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Can Alcohol Cause Metabolic Acidosis?

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Alcoholism is disease, heres some resources to help you fight back: Responsible Drinking: A Moderation Management Approach http://amzn.to/1ZdgP9f I Need to Stop Drinking!: How to get back your self-respect. http://amzn.to/1VEqbeU Why You Drink and How to Stop: A Journey to Freedom: http://amzn.to/1Q8pAv2 Alcoholics Anonymous: The Big Book: http://amzn.to/1N0rttl Alcoholics: Dealing With an Alcoholic Family Member, Friend or Someone You Love: http://amzn.to/1j9cvH4 Watch more How to Understand Alcoholism videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/517398-... The question that has been asked of me is if alcoholism can lead to diabetes. And if so, how? The answer is chronic alcohol use can lead to diabetes. The way it leads to diabetes is that chronic alcohol use can cause inflammation of the pancreas, and chronic inflammation of the pancreas can affect the production of insulin in the body. And that's what causes diabetes. So that is why alcohol can be an actual primary determinate of diabetes. The other way that heavy alcohol use can lead to diabetes or exacerbate diabetes is that alcohol has a high content of sugar. So if one is already diabetic, alcohol is really not indicated because o

Alcoholism And Lactic Acidosis

Learn more about the SDN Exhibition Forums for exclusive discounts and contests. So the way I understood this is that both alcohol metabolism and latcate to pyrvuate conversion require NAD, and with too much alcohol consumption the body uses up all the NAD for alcohol metabolism right? The part that I'm a bit troubled with this mechanism is that unless we are doing extreme exercise, we don't really generate lactic acid. In most cases, the body uses oxidative phosphorylation, right? So lactic acidosis will most likely occur when you drink alcohol and then do extreme exercise, correct? SDN Members don't see this ad. About the ads. My understanding is that high NADH levels from EtOH metab drives the pyruvate -> lactate conversion. So you don't need to be exercising +drinking, either will do it on their own. I actually enjoy your questions, though some things are really easily looked up. The several different causes of lactic acidosis: I actually enjoy your questions, though some things are really easily looked up. The several different causes of lactic acidosis: But the reasons behind why lactic acidosis occurs for these is significantly different.... For example, in exercise- lactic Continue reading >>

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  1. htone

    'Grondpad', on 08 Jul 2013 - 06:39 AM, said:

    OK, I have an experiences to add that I don’t know how to put gently, so apologies if it is a bit on the umhhh sensitive side:
    My beautiful wife and I have been battling to conceive the last 3.5 years. It was really a terrible time that amounted to us spending lots and lots of money and we went through many treatments. Now I am so chuffed cause our little Peanut is 12 weeks into the pregnancy this week.
    About 6 weeks ago we started chatting about the path we took to get here. There were artificial inseminations, various doctors and we were scheduled for an invetro this September. One of the doctors we went to was a Homeopath. He was not successful in what he did but on one of the visits he did say that I should eat as much butter and fresh avo as I can find cause it helps with the little swimmers. At that time I did not even know about LCHF and didn’t pay much attention to it, but it popped into my mind during the conversation with my wife.
    Seeing that the problem was with me (low sperm count due to the mumps), I have a strange feeling that my diet might have helped here. My wife got pregnant 3 months after I started with LCHF and eating all those butter, coconut oil, avo etc. I browsed the web and cannot actually find any research done on this subject, but there must be a reason why a Homeopath would say something like that. I have to add that this is the only thing that changed in our lives, and my wife is not on LCHF. Maybe just a very very very happy coincidence. But either way, I AM GONNE BE A DAD. Fantastic!
    Fantastic news and allow me to join the chorus of CONGRATULATIONS on here !
    Now read up about LCHF during pregnancy - there's a LOT of info out there and perhaps you and your wife together can change some of your child's destiny... there's a lot of theorizing going on about our adult eating patterns and the way we favour carbs being as a result of our mothers who ate a lot of carbs when they were pregnant with us.... Just saying

  2. Marge

    'htone', on 08 Jul 2013 - 12:48 PM, said:

    I am not answering FOR helpmytrap, I am just answering in general.
    I test my BG using a blood glucose meter - In my case a Roche AccuCheck Nano - an absolutely brilliant little meter.
    (https://www.accu-che...nano/index.html) No, I don't work for them...
    You prick your finger, "suck up" the droplet of blood with a special little BG "stick" that fits into the machine and about 5 seconds later you have the reading. It can store about 500 readings and in my case I went OTT and bought the Roche 360 BG analysis software, so I have a complete database of all my blood checks since I first started measuring. I download the readings from the tester to my PC where those are then nicely graphed over time. This was where I could clearly see how I all but cured my Type 2 diabetes following a LCHF eating plan !
    The meters are relatively cheap, in fact if you can make contact with one of the reps from e.g. Roche they will give you one for free - they make their money off the BG sticks (which some medical aid plans pay for).
    Cool thanks, will have a look at the accu-check-thingy, it would be very interesting to get a more regular reading.
    I just had a glucose check at dischem and the reading was 4.8 after about 10 days into my LCHF diet. Tried to google what the ideal measurement is so if anyone can comment it would help.
    (The dischem test did cost me R35 so might as well buy the home kit. It also included an old tannie nurse who lectured me on my bad eating habits seeing that I'm only eating 3 times a day, how my insulin levels will drop, eating no fruit and carbs will give me diabetes, and how I'm not allowed to buy a home glucose test kit seeing that I don't have diabetes (yet, according to her) and a lot of other old school 'advice' on what and when to eat....)

  3. Cuppa Bru

    'htone', on 08 Jul 2013 - 12:48 PM, said:

    I am not answering FOR helpmytrap, I am just answering in general.
    I test my BG using a blood glucose meter - In my case a Roche AccuCheck Nano - an absolutely brilliant little meter.
    (https://www.accu-che...nano/index.html) No, I don't work for them...
    You prick your finger, "suck up" the droplet of blood with a special little BG "stick" that fits into the machine and about 5 seconds later you have the reading. It can store about 500 readings and in my case I went OTT and bought the Roche 360 BG analysis software, so I have a complete database of all my blood checks since I first started measuring. I download the readings from the tester to my PC where those are then nicely graphed over time. This was where I could clearly see how I all but cured my Type 2 diabetes following a LCHF eating plan !
    The meters are relatively cheap, in fact if you can make contact with one of the reps from e.g. Roche they will give you one for free - they make their money off the BG sticks (which some medical aid plans pay for).
    Interesting on the subsidised BG meters!
    Followed the link and got a certificate. Looks like the subsidy is for USA only, but worth a shot.

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Anion gap usmle - anion gap metabolic acidosis normal anion gap metabolic acidosis

Metabolic Acidosis In The Alcoholic: A Pathophysiologic Approach - Sciencedirect

Volume 32, Issue 3 , March 1983, Pages 308-315 Metabolic acidosis in the alcoholic: A pathophysiologic approach Author links open overlay panel M.L.Halperin Get rights and content The purpose of this paper is to review the acid-base abnormalities in patients presenting with metabolic acidosis due to acute ethanol ingestion and to review the theoretical constraints on ethanol metabolism in the liver. Alcohol-induced acidosis is a mixed acid-base disturbance. Metabolic acidosis is due to lactic acidosis, ketoacidosis and acetic acidosis but the degree of each varies from patient to patient. Metabolic alkalosis is frequently present due to ethanol-induced vomiting. However, it could be overlooked because of an indirect loss of sodium bicarbonate (as sodium B-hydroxybutyrate in the urine). Nevertheless, the accompanying reduction in ECF volume may play an important role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic acidosis because it could lead to a relative insulin deficiency. Treatment of alcohol acidosis should include sodium, chloride, potassium, phosphorus, magnesium and thiamine replacements slong with attention to concomitant clinical problems. Unless hypoglycemia is present, glucose need Continue reading >>

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  1. sammerb

    I understand ketosis is achieved when staying between 0-50g of carbs, upwards to 100g for some people.
    But I was wondering where sugar fits in to this?
    The reason I'm asking is there's a full fat greek yogurt that I LOVE. But it's got 15g of carbs and 10g of sugar.
    Will eating that likely to kick me out of ketosis?

  2. Egoldstein

    thinking about being IN ketosis or not is somewhat misleading. What you want is to be fully keto-adapted, meaning your body will seamlessly move from carb burning, fat burning, maybe protein burning back and forth. The carb flu period is when you are not fully adapted and feel a bit out of sorts when transitioning. For someone fully adapted, having a high carb meal or day should not impair longer-term fat burning and fatloss.

  3. OnTheBayou

    Sugar and carbs in yogurt is misleading. Carbs in all foods are not determined directly, but presumed to be what is left over after subtracting proteins and fats. Most, but not all, of the milk's lactose is converted to acids (acidolphilus, any one?) which while still carbs are no longer sugars.
    Just stay away from sugar added yogurts and don't eat it too often. It is dairy.

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Lecture to Intensive Care Trainees, August 2012

Metabolic Acidosis In The Alcoholic: A Pathophysiologic Approach.

Metabolic acidosis in the alcoholic: a pathophysiologic approach. Halperin ML , Hammeke M , Josse RG , Jungas RL . The purpose of this paper is to review the acid-base abnormalities in patients presenting with metabolic acidosis due to acute ethanol ingestion and to review the theoretical constraints on ethanol metabolism in the liver. Alcohol-induced acidosis is a mixed acid-base disturbance. Metabolic acidosis is due to lactic acidosis, ketoacidosis and acetic acidosis but the degree of each varies from patient to patient. Metabolic alkalosis is frequently present due to ethanol-induced vomiting. However, it could be overlooked because of an indirect loss of sodium bicarbonate (as sodium B-hydroxybutyrate in the urine). Nevertheless, the accompanying reduction in ECF volume may play an important role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic acidosis because it could lead to a relative insulin deficiency. Treatment of alcohol acidosis should include sodium, chloride, potassium, phosphorus, magnesium and thiamine replacements along with attention to concomitant clinical problems. Unless hypoglycemia is present, glucose need not be given immediately. We feel that insulin should be withheld Continue reading >>

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  1. weaselposse

    Welcome to Reddit.
    Come for the cats, stay for the empathy.

    Become a Redditor
    and start exploring.

  2. Junkbot

    You get used to it. Drink lots of water, chew some gum.

  3. weaselposse

    I drink like 3 litres a day and have mints/mouth was and it just seems like it never leaves

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