acute renal failure in a patient with diabetic ketoacidosis. Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl. 2009;20:831-4. Poovazhagi V. Risk f Continue reading >>

Topic Discussion: Management Of Dka In Hemodialysis Patient

Topic Discussion: Management Of Dka In Hemodialysis Patient

Diabetic patients tend to suffer from ketoacidosis less frequently after starting chronic dialysis than prior to it.The prolonged half life of insulin in advanced renal failure and frequent follow up of patients on chronic dilayis have been identified as reasons for the decreased frequency of ketoacidois in the dialysis population. The usual course leading to ketoacidosis is omission of one or more insulin doses, often due to an intercurrent illness. This is of prime importance as an underlying cause should always be looked for at presentation. The common ones being access related infections and myocardial ischemia. The absence of osmotic diuresis distinguishes dialysis associated hyperglycemia from hyperglycemia observed in patients with normal renal function.The rise in plasma osmolality that is seen in diabetic ketoacidosis and non ketotic hyperosmolar coma is only in part due to the rise in serum glucose. The marked hyperosmolality is primarily due to the glucose osmotic diuresis that causes water loss in excess of sodium and potassium. The importance of effective plasma osmolality in the development of neurological symptoms are illustrated by observations in diabetic patients with end stage renal disease. These patients can develop severe hyperglycemia, with serum glucose concentrations that exceed 1000 to 1500 mg/dl . However because there is little or no osmotic diuresis, the rise in plasma osmolality is limited , hyponatremia is present, and there are few or no neurological symptoms. Mainly because of the absence of the osmotic diuresis a dialysis patient in DKA may be less likley to be volume depleted and in most cases the extracellular volume is expanded from its baseline, and only if it is deemed clinically necessary should small aliquots of fluid be administ Continue reading >>

Management Of A Dka Patient With Severe Metabolic And Ketoacidosis With Chronic Renal Insufficiency Brian Albany Otterbein University, Boomer.albany@otterbein.edu

Management Of A Dka Patient With Severe Metabolic And Ketoacidosis With Chronic Renal Insufficiency Brian Albany Otterbein University, [email protected]

Otterbein University Digital Commons @ Otterbein MSN Student Scholarship Student Research & Creative Work Fall 2014 Follow this and additional works at: Part of the Endocrine System Diseases Commons, Medical Pathology Commons, and the Nursing Commons This Project is brought to you for free and open access by the Student Research & Creative Work at Digital Commons @ Otterbein. It has been accepted for inclusion in MSN Student Scholarship by an authorized administrator of Digital Commons @ Otterbein. For more information, please contact [email protected] Recommended Citation Albany, Brian, "Management of a DKA patient with severe metabolic and ketoacidosis with chronic renal insufficiency" (2014). MSN Student Scholarship. Paper 6. Implications for nursing care Management of a DKA patient with severe metabolic and ketoacidosis with chronic renal insufficiency Brian Albany BSN, CCRN Introduction Case Study References Underlying Pathophysiology Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) serves as one the leading causes of mortality in diabetic patients [14]. The mortality has decreased over the past several decades due to the rapid recognition of the disease state and the improvement of management of DKA [14]. Despite a decline in mortality rates over the past twenty years from 7.96% to 0.67%, errors in management of the disease state are associated with significant morbidity and mortality [2]. Utilization of DKA protocols in the acute care setting have allowed congruency in care and delivery of effective lifesaving treatment. Despite advances in standardized DKA protocols, there still remains a gap in how to manage specific patient populations with end stage renal disease. Understanding the pathophysiology behind these patient populations will yield better outcomes with the ultimate Continue reading >>

Renal Failure

Renal Failure

Renal failure, especially CRF (Chronic renal failure), is a fairly common condition in older cats and dogs. The kidneys become less and less efficient at removing wastes[1] from the blood. CRF can sometimes be mistaken for diabetes, since polyuria and polydipsia can occur in both; this may lead to incorrect treatment and progression of the renal failure[2][3]. Diabetes can affect all bodily organs. Many humans with long-term diabetes have some problems relating to the kidneys, including diabetic nephropathy. There are many people who are renal dialysis patients and on renal transplant lists who are also diabetes patients. When CRF occurs in a diabetic pet, things can get tricky, since diabetes and CRF can complicate each other: prolonged hyperglycemia can lead to diabetic nephropathy. CRF can make it harder to regulate blood glucose levels. Insulin is metabolized mainly through the liver and kidneys[5][6]. The term used in references such as Physicians' Desk Reference and other medication information is reduced renal clearance, for the kidneys, reduced hepatic clearance for the liver. When the system processes insulin (and other medications) at a slower than normal rate, they remain in the system longer[7]. In the case of insulin, a previously acceptable dosage may lead to hypoglycemia, because it takes longer for the kidneys and/or liver to render it useless. Renal problems seem to affect the clearance of insulin more than disorders of the liver[8]. CRF and high blood pressure are both possible complications of diabetes, and of each other. See blindness. Continue reading >>

The Invokana Lawsuit - Amputations, Ketoacidosis & Kidney Injuries

The Invokana Lawsuit - Amputations, Ketoacidosis & Kidney Injuries

The Invokana lawsuits claim the manufacturers of Invokana failed to warn patients and physicians of the increased risks of amputations, kidney failure and ketoacidosis. Our law firm is accepting clients who took Invokana and suffered any of the above injuries. We have been handling claims against pharmaceutical companies since 1955, and we are listed in Best Lawyers in America and The National Trial Lawyers Hall of Fame. Why are Invokana Lawsuits Being Filed Thousands of claims have been filed against Johnson & Johnson and Janssen Pharmaceuticals by individuals who have suffered injuries as a result of taking Invokana. The lawsuits are presently combined before a federal judge in New Jersey where all of the national discovery and evidence gathering is taking place. Invokana linked to amputations, kidney damage and ketoacidosis. Yet, the manufacturers failed to properly warn. In the court filings, lawyers argue the following: Invokana is defective and unreasonably dangerous. Johnson & Johnson was negligent in the manufacturing of the drug. The company failed to properly test the medication, and failed to warn of the increased risks of amputations, kidney failure and ketoacidosis. Johnson & Johnson concealed evidence of the dangers from the government and the public, and misrepresented the safety of the drug in its marketing material. The most serious potential side effects and risks caused by Invokana are amputations, kidney damage and ketoacidosis. Clinical trials have found that patients taking Invokana are twice as likely to suffer a leg or foot amputation as those taking a placebo. Toe amputations and those in the middle of the foot are most common. Individuals taking Invokana should be especially careful to look for signs of increased tenderness, sores, ulcers, and Continue reading >>

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