diabetestalk.net

Can Alcohol Cause Metabolic Acidosis?

Share on facebook

Fasting Ketosis And Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

INTRODUCTION Ketoacidosis is the term used for metabolic acidoses associated with an accumulation of ketone bodies. The most common cause of ketoacidosis is diabetic ketoacidosis. Two other causes are fasting ketosis and alcoholic ketoacidosis. Fasting ketosis and alcoholic ketoacidosis will be reviewed here. Issues related to diabetic ketoacidosis are discussed in detail elsewhere. (See "Diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state in adults: Epidemiology and pathogenesis" and "Diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state in adults: Clinical features, evaluation, and diagnosis" and "Diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state in adults: Treatment".) PHYSIOLOGY OF KETONE BODIES There are three major ketone bodies, with the interrelationships shown in the figure (figure 1): Acetoacetic acid is the only true ketoacid. The more dominant acid in patients with ketoacidosis is beta-hydroxybutyric acid, which results from the reduction of acetoacetic acid by NADH. Beta-hydroxybutyric acid is a hydroxyacid, not a true ketoacid. Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. honorable_starfish

    I think I'm eating too much for weightloss, I'm averaging like 6-10 servings.

  2. honorable_starfish

    I had 11 servings today!!

  3. mikki

    and how many carbs?

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

Anion gap usmle - anion gap metabolic acidosis normal anion gap metabolic acidosis

What Is Metabolic Acidosis?

Metabolic acidosis happens when the chemical balance of acids and bases in your blood gets thrown off. Your body: Is making too much acid Isn't getting rid of enough acid Doesn't have enough base to offset a normal amount of acid When any of these happen, chemical reactions and processes in your body don't work right. Although severe episodes can be life-threatening, sometimes metabolic acidosis is a mild condition. You can treat it, but how depends on what's causing it. Causes of Metabolic Acidosis Different things can set up an acid-base imbalance in your blood. Ketoacidosis. When you have diabetes and don't get enough insulin and get dehydrated, your body burns fat instead of carbs as fuel, and that makes ketones. Lots of ketones in your blood turn it acidic. People who drink a lot of alcohol for a long time and don't eat enough also build up ketones. It can happen when you aren't eating at all, too. Lactic acidosis. The cells in your body make lactic acid when they don't have a lot of oxygen to use. This acid can build up, too. It might happen when you're exercising intensely. Big drops in blood pressure, heart failure, cardiac arrest, and an overwhelming infection can also cau Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. htone

    'Grondpad', on 08 Jul 2013 - 06:39 AM, said:

    OK, I have an experiences to add that I don’t know how to put gently, so apologies if it is a bit on the umhhh sensitive side:
    My beautiful wife and I have been battling to conceive the last 3.5 years. It was really a terrible time that amounted to us spending lots and lots of money and we went through many treatments. Now I am so chuffed cause our little Peanut is 12 weeks into the pregnancy this week.
    About 6 weeks ago we started chatting about the path we took to get here. There were artificial inseminations, various doctors and we were scheduled for an invetro this September. One of the doctors we went to was a Homeopath. He was not successful in what he did but on one of the visits he did say that I should eat as much butter and fresh avo as I can find cause it helps with the little swimmers. At that time I did not even know about LCHF and didn’t pay much attention to it, but it popped into my mind during the conversation with my wife.
    Seeing that the problem was with me (low sperm count due to the mumps), I have a strange feeling that my diet might have helped here. My wife got pregnant 3 months after I started with LCHF and eating all those butter, coconut oil, avo etc. I browsed the web and cannot actually find any research done on this subject, but there must be a reason why a Homeopath would say something like that. I have to add that this is the only thing that changed in our lives, and my wife is not on LCHF. Maybe just a very very very happy coincidence. But either way, I AM GONNE BE A DAD. Fantastic!
    Fantastic news and allow me to join the chorus of CONGRATULATIONS on here !
    Now read up about LCHF during pregnancy - there's a LOT of info out there and perhaps you and your wife together can change some of your child's destiny... there's a lot of theorizing going on about our adult eating patterns and the way we favour carbs being as a result of our mothers who ate a lot of carbs when they were pregnant with us.... Just saying

  2. Marge

    'htone', on 08 Jul 2013 - 12:48 PM, said:

    I am not answering FOR helpmytrap, I am just answering in general.
    I test my BG using a blood glucose meter - In my case a Roche AccuCheck Nano - an absolutely brilliant little meter.
    (https://www.accu-che...nano/index.html) No, I don't work for them...
    You prick your finger, "suck up" the droplet of blood with a special little BG "stick" that fits into the machine and about 5 seconds later you have the reading. It can store about 500 readings and in my case I went OTT and bought the Roche 360 BG analysis software, so I have a complete database of all my blood checks since I first started measuring. I download the readings from the tester to my PC where those are then nicely graphed over time. This was where I could clearly see how I all but cured my Type 2 diabetes following a LCHF eating plan !
    The meters are relatively cheap, in fact if you can make contact with one of the reps from e.g. Roche they will give you one for free - they make their money off the BG sticks (which some medical aid plans pay for).
    Cool thanks, will have a look at the accu-check-thingy, it would be very interesting to get a more regular reading.
    I just had a glucose check at dischem and the reading was 4.8 after about 10 days into my LCHF diet. Tried to google what the ideal measurement is so if anyone can comment it would help.
    (The dischem test did cost me R35 so might as well buy the home kit. It also included an old tannie nurse who lectured me on my bad eating habits seeing that I'm only eating 3 times a day, how my insulin levels will drop, eating no fruit and carbs will give me diabetes, and how I'm not allowed to buy a home glucose test kit seeing that I don't have diabetes (yet, according to her) and a lot of other old school 'advice' on what and when to eat....)

  3. Cuppa Bru

    'htone', on 08 Jul 2013 - 12:48 PM, said:

    I am not answering FOR helpmytrap, I am just answering in general.
    I test my BG using a blood glucose meter - In my case a Roche AccuCheck Nano - an absolutely brilliant little meter.
    (https://www.accu-che...nano/index.html) No, I don't work for them...
    You prick your finger, "suck up" the droplet of blood with a special little BG "stick" that fits into the machine and about 5 seconds later you have the reading. It can store about 500 readings and in my case I went OTT and bought the Roche 360 BG analysis software, so I have a complete database of all my blood checks since I first started measuring. I download the readings from the tester to my PC where those are then nicely graphed over time. This was where I could clearly see how I all but cured my Type 2 diabetes following a LCHF eating plan !
    The meters are relatively cheap, in fact if you can make contact with one of the reps from e.g. Roche they will give you one for free - they make their money off the BG sticks (which some medical aid plans pay for).
    Interesting on the subsidised BG meters!
    Followed the link and got a certificate. Looks like the subsidy is for USA only, but worth a shot.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine. The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin. Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin. Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium. Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked. Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection. In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended. Rates of DKA vary around the world. About 4% of people with type 1 diabetes in United Kingdom develop DKA a year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year. DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost universally fatal. The risk of death with adequate and timely treatment is currently around 1–4%. Up to 1% of children with DKA develop a complication known as cerebral edema. The symptoms of an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a period of about 24 hours. Predominant symptoms are nausea and vomiting, pronounced thirst, excessive urine production and abdominal pain that may be severe. Those who measure their glucose levels themselves may notice hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels). In severe DKA, breathing becomes labored and of a deep, gasping character (a state referred to as "Kussmaul respiration"). The abdomen may be tender to the point that an acute abdomen may be suspected, such as acute pancreatitis, appendicitis or gastrointestinal perforation. Coffee ground vomiting (vomiting of altered blood) occurs in a minority of people; this tends to originate from erosion of the esophagus. In severe DKA, there may be confusion, lethargy, stupor or even coma (a marked decrease in the level of consciousness). On physical examination there is usually clinical evidence of dehydration, such as a dry mouth and decreased skin turgor. If the dehydration is profound enough to cause a decrease in the circulating blood volume, tachycardia (a fast heart rate) and low blood pressure may be observed. Often, a "ketotic" odor is present, which is often described as "fruity", often compared to the smell of pear drops whose scent is a ketone. If Kussmaul respiration is present, this is reflected in an increased respiratory rate.....

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic ketoacidosis is a metabolic complication of alcohol use and starvation characterized by hyperketonemia and anion gap metabolic acidosis without significant hyperglycemia. Alcoholic ketoacidosis causes nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Diagnosis is by history and findings of ketoacidosis without hyperglycemia. Treatment is IV saline solution and dextrose infusion. Alcoholic ketoacidosis is attributed to the combined effects of alcohol and starvation on glucose metabolism. Alcohol diminishes hepatic gluconeogenesis and leads to decreased insulin secretion, increased lipolysis, impaired fatty acid oxidation, and subsequent ketogenesis, causing an elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis. Counter-regulatory hormones are increased and may further inhibit insulin secretion. Plasma glucose levels are usually low or normal, but mild hyperglycemia sometimes occurs. Diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion; similar symptoms in an alcoholic patient may result from acute pancreatitis, methanol or ethylene glycol poisoning, or diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). In patients suspected of having alcoholic ketoacidosis, serum electrolytes (including magnesium), BUN and creatinine, glucose, Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. SPUDS

    are there more than one stages of ketosis I use the keto stix and no matter what I eat or drink I seem to always be in the moderate range even if I go several days of zero carbs.

  2. FatCat

    ketosis is ketosis. Either you are throwing ketones as a product of burning fat, or you aren't. Don't get hung up on the colors, as long as you're turning them, you're fine.

  3. Faia

    It can depend on how long you have been doing LC as well. It takes a few weeks for significant adaptation, but can be a few months to be fully adapted. Any carb binges can set back adaptation early on, closer to full adaptation will make you more tolerant, but excess can still break ketogenic adaptation.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

No more pages to load

Related Articles

  • Which Metabolic Rate Resulted In Metabolic Acidosis?

    Practice Essentials Metabolic acidosis is a clinical disturbance characterized by an increase in plasma acidity. Metabolic acidosis should be considered a sign of an underlying disease process. Identification of this underlying condition is essential to initiate appropriate therapy. (See Etiology, DDx, Workup, and Treatment.) Understanding the regulation of acid-base balance requires appreciation of the fundamental definitions and principles unde ...

    ketosis Jan 11, 2018
  • Metabolic Acidosis Alcohol Intoxication

    Metabolic Acidosis in a Patient With Isopropyl Alcohol Intoxication: A Case Report Xiaomei Meng, MD, PhD; Suman Paul, MBBS, PhD; Douglas J. Federman, MD From University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo, Ohio; and University of Toledo College of Medicine, Toledo, Ohio. From University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo, Ohio; and University of Toledo College of Medicine, Toledo, Ohio. From University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo, Ohio; and Univ ...

    ketosis May 3, 2018
  • Respiratory Acidosis And Metabolic Acidosis At The Same Time

    Home / ABA Keyword Categories / A / ABG: Respiratory acidosis/metabolic alkalosis ABG: Respiratory acidosis/metabolic alkalosis A combined respiratory acidosis / metabolic alkalosis will result in elevated PaCO2 and serum bicarbonate. Which process is the primary disorder (e.g. primary respiratory acidosis with metabolic compensation versus primary metabolic alkalosis with respiratory compensation) is dependent on the pH in an acidotic patient, ...

    ketosis Apr 29, 2018
  • Can Alcohol Cause Metabolic Acidosis?

    Learn more about the SDN Exhibition Forums for exclusive discounts and contests. So the way I understood this is that both alcohol metabolism and latcate to pyrvuate conversion require NAD, and with too much alcohol consumption the body uses up all the NAD for alcohol metabolism right? The part that I'm a bit troubled with this mechanism is that unless we are doing extreme exercise, we don't really generate lactic acid. In most cases, the body u ...

    ketosis Mar 31, 2018
  • Respiratory Acidosis Vs Metabolic Acidosis

    A FOUR STEP METHOD FOR INTERPRETATION OF ABGS Usefulness This method is simple, easy and can be used for the majority of ABGs. It only addresses acid-base balance and considers just 3 values. pH, PaCO2 HCO3- Step 1. Use pH to determine Acidosis or Alkalosis. ph < 7.35 7.35-7.45 > 7.45 Acidosis Normal or Compensated Alkalosis Step 2. Use PaCO2 to determine respiratory effect. PaCO2 < 35 35 -45 > 45 Tends toward alkalosis Causes high pH Neutralizes ...

    ketosis Apr 30, 2018
  • Metabolic Acidosis And Metabolic Alkalosis Ppt

    ACETAZOLAMIDE, a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, is used in patients with meningeal inflammation, mild intracranial hypertension, and basal skull fractures to decrease the formation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). It causes mild metabolic acidosis by inhibiting the reabsorption of bicarbonate (HCO−3) ions from renal tubules. This effect has been used successfully in the treatment of patients with chronic respiratory acidosis with superimposed metab ...

    ketosis Apr 29, 2018

More in ketosis