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Bun In Dka

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In this video, Dr. Michael Agus discusses the risk factors, signs, symptoms, and treatment of cerebral edema in diabetic ketoacidosis. Please visit: www.openpediatrics.org OPENPediatrics is an interactive digital learning platform for healthcare clinicians sponsored by Boston Children's Hospital and in collaboration with the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies. It is designed to promote the exchange of knowledge between healthcare providers around the world caring for critically ill children in all resource settings. The content includes internationally recognized experts teaching the full range of topics on the care of critically ill children. All content is peer-reviewed and open access-and thus at no expense to the user. For further information on how to enroll, please email: [email protected] Please note: OPENPediatrics does not support nor control any related videos in the sidebar, these are placed by Youtube. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.

Factors Associated With Adverse Outcomes In Children With Diabetic Ketoacidosis-related Cerebral Edema

Abstract Objective: To investigate the relation between outcomes of children with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA)-related cerebral edema and baseline clinical features and therapeutic interventions for treatment of cerebral edema. Study design: All children ≤18 years old with DKA and cerebral edema (n = 61) were retrospectively identified from 10 pediatric centers between 1982 and 1997. Demographic, biochemical, and therapeutic data were collected. Ordinal logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with the clinical outcome (death or persistent vegetative state; mild to moderate neurological disability; or normal) after adjusting for known risk factors for the development of cerebral edema as well as the degree of neurologic depression at the time of diagnosis of cerebral edema. Results: Seventeen (28%) children died or survived in a vegetative state; 8 (13%) survived with mild to moderate neurologic disabilities; and 36 (59%) survived without sequelae. Factors associated with poor outcomes included greater neurologic depression at the time of diagnosis of cerebral edema, a high initial serum urea nitrogen concentration, and intubation with hyperventilation Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Asystole RN

    yes! very astute observation.
    to understand the relationship one must understand hyperglycemia. first answer the question, what pathophysiology occurs with hyperglycemia? there are key s&s the nurse is looking for when attempting to assess for hyperglycemia, there lays a clue to the connection.
    then answer, what can cause the blood urea nitrogen level to be elevated?
    hint.
    "what is hyperglycemia?
    hyperglycemia (hi"per-gli-se'me-ah) is an increase in plasma glucose (blood sugar). it can turn into a complex medical condition -- diabetic ketoacidosis (ke"to-as"id-o'sis) and coma -- if it's not treated on time and adequately. hyperglycemia is usually the first sign of diabetes mellitus. symptoms of hyperglycemia are
    polyuria (pol"e-yur'e-ah) (excess urine)
    polydipsia (pol"e-dip'se-ah) (thirst)

    polyphagia (pol"e-fa'je-ah) (excessive hunger) "
    the american heart association, (2011). hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia. retrieved from http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=4593

  2. illuminati88

    Hi,
    Look into what physiological processes occur in hyperglycemia, what the body resorts to when glucose is not available for energy, and by products of amino acid breakdown. That should help you on the path

  3. ladyangel341

    Since we know why blood glucose elevated lets go to BUN...
    There are 3 reasons of elevation of the BUN
    1) renal impairment
    2) pregnancy
    3) excessive breakdown of protein (called catabolism)
    On that three the closest relation to increase glucose is the breakdown of protein...
    Why there's a breakdown of protein if there is an increase number of blood glucose?
    We are talking about diabetic patient which there is a decrease production of insulin. Insulin helps absorption of glucose into the cells. Lack of insulin makes the glucose remain in the blood stream and some excreted through urination.
    So what will the body use for energy if there is no glucose?
    That's where protein or fat breakdown happens. The proteins breakdown makes the BUN elevated which urea is the byproduct of protein breakdown.
    Hope I helped^^:heartbeat

  4. -> Continue reading
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Recorded with http://screencast-o-matic.com

Dka Case Study

Jerry Thomas is a 26-year-old Type I Diabetic. He was originally diagnosed at the age of 14, and currently manages his disease with an intensive regimen of insulin injections. Jerry is employed as a schoolteacher and soccer coach. He presents today with a 2-day history of vomiting and diarrhea. He has been closely monitoring his blood glucoses, and is using regular insulin for high blood glucose levels. He has only been able to tolerate liquids such as Gatorade, but today he is unable to even tolerate that, and comes to the clinic for evaluation of possible Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA). Describe the pathophysiology of DKA and why it occurs in patients with Type I Diabetes Mellitus. (5 points) Patients with Type 1 diabetes do not produce insulin in their body, so instead of using glucose to burn in their metabolism, their body starts burning proteins. The metabolism of proteins produces ketones as a by product and as this accumulates, causes diabetes ketoacidosis, an acidification of the blood. Based upon the diagnosis of DKA, what assessment findings does the nurse correlate to this disorder? (5 points) Polydipsia, polyuria, fruity breath, weakness, nausea and vomiting, abdominal pa Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Asystole RN

    yes! very astute observation.
    to understand the relationship one must understand hyperglycemia. first answer the question, what pathophysiology occurs with hyperglycemia? there are key s&s the nurse is looking for when attempting to assess for hyperglycemia, there lays a clue to the connection.
    then answer, what can cause the blood urea nitrogen level to be elevated?
    hint.
    "what is hyperglycemia?
    hyperglycemia (hi"per-gli-se'me-ah) is an increase in plasma glucose (blood sugar). it can turn into a complex medical condition -- diabetic ketoacidosis (ke"to-as"id-o'sis) and coma -- if it's not treated on time and adequately. hyperglycemia is usually the first sign of diabetes mellitus. symptoms of hyperglycemia are
    polyuria (pol"e-yur'e-ah) (excess urine)
    polydipsia (pol"e-dip'se-ah) (thirst)

    polyphagia (pol"e-fa'je-ah) (excessive hunger) "
    the american heart association, (2011). hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia. retrieved from http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=4593

  2. illuminati88

    Hi,
    Look into what physiological processes occur in hyperglycemia, what the body resorts to when glucose is not available for energy, and by products of amino acid breakdown. That should help you on the path

  3. ladyangel341

    Since we know why blood glucose elevated lets go to BUN...
    There are 3 reasons of elevation of the BUN
    1) renal impairment
    2) pregnancy
    3) excessive breakdown of protein (called catabolism)
    On that three the closest relation to increase glucose is the breakdown of protein...
    Why there's a breakdown of protein if there is an increase number of blood glucose?
    We are talking about diabetic patient which there is a decrease production of insulin. Insulin helps absorption of glucose into the cells. Lack of insulin makes the glucose remain in the blood stream and some excreted through urination.
    So what will the body use for energy if there is no glucose?
    That's where protein or fat breakdown happens. The proteins breakdown makes the BUN elevated which urea is the byproduct of protein breakdown.
    Hope I helped^^:heartbeat

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high b

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) A state of absolute or relative insulin deficiency aggravated by ensuing hyperglycemia, dehydration, and acidosis-producing derangements in intermediary metabolism, including production of serum acetone. Can occur in both Type I Diabetes and Type II Diabetes In type II diabetics with insulin deficiency/dependence The presenting symptom for ~ 25% of Type I Diabetics. Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State (HHS) An acute metabolic complication of diabetes mellitus characterized by impaired mental status and elevated plasma osmolality in a patient with hyperglycemia. Occurs predominately in Type II Diabetics A few reports of cases in type I diabetics. The presenting symptom for 30-40% of Type II diabetics. Diagnostic Criteria for DKA and HHS Mild DKA Moderate DKA Severe DKA HHS Plasma glucose (mg/dL) > 250 > 250 > 250 > 600 Arterial pH 7.25-7.30 7.00-7.24 < 7.00 > 7.30 Sodium Bicarbonate (mEq/L) 15 – 18 10 - <15 < 10 > 15 Urine Ketones Positive Positive Positive Small Serum Ketones Positive Positive Positive Small Serum Osmolality (mOsm/kg) Variable Variable Variable > 320 Anion Gap > 10 > 12 > 12 variable Mental Status Alert Alert/Drowsy Stupor/Coma Stupo Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Asystole RN

    yes! very astute observation.
    to understand the relationship one must understand hyperglycemia. first answer the question, what pathophysiology occurs with hyperglycemia? there are key s&s the nurse is looking for when attempting to assess for hyperglycemia, there lays a clue to the connection.
    then answer, what can cause the blood urea nitrogen level to be elevated?
    hint.
    "what is hyperglycemia?
    hyperglycemia (hi"per-gli-se'me-ah) is an increase in plasma glucose (blood sugar). it can turn into a complex medical condition -- diabetic ketoacidosis (ke"to-as"id-o'sis) and coma -- if it's not treated on time and adequately. hyperglycemia is usually the first sign of diabetes mellitus. symptoms of hyperglycemia are
    polyuria (pol"e-yur'e-ah) (excess urine)
    polydipsia (pol"e-dip'se-ah) (thirst)

    polyphagia (pol"e-fa'je-ah) (excessive hunger) "
    the american heart association, (2011). hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia. retrieved from http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=4593

  2. illuminati88

    Hi,
    Look into what physiological processes occur in hyperglycemia, what the body resorts to when glucose is not available for energy, and by products of amino acid breakdown. That should help you on the path

  3. ladyangel341

    Since we know why blood glucose elevated lets go to BUN...
    There are 3 reasons of elevation of the BUN
    1) renal impairment
    2) pregnancy
    3) excessive breakdown of protein (called catabolism)
    On that three the closest relation to increase glucose is the breakdown of protein...
    Why there's a breakdown of protein if there is an increase number of blood glucose?
    We are talking about diabetic patient which there is a decrease production of insulin. Insulin helps absorption of glucose into the cells. Lack of insulin makes the glucose remain in the blood stream and some excreted through urination.
    So what will the body use for energy if there is no glucose?
    That's where protein or fat breakdown happens. The proteins breakdown makes the BUN elevated which urea is the byproduct of protein breakdown.
    Hope I helped^^:heartbeat

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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