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Can Caffeine Affect Ketosis?

Caffeine And Ketosis Is Coffee Ok On A Ketogenic Diet

Caffeine And Ketosis Is Coffee Ok On A Ketogenic Diet

You know how it goes; you just can’t start the day without a good strong coffee to get you up and running. But what about the interaction between caffeine and ketosis, does coffee have a negative effect on a ketogenic diet? Or any LCHF diet for that matter. This is a good question not only for coffee but other caffeinated beverages such as soda, energy drinks, and some supplements. The first thing I’d like to address is that there is no scientific study that points to any negative or positive interaction between caffeine and ketosis. However, Dr. Atkins (for which the Atkins Diet is named) does make a point of advising that people consume caffeine in moderation and that caffeine has been shown to cause hypoglycemic reactions in people who consume large amounts of it. Whether that reaction occurs in people who are on Keto or LCHF diets remains to be known. Personal Experience on Caffeine and Ketosis with my Keto Diet From personal experience I see no negative impact on ketosis from consuming caffeinated beverages, I drink probably too much coffee, the odd energy drink and caffeinated sodas from time to time and still maintain a state of ketosis. The best way to know whether or not what you’re drinking or eating is throwing you out of ketosis is to test yourself with a blood ketone glucose meter like this one here about 45 minutes after consumption. It must also be noted that one guy’s experience doesn’t form the basis of credible scientific research, that my friends would be “bro science.” So it’s for you to make the decision about what is best for you. I drink coffee and sodas because I like them, caffeine certainly isn’t purposely put into my diet for any nutritional benefit, and if you can go life without it, I say, “good on you.” What I can say Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Success Part 1: Low-carb Dieting Habits

Ketogenic Diet Success Part 1: Low-carb Dieting Habits

If you are embarking on a ketogenic diet plan, you are on the path to healthy, effective weight loss. There are, however, certain things you can do and mindsets you can get into that can further boost your chances of success, and make your experience of losing weight the low carb way even more satisfying. Here, we look at how changing your habits to work alongside your ketogenic diet plan can help you reach your goals. Good Habits to Get into: Hydration. Drink plenty of water. This is good for you anyway, but the ketogenic diet plan has a diuretic effect (this is good, because it stops you retaining excess fluid which makes you heavier than you should be), so you need to make sure you are drinking enough. Get into the habit of keeping bottles of water by your bed, on your desk, or wherever you spend a lot of your time, and drinking a glass before every meal (this also stops you eating too much, though the ketogenic diet plan also curbs your appetite). Checking labels. Even some of the foods that are generally permitted on a ketogenic diet plan contain some carbs, so make sure you count every gram you eat and make sure you stay below your daily limit. Checking labels also ensures you don’t accidentally buy something with hidden sugars in it. Cooking. If you don’t normally cook, it is a great habit to get into. On a ketogenic diet plan, you get the best results by eating whole foods, rather than anything processed. You don’t need to learn any fancy skills, but simply cooking your meat and fish and steaming your vegetables is a good place to start. Bad Habits to Change: Drinking Caffiene. While things like coffee and diet cola don’t contain carbs, the caffiene can interfere with the way your metabolism works and can, in some cases, hinder the effectiveness of your Continue reading >>

Diet Soda On A Keto Diet

Diet Soda On A Keto Diet

Throughout the years, I have gotten so many questions regarding diet soda on a Keto diet. Is it okay to drink since it’s 0 grams of carbohydrates (thanks to sugar alcohols and sweeteners)? The short answer is… it depends. Some people can drink diet sodas all day long, lose weight and feel great. I wish I were one of these people. Personally, I find that I can indulge every so often and be symptom free, but it comes with risks. I just have to be extremely careful and mindful of my intake. So what are the draw backs, you say? Stalls in weight loss When people tell me that they are following the Keto diet properly by tracking macros and are still unable to lose weight, one of my first suggestions will always be to cut out diet sodas. These have infamously caused stalls in the low carb community for years. Triggers insulin response Despite most sweeteners being carbohydrate-free, these sweet beverages can still cause an insulin response in the body. One of the foundations of the Keto diet is to keep our blood sugar levels as stable as possible. Constant elevated insulin levels can correlate with weight gain. Did you know that sugar substitutes and sweeteners are usually much sweeter than sugar itself? That seems crazy to me! Increased cravings for sweets This is probably the biggest kicker for me. When I do have diet soda on a low carb, Keto diet, I almost always want to finish an entire 2 litre bottle. For me, this stems backs to my old days of being helplessly addicted to Coca Cola. The sheer quantity of what I used to consume is dangerous and disgusting. This may even attribute to eating disorders like BED (binge eating disorder). Questionable long-term effects of sugar substitutes The verdict on sweeteners long-term — no one really knows. Some people claim that ar Continue reading >>

5 Supplements You Should Avoid

5 Supplements You Should Avoid

Given the opportunity, availability and depth of one’s pockets, getting the daily requirements of vitamins and minerals should always come from real food sources. In reality, this is not always the case – and that’s where supplements can help. But making sense of the overwhelming choices of supplements can be a cause for aspirin in itself. Here’s a list of five supplements that you absolutely want to avoid. Cheap Multi-vitamins Most multivitamins are made from synthetic products, using artificial colors and binders. Depending on how your digestive environment reacts they can cause feelings of nausea or worse. Some of the vitamins and minerals in multivitamins are too high, acting as fillers, or they are too low to have any real benefit. The outcome of all this is simply expensive urine. Poor quality, ineffectual amounts, and hazardous manufacturing are some things to watch for. From a keto perspective also watch for hidden sugars. Some vitamins include sugar-based binders and fillers like dextrose or maltodextrin, corn syrup, and rice and other flour fillers. Although the amount of sugar is small, don’t spend it on supplements. Do this instead Eat a nice variety of keto-friendly foods. Organ meats (in sausage, for those less daring personalities), dairy, and keto-approved vegetables are all great ways to get all the vitamins and minerals you need. Also, getting plenty of Vitamin D is easy…go outside and play/run/walk/bike/etc. Cleanse / Detox products Products which will aid bowel movements, ease constipation or flush “mucoid plaque” from the intestines. The term “mucoid plaque” comes from the alternative medical community and such claims are anecdotal, lacking empirical data. Similar to some multivitamins, these are money down the drain…pun TOTALL Continue reading >>

The Power Of The Ketogenic Diet With Dr. Dom D’agostino

The Power Of The Ketogenic Diet With Dr. Dom D’agostino

Dr. Dominic “Dom” D’Agostino is an assistant professor in the Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology at the University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, and a senior research scientist at the Institute for Human and Machine Cognition (IHMC). Why people frown so much on the ketogenic diet? Most people don’t like it because of a lack of education, even in the nutrition branch. The diet can help a lot with overcoming type II diabetes and obesity. It’s not really feasible for most because there is too much restriction. The diet contains a lot of saturated fat, which scares away most people. Doctors are not really educated on nutrition, because it doesn’t fit in their busy schedule. Nutrition is the pillar of good health, but we lack studies. The studies are hard to do and really expensive. Without research, there’s no evidence for doctors. 10% of the population could benefit from a ketogenic diet. 40% of the population could follow a modified ketogenic diet that keeps the ketones in the blood elevated. What can you use the diet for? There are many applications for athletes. It’s not optimal for every endurance athlete. People over 40 would respond really well. How much protein intake do you need? It takes1 to 1.5g per kg per day to stay in nutritional ketosis. Too much protein causes the ketones to decrease. If you have a fast metabolism (ectomorph), then you need 2g per kg per day. A typical ketogenic diet has a 4:1 ratio, so 4 parts fats, 1 part of protein and carbs. In a modified Atkins diet, the amount of protein is increased to 25 to 35%. Eric Kossoff is the leader of the modified diet for people with seizures. Impact of ketogenic diet on type I diabetes Dom has a student in his class with type I diabetes. That student found tha Continue reading >>

Does Cheese, Nuts Or Coffee Impact A Ketogenic Diet?

Does Cheese, Nuts Or Coffee Impact A Ketogenic Diet?

There is a lot of conflicting data on whether cheese, nuts or coffee are ideal or acceptable for a ketogenic diet. So let me clear the air a little with some of my experiences and bring in a pinch of clarity and sanity to the issue. SO are cheese, nuts and/or coffee harmful when taken while on keto? What are the impacts? Are there any specifications as to the quantities, if it ideal to take them? Are they diet friendly? Let’s review. Cheese A lot of people will argue that eating cheese on a ketogenic diet is harmful. The assumption that by eating cheese you are prone to taking in additional carbs, which is not 100% true. Yes, cheese does contains carbs so as long as you don’t go over the carb limit, you’ll be good. The thing to be concerned about is most individuals have a sensitivity to dairy products (and don’t know it), due to the casein in them. So if you have dietary sensitivity to it, avoid it (many people who suffer from a keto diet stall should cut out cheese). Cheese can be a great source of fat soluble vitamins. Eaten in moderation therefore, cheese is ok. Nuts Nuts should not be one of your major sources of fat in the diet. This is because they contain carbohydrates as well as phytic acid (are a pretty high in calories). Phytic acid absorbs essential dietary minerals such as magnesium which is essential for the utilization of vitamin D among many others. In moderation however, similar to cheese nuts are acceptable as part of your keto diet plan, taken as a snack, for instance. To avoid the phytic acid, you could soak or sprout your nuts but for most people on a ketogenic diet it’s not worth the effort due to the fact it a very small part of their daily intake. Coffee & Caffeine Biggest grey area in the world of keto. Coffee is engraved in our cultur Continue reading >>

“you Have Literally Saved My Life”

“you Have Literally Saved My Life”

Here’s an impressive life transformation story, from Gareth Hicks: The Email Hej Andreas! Thanks for such an inspirational site! I was informed by my doctor at the end of 2012 that I needed to make some significant changes to my life – as I was nearly 44 lbs (20kg) overweight – and had a very poor fasting lipid profile. This coupled with high blood pressure (routinely 160/120) and little exercise, I was classified as a 15% daily risk of heart attack – and was racing towards CVD. As someone with a history of family heart disease, I knew I needed to do something different! As of tomorrow, 19th Feb, I will have been living a Low Carb High Fat lifestyle for one year. I have lost (and easily kept off) 35 lbs (16 kg) so far – by living on real food – with lots of fats added to make it extra tasty. I have completely removed pasta, most bread (I occasionally use unleavened bread with curry), have almost completely removed sugar – and live on a diet that is mostly curry, cauli-rice and fresh vegetables washed down with a glass of extra dry cava. I have inspired lots of people in the UK to adopt a lchf lifestyle, based on you – and your website – and am currently helping about 20 people on a one-to-one basis, as well as several others via Facebook. I’m a follower on twitter and Facebook – as well as the original DietDoctor.com website – and have created my own interpretation based on what I have learned from you – @curryandcava, www.curryandcava.com (still being developed) and on Facebook – curryandcava.com ;) Many people in the UK are desperate for this type of information – so please keep it coming – and I will keep sharing it !! Please also feel free to have a look at the pages and feedback anything you’d like to highlight! I have done extensi Continue reading >>

Bone Broth + Ketogenic Diet: A Match Made In A Low-carb Heaven

Bone Broth + Ketogenic Diet: A Match Made In A Low-carb Heaven

Bone broth is an established superfood and many therapeutic diets have embraced its healing properties including the ketogenic diet. Bone broth is recognized as a healing food because of its high concentration of minerals and anti-inflammatory amino acids, as well as being one of the only food sources of the gut-healing proteins collagen and gelatin. In a moment, we’ll explain how bone broth is particularly beneficial for anyone following a keto diet. But first, let’s look closer at how bone broth fits in, since very specific macronutrient ratios are required to achieve desired results. The Keto Diet: How Does Bone Broth Fit in? The idea behind the keto diet is to train your body to burn fat for energy rather than glucose, which allows you to enter the fat-burning state: ketosis. Now, the only way to enter ketosis is by drastically reducing your carb consumption to approximately 5% of your diet, and increasing fat consumption to at least 70% of your diet. This way, your body has no choice but to rely on fatty acids for energy, which are its secondary ‘backup’ energy source when glucose isn’t readily available. The standard keto diet looks like this: 75% fat, 20% protein, 5% carbs. Since everyone has a unique body and lifestyle different, you can use the ketogenic diet calculator to determine your exact macronutrient needs. The keto calculator is an easy way to see how many grams of each macronutrient you need on the keto diet plan to keep your body in a state of ketosis, based on your current weight, height and activity levels. So, what would keto bone broth need to look like, in order to fit your macronutrient requirements? When you take a look at the nutrient profile of Kettle and Fire Bone Broth, you’ll see how both chicken bone broth and beef bone broth Continue reading >>

Do Sweeteners (sucralose, Stevia, Xylitol) Affect Keto Diets?

Do Sweeteners (sucralose, Stevia, Xylitol) Affect Keto Diets?

Now that you’re switching to low carb, you’ve probably found yourself with some sweet tooth cravings. Most fruits and sugary snacks are off limits, but luckily you come across, the much debated about, sweeteners. You’ve heard so much about how they’re terrible for your health, but many people have conflicting opinions on how they affect ketosis. Having experimented with all kinds of sweeteners over the last few years, I thought I’d share my personal experience with consuming them. Before I get into it though, I’d advised you consult your doctor or nutritionist before deciding on a sweetener as I am by no means a medical professional! Are Sweeteners safe for a Keto Diet? I see a lot of people asking this question. Can I have Sucralose (Splenda)/Stevia/Malitol/Xyltitol/other sweeteners while on a ketogenic diet? Before I answer the question, first you need to understand the different types of sweeteners. The types of sweeteners available on the market can be categorized under two main buckets. Natural Sweeteners and Keto Natural sweeteners are exactly what the name means, sweeteners that come from nature and aren’t artificially made in a lab. There are two main natural sweeteners you’ll probably come across. Stevia Stevia is an extract from a plant which is approximately 200 to 300 times sweeter than sugar. Stevia has gained popularity in the last few years and is becoming more widely available at local stores across America. Stevia has a glycemic index of zero, which means it should not affect your blood sugar (insulin) at all. It’s also zero calories and since it’s naturally occurring, it’s been widely adopted by people all over. One thing to be wary when purchasing stevia is that the product may be mixed with other forms of sweeteners or bulking a Continue reading >>

22 Revitalizing Ketogenic Coffee And Tea Recipes

22 Revitalizing Ketogenic Coffee And Tea Recipes

Having a routine can be very satisfying and one of my favorite routines is having a cup of coffee or tea in the mornings (after my Ketogenic green smoothie). But it can get boring just drinking black coffee or black tea all the time, so if you miss your lattes and cappuccinos, then this list of Ketogenic coffee and tea recipes is for you! I would give these drinks a try even if you’re not on a Ketogenic diet. These coffee and tea recipes are very low in sugar or carbohydrates (and they’re Paleo) and can be a great way to energize yourself in the morning without the mid-morning sugar crash! And if you’re not a coffee fan, don’t worry because we have a ton of refreshing tea recipes – some are made from black tea, some are herbal, and some are fruity. ​For something different, why not try the Vanilla Maca Latte​ or the Homemade Vanilla Chocolate Rooibos Tea recipe. You can use the table of contents to jump to the section you want, or click the green button below to download this entire list of Ketogenic coffee and tea recipes. Table Of Contents For Ketogenic Coffee and Tea Recipes Cold Brew and Iced Coffee Recipes – The Coconut Mama Ingredients: coffee, water. Photo Credit: Tiffany from The Coconut Mama Here is a basic recipe for cold brew coffee that can be altered to suit your own taste. It is simple to make and can be stored in the fridge. Many of us love our daily hit of coffee, but because this is cold brew, it is ideal for warmer days. If you are using a mason jar to make this, just remember to strain the grounds through a cheesecloth or sieve first! – My Heart Beets Ingredients: ground coffee, ground cacao nibs, water, nutmeg, cinnamon Photo Credit: Ashley from My Heart Beets Adding the cacao nibs to this cold brew gives a subtle chocolate note to Continue reading >>

Common Ketosis Killers

Common Ketosis Killers

“I’ve tried your low-carb diet, Dr. Nally, and it didn’t work.” “Hmm . . . really?” If your mumbling this to yourself, or you’ve said it to me in my office, then lets have a little talk. I’ve heard this statement before. It’s not a new statement, but it’s a statement that tells me we need to address a number of items. If you’ve failed a low carbohydrate diet, I’d suspect you are pretty severely insulin resistant or hyperinsulinemic. You probably never really reached true ketosis. I’d want to have you checked out by your doctor to rule out underlying disease like hypothyroidism, diabetes, other hormone imbalance, etc. Next, switching to a low-carbohydrate lifestyle is literally a “lifestyle change.” It requires that you understand a few basic ketosis principles. And, it takes the average person 3-6 months to really wrap their head around what this lifestyle means . . . and, some people, up to a year before they are really comfortable with how to eat and function in any situation. I assume, if you are reading this article, that you’ve already read about ketosis and understand the science behind it. If not, please start your reading with my article The Principle Based Ketogenic Lifestyle – Part I and Ketogenic Principles – Part II. If this is the case, then please proceed forward, “full steam ahead!” There are usually a few areas that are inadvertently inhibiting your body transformation, so let’s get a little personal. First, this is a low carbohydrate diet. For weight loss, I usually ask people to lower their carbohydrate intake to less than 2o grams per day. How do you do that? (A copy of my diet is accessible through my membership site HERE.) You’ve got to begin by restricting all carbohydrates to less than 20 grams per day. Continue reading >>

Are You Using Too Much Heavy Cream In Your Coffee?

Are You Using Too Much Heavy Cream In Your Coffee?

Many low carbers are overjoyed when they discover that heavy cream has only 0.4 grams of carbohydrate per tablespoon. You don't have to drink your coffee black. However, if you use too much cream, or don't measure it out first, your weight loss might stop. Whipping cream isn't the only high-calorie item to watch out for. Here's how to pinpoint foods that might be causing your weight loss to stall. I ran into an interesting thread over at Low Carb Friends today. One of the senior members there has lost almost 50 pounds. Because weight loss never travels in a straight line, he wanted to share how several week ago, he stalled just a few pounds above his goal weight. Like most of us who have experienced a stall at one time or another, he felt frustrated and helpless, but luckily, he was able to hold onto what he had accomplished so far. Not everyone does. Those last pesky pounds can really put up a strong fight. If you have reached that point in your weight-loss journey yourself, or if you have found yourself on a lengthy plateau, it's time to take a serious look at your everyday habits, so you can make a few adjustments. While no one wants to hear that further dietary changes must be made, there is no way to know what's wrong until you look. At the suggestion of others, the man decided to spend a week carefully weighing out his food and beverages, recording everything, so he could take a closer look at the end of the week. His largest calorie hog? Heavy whipping cream in his coffee! Can Dietary Fat Slow Down Weight Loss? On a low-carb diet, heavy cream is considered one of those luxurious foods you don't get to eat on low-fat diets. At 6.6 carbs per cup, 2 tablespoons of rich, heavy whipping cream in your morning cup or travel mug will set you back just under 1 carb. Howev Continue reading >>

Can Caffeine Kick You Out Of Ketosis?

Can Caffeine Kick You Out Of Ketosis?

Low-carb dieters who consume very few carbohydrates often go into ketosis. Ketosis develops when you use up your glycogen stores and need an alternate source of energy. Your body forms ketone bodies as it breaks down fat to use for energy, and you excrete ketones in the urine. Low-carb dieter use ketone test strips to ensure that they're following the diet correctly and burning fat. Caffeine might disrupt glucose metabolism, which could affect ketosis, although only anecdotal evidence of this exists. Video of the Day Insulin resistance, the inability of cells to respond to and absorb glucose, can raise glucose levels and cause weight gain. Ketosis decreases insulin resistance by improving insulin sensitivity, meaning the ability of cells to absorb glucose. Insulin helps cells take glucose from the bloodstream to use for energy. Improving insulin sensitivity helps you lose weight. Caffeine might increase insulin resistance. Caffeine and Insulin Resistance Caffeine might increase insulin resistance, which might make losing weight more difficult and also increase your chances of developing type 2 diabetes, although this has not been clinically proven. A study conducted by researchers from Duke University Medical Center in the August 2004 issue of "Diabetes Care," published by the American Diabetes Association, discussed the effects of caffeine on blood glucose levels and insulin sensitivity. This study showed that 250 mg of caffeine did not change fasting glucose levels but did raise glucose levels after consumption of 75 g of glucose compared with placebo. Although caffeine might raise glucose levels after eating a meal high in carbohydrates, it's unclear that this effect occurs after a low-carbohydrate meal such as those eaten by low-carb dieters. It's also unclear wheth Continue reading >>

Is Ketosis Safe And Does It Have Side Effects?

Is Ketosis Safe And Does It Have Side Effects?

Some people think that ketosis is extremely dangerous. However, they might be confusing ketosis with ketoacidosis, which is completely different. While ketoacidosis is a serious condition caused by uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a natural metabolic state. In fact, ketosis and ketogenic diets have been studied extensively and shown to have major benefits for weight loss (1, 2). Ketogenic diets have also been shown to have therapeutic effects in epilepsy, type 2 diabetes and several other chronic conditions (3, 4, 5, 6). Ketosis is generally considered to be safe for most people. However, it may lead to a few side effects, especially in the beginning. First, it's necessary to understand what ketosis is. Ketosis is a natural part of metabolism. It happens either when carbohydrate intake is very low (such as on a ketogenic diet), or when you haven't eaten for a long time. Both of these lead to reduced insulin levels, which causes a lot of fat to be released from your fat cells. When this happens, the liver gets flooded with fat, which turns a large part of it into ketones. During ketosis, many parts of your body are burning ketones for energy instead of carbs. This includes a large part of the brain. However, this doesn't happen instantly. It takes your body and brain some time to "adapt" to burning fat and ketones instead of carbs. During this adaptation phase, you may experience some temporary side effects. These are generally referred to as the "low-carb flu" or "keto flu." In ketosis, parts of the body and brain use ketones for fuel instead of carbs. It can take some time for your body to adapt to this. In the beginning of ketosis, you may experience a range of negative symptoms. They are often referred to as "low-carb flu" or "keto flu" because they resemble symptom Continue reading >>

Keto Drinks: What Is Safe To Drink On The Ketogenic Diet?

Keto Drinks: What Is Safe To Drink On The Ketogenic Diet?

We talk a lot about keto foods here, but today, it is all about the drinks! When it comes to drinks on keto, plain old water is king. However, sometimes you might want something else to enjoy with meals or as a nice refreshment. So, let’s look at what is safe to drink on the ketogenic diet, both alcoholic and non-alcoholic. Non-Alcoholic Drinks Here are some options for every day drinks during the week or the weekend: Coffee Drinks Many people turn to coffee for extra alertness. Is it okay on keto? Yes! It can even be helpful if you’re new to ketosis or beginning intermittent fasting and experience tiredness at first. Just be careful what you add to it. Some coffee ideas include: Plain ole’ black. Enjoy drip, espresso, cold brew, aeropress, iced, etc. as black as coal for all the caffeine without anything added. With milk. Add a splash of unsweetened full-fat dairy, almond milk, or coconut milk to your morning cup or combine with espresso for a no-sugar, low-carb latte. “Bulletproof” coffee. Created by Dave Asprey, Bulletproof coffee includes some special ingredients, but you can easily make your own simpler version at home. Add a good fat source from MCT oil or powder, coconut oil, or grass-fed butter to your coffee and blend. This can be a great option first thing in the morning because you’re getting easily digestible fats that continue the fat burning from your overnight fast, giving you a nice jolt of energy. Plenty of variation options too when it comes to keto coffee. Like those sugar-laden pumpkin spice lattes? Add some spices like cinnamon, nutmeg, and cloves to fancy it up even more. Want a healthy keto mocha? Add some coconut oil and unsweetened cocoa powder for a creamy, chocolatey treat. Tea Drinks Most teas have virtually no carbs, so they are Continue reading >>

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