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Can Alcohol Cause Ketoacidosis?

Ketoacidosis

Ketoacidosis

GENERAL ketoacidosis is a high anion gap metabolic acidosis due to an excessive blood concentration of ketone bodies (keto-anions). ketone bodies (acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, acetone) are released into the blood from the liver when hepatic lipid metabolism has changed to a state of increased ketogenesis. a relative or absolute insulin deficiency is present in all cases. CAUSES The three major types of ketosis are: (i) Starvation ketosis (ii) Alcoholic ketoacidosis (iii) Diabetic ketoacidosis STARVATION KETOSIS when hepatic glycogen stores are exhausted (eg after 12-24 hours of total fasting), the liver produces ketones to provide an energy substrate for peripheral tissues. ketoacidosis can appear after an overnight fast but it typically requires 3 to 14 days of starvation to reach maximal severity. typical keto-anion levels are only 1 to 2 mmol/l and this will usually not alter the anion gap. the acidosis even with quite prolonged fasting is only ever of mild to moderate severity with keto-anion levels up to a maximum of 3 to 5 mmol/l and plasma pH down to 7.3. ketone bodies also stimulate some insulin release from the islets. patients are usually not diabetic. ALCOHOLIC KETOSIS Presentation a chronic alcoholic who has a binge, then stops drinking and has little or no oral food intake for a few days (ethanol and fasting) volume depletion is common and this can result in increased levels of counter regulatory hormones (eg glucagon) levels of free fatty acids (FFA) can be high (eg up to 3.5mM) providing plenty of substrate for the altered hepatic lipid metabolism to produce plenty of ketoanions GI symptoms are common (eg nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, haematemesis, melaena) acidaemia may be severe (eg pH down to 7.0) plasma glucose may be depressed or normal or Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic ketoacidosis is a metabolic complication of alcohol use and starvation characterized by hyperketonemia and anion gap metabolic acidosis without significant hyperglycemia. Alcoholic ketoacidosis causes nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Diagnosis is by history and findings of ketoacidosis without hyperglycemia. Treatment is IV saline solution and dextrose infusion. Alcoholic ketoacidosis is attributed to the combined effects of alcohol and starvation on glucose metabolism. Alcohol diminishes hepatic gluconeogenesis and leads to decreased insulin secretion, increased lipolysis, impaired fatty acid oxidation, and subsequent ketogenesis, causing an elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis. Counter-regulatory hormones are increased and may further inhibit insulin secretion. Plasma glucose levels are usually low or normal, but mild hyperglycemia sometimes occurs. Diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion; similar symptoms in an alcoholic patient may result from acute pancreatitis, methanol or ethylene glycol poisoning, or diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). In patients suspected of having alcoholic ketoacidosis, serum electrolytes (including magnesium), BUN and creatinine, glucose, ketones, amylase, lipase, and plasma osmolality should be measured. Urine should be tested for ketones. Patients who appear significantly ill and those with positive ketones should have arterial blood gas and serum lactate measurement. The absence of hyperglycemia makes DKA improbable. Those with mild hyperglycemia may have underlying diabetes mellitus, which may be recognized by elevated levels of glycosylated Hb (HbA1c). Typical laboratory findings include a high anion gap metabolic acidosis, ketonemia, and low levels of potassium, magnesium, and phosphorus. Detection of acidosis may be com Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

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Alcoholic Ketoacidosisunderrecognized Cause Of Metabolic Acidosis In The Elderly

Alcoholic Ketoacidosisunderrecognized Cause Of Metabolic Acidosis In The Elderly

Alcoholic KetoacidosisUnderrecognized Cause of Metabolic Acidosis in the Elderly The Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) reported that substance abuse among adults age 60 years and older is a rapidly growing health problem. The report also stated that in 2000, 17% of Americans age 65 and older had problems with prescription drug and alcohol abuse.1 Most elderly people with alcohol abuse problems have a history of early-life alcohol abuse. However, a significant proportion start drinking later in life in response to traumatic life events such as the death of a loved one, loneliness, pain, insomnia, and retirement. This subset often experiences periods of binge drinking with little or no food intake. Alcoholic ketoacidosis (AKA) is an acute anion gap metabolic acidosis that typically occurs in people with a recent history of binge drinking and little or no nutritional intake. Some patients with AKA also have intractable vomiting and dehydration, and in these cases there is a concomitant metabolic alkalosis. An 86-year-old female, who had been a widow for the past 20 years, presented to the hospital with complaints of nausea, epigastric discomfort, and breathlessness for 2 days. She confessed to a history of alcohol abuse starting shortly after her husbands death and to regularly consuming a pint of hard liquor each day. She had been on an alcohol binge for 4-5 days without eating any food, but she had stopped consuming alcohol because of nausea for 2 days prior to presentation. Although the patient was depressed and admitted to suicidal ideation, she denied ingestion of antifreeze, methanol-containing solvents, rubbing alcohol, or salicylates. Physical examination was remarkable for only signs of dehydration and epigastric tenderness. Fundosc Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Among the many dangerous side effects of heavy alcohol use, one that you may not be familiar with is a condition called alcoholic ketoacidosis. This is anacuteform ofmetabolic acidosis, which is when the chemical balance in your blood is disrupted, leading to an accumulation of too much acid in the body. Alcoholic ketoacidosis is the buildup of ketones in the blood. Ketones are a type of acid that are produced when the body burns fat for energy or fuel, or when there is not enough insulin to help your body use sugar for energy. Alcoholic ketoacidosis is caused by heavy alcohol use, but it usually occurs in a person who is also malnourished. Malnutrition occurs when your body is lacking an essential vitamin or nutrient. Alcohol has no vitamins or nutrients, and it can suppress appetite over time as well as interfering with metabolism. It can also cause cravings for carbohydrates, salts, and sugars. People who frequently drink too much alcohol also vomit a lot, which causes further malnourishment. Some of the symptoms of alcoholic ketoacidosis include: nausea and vomiting, abdominal pain, agitation,confusion, impaired level of alertness, which may lead to coma, fatigue, slow sluggish movements, deep, labored,or rapid breathing, loss of appetite, and symptoms ofdehydration, such as dizziness, lightheadedness, and thirst. There are some conditions that are also associated with alcohol abuse that may have similar symptoms to alcoholic ketoacidosis, including pancreatitis, liver disease, kidney disease, ulcers, and ethylene glycol poisoning. These must be ruled out before you can be treated. Treatment usually must be done in a hospital, as it involves intravenous fluids and vitamin supplements to counteract nutritional deficiencies. Your vital signs will need to be monitored Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

What is alcoholic ketoacidosis? Cells need glucose (sugar) and insulin to function properly. Glucose comes from the food you eat, and insulin is produced by the pancreas. When you drink alcohol, your pancreas may stop producing insulin for a short time. Without insulin, your cells won’t be able to use the glucose you consume for energy. To get the energy you need, your body will start to burn fat. When your body burns fat for energy, byproducts known as ketone bodies are produced. If your body is not producing insulin, ketone bodies will begin to build up in your bloodstream. This buildup of ketones can produce a life-threatening condition known as ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis, or metabolic acidosis, occurs when you ingest something that is metabolized or turned into an acid. This condition has a number of causes, including: shock kidney disease abnormal metabolism In addition to general ketoacidosis, there are several specific types. These types include: alcoholic ketoacidosis, which is caused by excessive consumption of alcohol diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), which mostly develops in people with type 1 diabetes starvation ketoacidosis, which occurs most often in women who are pregnant, in their third trimester, and experiencing excessive vomiting Each of these situations increases the amount of acid in the system. They can also reduce the amount of insulin your body produces, leading to the breakdown of fat cells and the production of ketones. Alcoholic ketoacidosis can develop when you drink excessive amounts of alcohol for a long period of time. Excessive alcohol consumption often causes malnourishment (not enough nutrients for the body to function well). People who drink large quantities of alcohol may not eat regularly. They may also vomit as a result of drinking too Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis Damian Baalmann, 2nd year EM resident A 45-year-old male presents to your emergency department with abdominal pain. He is conscious, lucid and as the nurses are hooking up the monitors, he explains to you that he began experiencing abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting about 2 days ago. Exam reveals a poorly groomed male with dry mucous membranes, diffusely tender abdomen with voluntary guarding. He is tachycardic, tachypneic but normotensive. A quick review of the chart reveals a prolonged history of alcohol abuse and after some questioning, the patient admits to a recent binge. Pertinent labs reveal slightly elevated anion-gap metabolic acidosis, normal glucose, ethanol level of 0, normal lipase and no ketones in the urine. What are your next steps in management? Alcoholic Ketoacidosis (AKA): What is it? Ketones are a form of energy made by the liver by free fatty acids released by adipose tissues. Normally, ketones are in small quantity (<0.1 mmol/L), but sometimes the body is forced to increase its production of these ketones. Ketones are strong acids and when they accumulate in large numbers, their presence leads to an acidosis. In alcoholics, a combination or reduced nutrient intake, hepatic oxidation of ethanol, and dehydration can lead to ketoacidosis. Alcoholics tend to rely on ethanol for their nutrient intake and when the liver metabolizes ethanol it generates NADH. This NADH further promotes ketone formation in the liver. Furthermore, ethanol promotes diuresis which leads to dehydration and subsequently impairs ketone excretion in the urine. Alcoholic Ketoacidosis: How do I recognize it? Typical history involves a chronic alcohol abuser who went on a recent binge that was terminated by severe nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. These folk Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis: Causes, Symptoms, Treatment, Prognosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis: Causes, Symptoms, Treatment, Prognosis

Ketoacidosis is a medical condition in which the food that is ingested by an individual is either metabolized or converted into acid. Alcoholic Ketoacidosis is a condition in which there is development of Ketoacidosis as a result of excessive alcohol intake for a long period of time and less ingestion of food resulting in malnutrition. Drinking excessive alcohol causes the individual to be able to eat less food. Additionally, if excess alcohol is ingested then it may lead to vomiting which further worsens the nutritional status of the individual which results in formation of excess acids resulting in Alcoholic Ketoacidosis. The symptoms caused by Alcoholic Ketoacidosis include abdominal pain, excessive fatigue, persistent vomiting, and the individual getting dehydrated due to frequent vomiting episodes and less fluid intake. If an individual has a history of alcohol abuse and experiences the above mentioned symptoms then it is advised that the individual goes to the nearest emergency room to get evaluated and if diagnosed treated for Alcoholic Ketoacidosis. As stated above, the root cause of Alcoholic Ketoacidosis is drinking excessive amounts of alcohol for a prolonged period of time. When an individual indulges in binge drinking he or she is not able to take in enough food that is required by the body to function. This eventually results in malnourishment. Additionally, vomiting caused by excessive drinking also results in loss of vital nutrients and electrolytes from the body such that the body is not able to function normally. This results in the insulin that is being produced by the body becoming less and less. All of these ultimately results in the development of Alcoholic Ketoacidosis. An individual may develop symptoms within a day after binge drinking, dependin Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Go to: CHARACTERISATION In 1940, Dillon et al1 described a series of nine patients who had episodes of severe ketoacidosis in the absence of diabetes mellitus, all of whom had evidence of prolonged excessive alcohol consumption. It was not until 1970 that Jenkins et al2 described a further three non‐diabetic patients with a history of chronic heavy alcohol misuse and recurrent episodes of ketoacidosis. This group also proposed a possible underlying mechanism for this metabolic disturbance, naming it alcoholic ketoacidosis. Further case series by Levy et al, Cooperman et al, and Fulop et al were subsequently reported, with remarkably consistent features.3,4,5 All patients presented with a history of prolonged heavy alcohol misuse, preceding a bout of particularly excessive intake, which had been terminated several days earlier by nausea, severe vomiting, and abdominal pain. Clinical signs included tachypnoea, tachycardia, and hypotension. In 1974, Cooperman's series of seven ketoacidotic alcoholic patients all displayed diffuse epigastric tenderness on palpation.4 In contrast to patients with diabetic ketoacidosis, the patients were usually alert and lucid despite the severity of the acidosis and marked ketonaemia. When altered mental status occurred, this was clearly attributable to other causes. Laboratory results included absent blood alcohol with normal or low blood glucose level, no glycosuria, and a variably severe metabolic acidosis with a raised anion gap. This acidosis appeared to result from the accumulation in plasma of lactate and ketone bodies including beta‐hydroxybutyrate (BOHB) and acetoacetate (AcAc).3 Cooperman et al found that near patient testing for ketone bodies using nitroprusside test (Acetest, Ketostix) produced a low to moderate result in th Continue reading >>

Alcoholism And Its Relation To Hypoglycemia An Overview

Alcoholism And Its Relation To Hypoglycemia An Overview

Alcoholism and Its Relation to Hypoglycemia An Overview Sabitha Kandi, Neelesh deshpande, Pragna rao, K.V. Ramana Sabitha Kandi 1 , Neelesh deshpande 2 , Pragna rao 3 , K.V. Ramana 4 , 1Department of Biochemistry, Chalmeda Anandrao Institute of Medical Sciences, Karimnagar, India 2Department of Biochemistry, Government Medical College, Nagpur, India 3Department of Biochemistry, Manipal University, Manipal, India 4Department of Microbiology, Prathima Institute of Medical Sciences, Karimnagar, India Alcohol (ethanol) is metabolized in the liver by enzymes alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase to acetate, which is spontaneously broken down to CO2 and H2O utilizing NAD+ and Cytochrome P450 E1 (CYPE1). Thus alcohol metabolism decreases NAD+ / NADH ratio(redox state). Gluconeogenesis, the synthetic pathway of glucose from non-carbohydrate sources(propionate, lactate, aminoacids, glycerol, alanine) predominantly takes place in liver. The significance of gluconeogenic pathway is that it helps in maintaining blood glucose levels in fasting or starvation conditions. Alcoholism (>120ml /day) leads to an increase in the ratio of NAD+ / NADH, and since the gluconeogenic pathway is dependent on the NAD+ / NADH ratio, increased ratio slows down the pathway leading to hypoglycemia. There is enhanced ketone body metabolism due to hypoglycemia, leading to the accumulation of beta hydroxy butyrate resulting in alcoholic ketosis. Thus alcoholic hypoglycemia and alcoholic ketosis are associated with each other and gross change in liver can be seen after chronic alcoholism with malnutrition. Further studies are required to better understand how liver is able to maintain the redox states longer even during alcoholism. Keywords: alcoholism, alcoholic hypoglycemia, alcoholic ketosis Continue reading >>

Postmortem Diagnosis Of Alcoholic Ketoacidosis | Alcohol And Alcoholism | Oxford Academic

Postmortem Diagnosis Of Alcoholic Ketoacidosis | Alcohol And Alcoholism | Oxford Academic

Aims: The aim of this article is to review the forensic literature covering the postmortem investigations that are associated with alcoholic ketoacidosis fatalities and report the results of our own analyses. Methods: Eight cases of suspected alcoholic ketoacidosis that had undergone medico-legal investigations in our facility from 2011 to 2013 were retrospectively selected. A series of laboratory parameters were measured in whole femoral blood, postmortem serum from femoral blood, urine and vitreous humor in order to obtain a more general overview on the biochemical and metabolic changes that occur during alcoholic ketoacidosis. Most of the tested parameters were chosen among those that had been described in clinical and forensic literature associated with alcoholic ketoacidosis and its complications. Results: Ketone bodies and carbohydrate-deficient transferrin levels were increased in all cases. Biochemical markers of generalized inflammation, volume depletion and undernourishment showed higher levels. Adaptive endocrine reactions involving insulin, glucagon, cortisol and triiodothyronine were also observed. Conclusions: Metabolic and biochemical disturbances characterizing alcoholic ketoacidosis can be reliably identified in the postmortem setting. The correlation of medical history, autopsy findings and biochemical results proves therefore decisive in identifying pre-existing disorders, excluding alternative causes of death and diagnosing alcoholic ketoacidosis as the cause of death. Alcoholic ketoacidosis: definition and clinical features The entity of alcoholic ketoacidosis, sometimes called alcoholic acidosis in the literature, was first described by Dillon et al. in 1940. In this report, the authors described a series of nine patients who had episodes of sever Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Print Overview Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious complication of diabetes that occurs when your body produces high levels of blood acids called ketones. The condition develops when your body can't produce enough insulin. Insulin normally plays a key role in helping sugar (glucose) — a major source of energy for your muscles and other tissues — enter your cells. Without enough insulin, your body begins to break down fat as fuel. This process produces a buildup of acids in the bloodstream called ketones, eventually leading to diabetic ketoacidosis if untreated. If you have diabetes or you're at risk of diabetes, learn the warning signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — and know when to seek emergency care. Symptoms Diabetic ketoacidosis signs and symptoms often develop quickly, sometimes within 24 hours. For some, these signs and symptoms may be the first indication of having diabetes. You may notice: Excessive thirst Frequent urination Nausea and vomiting Abdominal pain Weakness or fatigue Shortness of breath Fruity-scented breath Confusion More-specific signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — which can be detected through home blood and urine testing kits — include: High blood sugar level (hyperglycemia) High ketone levels in your urine When to see a doctor If you feel ill or stressed or you've had a recent illness or injury, check your blood sugar level often. You might also try an over-the-counter urine ketones testing kit. Contact your doctor immediately if: You're vomiting and unable to tolerate food or liquid Your blood sugar level is higher than your target range and doesn't respond to home treatment Your urine ketone level is moderate or high Seek emergency care if: Your blood sugar level is consistently higher than 300 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 16.7 mill Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis: A Case Report And Review Of The Literature

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis: A Case Report And Review Of The Literature

Go to: CASE REPORT We present a 64-year-old female who presented with generalized abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and shortness of breath. Arterial blood gas analysis showed significant acidaemia with a pH of 7.10, bicarbonate of 2.9 mmol/l and lactate of 11.7 mmol/l. Serum ketones were raised at 5.5 mmol/l. Capillary blood glucose was noted to 5.8 mmol/l. The anion gap was calculated and was elevated at 25 mmol/l. The diagnosis of DKA was queried after initial triage. However, following senior medical review, given a recent history of drinking alcohol to excess, the diagnosis of AKA was felt more likely. Whilst a decreased conscious level may have been expected, our patient was lucid enough to report drinking one to two bottles of wine per day for the past 30 years, with a recent binge the day prior to admission. Subsequent fluid resuscitation and monitoring were instituted. Further biochemical investigation after treatment showed a rapid decline in the level of ketones and normalization of pH. Our patient had a multidisciplinary team (MDT) looking after her care, whilst she was an inpatient, including acute medical and gastroenterology doctors and nurses, dietitians, alcohol specialist nurse, physiotherapists and occupational therapists. Following resuscitation, our patient had plasma electrolyte levels corrected, nutritional supplementation provided and completed an alcohol detoxification regimen. Given the early recognition of AKA and concurrent management, our patient had a good outcome. She was discharged home and has been well on follow-up appointments. Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Glucose or sugar is the preferred source of fuel for the body. If the body’s cells get insufficient glucose, fat is used as the alternative source of energy. When fat is used as a source of energy, it produces ketones, which are acidic chemicals. A buildup of ketones causes the blood to become too acidic. This leads to chemical derangements called ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis comes in two different forms - diabetic ketoacidosis and alcoholic ketoacidosis. Here is more information about alcoholic ketoacidosis. What Is Alcoholic Ketoacidosis? Alcoholic Ketoacidosis (AKA) is a condition that develops in people who drink too much alcohol. This condition results in the increase of Ketones. AKA is common in adults who have a history with alcoholism. Any person showing signs of AKA needs to seek immediate medical attention because it is a potentially fatal condition. If you consume alcoholic beverages excessively without eating a balanced diet, the acidic levels of your blood might rise, causing health complications. Drinking alcoholic beverages in moderation or drinking as you eat can help reduce the likelihood of getting AKA. When the body’s fat cells breakdown after they have been consumed, ketones are formed. Consequently, the amount of acid in the blood dramatically increases and the blood’s pH (potenz Hydrogen) balance drops. While people who drink lots of alcoholic drinks and do not eat sufficient nutrients, or a balanced diet are likely to develop AKA, they are not the only ones. Inexperienced drinkers who binge drink can also develop this condition. What Are the Symptoms of Alcoholic Ketoacidosis? AKA symptoms vary based on the amount of alcohol you consume. Symptoms also depend on the amount of ketones you have in the bloodstream. If any of the following symptoms Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Increased production of ketone bodies due to: Dehydration (nausea/vomiting, ADH inhibition) leads to increased stress hormone production leading to ketone formation Depleted glycogen stores in the liver (malnutrition/decrease carbohydrate intake) Elevated ratio of NADH/NAD due to ethanol metabolism Increased free fatty acid production Elevated NADH/NAD ratio leads to the predominate production of β–hydroxybutyrate (BHB) over acetoacetate (AcAc) Dehydration Fever absent unless there is an underlying infection Tachycardia (common) due to: Dehydration with associated orthostatic changes Concurrent alcohol withdrawal Tachypnea: Common Deep, rapid, Kussmaul respirations frequently present Nausea and vomiting Abdominal pain (nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain are the most common symptoms): Usually diffuse with nonspecific tenderness Epigastric pain common Rebound tenderness, abdominal distension, hypoactive bowel sounds uncommon Mandates a search for an alternative, coexistent illness Decreased urinary output from hypovolemia Mental status: Minimally altered as a result of hypovolemia and possibly intoxication Altered mental status mandates a search for other associated conditions such as: Head injury, cerebrovascular accident (CVA), or intracranial hemorrhage Hypoglycemia Alcohol withdrawal Encephalopathy Toxins Visual disturbances: Reports of isolated visual disturbances with AKA common History Chronic alcohol use: Recent binge Abrupt cessation Physical Exam Findings of dehydration most common May have ketotic odor Kussmaul respirations Palmar erythema (alcoholism) Lab Acid–base disturbance: Increased anion gap metabolic acidosis hallmark Mixed acid–base disturbance common: Respiratory alkalosis Metabolic alkalosis secondary to vomiting and dehydration Hyperchlorem Continue reading >>

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