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Can Being Dehydrated Raise Your Blood Sugar?

Blood Sugar Spikes: Causes, Symptoms, And Prevention

Blood Sugar Spikes: Causes, Symptoms, And Prevention

Diabetes is a disease that causes a person's blood sugar to become too high. This can lead to various complications. A person with diabetes must be careful to keep their blood sugar levels under control. Glucose comes from the food we eat. It is the main source of energy for the body. The pancreas secretes substances, including the hormone insulin, and enzymes. Enzymes break down food. Insulin makes it possible for body cells to absorb the glucose we consume. With diabetes, either the pancreas is unable to produce insulin to help the glucose get into the body cells, or the body becomes resistant to the insulin. The glucose stays in the blood instead. This is what raises blood sugar levels. High blood sugar is known as hyperglycemia. Contents of this article: Causes of blood sugar spikes People with diabetes have to be especially careful about keeping their blood sugar levels under control. There are several reasons why blood glucose levels may spike. These are: Sleep: A lack of sleep can be especially bad for people with diabetes, because it can also raise blood sugar levels. One study performed on Japanese men found that getting under 6.5 hours of sleep each night increases a person's risk for high blood glucose levels. Prioritizing healthy sleep and promoting sleep hygiene are good habits for everyone, but especially for people with diabetes. Stress: When under a lot of stress, the body produces hormones that make it difficult for insulin to do its job, so more glucose stays in the bloodstream. Finding a way to keep stress levels down, such as yoga or meditation, is essential for people with diabetes. Exercise: Having a sedentary lifestyle can cause blood sugar levels to go up. In addition, exercise that is too difficult can cause stress and blood glucose levels to ri Continue reading >>

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

A A A High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia) Whenever the glucose (sugar) level in one's blood rises high temporarily, this condition is known as hyperglycemia. The opposite condition, low blood sugar, is called hypoglycemia. Glucose comes from most foods, and the body uses other chemicals to create glucose in the liver and muscles. The blood carries glucose (blood sugar) to all the cells in the body. To carry glucose into the cells as an energy supply, cells need help from insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas, an organ near the stomach. The pancreas releases insulin into the blood, based upon the blood sugar level. Insulin helps move glucose from digested food into cells. Sometimes, the body stops making insulin (as in type 1 diabetes), or the insulin does not work properly (as in type 2 diabetes). In diabetic patients, glucose does not enter the cells sufficiently, thus staying in the blood and creating high blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels can be measured in seconds by using a blood glucose meter, also known as a glucometer. A tiny drop of blood from the finger or forearm is placed on a test strip and inserted into the glucometer. The blood sugar (or glucose) level is displayed digitally within seconds. Blood glucose levels vary widely throughout the day and night in people with diabetes. Ideally, blood glucose levels range from 90 to 130 mg/dL before meals, and below 180 mg/dL within 1 to 2 hours after a meal. Adolescents and adults with diabetes strive to keep their blood sugar levels within a controlled range, usually 80-150 mg/dL before meals. Doctors and diabetes health educators guide each patient to determine their optimal range of blood glucose control. When blood sugar levels remain high for several hours, dehydration and more serious complicat Continue reading >>

14 Surprising Causes Of Dehydration

14 Surprising Causes Of Dehydration

Chris Ryan via Getty Images By K. Aleisha Fetters Your body is about 60 percent water. Lose even 1.5 percent of that H2O — the tipping point for mild dehydration — and your mood, energy levels and cognitive function all drop, according to research from the University of Connecticut. And while there are obvious reasons you can end up dehydrated — a sunny day, exercise or not drinking enough in general — other triggers are less obvious. Check out these 14 surprising causes of dehydration and how to prevent them. People with diabetes — especially people who don’t yet realize they have it — are at increased risk for dehydration. When levels of sugar in the blood are too high, the body tries to get rid off the excess glucose through increased urine output, says Robert Kominiarek, DO, a board-certified family physician in Ohio. All of those extra trips to the bathroom can be dehydrating. If you’re diabetic and suffer from frequent thirst or urination, talk to your doctor about how you can work together to improve your blood sugar control. And if you’re experiencing excessive thirst along with these other type 2 diabetes symptoms, it’s time to pay a visit to your doctor. Is it that time of the month? Drink an extra glass of water. Estrogen and progesterone influence your body’s hydration levels, and when the two are roller-coastering, like when you’re in the throes of PMS, you may need to increase your fluid intake to stay hydrated, Dr. Kominiarek says. What’s more, for some women who have excessively heavy periods, the amount of blood lost is enough to deplete fluid levels, says OB-GYN Marielena Guerra, MD, of Elite OB/GYN in Florida. If you think the latter might be you, start counting your tampons. If you have to change them more than once every tw Continue reading >>

Why Does Diabetes Cause Excessive Thirst?

Why Does Diabetes Cause Excessive Thirst?

7 0 We’ve written before about the signs and symptoms of diabetes. While there are a lot of sources about what symptoms diabetes causes, and even some good information about why they’re bad for you, what you don’t often get are the “whys”. And while the “whys” aren’t necessarily critical for your long-term health, they can help you to understand what’s going on with your body and why it acts the way it does. That, in turn, can help with acceptance and understanding of how to better treat the symptoms, which in turn can help you stay on a good diabetes management regimen. In short, you don’t NEED to know why diabetes causes excessive thirst, but knowing the mechanism behind it can make your blood glucose control regimen make more sense and help you stick to it. So why DOES diabetes cause thirst? First, we’d like to start by saying that excessive thirst is not a good indicator of diabetes. For many people, the symptom creeps up so slowly that it’s almost impossible to determine if your thirst has noticeably increased (unless you keep a spreadsheet of how much water you drink, in which case you also probably get tested pretty regularly anyway). It’s also a common enough symptom that a sudden increase in thirst can mean almost anything. Some conditions that cause thirst increases include allergies, the flu, the common cold, almost anything that causes a fever, and dehydration caused by vomiting or diarrhea. So while excessive thirst is one of those diabetes symptoms that happens, and needs to be addressed, it’s not always a great sign that you should immediately go out and get an A1C test. Why does diabetes cause thirst? Excessive thirst, when linked to another condition as a symptom or comorbidity, is called polydipsia. It’s usually one of the Continue reading >>

Does The Flu Shot Affect Blood Sugar?

Does The Flu Shot Affect Blood Sugar?

While most physicians will tell you that your blood glucose will not be impacted by a flu shot, anecdotally there are reports of increased blood sugar levels immediately post- injection. Does this mean you shouldn’t get a flu shot? Absolutely not. Your risk from contracting the flu is far greater than a brief period of elevated blood glucose. The Flu Shot Doctors say that diabetics should not take the nasal form of the flu vaccination, only the injection. The vaccine is made of killed flu viruses, and cannot give you the flu. The vaccine is between 70% and 90% effective, and takes about two weeks to provide full immunity. It is generally available sometime during September, and physicians urge diabetics to get it as early as possible so they have complete immunity when the season begins. Some people report higher-than-normal blood glucose readings immediately after their vaccination and for a week or two. Generally, these levels are not high enough to signify an emergency situation, i.e. hyperglycemia and all of its ramifications. There is no real explanation for this increase, other than a possible small bump to the metabolism as the body processes the vaccine. Being aware of the possibility, and adjusting insulin and diet to address the higher readings should be sufficient. If after a couple of weeks glucose levels don’t return to normal, consult your physician. Why Getting a Flu Shot is Critical for Diabetics According to the CDC, diabetics are three times more likely to be hospitalized for the flu and the complications it causes than the rest of the population. Diabetes weakens the immune system, making diabetics more susceptible to the flu, and more likely to develop complications. Doctors not only urge diabetics to get vaccinated, but also strongly recommend t Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose And Dehydration

Blood Glucose And Dehydration

In the past, I assumed that the only association between diabetes and dehydration was that severe hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) would cause dehydration as one of the symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). However, over the years I’ve noticed the occasional unexpected high blood sugar when I was mildly dehydrated due to exercise without consuming enough water. I figured that was anecdotal and never gave it serious thought as a health issue worth pursuing. When I did consider the possibility, it seemed logical to me that since diabetics are told to drink water to help bring down high blood glucose, perhaps the absence of hydration would cause blood sugar to rise. Maybe? Last week summer came to San Diego in one hot wave We moved to northeast San Diego in April, so this was our first experience of the inland heat in our non-air-conditioned house. We’ve been sweaty and uncomfortable, especially while home most of the weekend. During this stint, I noticed my blood sugars were running high despite healthy eating, normal insulin doses, and plenty of activity. A nagging thought kept occurring to me, "Am I dehydrated?" I tend to be better about drinking water when I’m at work during the week, sitting at my desk. I certainly wasn’t drinking enough to maintain hydration during this hot spell. I got online and goggled, "dehydration and blood sugar" to see if I could locate information to confirm my suspicions. Oh, wonderful internet! I found dozens of articles and posts that explained that, in fact, dehydration can contribute to hyperglycemia. It’s actually pretty straightforward. Basically, when we’re dehydrated (even mildly) there is less liquid in our blood which means that the concentration of glucose (and other nutrients) is higher. As the heat and humidity Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Hot Weather — 12 Things To Know

Diabetes In Hot Weather — 12 Things To Know

To date, 2016 has been the hottest year ever, and it’s getting hotter. From now on, coping with heat will be an important part of managing diabetes. Some knowledge that might help you: 1. High body temperatures can lower blood sugar. Mayo Clinic writers Nancy Klobassa Davidson, RN, and Peggy Moreland, RN, CDE, say you should check your sugars more often in the hot weather. 2. Sunburn can raise blood sugar. The Mayo Clinic advises wearing a good sunscreen, sunglasses, and a hat while out in the sun. 3. Warm skin absorbs insulin faster, while dehydrated skin absorbs insulin more slowly. The closer you can keep your injection site to normal temperature and hydration, the better. 4. Dehydration from sweating can raise blood sugar and can lead to heat exhaustion. According to the Cleveland Clinic, people with diabetes are more likely than others to be admitted to hospitals for dehydration and heat exhaustion, and to die from it. High glucose levels lead to urinating more, which increases risk for dehydration. This may be especially true if you’re on an SGLT-2 inhibitor drug. Keep drinking water with a bit of salt if you are blessed to live in an area where water is available. Have a bottle with you and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink. Learn to check yourself for dehydration by pinching up some skin on your arm and letting it go. It should snap right back into place. If it goes more slowly, you are getting dehydrated. Don’t drink alcohol or caffeine in super-hot weather, as they are dehydrating. 5. Heat can damage insulin, other medications, and test strips. The Joslin Clinic advises people to keep their insulin cool, but not on ice. If you take medicines with you while you’re away from home, get a cooler bag to keep your medicines and test strips in. Ext Continue reading >>

Hyperglycaemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycaemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycaemia is the medical term for a high blood sugar (glucose) level. It's a common problem for people with diabetes. It can affect people with type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes, as well as pregnant women with gestational diabetes. It can occasionally affect people who don't have diabetes, but usually only people who are seriously ill, such as those who have recently had a stroke or heart attack, or have a severe infection. Hyperglycaemia shouldn't be confused with hypoglycaemia, which is when a person's blood sugar level drops too low. This information focuses on hyperglycaemia in people with diabetes. Is hyperglycaemia serious? The aim of diabetes treatment is to keep blood sugar levels as near to normal as possible. But if you have diabetes, no matter how careful you are, you're likely to experience hyperglycaemia at some point. It's important to be able to recognise and treat hyperglycaemia, as it can lead to serious health problems if left untreated. Occasional mild episodes aren't usually a cause for concern and can be treated quite easily or may return to normal on their own. However, hyperglycaemia can be potentially dangerous if blood sugar levels become very high or stay high for long periods. Very high blood sugar levels can cause life-threatening complications, such as: diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) – a condition caused by the body needing to break down fat as a source of energy, which can lead to a diabetic coma; this tends to affect people with type 1 diabetes hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state (HHS) – severe dehydration caused by the body trying to get rid of excess sugar; this tends to affect people with type 2 diabetes Regularly having high blood sugar levels for long periods of time (over months or years) can result in permanent damage to parts Continue reading >>

Effect Of Dehydration On Blood Tests

Effect Of Dehydration On Blood Tests

In this third article in our ‘Test tips’ series, Dr Muhammad Masood Ashraf and Dr Rustam Rea examine the effects of dehydration on all essential diabetes blood tests, and provide guidance on key practical points to consider. Dehydration is common in patients presenting to the acute admissions ward. The most common reasons include poor oral intake and fluid loss from: • Gastrointestinal tract (e.g. diarrhoea, vomiting). • Skin (e.g. fever, burns). • Urine (e.g. glucosuria, diuretic therapy, diabetes insipidus, diabetic ketoacidosis). A reduction of the central circulating blood volume due to hypovolaemia accompanying dehydration results in a fall in cardiac filling pressure and stroke volume and, if uncompensated, a fall in cardiac output. The body can compensate by moving water from the extravascular to the intravascular space.1,2 As a result of these fluid shifts, changes in electrolytes and water concentrations in various body compartments occur which are reflected in many blood tests results. This is classically seen in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis and Hyperglycaemic Hyperosmolar State (previously HONK). The clinical and biochemical features of dehydration3 are summarised in Box 1. Box 1. Summary of the clinical and biochemical features of dehydration3 Effect of dehydration on haemoglobin, haematocrit and HbA1c Both haemoglobin and haematocrit increase in a dehydrated person.2,4 Hiroshi Nose1 and colleagues induced dehydration in 10 subjects by exercise and checked haemoglobin (Hb), haematocrit (Hct), Na, K+, Cl, and plasma osmolality at 0 minutes, 30 minutes and 60 minutes after exercise. Figure 1 shows the change in Hct, Hb, and plasma solids before and after dehydration. Immediately after exercise, these increased from 42.7±0.5% to 44.7±0.5%, 14 Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Preventing High Blood Sugar Emergencies

Diabetes: Preventing High Blood Sugar Emergencies

Introduction High blood sugar in diabetes occurs when the sugar (glucose) level in the blood rises above normal. It is also called hyperglycemia. When you have diabetes, high blood sugar may be caused by not getting enough insulin or missing your diabetes medicine. It may also be caused by eating too much food, skipping exercise, or being ill or stressed. Unlike low blood sugar, high blood sugar usually happens slowly over hours or days. Blood sugar levels above your target range may make you feel tired and thirsty. If your blood sugar keeps rising, your kidneys will make more urine and you can get dehydrated. Signs of dehydration include being thirstier than usual and having darker urine than usual. Without treatment, severe dehydration can be life-threatening. Over time, high blood sugar can damage the eyes, heart, kidneys, blood vessels, and nerves. Watch for symptoms of high blood sugar. Symptoms include feeling very tired or thirsty and urinating more often than usual. As long as you notice the symptoms, you will probably have time to treat high blood sugar so that you can prevent an emergency. Three things can help you prevent high blood sugar problems: Test your blood sugar often, especially if you are sick or not following your normal routine. Testing lets you see when your blood sugar is above your target range, even if you don't have symptoms. Then you can treat it early. Call your doctor if you often have high blood sugar or your blood sugar is often above your target range. Your medicine may need to be adjusted or changed. Drink extra water or drinks that don't have caffeine or sugar to prevent dehydration. How do you prevent high blood sugar emergencies? Treat infections early Infections that aren't treated (such as urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and Continue reading >>

Dehydration And Diabetes

Dehydration And Diabetes

Tweet People with diabetes have an increased risk of dehydration as high blood glucose levels lead to decreased hydration in the body. Diabetes insipidus, a form of diabetes that is not linked with high blood sugar levels, also carries a higher risk of dehydration. Symptoms of dehydration The symptoms of dehydration include: Thirst Headache Dry mouth and dry eyes Dizziness Tiredness Dark yellow coloured urine Symptoms of severe dehydration Low blood pressure Sunken eyes A weak pulse and/or rapid heartbeat Feeling confused Lethargy Causes and contributory factors of dehydration The following factors can contribute to dehydration. Having more of these factors present at one time can raise the risk of dehydration: Dehydration and blood glucose levels If our blood glucose levels are higher than they should be for prolonged periods of time, our kidneys will attempt to remove some of the excess glucose from the blood and excrete this as urine. Whilst the kidneys filter the blood in this way, water will also be removed from the blood and will need replenishing. This is why we tend to have increased thirst when our blood glucose levels run too high. If we drink water, we can help to rehydrate the blood. The other method the body uses is to draw on other available sources of water from within the body, such as saliva, tears and taking stored water from cells of the body. This is why we may experience a dry mouth and dry eyes when our blood glucose levels are high. If we do not have access to drink water, the body will find it difficult to pass glucose out of the blood via urine and can result in further dehydration as the body seeks to find water from our body's cells. Treating dehydration Dehydration can be treated by taking on board fluids. Water is ideal because it has no add Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of High Blood Sugar

Symptoms Of High Blood Sugar

Topic Overview High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) is most often seen in people who have diabetes that isn't well controlled. The symptoms of high blood sugar can be mild, moderate, or severe. Mild high blood sugar If your blood sugar levels are consistently higher than your target range (usually 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) to 350 mg/dL in adults and 200 mg/dL to 240 mg/dL in children), you may have mild symptoms of high blood sugar. You may urinate more than usual if you are drinking plenty of liquids. Some people who have diabetes may not notice any symptoms when their blood sugar level is in this range. The main symptoms of high blood sugar are: Increased thirst. Increased urination. Weight loss. Fatigue. Increased appetite. Young children are unable to recognize symptoms of high blood sugar. Parents need to do a home blood sugar test on their child whenever they suspect high blood sugar. If you don't drink enough liquids to replace the fluids lost from high blood sugar levels, you can become dehydrated. Young children can become dehydrated very quickly. Symptoms of dehydration include: A dry mouth and increased thirst. Warm, dry skin. Moderate to severe high blood sugar If your blood sugar levels are consistently high (usually above 350 mg/dL in adults and above 240 mg/dL in children), you may have moderate to severe symptoms of high blood sugar. These symptoms include: Blurred vision. Extreme thirst. Lightheadedness. Flushed, hot, dry skin. Restlessness, drowsiness, or difficulty waking up. If your body produces little or no insulin (people with type 1 diabetes and some people with type 2 diabetes), you also may have: Rapid, deep breathing. A fast heart rate and a weak pulse. A strong, fruity breath odor. Loss of appetite, belly pain, and/or vomiting. If your Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Levels With Gestational Diabetes

High Blood Sugar Levels With Gestational Diabetes

High blood sugar levels are where your blood sugar levels go over YOUR test target. So that is anything 0.1mmol/l over your target e.g. if your target is 7.8mmol and you get 7.9mmol/l, this is classed as an over target reading or high blood sugar level. Bearing in mind that test targets vary all over the UK and Ireland, what is classed as a high reading for one person, maybe still within target levels for someone else. What to do if you get high blood sugar levels Re-test your blood sugar levels Re-wash your hands in JUST water and re-test your blood sugar levels. It is very easy to touch something, even your face or hair and contaminate our hands before testing. Many soaps and sanitisers can have ingredients which leave residue on the skin which can give false high readings and so it is important to wash hands in just water before re-testing. If levels are still high Record all the results so that your diabetes team can review them and what you ate so that you can review what may have caused the spike in your blood sugar levels. Drink plenty of water and walk or be as active as possible for 20 mins or longer. Drinking water helps to flush excess sugars from the body and exercise has an insulin type effect on the body. Communicate with your team Each diabetes team may give different recommendations as to when to contact them, but the general guidance given and also what we recommend is to contact your team after 3 over target readings within a week. Don't wait until your next scheduled appointment if you're getting over target readings, give your team a call to discuss it with them. Some teams will ask you to come in earlier to start medication or insulin, others may fax a prescription through to your GP surgery or Pharmacy for you to collect and start. Other teams may Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms - Don’t Ignore This Warning Sign Of Condition

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms - Don’t Ignore This Warning Sign Of Condition

Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or the insulin produced does not work properly and can be linked to lifestyle factors such as being overweight. The condition can cause long-term complications - and increase the risk of heart disease, stroke and kidney damage. However it can alter the way the body works in the short-term. People with diabetes have an increase risk of dehydration as high blood glucose levels can lead to decreased hydration in the body. Symptoms of dehydration can include thirst, headache, dry mouth and eyes, dizziness, tiredness and dark coloured urine. Often, feeling thirsty is the last symptom of dehydration and irritability and tiredess can come first. People are also considered to be dehydrated if they urinate less than four times a day. Symptoms of severe dehydration can include low blood pressure, a weak pulse or rapid heart rate and feeling confused. Diabetes.co.uk said: “If you feel thirsty all the time or your thirst is stronger than usual and continues even after you drink, it can be a sign that not all is well inside your body.” Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. If you feel thirsty all the time it can be a sign that not all is well inside your body If our blood glucose levels are higher than they should be for prolonged periods of time, the kidneys will work to get rid some of the excess glucose from the blood and excrete this as urine. While the kidneys filter the blood in this way, water will also be removed from the blood and will need replenishing and this is why we tend to have increase thirst when blood sugar levels are too high. Continue reading >>

Dehydration

Dehydration

The body needs water to function. Symptoms range from mild to life-threatening. The young and the elderly are especially susceptible to dehydration. What is dehydration? Water is a critical element of the body, and keeping the body adequately hydrated is a must to allow the body to function. Up to 75% of the body's weight is made up of water. Most of the water is found within the cells of the body (intracellular space). The rest is found in the extracellular space, which consists of the blood vessels (intravascular space) and the spaces between cells (interstitial space). Dehydration occurs when the amount of water leaving the body is greater than the amount being taken in. The body is very dynamic and always changing. This is especially true with water in the body. We lose water routinely when we: breathe and humidified air leaves the body (this can be seen on a cold day when you can see your breath in the air, which is just water that has been exhaled); sweat to cool the body; and eliminate waste by urinating or having a bowel movement. In a normal day, a person has to drink a significant amount of water to replace this routine loss. The formula for daily fluid requirements depends upon an individual's weight. Normally, fluid and weight are calculated using the metric system; however, below is the approximation in imperial (American) units. If you would like to calculate your body weight and daily fluid requirements using the metric system, please use this formula. For the first 10kg (kilogram) of body weight the daily fluid intake required is 100cc (or mL) per kg. For the next 10kg of body weight, the fluid required is an additional 50 cc/kg. For every additional kg of body weight, an additional 10cc/kg is required This is the basic body requirement. More fluid would Continue reading >>

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