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Can Alcohol Cause Acidosis?

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Anion gap usmle - anion gap metabolic acidosis normal anion gap metabolic acidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosisunderrecognized Cause Of Metabolic Acidosis In The Elderly

Alcoholic KetoacidosisUnderrecognized Cause of Metabolic Acidosis in the Elderly The Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) reported that substance abuse among adults age 60 years and older is a rapidly growing health problem. The report also stated that in 2000, 17% of Americans age 65 and older had problems with prescription drug and alcohol abuse.1 Most elderly people with alcohol abuse problems have a history of early-life alcohol abuse. However, a significant proportion start drinking later in life in response to traumatic life events such as the death of a loved one, loneliness, pain, insomnia, and retirement. This subset often experiences periods of binge drinking with little or no food intake. Alcoholic ketoacidosis (AKA) is an acute anion gap metabolic acidosis that typically occurs in people with a recent history of binge drinking and little or no nutritional intake. Some patients with AKA also have intractable vomiting and dehydration, and in these cases there is a concomitant metabolic alkalosis. An 86-year-old female, who had been a widow for the past 20 years, presented to the hospital with complaints of nausea, epigastric discomfort, and br Continue reading >>

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  1. FLEXLUIS

    how much is too much protein on keto?

    I'm new to me to keto and still in my abduction phase..I've been reading that to much protein is bad on keto because it gets converted to glucose.. I'm having trouble understanding that since I'm used to eating 1g - 1.5g per lbs. (200~250g P) And currently just eating 1g per lbs. LBM (~155g P) I'm worried that I'm not getting enough protein...my stats are 182lbs 14%BF 29yrs LBM ~155 work out 5X week plus cardio..cutting on 2000 calories.

  2. 4hour

    Originally Posted by FLEXLUIS
    I'm new to me to keto and still in my abduction phase..I've been reading that to much protein is bad on keto because it gets converted to glucose.. I'm having trouble understanding that since I'm used to eating 1g - 1.5g per lbs. (200~250g P) And currently just eating 1g per lbs. LBM (~155g P) I'm worried that I'm not getting enough protein...my stats are 182lbs 14%BF 29yrs LBM ~155 work out 5X week plus cardio..cutting on 2000 calories.

    I think I read some posts saying that if you're on a cut, get your protein needs satisfied first and then get the rest of calories from fat. In your case looks like you could easily consume 250g of protein (250*4 = 1000 kcal). Another 1000 kcal could come from fat. Look at flaxseed meal as a source of fiber. (it's mostly insoluble fiber, which is zero calories). You could also allow 100-150 kcal for veggies. So, in your case, at 2000 kcal you could easily consume 250g of protein and have 45-50% fat ratio. At 200 g of protein, you could get 60% fat calories ratio.

  3. alexwynveen

    Originally Posted by FLEXLUIS
    I'm new to me to keto and still in my abduction phase..I've been reading that to much protein is bad on keto because it gets converted to glucose.. I'm having trouble understanding that since I'm used to eating 1g - 1.5g per lbs. (200~250g P) And currently just eating 1g per lbs. LBM (~155g P) I'm worried that I'm not getting enough protein...my stats are 182lbs 14%BF 29yrs LBM ~155 work out 5X week plus cardio..cutting on 2000 calories.

    Honestly I think your cutting too hard off the top of my head, but I don't know your TDEE. You should be perfectly fine with 155g a day, your body can only use so much protein in a day for its primary purpose of body functions, and its shown that .6-.8g per lb are sufficient based off of studies. If you want some solid evidence, look for some of wonderpugs responses to people about how to figure out protein needs, I believe he lists articles.

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Alcohol Toxicity - The Clinical Advisor

Alcohol toxicity or poisoning is caused by drinking large quantities of alcohol in a short period of time. According to Centers for Disease Control (CDC) data released January 2015, an average of 6 people died of alcohol poisoning each day in the US from 2010-2012. Seventy-six percent of alcohol poisoning deaths are among adults ages 35-64 years old, the majority of whom are men and non-Hispanic whites. While alcohol dependence was identified as a factor in 30% of alcohol poisoning deaths, binge drinking (defined as more than 5 drinks on an occasion for men or 4 or more drinks on an occasion for women) can also lead to death from alcohol poisoning. A standard drink in the US is considered either 12 ounces (oz) of beer (5% alcohol), 8 oz of malt liquor (7% alcohol), 5 oz of wine (12% alcohol), or 1.5 oz of distilled spirits (40% alcohol; 80 proof). The current Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend not to exceed 1 drink a day for women or 2 drinks a day for men. Any alcohol can be toxic if ingested in large enough quantities. While alcohol toxicity most commonly results from the abuse of ethanol ("drinking alcohol") found in alcoholic beverages, it can also result from the inge Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Jeanwf

    Hi. Anyone out there suffer from feeling really, really hot doing Keto Diet. My face is as red as beetroot in the mornings and throughout the day I get several hot flushes. Any ideas?:explode:

  2. rachelrb85

    Could it be menopause?

  3. Jeanwf

    I have finished now with the menopause as I started when I was 46! Grrrrr. Could it be because I am burning fat?

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this will be a series of lectures to illustrate in simple and precise way how you can manage acid-base imbalance in practical step by step approach.

Metabolic Acidosis In The Alcoholic: A Pathophysiologic Approach.

Metabolic acidosis in the alcoholic: a pathophysiologic approach. Halperin ML , Hammeke M , Josse RG , Jungas RL . The purpose of this paper is to review the acid-base abnormalities in patients presenting with metabolic acidosis due to acute ethanol ingestion and to review the theoretical constraints on ethanol metabolism in the liver. Alcohol-induced acidosis is a mixed acid-base disturbance. Metabolic acidosis is due to lactic acidosis, ketoacidosis and acetic acidosis but the degree of each varies from patient to patient. Metabolic alkalosis is frequently present due to ethanol-induced vomiting. However, it could be overlooked because of an indirect loss of sodium bicarbonate (as sodium B-hydroxybutyrate in the urine). Nevertheless, the accompanying reduction in ECF volume may play an important role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic acidosis because it could lead to a relative insulin deficiency. Treatment of alcohol acidosis should include sodium, chloride, potassium, phosphorus, magnesium and thiamine replacements along with attention to concomitant clinical problems. Unless hypoglycemia is present, glucose need not be given immediately. We feel that insulin should be withheld Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Bobhes

    What is the best time of the day to check blood ketone levels? I've heard that upon rising is a bad time because the body produces glucose overnight while you sleep. I've heard others say mid afternoon and still others at night at the end of the day.

    Please unconfuse this confused keto novice. Thanks in advance!

  2. Shortstuff

    I've been testing three times a day, just out of curiosity.
    Can't keep doing it as the test strips are so expensive, but interesting to gauge things properly.

  3. MaryAnn

    Bobhes:


    I've heard that upon rising is a bad time because the body produces glucose overnight while you sleep.
    I've heard this too. But I'm doing an N=1 experiment and my blood ketone readings are higher in the AM (generally).

    Not fasting *approx 5 hrs after eating Ketones: 3.9

    Not fasting (mid afternoon) Ketones: 1.4

    Not Fasting (approx 5 hrs after eating) Ketones 2.0

    Not Fasting (approx 3.5 hrs after eating) Ketones 1.6

    Fasting Ketones 3.3

    Fasting Ketones 2.9

    Fasting but a few hours (3) after ACV Ketones 2.8

    Fasting Ketones 3.6

    Not Fasting 2.2

    Not fasting means in the afternoon and at least after 1 meal. My first reading was the highest and it was in the afternoon. These are all separate day measurements. I haven't done the test in the AM and the PM (only because of cost). Will try that next.

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