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Brittle Diabetes Mellitus Icd 10

Diabetes Mellitus Without Mention Of Complication, Type Ii Or Unspecified Type, Not Stated As Uncontrolled

Diabetes Mellitus Without Mention Of Complication, Type Ii Or Unspecified Type, Not Stated As Uncontrolled

Approximate Synonyms Abnormal metabolic state in diabetes mellitus Acrorenal field defect, ectodermal dysplasia, and lipoatrophic diabetes Brittle diabetes mellitus Brittle type II diabetes mellitus Diabetes in childbirth Diabetes in pregnancy Diabetes mellitus Diabetes mellitus autosomal dominant type II Diabetes mellitus in childbirth Diabetes mellitus in mother complicating pregnancy, childbirth AND/OR puerperium Diabetes mellitus in the puerperium - baby delivered during current episode of care Diabetes mellitus induced by non-steroid drugs Diabetes mellitus induced by non-steroid drugs without complication Diabetes mellitus type 2 Diabetes mellitus type 2 in nonobese Diabetes mellitus type 2 in obese Diabetes mellitus type 2 without retinopathy Diabetes mellitus without complication Diabetes type 2 Diabetes type 2 controlled with diet Diabetes type 2 on insulin Diabetes type 2 with hyperglycemia Diabetes type 2, controlled Diabetes type 2, uncomplicated Diabetes type 2, without retinopathy Diabetic foot exam Diabetic foot exam done Diabetic on diet only Diabetic on oral treatment Dm 2 DM 2 controlled by diet DM 2 on insulin DM 2 w hyperglycemia DM 2 wo complications DM 2 wo diabetic retinopathy DM 2, controlled DM 2, diet controlled DM 2, WO retinopathy DM in childbirth DM in pregnancy Foot abnormality - diabetes-related Gestational diabetes mellitus Glucose tolerance test indicates diabetes mellitus Hyperglycemia due to type 2 diabetes mellitus Insulin-treated non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus Latent autoimmune diabetes mellitus in adult Lipodystrophy, partial, with Rieger anomaly, short stature, and insulinopenic diabetes mellitus Maternal diabetes postpartum (after childbirth) complication Maturity onset diabetes mellitus in young Maturity onset diabetes o Continue reading >>

Brittle Diabetes (labile Diabetes)

Brittle Diabetes (labile Diabetes)

Tweet Brittle diabetes mellitus (or labile diabetes) is a term used to describe particularly hard to control type 1 diabetes. Those people who have brittle diabetes will experience frequent, extreme swings in blood glucose levels, causing hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia. How does brittle diabetes develop and what is it associated with? Brittle diabetes has a number of potential causes. It can be caused by absorption problems in the intestines. This includes delayed stomach emptying, drug interactions, insulin absorption issues and malfunctioning hormones. Severely low blood sugar levels may also create thyroid and adrenal gland problems. Gastroperesis, delayed stomach emptying, can affect the rate at which food, glucose and insulin is absorbed into the bloodstream. Brittle diabetes is often associated with psychological issues such as stress and depression. Is brittle diabetes different from stable diabetes? All people with diabetes will a certain level of blood glucose level fluctuation. However, when these shifts are not extreme or over-frequent they do not impair the ability to lead a normal life. With brittle diabetes, however, the fluctuations are more serious and tend to result in frequent hospital visits, interruption to employment and can often contribute to psychological issues such as stress. Life expectancy with brittle diabetes The life expectancy for someone with brittle diabetes is no different to someone who has type 1 or type 2 diabetes. In fact, brittle diabetes can also be described poorly controlled type 2 diabetes. Is brittle diabetes common? Brittle diabetes is rare but serious. Around 3 in 1,000 people with type 1 diabetes mellitus will develop brittle diabetes. Will I get brittle diabetes? Those people suffering from psychological problems, includin Continue reading >>

Icd-10-cm-2017 Diabetes Coding Guide-medesun-dr Guptha

Icd-10-cm-2017 Diabetes Coding Guide-medesun-dr Guptha

ICD-10-CM-2017 Diabetes Coding Guide-MEDESUN-Dr Guptha Diabetes mellitus, often simply referred to asdiabetesis a group of metabolic diseases in which a person has high bloodsugar, either because the body does not produce enough insulin, or becausecells do not respond to the insulin that is produced. This high blood sugarproduces the classical symptoms of polyuria (frequent urination), polydipsia(increased thirst) and polyphagia (increased hunger). Type 1 diabetes:resultsfrom the body's failure to produce insulin, and presently requires the personto inject insulin. (Also referred to as insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus,IDDM for short, and juvenile diabetes.) Type 1 diabetes mellitus is characterized byloss of the insulin-producing beta cells of the islets of Langerhans in thepancreas leading to insulin deficiency. With DKA, the diagnosis of diabetes defaultsto Type I, since most diabetics who develop DKA are Type I diabetics. DKA occurs when a shortage of insulin causes thebody to break down fat and muscle for energy. The byproduct of this process isketones, which enter the bloodstream and cause a dangerous form of acidosis. InDKA, the patient is severely dehydrated and confused. Due to the electrolyteimbalance caused by DKA, hospitalization is required to stabilize the bloodchemistry and restore hydration. Type 2 diabetes:results from insulinresistance, a condition in which cells fail to use insulin properly, sometimescombined with an absolute insulin deficiency. (Formerly referred to asnon-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, NIDDM for short, and adult-onsetdiabetes.) Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterizedby insulin resistance which may be combined with relatively reduced insulinsecretion. The classical symptoms of diabetes arepolyuria (frequent urination), poly Continue reading >>

Coding Diabetes Mellitus In Icd-10-cm

Coding Diabetes Mellitus In Icd-10-cm

By Karen M. Kostick ICD-10-CM diabetes codes complement present medical science—separate type 1 and type 2 diabetes category codes and body system combination codes represent a major improvement over ICD-9-CM. Diabetes mellitus codes are no longer classified as controlled or uncontrolled. Instead ICD-10-CM classifies inadequately controlled, out of control, and poorly controlled diabetes mellitus by type with hyperglycemia. ICD-10-CM diabetes codes are combination codes that include the type of diabetes mellitus, body system affected, and the complications affecting that body system. The following examples apply ICD-10-CM chapter 4, “Diabetes mellitus E08-E13” tabular list instructions and illustrate diabetes mellitus code combinations and code specificity. ICD-10-CM Diabetes Mellitus Coding Examples ICD-10-CM diabetes codes are combinations codes that include the type of diabetes mellitus, body system affected, and the complications affecting that body system. Diagnosis: A patient is seen for diabetic chronic kidney disease, stage 3. The patient has type 2 diabetes and takes insulin on a daily basis. E11.22 Type 2 diabetes mellitus with diabetic chronic kidney disease N18.3 Chronic kidney disease, stage 3 (moderate) Z79.4 Long term (current) use of insulin Rationale: There is a combination code for the type 2 diabetes with chronic kidney disease, and the tabular instructs the coder to use an additional code to identify the stage of the chronic kidney disease. At the E11 category level, the use additional code note instructs the coder to identify insulin use. Diagnosis: A female patient with type 1 diabetes is seen for severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema. E10.341 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy Continue reading >>

Mary Ann Hodorowicz Consulting, Llc 5-10-16

Mary Ann Hodorowicz Consulting, Llc 5-10-16

Overview of ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Coding: What Diabetes Health Care Professionals, Educators, RDs, Coaches and Education Specialists Need To Know! Mary Ann Hodorowicz, RD, MBA, CDE, CEC Mary Ann Hodorowicz RD, LDN, MBA, CDE, CEC (Certified Endocrinology Coder) Mary Ann Hodorowicz, RD, LDN, MBA, CDE, CEC, is a licensed registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator and earned her MBA with a focus on marketing. She is also a certified endocrinology coder and owns a private practice specializing in corporate clients in Palos Heights, IL. She is a consultant, professional speaker, trainer, and author for the health, food, and pharmaceutical industries in nutrition, wellness, diabetes, and Medicare and private insurance reimbursement. Her clients include healthcare entities, professional membership associations, pharmacies, medical CEU education and training firms, government agencies, food and pharmaceutical companies, academia, and employer groups. She serves on the Board of Directors of the American Association of Diabetes Educators. Mary Ann Hodorowicz Consulting, LLC www.maryannhodorowicz.com [email protected] 708-359-3864 Twitter: @mahodorowicz This information is intended for educational and reference purposes only. It does not constitute legal, financial, medical, coding, billing or other professional advice. The information does not necessarily reflect opinions, policies and/or official positions of the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services, private healthcare insurance companies, or other professional associations. Information contained herein is subject to change by these and other organizations at any moment, and is subject to interpretation by its legal representatives, end users and recipients. Readers/users should seek professional counsel for leg Continue reading >>

Brittle Diabetes

Brittle Diabetes

Brittle diabetes is a term that is sometimes used to describe hard-to-control diabetes (also called labile diabetes). It is characterized by wide variations or “swings” in blood glucose (sugar) in which blood glucose levels can quickly move from too high (hyperglycemia) to too low (hypoglycemia). These episodes are hard to predict and can disrupt quality of life. They can require frequent or lengthy hospitalizations and can be fatal. People with type 1 diabetes are at greatest risk. While many people with type 1 diabetes experience hypoglycemia, only a small proportion of people with type 1 diabetes experience the frequent blood glucose swings described as “brittle.” People with long-standing type 2 diabetes may also have difficulty controlling blood glucose, but few have these frequent swings. People of any age with diabetes can be affected with these frequent ups and downs in blood glucose levels. Some research suggests that women may be affected more often than men. Frequent episodes of hypoglycemia can lead to hypoglycemic unawareness and make the condition worse. Keeping diabetes under good control for at least several weeks can restore hypoglycemic awareness. New technologies such as continuous glucose monitors and insulin pumps may help improve control.In diabetes, many factors can trigger frequent changes in blood glucose levels. For example, people who don’t test blood glucose or take diabetes medications as prescribed often experience significant fluctuations in blood glucose levels. Other causes of unstable blood glucose levels include emotional stress, eating disorders, drug or alcohol use, malabsorption, gastroparesis, and celiac disease. The development of new treatments for diabetes has made it easier for most people to control their blood gluco Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Aka: Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus, Type I Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus, IDDM, Type I Diabetes Prevalence : 5-10% of total Diabetes Mellitus patients (3 million cases in United States) Cell mediated pancreatic beta cell destruction Enterovirus IgM linked to IDDM in adolescents Non-specific to subtype (coxsackie, echovirus) Major presenting syndrome in 25% of cases More common in under 3 years and adolescence Anti-Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase Antibody (Anti-GAD65 Antibody ) - most useful of markers Test Sensitivity in Type I Diabetes: 60% in adults (60-73% in children) Not specific, also found in 7-34% in adults and children with Type II Diabetes Absence of Antibody makes requring inulin withn 6 years in adults unlikely (NPV 94%) Test Sensitivity in Type I Diabetes: 75-85% in adults and children Not specific for Type I Diabetes (seen in up to 21% of Type II Diabetes adults) Test Sensitivity in Type I Diabetes: 40% in adults and 40-86% in children More specific for Type I Diabetes (only present in ~2% of Type II Diabetes ) Not specific for Type I Diabetes Mellitus (also seen in Type II) May confirm autoimmune-mediated Diabetes Mellitus when other autoantibody tests are negative Treat acute problems (includes non-diabetic issues) If atypical presentation, then base on ketones Ketones negative: Consider treating as Type II Establish plan for ongoing care and education Review importance of intensive therapy (compared with conventional care) Fastin g lipid profile within 6 months of diagnosis Age over 12 years or Diabetes Mellitus for 5 years Transcutaneous Serum Glucose monitoring (watch) Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus." Click on the image (or Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus E10- >

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus E10- >

A subtype of diabetes mellitus that is characterized by insulin deficiency. It is manifested by the sudden onset of severe hyperglycemia, rapid progression to diabetic ketoacidosis, and death unless treated with insulin. The disease may occur at any age, but is most common in childhood or adolescence. diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, is too high. With type 1 diabetes, your pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much glucose stays in your blood. Over time, high blood glucose can lead to serious problems with your heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. Type 1 diabetes happens most often in children and young adults but can appear at any age. Symptoms may include being very thirsty urinating often feeling very hungry or tired losing weight without trying having sores that heal slowly having dry, itchy skin losing the feeling in your feet or having tingling in your feet having blurry eyesight a blood test can show if you have diabetes. If you do, you will need to take insulin for the rest of your life. Diabetes mellitus characterized by insulin deficiency, sudden onset, severe hyperglycemia, rapid progression to ketoacidosis, and death unless treated with insulin. The disease may occur at any age, but is most common in childhood or adolescence. Subtype of diabetes mellitus that is characterized by insulin deficiency; it is manifested by the sudden onset of severe hyperglycemia, rapid progression to diabetic ketoacidosis, and death unless treated with insulin; the disease may occur at any age, but is most common in childhood or adolescence. Continue reading >>

Icd-10 Diagnosis Code E10.9

Icd-10 Diagnosis Code E10.9

Diabetes Type 1 Also called: Insulin-dependent diabetes, Juvenile diabetes, Type I diabetes Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 1 diabetes, your pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much glucose stays in your blood. Over time, high blood glucose can lead to serious problems with your heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. Type 1 diabetes happens most often in children and young adults but can appear at any age. Symptoms may include Being very thirsty Urinating often Feeling very hungry or tired Losing weight without trying Having sores that heal slowly Having dry, itchy skin Losing the feeling in your feet or having tingling in your feet Having blurry eyesight A blood test can show if you have diabetes. If you do, you will need to take insulin for the rest of your life. A blood test called the A1C can check to see how well you are managing your diabetes. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases A1C test (Medical Encyclopedia) Diabetes - low blood sugar - self-care (Medical Encyclopedia) Diabetes - tests and checkups (Medical Encyclopedia) Diabetes - when you are sick (Medical Encyclopedia) Diabetes and exercise (Medical Encyclopedia) Diabetic ketoacidosis (Medical Encyclopedia) Giving an insulin injection (Medical Encyclopedia) Type 1 diabetes (Medical Encyclopedia) [Read More] Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes is a disorder characterized by abnormally high blood sugar levels. In this form of diabetes, specialized cells in the pancreas called beta cells stop producing insulin. Insulin controls how much glucose (a type of sugar) is passed from the blood into cells for conversion to energy. Lac Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Type 1

Diabetes Mellitus Type 1

Diabetes mellitus type 1 (also known as type 1 diabetes) is a form of diabetes mellitus in which not enough insulin is produced.[4] This results in high blood sugar levels in the body.[1] The classical symptoms are frequent urination, increased thirst, increased hunger, and weight loss.[4] Additional symptoms may include blurry vision, feeling tired, and poor healing.[2] Symptoms typically develop over a short period of time.[1] The cause of type 1 diabetes is unknown.[4] However, it is believed to involve a combination of genetic and environmental factors.[1] Risk factors include having a family member with the condition.[5] The underlying mechanism involves an autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas.[2] Diabetes is diagnosed by testing the level of sugar or A1C in the blood.[5][7] Type 1 diabetes can be distinguished from type 2 by testing for the presence of autoantibodies.[5] There is no known way to prevent type 1 diabetes.[4] Treatment with insulin is required for survival.[1] Insulin therapy is usually given by injection just under the skin but can also be delivered by an insulin pump.[9] A diabetic diet and exercise are an important part of management.[2] Untreated, diabetes can cause many complications.[4] Complications of relatively rapid onset include diabetic ketoacidosis and nonketotic hyperosmolar coma.[5] Long-term complications include heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, foot ulcers and damage to the eyes.[4] Furthermore, complications may arise from low blood sugar caused by excessive dosing of insulin.[5] Type 1 diabetes makes up an estimated 5–10% of all diabetes cases.[8] The number of people affected globally is unknown, although it is estimated that about 80,000 children develop the disease each year.[5] With Continue reading >>

Brittle Diabetes Icd 10 Fast Facts Sheet

Brittle Diabetes Icd 10 Fast Facts Sheet

Diabetic Eye Exam Components Diabetes Diet Carbs Per Day ::The 3 Step Trick that Reverses Diabetes Permanently in As Little as 11 Days.[ Home / Alternative medicine How to use natural remedies to control diabetes better Diabetes can be effectively managed with the help of methi (fenugreek) Pathogenesis of diabetes complications. Brittle Diabetes Icd 10 Fast Facts Sheet causes And Risk Factors Of Diabetes Type 2 diabetes controlling so you no longer have diet diabetic diabetes medications drug classes. Facts and complicated by gestational diabetes % chance of developing diabetes in the next 10-20 yrs. If you have type 1 diabetes you have to take daily You have it in your power to keep blood sugar levels from going you can become just as sick if your blood One of the side effects you could notice is bad eath. Pancreatic Cyst Aspirate CEA Levels: Twos the Charm. SAN FRANCISCO Both lifestyle and metformin help to prevent diabetes in high-risk patients over the long run researchers reported here. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews for literature published from database inception in 1950 through January 2010. 11 compared aspart to regular insulin in a study reported at the The majority of the pancreas lies in a retro peritoneal patency of cystic duct and its relation to primary tumour location may be obtained by performing a Diabetes Quality of Life (DQOL) Questionnaire of a diabetes quality-of-life measure for the measures of quality of life in patients with type I and Burning sensations (especially in the evening). MANIS (DIABETES MELLITUS) ? Kelompok macam -macam gejala yang ditandai Diet Diabetes 2. Most urinary tract infections are caused by the and sugar wreaks havoc with blood sugar levels and impairs Any sign of blood in the urine would diabetic ketoacidosis low Continue reading >>

Icd-10 Codes For Diabetes Mellitus Type 1

Icd-10 Codes For Diabetes Mellitus Type 1

List of ICD-10cm Codes for Diabetes Mellitus Type 1. You can also checkout here ICD-10 Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 Codes. Type 1 diabetes mellitus includes brittle diabetes (mellitus), diabetes (mellitus) due to autoimmune process, diabetes (mellitus) due to immune mediated pancreatic islet beta-cell destruction, idiopathic diabetes (mellitus), juvenile onset diabetes (mellitus), ketosis-prone diabetes (mellitus). Diabetes mellitus (DM) codes in ICD-10-CM are combination codes that include the type of DM, the body system affected, and the complication affecting that body system as part of the code description. Subcategory levels first specify the type of complication by system, such as diabetes with kidney complications, ophthalmic complications, neurological complications, and circulatory complications. The subclassification level then describes the particular manifestation. ICD 10 code E10.1x Type 1 diabetes mellitus with ketoacidosis E10.10 without coma E10.11 with coma ICD 10 code E10.2x Type 1 diabetes mellitus with kidney complications E10.21 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with diabetic nephropathy E10.22 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with diabetic chronic kidney disease E10.29 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with other diabetic kidney complication ICD 10 code E10.3xx Type 1 diabetes mellitus with ophthalmic complications Type 1 diabetes mellitus with unspecified diabetic retinopathy E10.311 with macular edema E10.319 without macular edema Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy E10.321 with macular edema E10.329 without macular edema Type 1 diabetes mellitus with moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy E10.331 with macular edema E10.339 without macular edema Type 1 diabetes mellitus with severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy E10.341 with Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus With Hyperglycemia

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus With Hyperglycemia

E10.65 is a billable/specific ICD-10-CM code that can be used to indicate a diagnosis for reimbursement purposes. This is the American ICD-10-CM version of E10.65 - other international versions of ICD-10 E10.65 may differ. Approximate Synonyms Diabetes type 1 with hyperglycemia Hyperglycemia due to type 1 diabetes mellitus ICD-10-CM E10.65 is grouped within Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v35.0): Code History 2016 (effective 10/1/2015): New code (first year of non-draft ICD-10-CM) 2017 (effective 10/1/2016): No change 2018 (effective 10/1/2017): No change Reimbursement claims with a date of service on or after October 1, 2015 require the use of ICD-10-CM codes. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Without Complications

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Without Complications

ICD-10: E11.9 Short Description: Type 2 diabetes mellitus without complications Long Description: Type 2 diabetes mellitus without complications This is the 2018 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code E11.9 Valid for Submission The code E11.9 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions. Code Classification Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases (E00–E90) Diabetes mellitus (E08-E13) Type 2 diabetes mellitus (E11) Code Edits The following edits are applicable to this code: Questionable admission codes Convert to ICD-9 Synonyms Acquired acanthosis nigricans Brittle diabetes mellitus Brittle type II diabetes mellitus Diabetes mellitus Diabetes mellitus in remission Diabetes mellitus type 2 Diabetes mellitus type 2 in nonobese Diabetes mellitus type 2 without retinopathy Diabetes mellitus without complication Diabetic - good control Diabetic on diet only Diabetic on insulin Hemoglobin A1C - diabetic control finding Hemoglobin A1C - diabetic control finding Hemoglobin A1C - diabetic control finding Hemoglobin A1c between 7%-10% indicating borderline diabetic control Hemoglobin A1c greater than 10% indicating poor diabetic control Hemoglobin A1c less than 7% indicating good diabetic control Insulin treated type 2 diabetes mellitus Maturity onset diabetes of the young, type 2 Megaloblastic anemia, thiamine-responsive, with diabetes mellitus and sensorineural deafness Newly diagnosed diabetes Photomyoclonus, diabetes mellitus, deafness, nephropathy and cerebral dysfunction Pre-existing type 2 diabetes mellitus Type 2 diabetes mellitus controlled by diet Type 2 diabetes mellitus with acanthosis nigricans Type II diabetes mellitus in remission Type II diabetes mellitus well controlled Type II diabetes mellitus without complication Diabetes Type 2 Also called: Continue reading >>

Coding Tip: Uncontrolled Diabetes Mellitus In Icd-10

Coding Tip: Uncontrolled Diabetes Mellitus In Icd-10

Coding Tip: Uncontrolled Diabetes Mellitus in ICD-10 How do coders report uncontrolled DM in ICD-10-CM? First, coders will need to have further documentation of hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia as there is no default code for uncontrolled diabetes. Uncontrolled diabetes is classified by type and whether it is hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia. The term uncontrolled is not synonymous with hyperglycemia. The term poorly controlled is synonymous with hyperglycemia when referring to diabetes in ICD-10-CM. In ICD-9-CM, uncontrolled diabetes had a specific 5th digit to show that the diabetes was controlled or uncontrolled. This is no longer the case in ICD-10-CM. If the patient has documented uncontrolled diabetes, without further clarification of hyperglycemia and/or hypoglycemia, a query is necessary to clarify which type the patient has. If the patient does have documented hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia in addition to the diagnosis of uncontrolled diabetes, ICD-10-CM codes would be used to show that the diabetes is with hyperglycemia and/or hypoglycemia. Is uncontrolled and poorly controlled DM the same? No, uncontrolled and poorly controlled are not interchangeable when describing diabetes in ICD-10-CM. Uncontrolled can mean either hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia and is indexed as such in ICD-10-CM. Poorly controlled means hyperglycemia per the ICD-10-CM index. Poorly controlled-code to Diabetes, by type with hyperglycemia Hyperglycemia-see Diabetes, by type, with hyperglycemia Hypoglycemia-see Diabetes, by type, with hypoglycemia Please see question and answer in AHA Coding Clinic, First Quarter 2017 Page: 42 The information contained in this coding advice is valid at the time of posting. Viewers are encouraged to research subsequent official guidance in the areas associated with Continue reading >>

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