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Can Acidosis Cause Heart Failure?

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Congestive Heart Failure - congestive heart failure - Explained - MADE EASY end of life- end of life Symptoms, Causes, and Treatment Subscribe My Channel to Stay Updated What is congestive heart failure? Heart failure, sometimes known as congestive heart failure, occurs when your heart muscle doesn't pump blood as well as it should. Certain conditions, such as narrowed arteries in your heart coronary artery disease or high blood pressure, gradually leave your heart too weak or stiff to fill and pump efficiently. What is left sided Congestive Heart Failure - congestive heart failure - end of life? Left-side heart failure occurs when the left ventricle does not pump efficiently, and your body does not receive enough oxygen-rich blood. The blood instead backs up into your lungs, causing shortness of breath and fluid accumulation. What is a left ventricular failure? Systolic failure: The left ventricle loses its ability to contract normally. The heart can't pump with enough force to push enough blood into circulation. Diastolic failure also called diastolic dysfunction: The left ventricle loses its ability to relax normally because the muscle has become stiff What is left ventricular systolic dysfunction? Systolic and diastolic. Similarly, a distinction is frequently made between systolic and diastolic heart failure. This is somewhat arbitrary and many patients with heart failure have evidence of both. Left ventricular systolic dysfunction is usually defined as an LV ejection fraction (_)40% on echocardiography. Heart failure affects nearly 6 million Americans. Roughly 670,000 people are diagnosed with heart failure each year. It is the leading cause of hospitalization in people older than age 65. What Is Heart Failure? Heart failure does not mean the heart has stopped working. Rather, it means that the heart's pumping power is weaker than normal. With heart failure, blood moves through the heart and body at a slower rate, and pressure in the heart increases. As a result, the heart cannot pump enough oxygen and nutrients to meet the body's needs. The chambers of the heart may respond by stretching to hold more blood to pump through the body or by becoming stiff and thickened. This helps to keep the blood moving, but the heart muscle walls may eventually weaken and become unable to pump as efficiently. As a result, the kidneys may respond by causing the body to retain fluid and salt. If fluid builds up in the arms, legs, ankles, feet, lungs, or other organs, the body becomes congested, and congestive heart failure is the term used to describe the condition. What Causes Congestive Heart Failure - congestive heart failure - end of life? Heart failure is caused by many conditions that damage the heart muscle, including: Coronary artery disease. Coronary artery disease, a disease of the arteries that supply blood and oxygen to the heart, causes decreased blood flow to the heart muscle. If the arteries become blocked or severely narrowed, the heart becomes starved for oxygen and nutrients. Heart attack. A heart attack occurs when a coronary artery becomes suddenly blocked, stopping the flow of blood to the heart muscle. A heart attack damages the heart muscle, resulting in a scarred area that does not function properly. Cardiomyopathy. Damage to the heart muscle from causes other than artery or blood flow problems, such as from infections or alcohol or drug abuse. Conditions that overwork the heart. Conditions including high blood pressure, valve disease, thyroid disease, kidney disease, diabetes, or heart defects present at birth can all cause heart failure. In addition, heart failure can occur when several diseases or conditions are present at once. Congestive Heart Failure - congestive h In an effort to prevent further heart damage: Stop smoking or chewing tobacco. Reach and maintain your healthy weight. Control high blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and diabetes. Exercise regularly. Do not drink alcohol. Have surgery or other procedures to treat your heart failure as recommended. What Medications Should I Avoid if I Have Heart Failure? There are several different types of medications that are best avoided in those with heart failure including: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications such as Motrin or Aleve. For relief of aches, pains, or fever take Tylenol instead. Some antiarrhythmic agents Most calcium channel blockers if you have systolic heart failure If you are taking any of these drugs, discuss them with your doctor. It is important to know the names of your medications, what they are used for, and how often and at what times you take them. Subscribe my Channel Here to get more videos daily https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCf40... Facebook Page https://www.facebook.com/oceanofvideos Website http://www.oceanofentertainment.blogs... Google + https://plus.google.com/u/0/102343539... Twitter @malikakmal70086

Lactic Acidosis In Acute Congestive Heart Failure

@article{cceb1ca8c7cc4a0fb40c047ae4527bfc, title = "Lactic acidosis in acute congestive heart failure", abstract = "Lactic acidosis appears to be a common complication of acute congestive heart failure. Like other metabolic acidoses that complicate various illnesses, it must be corrected in order to treat the underlying disease successfully. Routine determinations of the lactic acid level of the blood may have value in both diagnosis and treatment of acute congestive failure. Lactic acid and bicarbonate values are inversely correlated, but oxygen and carbon dioxide tensions are poorly correlated with the lactic acid level and with the clinical course. However, both the initial level and changes in lactic acid are of value in assessing treatment response and prognosis.", T1 - Lactic acidosis in acute congestive heart failure N2 - Lactic acidosis appears to be a common complication of acute congestive heart failure. Like other metabolic acidoses that complicate various illnesses, it must be corrected in order to treat the underlying disease successfully. Routine determinations of the lactic acid level of the blood may have value in both diagnosis and treatment of acute congestive fa Continue reading >>

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  1. treehorn+bunny

    You don't need to be in DKA to get ketosis. It's probably because he hasn't been eating enough/is sick. It is not uncommon for people who have stomach viruses to burn ketones.
    In nondiabetic persons, ketonuria may occur during acute illness or severe stress.

  2. PorcineWithMe

    GERD/reflux/"heartburn" can cause that smell and so can taking Prilosec (or other PPIs). My husband had THE WORST breath from taking Prilosec. Ugh.

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Please *LIKE || COMMENT | | SHARE | | SUBSCRIBE* to support this channel. For more info visit http://www.DiseasesAndTreatment.com/ ============================================================= Lactic Acidosis ,MELAS Syndrome, what, is, causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, complications, prevention , cure, risk factors, outlook, prognosis, remedies, surgery, causes of Lactic Acidosis, symptoms of Lactic Acidosis, treatment of Lactic Acidosis, diagnosis of Lactic Acidosis, Lactic Acidosis symptoms, Lactic Acidosis treatment, Lactic Acidosis causes,

Lactic Acidosis: Symptoms, Causes, And Treatment

Lactic acidosis occurs when the body produces too much lactic acid and cannot metabolize it quickly enough. The condition can be a medical emergency. The onset of lactic acidosis might be rapid and occur within minutes or hours, or gradual, happening over a period of days. The best way to treat lactic acidosis is to find out what has caused it. Untreated lactic acidosis can result in severe and life-threatening complications. In some instances, these can escalate rapidly. It is not necessarily a medical emergency when caused by over-exercising. The prognosis for lactic acidosis will depend on its underlying cause. A blood test is used to diagnose the condition. Lactic acidosis symptoms that may indicate a medical emergency include a rapid heart rate and disorientaiton. Typically, symptoms of lactic acidosis do not stand out as distinct on their own but can be indicative of a variety of health issues. However, some symptoms known to occur in lactic acidosis indicate a medical emergency. Lactic acidosis can occur in people whose kidneys are unable to get rid of excess acid. Even when not related to just a kidney condition, some people's bodies make too much lactic acid and are unabl Continue reading >>

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  1. Steve Rapaport

    Correlation isn't causation, so the question's presupposition of high blood sugar 'resulting' in diabetic coma is wrong. They both result from common causes.
    Diabetic coma (advanced diabetic ketoacidosis or DKA) is not the result of high blood sugar, but of low insulin and water levels. Low insulin levels lead to high blood sugar AND to ketoacidosis. Hence there's no minimum blood sugar level to watch for (though there may be for a given individual).
    The best way to avoid DKA is to keep insulin levels steady in the bloodstream, keep well hydrated, and keep small amounts of food in the system at all times.
    DKA is a result of the body demanding sugar for fuel, and being denied it through lack of insulin. The body burns fat instead, which produces ketone bodies as a byproduct. The ketones build up in blood, making it acid and highly concentrated. Concentrated blood sucks water out of cells by osmosis. Dehydration makes this worse. The ketones signal the liver that glucose is desperately needed, so it dumps stored glucose to help out, but in the absence of insulin this just makes things worse -- now the blood is full of ketones AND glucose, and even more highly concentrated. Both of these conditions will get worse until fast-acting insulin and missing electrolytes are added in carefully controlled doses, including a drip-feed for hydration and frequent recheck and adjustment of all those values.

  2. Suhail Malhotra

    First we must know that there are 2 types of diabetes.
    IDDM(insulin dependent diabetes mellitus) aka Type 1
    NIDDM( non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus) aka Type 2.
    Type 1 is due to loss of insulin secretion by pancreas as in destruction of pancreas.
    Type 2 is due to insulin resistance that is insulin secretion is ok but body cells don't respond to it.
    Now the comas in these two types are different to the extent that they are named differently.
    The coma of type 1 is called the DKA(diabetic ketoacidosis) and that of type 2 is HONK( hyperosmotic non ketotic coma) now known as HHS(hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state).
    DKA occurs in type 1 diabetes or situations simulating type 1 mechanism like when a patient forgets to take his dose of insulin or in states when patient is regular with insulin but the body needs more than normal as in cases of surgery or illness or pregnancy.
    Blood glucose ranges in DKA from 250 to 600 mg/dl( 13 to 33 mmol/l) with increased ketones in blood which being acidic drive the blood ph to acidic levels ( <7.3). Symptoms include vomiting,increased urination, increased thirst, abdominal pain,increased rate of respiration(Kussumaul breathing) and in the end coma.
    HONK or HHS is caused by type 2 diabetes or situations similar to it like relative insulin deficiency combined with inadequate fluid intake and often precipitated in patients with type2 DM and a concurrent illness.
    Blood glucose ranges from 600 to 1200 mg/dl (33 to 66 mmol/l). The blood ph is normal (>=7.3) as ketones are absent. Patient is lethargic with increased thirst and increased urination leading to coma.
    Symptoms absent in HONK are nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain and increased rate of respiration which were very much a part of DKA.

  3. Jae Won Joh

    If you are asking what blood sugar levels are commonly seen in diabetic coma[1], there is a very wide range. Patients naive to the condition typically present with blood glucoses around the 300s, while those with chronic poorly-managed diabetes can present with blood glucoses over 1000.
    [1] As Steve Rapaport already pointed out in his answer, the high glucose level is not, in and of itself, the problem.

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Diabetes and Heart Attacks - What Are Diabetes and Heart Attacks Symptoms? http://diabetesnews365.com/ - If Youre over 30 With Diabetes, Be Warned. Fact: More Than 75% of Diabetics Die Of Heart Disease Discover your risk for heart disease or stroke now! Fact: More Than 75% of Diabetics Die Of Heart Disease Nearly half of those who die from heart attacks each year never showed prior symptoms of heart disease. Right now, millions of people over age 40 are suffering from heart disease and do not even know it. Dont be caught off guard. Know your risk now. Weve created a simple, easy-to-complete, online test that will help you understand your heart attack risk factors. When you take the Simple Heart Test it takes just 1 minutes to complete Discover your risk for heart disease and stroke now. Visit http://diabetesnews365.com/ now mv https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dqu6e... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gZK9O... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wyQQb... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wd6qM... mvend lw.. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f-Nl6... chw.. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f-Nl6...

What Causes Heart Attacks?

The story of how I came to understand the cause, and therefore the appropriate treatment, of acute coronary syndrome involves fascinating elements of surprise and serendipity. I thought it best, therefore, to describe how this tale unfolded for me. Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) describes a constellation of illnesses that include angina (chest pain), unstable angina (basically bad chest pain) and myocardial infarction (otherwise known as heart attack or MI). These three illnesses form a continuum, with angina as the mildest symptom and heart attackwhen there is actual death of the heart cellsas the most severe. The history of thought about this group of illnesses is both fascinating and controversial. It seems that heart attacks were rare in this country until about the 1930s. The incidence of fatal MIs quickly increased from about 3,000 per year during that decade to almost half a million per year during the 1950s. In fact, mid century, this formerly rare disease had become the leading cause of death in the US. The incidence has risen continually since then until just recently, when it seems that the tide may be turning a bit and the incidence lessening, or at least leveling off. Continue reading >>

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  1. Hankpiggy

    Throwaway account for obvious reasons.
    Husband (55) was just diagnosed with adult-onset diabetes (misdiagnosed for 5 years as panic attacks) but refuses to do anything about it. He had a fasting glucose test (360mg/dL) and a follow-up a1c blood test (11.4%). That's literally the only testing he's had done for it.
    As soon as the initial diagnosis came back, he "fired" his primary care physician for misdiagnosing his condition. But he refuses to talk to his new PCM about it (the PCM has threatened to drop him as a patient because of it). He insists that he'll be fine, "or if not at least I know what's going to kill me."
    Won't change his diet, which has always been high in sugar. He can drink a 2liter bottle of soda a day, jokes that the suggested serving size for cinnamon buns is "all of them," etc. I've made some sneaky changes around the house. There's no snacks in easy reach. I'm cutting down on portion sizes and cooking with fewer carbs. But I have no control over what he does when he leaves for work, and I'm sure there are daily Dunkin Donut runs and fast food lunches.
    He gets blurred vision and what we used to call panic attacks but now we're calling "blood sugar events" about once a week. They're debilitating. He's unable to function for close to an hour and then shaky for another three or four. I did notice that he had a tiny cut on his foot that took forever to heal last year. In retrospect, I should have forced him to get tested then. No cardio or other issues. We regularly go on hikes with steep grades and 1,000' changes in altitude.
    I'm scared (and super pissed off) about his attitude. How long do I have to dig this grave?

  2. Ceanot

    Unfortunately, he can live for many years with horrible complications. You need to figure out what kind of life/partner you want. Are you happy to be sneaky and watch your partner slowly kill himself; or do you want a partner who will take care of himself so he can be around to do fun things? Are you partners or are you his caregiver?

  3. cdn_SW

    I'm so sorry your going through this, you must be incredibly frustrated. In my opinion it's not about how long it will take to kill him, it's about what it will do to his quality of life. Two of the more common and horrible complications of diabetes are problems with the eyes and neuropathy. He could go blind or end up losing a limb. You mentioned a cut that took forever to heal, uncontrolled blood sugar makes you prone to infections that can be difficult to heal, he could end up losing a toe, foot, or part of his leg. Neuropathy can also be horribly painful.
    Your husband needs to get a grip on dealing with this, it's really not that difficult once you make a decision to make some changes and get the proper treatment. You may also need to let him know whether or not you feel you would be able to be his caregiver if his health goes to shit due to his own negligence. It's a harsh reality, but better to come to grips with it now than when it's too late. It's hard to give a timeline, like in many things some people seem to fair reasonably well even with horrible control, and others may do all the right things and still end up with complications. Hopefully you can talk some sense into your husband, maybe have him google some images of diabetic neuropathy or diabetic foot ulcers, and see if that is enough to scare him into doing something.

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