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Blood Sugar Joint Pain

Does Diabetes Cause Joint Pain?-what Are The Natural Methods For Pain Relief?

Does Diabetes Cause Joint Pain?-what Are The Natural Methods For Pain Relief?

Does diabetes cause joint pain? There isn’t a person existing that would admit to enjoying pain. Pain is not an enjoyable experience and joint pain with diabetes is no exception. Have you ever just woken up in the morning and it seems that all your joints ache? Who hasn’t been there? Maybe sometimes it’s one or two joints or just an occasional occurrence. If it isn’t related to diabetes, then it could be a number of reasons. But if it is related to diabetes, then you would have a 200% better chance of having arthritis and joint pain. Diabetes happens when your body does not produce enough insulin. Without insulin glucose remains in your bloodstream which raises your blood sugar levels. So diabetes will cause skeletal changes that can lead to symptoms such as joint pain, stiffness, shoulder pain, trigger finger, swelling, and carpal tunnel syndrome just to mention a few. Arthritis can occur with age so you want to do your best to first avoid diabetes. Diabetes and arthritis- how you can help both Joint pain and arthritis are like Clark Kent and Superman. They are one and the same thing. So where the two bones come together is your joint. Ligaments hold the bones in place and attach them to one another and are also attached by tendons to the bones and muscles that allow them to move. Cartilage which is at the very ends of the bones protects the bones from damage and allows them to move. Cartilage is a substance made up of water, proteins, and fiber from collagen. Cartilage is important for protection and normal wear and tear and also injuries (especially sports injuries) and it can be damaged. Aging is definitely a factor here, but even more of a factor is diabetes because it will make joint damage happen faster. Excess glucose isn’t good because it adheres to s Continue reading >>

Glucosamine Supplements: Good For Joints But Possibly Risky For Diabetes

Glucosamine Supplements: Good For Joints But Possibly Risky For Diabetes

Glucosamine is a popular dietary supplement used by many who suffer from joint pain. Most dietary supplements make claims that aren’t backed by scientific research, but NIH reports that daily doses of glucosamine can lower pain. As a result, the supplements are recommended by many physicians. However, glucosamine is a sugar that uses some glucose processing pathways. It is processed mainly through the “Hexosamine Biosynthetic Pathway,” which is involved in both glucose transport and the development of insulin resistance-the main cause of type 2 diabetes.[1] Does that mean that these pills can be dangerous? A person with diabetes does not produce enough insulin to regulate blood sugar levels in the body. Without the right amount of insulin (which is what we mean by “insulin resistance”), glucose can not be properly absorbed and used, leading to too little or too much sugar circulating in the body.[1] More research is needed to determine whether glucosamine supplements can cause diabetes in healthy adults, but meanwhile, if you are already at risk for diabetes or have diabetes, you may want to think twice before taking glucosamine. Glucosamine is already used in laboratory settings and animal studies to induce insulin resistance for the purpose of studying the condition and drugs to treat it, so clearly scientists are confident it has that effect. We also know from animal studies that glucosamine interferes with the liver’s ability to control glucose production, glucose uptake by surrounding tissue, and insulin production in pancreatic beta-cell.[2] A study of healthy men and women taking 1500mg of glucosamine a day for six weeks, published in The American Journal of the Medical Sciences, concluded that adults who already have poor insulin sensitivity will inc Continue reading >>

78: Lap Band Removal, Blood Sugar Rising Taking Insulin, Joint Pain, High Liver Function Test, Thriving In Lower Level Of Ketosis

78: Lap Band Removal, Blood Sugar Rising Taking Insulin, Joint Pain, High Liver Function Test, Thriving In Lower Level Of Ketosis

If you are interested in the low-carb, moderate protein, high-fat, ketogenic diet, then this is the podcast for you. We zero in exclusively on all the questions people have about how being in a state of nutritional ketosis and the effects it has on your health. There are a lot of myths about keto floating around out there and our two amazing cohosts are shooting them down one at a time. Keto Talk is cohosted by 10-year veteran health podcaster and international bestselling author Jimmy Moore from “Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb” and Arizona osteopath and certified bariatric physician Dr. Adam Nally from “Doc Muscles”who thoroughly share from their wealth of experience on the ketogenic lifestyle each and every Thursday. We love hearing from our fabulous Ketonian listeners with new questions–send an email to Jimmy at [email protected] And if you’re not already subscribed to the podcast on iTunes and listened to the past episodes, then you can do that and leave a review HERE. Listen in today as Jimmy and Doc Muscles celebrate the Doc’s final show as co-host of Keto Talk and anwser your low-carb, high-fat, ketogenic questions in Episode 78. As Jimmy and Dr. Nally said in this episode, this is not goodbye, but just so long for now as they continue to work together on their Keto Living line of supplements as well as their forthcoming book The Keto Cure, due out this November. JIMMY AND DR. ADAM NALLY’S KETO LIVING SUPPLEMENTS You can set up automatic monthly payments there.THE PERFECT KETO SUPPLEMENT NOTICE OF DISCLOSURE: Paid sponsorship KEY QUOTE: “Keep the fat high. the carbs low, and keep ketoing on!” — Dr. Adam Nally MAKE KETO EASIER WITH FBOMB JIMMYLOVESFBOMB FOR 10% OFF YOUR FIRST FOOD ORDER NOTICE OF DISCLOSURE: Paid sponsorship Here’s wh Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar And The Problems It Can Cause

High Blood Sugar And The Problems It Can Cause

JANUMET tablets contain 2 prescription medicines: sitagliptin (JANUVIA®) and metformin. Once-daily prescription JANUMET XR tablets contain sitagliptin (the medicine in JANUVIA®) and extended-release metformin. JANUMET or JANUMET XR can be used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUMET or JANUMET XR should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUMET or JANUMET XR. Metformin, one of the medicines in JANUMET and JANUMET XR, can cause a rare but serious side effect called lactic acidosis (a buildup of lactic acid in the blood), which can cause death. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency that must be treated in a hospital. Call your doctor right away if you get any of the following symptoms, which could be signs of lactic acidosis: feel cold in your hands or feet; feel dizzy or lightheaded; have a slow or irregular heartbeat; feel very weak or tired; have unusual (not normal) muscle pain; have trouble breathing; feel sleepy or drowsy; have stomach pains, nausea, or vomiting. Most people who have had lactic acidosis with metformin have other things that, combined with the metformin, led to the lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have any of the following, because you have a higher chance of getting lactic acidosis with JANUMET or JANUMET XR if you: have severe kidney problems or your kidneys are affected by certain x-ray tests that use injectable dye; have liver problems; drink alcohol very often, or drink a lot of alcohol in short-term “binge” drinking; get dehydrated (lose large amounts of body fluids, w Continue reading >>

Foods That May Trigger Joint Pain: Here's What Not To Eat

Foods That May Trigger Joint Pain: Here's What Not To Eat

Joint pain is one of the commonly experienced issues across the world. While most cases are attributed to wrong posture, weak bones, or lack of nutrients, many other instances of joint pain are the result of some injury or other medical conditions like rheumatism, arthritis, and osteoarthritis among others. While it is imperative to understand the exact cause of your joint pain, it is also essential to have an understanding that dietary choices can also help tame or aggravate your pain. Experts suggest that consuming food items that are inflammatory in nature may add to your ongoing joint pain and can even trigger it if you are susceptible to experiencing it. Adding a host of anti-inflammatory foods items may in turn help bring relief. Foods that Can Trigger Joint Pain The essential idea here is to keep a check on inflammation. Though more and more research needs to be called upon to establish this as a fact in entirety, but largely, inflammation causing food items may worsen or at times trigger joint and muscle pain. Some of the most recent studies express that foods rich in sugar, trans fats, processed ingredients and purines are inversely related to the health of our joints. Blood sugar spikes may up the inflammatory response in the body, thereby inducing pain. Follow the list given below to make smarter dietary choices and manage your joint pain better or keep it at bay. "Few items that instantly raise the inflammatory response in the body would include refines sugar, refined flours and carbs, and of course trans fats and saturated fats. People who are overweight are at a higher risk of experiencing joint pain as their joints and bones carry more weight than what they are actually supposed to," said Dr. Ritika Sammadar, Chief Nutritionist at Max Super Specialty, Sak Continue reading >>

How Rheumatoid Arthritis Can Affect Your Blood Sugar

How Rheumatoid Arthritis Can Affect Your Blood Sugar

When you hear the word “arthritis,” you probably think of joint pain, swelling and stiffness. But rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a disease that causes inflammation in your joints, can affect the rest of your body, too—sometimes in surprising ways. For example, studies have shown that people with RA are more likely to also have diabetes, a condition characterized by high blood sugar levels. From Joint Pain to Blood Sugar Woes It turns out that inflammation, which is a key feature of RA, may cause a buildup of sugar in the blood. Luckily, there’s a silver lining to the relationship between RA and blood sugar: Certain things that help manage your RA, like some lifestyle choices and medications, may also help prevent or control diabetes. Inflammation and Insulin Resistance So, how can inflammation lead to high blood sugar? The answer has to do with insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps a person’s cells absorb sugar from the blood so it can be used for energy. If the cells are unable to use insulin effectively, a condition known as insulin resistance, excess sugar can start to build up in the blood. Eventually, the person may develop type 2 diabetes. Remember that RA can cause widespread inflammation throughout the body. This inflammation, in turn, may increase the body’s risk of developing insulin resistance. Researchers are still studying exactly how inflammation contributes to insulin resistance. Two likely culprits are tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), proteins that are involved in joint inflammation. There’s evidence that both TNF and IL-6 may interfere with insulin’s ability to work properly. Tips to Help Manage Both Conditions Having RA doesn’t automatically mean you’ll develop insulin resistance or diabetes. But your risk is inc Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms And Ranges

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms And Ranges

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) definition and facts Hypoglycemia is the medical term for low blood sugar. It typically occurs as a side effect of medications for diabetes. The normal range of blood glucose is from 70 to 100 mg/dL in an individual without diabetes, Most people will feel the effects and symptoms of low blood sugar when blood glucose levels are lower than 50 mg/dL. Low blood sugar is treated by giving a readily absorbed source of sugar, including soft drinks, juice, or foods containing sugar. If the hypoglycemia has progressed to the point at which the patient cannot take anything by mouth, an injection of glucagon may be given. Glucagon is a hormone that causes a fast release of glucose from the liver. Hypoglycemia or low blood sugar is syndrome that results from low blood sugar. The severity and symptoms of hypoglycemia can vary from person to person. Blood tests can diagnose low blood sugar, and symptoms resolve when the levels of sugar in the blood return to the normal range. The medical term for blood sugar is blood glucose. What can cause low blood sugar? Despite advances in the treatment of diabetes, low blood sugar episodes occur as a side effect of many treatments for diabetes. In fact, these episodes are often the limiting factor in achieving optimal blood sugar control, because many medications that are effective in treating diabetes carry the risk of lowering the blood sugar level too much, causing symptoms. In large scale studies looking at tight control in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, low blood sugars occurred more often in the patients who were managed most intensively. This is important for patients and physicians to recognize, especially as the goal for treating patients with diabetes becomes tighter control of blood sugar. While peopl Continue reading >>

Reset Your Brain And Body For A Pain-free Life.

Reset Your Brain And Body For A Pain-free Life.

Sugar, in its many forms, is a menace. In 1988, the forward-thinking Nancy Appleton wrote a book entitled Lick the Sugar Habit, implicating sugar in 141 diseases. Today we understand that too much sugar – hiding under many names in endless combinations of glucose and fructose – causes a host of health problems, including PAIN. People with diagnosed diabetes are nearly twice as likely to have arthritis, indicating a diabetes-arthritis connection. But you don’t need to be diabetic or even pre-diabetic. How does sugar attack our joints? Sugar in its natural form found in most plant foods is designed to give our body energy. By nature, sugar is our friend. But how many of us eat by nature? That raw carrot is the perfect combination of fiber, nutrients and water relative to its natural sugar content…just what our body needs. Most manufactured foods, however, concentrate the sugar into amounts too much for our bodies, tipping our scales into an imbalanced, inflamed state. More and more patients are coming to me with chronic pain directly associated to insulin resistance, high HbA1C and CRP. These markers of inflammation signal a warning sign to the body. “I can’t digest all of this sugar!” If the body is a furnace with a steady slow-burning heat, too much sugar is a dousing of gas leading to a house fire. The cells designed to metabolize the sugar start to shut down so the body grows sluggish and unable to create energy from sugar. Simultaneously, the sugar builds up in the blood, increasing production of insulin. In excess, insulin, the “fat cell fertilizer” increases body fat, which adds more stress to the joints. The endless cycle of high blood sugar and insulin resistance leads to inflammation in the body resulting in arthritis, brittle tendons, and high Continue reading >>

15 Ways High Blood Sugar Affects Your Body

15 Ways High Blood Sugar Affects Your Body

High blood sugar symptoms Glucose, or sugar, is the fuel that powers cells throughout the body. Blood levels of this energy source ebb and flow naturally, depending what you eat (and how much), as well as when you eat it. But when something goes wrong—and cells aren't absorbing the glucose—the resulting high blood sugar damages nerves, blood vessels, and organs, setting the stage for dangerous complications. Normal blood-sugar readings typically fall between 60 mg/dl and 140 mg/dl. A blood test called a hemoglobin A1c measures average blood sugar levels over the previous three months. A normal reading is below 5.7% for people without diabetes. An excess of glucose in the bloodstream, or hyperglycemia, is a sign of diabetes. People with type 1 diabetes don’t make insulin, the hormone needed to ferry sugar from the bloodstream into cells. Type 2 diabetes means your body doesn’t use insulin properly and you can end up with too much or too little insulin. Either way, without proper treatment, toxic amounts of sugar can build up in the bloodstream, wreaking havoc head to toe. That’s why it’s so important to get your blood sugar levels in check. “If you keep glucose levels near normal, you reduce the risk of diabetes complications,” says Robert Ratner, MD, chief scientific and medical officer of the American Diabetes Association. Here’s a rundown of the major complications and symptoms of high blood sugar. No symptoms at all Often, high blood sugar causes no (obvious) symptoms at all, at least at first. About 29 million people in the U.S. have diabetes, but one in four has no idea. Another 86 million have higher-than-normal blood sugar levels, but not high enough to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. That's why it’s a good idea to get your blood sugar test Continue reading >>

Case Study: Reversing 11 Years Of Pain And Frustration With Type 2 Diabetes In Less Than 6 Months

Case Study: Reversing 11 Years Of Pain And Frustration With Type 2 Diabetes In Less Than 6 Months

I’d like to take a moment to recognize the incredible 6-month transformation of Cynthia Bronte, one of my clients working diligently at reversing insulin resistance. This is another story that reflects the amazing mental, physical and emotional transformation that can occur with a strategic approach to plant-focused high-carbohydrate nutrition. Diagnosis with Type 2 Diabetes Cynthia was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2003, in the midst of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), an acute life-threatening condition that typically marks the onset of type 1 diabetes. Cynthia’s symptoms of DKA were unmistakable, and included urinating more than 14 times per day, insatiable thirst and low energy. Cynthia was unaware that her fasting blood sugar was 5 times higher than normal, at 550 mg/dL (normal blood sugars range from 70 – 130 mg/dL). Treatment Protocol When Cynthia was first diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, she was instructed to consume a low carbohydrate diet in order to minimize blood sugar. She was instructed to eat foods that were high in protein and fat, while limiting her intake of fruits, artificial sweeteners, grains, pastas, rice, bread and cereal. As we’ve talked about in a previous article, she was initially instructed to minimize her intake of carbohydrates to minimize the amount of glucose that would eventually appear in her blood. Her diet plan followed what I refer to as “the linear diabetes nutrition model,” shown below. The problem with the linear model is that it does not address the underlying root cause of type 2 diabetes – insulin resistance. By eating a low carbohydrate diet, Cynthia was eating mainly fat and protein, resulting in increased lipid deposits in her liver and muscle tissue. In turn, increased fat storage in her liver and muscle resul Continue reading >>

5 Top Tips For Dealing With Arthritis And Joint Pain

5 Top Tips For Dealing With Arthritis And Joint Pain

According to official statistics published by the NHS, it is estimated that over 10 million people in the UK are living with arthritis. With the winter months often causing it to flare up for many of us, here are some top tips on pain management for arthritis. Ditch the Sugar High blood sugar levels, which are often caused by eating too many sweet, sugary and processed foods, can damage your joints through a process called glycation, where sugar bonds to proteins causing painful inflammation around the joints. Try swapping white bread and pasta to wholegrains and using natural sweeteners in your cooking such as dates and honey. If you’re struggling, you can always try our Equigluco, which helps balance your blood sugar levels and curb those sugary cravings. Cutting down on the sugar will also help to prevent you from piling on the pounds, which can ease the pressure on your joints. Let the Sun Shine Vitamin D not only supports the body with the absorption of calcium, which helps to ensure a strong bone density, but is also vital for a healthy immune system. This is particularly important, as some types of arthritis such as rheumatoid arthritis are autoimmune conditions, where the immune system mistakenly attacks our joint tissue. Make sure you’re eating plenty of foods rich in vitamin D such as fish, milk, fortified cereals and eggs, getting outdoors to take advantage of the sunshine, or for an extra help with pain management for rheumatoid arthritis take a supplement such as our Forte D 4000. Try Aerobic exercises Regular exercise is really important for those who suffer from stiff joints or arthritis. Although it might sometimes feel like the last thing you want to do, exercise can help to keep your joints supple and may aid reducing some of the pain. Try aerobic Continue reading >>

7 Worst Foods For Your Joints

7 Worst Foods For Your Joints

Have you been trying to figure out the source of your joint pain? Has your quality of life reduced because of uncomfortable and persistent joint pain? Joints occur where the bones in the body connect and are an important part of our daily lives. When damage to the joints occurs, pain is a typical result or consequence. Unfortunately, joint pain occurs more frequently in people and this can include a number of conditions such as cartilage damage, sprains, bursitis, rheumatoid arthritis, strains, osteoarthritis and other conditions. While the actual cause of joint pain may vary, one common element associated with joint pain is inflammation. Hence, by controlling, reducing or eliminating inflammation, you could also directly influence any joint pain you may have. Does this sound too good to be true? Well, embrace the good news! You can minimize or eliminate joint pain by getting rid of the inflammation associated with joint pain. Inflammation can cause pain as a person moves the joint. While anti-inflammatory drugs and other medications may help, eliminating, reducing or avoiding certain foods may be an effective way to get rid of joint pain and keep such pain away. The key is to figure out foods and related food items that can promote inflammation. These foods or food items may not be the actual source of the joint pain, but intake of these items could severely worsen inflammation around the joints. The following are 7 worst foods for your joints: 1. Sugar Yes, many weight loss experts discuss the reduction or elimination of sugar from one’s diet. In addition, cutting out sugar could also do wonders for your joints. Joints get painful when inflammation occurs and sugar is great at causing inflammation. Hence, this is really a no-brainer. Once sugar enters the blood stre Continue reading >>

Sugar Aches & Inflammation

Sugar Aches & Inflammation

Yes, you read that right. Sugar-aches. I don’t mean the sugar lust that comes from the aroma of fresh brownies or the Blizzard-of-the-month sign at the Dairy Queen®. I mean what happens after you consume high-sugar foods that in turn create inflammation, aches and pain throughout your body; in other words, sugar-aches. Do You Have Sugar-Aches? This achy feeling may appear as stiff joints, achy muscles, migraines, added asthma or PMS symptoms. Chronic sugar-aches can lead to giving up your favorite pastimes such as golf, gardening, or other activities because you're in too much pain. Let's back up. Where do your sugar-aches originate? They can come from a mocha and muffin at the coffee shop or maybe from a generous serving of pasta, or sub sandwich, at lunch. On the other hand, they may be from the hard to resist candy stash at your co-worker’s desk. You're probably getting the picture ... sugar is hiding, in high amounts in many beverages and foods. While you wouldn’t consume spoon after spoon of plain sugar, you may drink soda or eat popular foods that result in sugar-overload in your body without realizing it. Here's a simple equation to see how much sugar you are actually consuming, beyond what's listed on the label. 4 grams of carbohydrates = 1 teaspoon of sugar in your body. When you check product labels, look for serving size so you can complete the equation for the amount of food or beverage you want to consume. Sugar-Loaded Snacks to be Cautious of: Potato chips: A nine-ounce bag of chips breaks down into 32 teaspoons of sugar (most people can’t stop after four or five chips). If you wash down the chips with a soda, that’s another 16 or more teaspoons of sugar. Dots: One box of movie-theater sized Dots contains 5.5 servings. If you consume the whole b Continue reading >>

Joint Disorders & Joint Pain In Children

Joint Disorders & Joint Pain In Children

Joint pain can arise as a symptom of hypothyroid (too little thyroid hormone), hyperthyroid (too much thyroid hormone) or diabetes (high blood sugar). Your child’s thyroid gland is a butterfly-shaped gland located at the base of the neck, just above the collarbone. It produces hormones that control the body’s metabolism. When this gland under-produces the thyroid hormone or overproduces the hormone, children may experience joint pain. If your child has diabetes, it means his or her body does not produce (type 1) or use (type 2) the hormone insulin effectively. Insulin is responsible for allowing glucose to enter the body’s cells to be used as energy. When this mechanism is damaged, children suffer from high blood sugar. Diabetes causes musculoskeletal changes that lead to symptoms such as joint inflammation, pain and stiffness. Being overweight, a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, can also cause joint pain, as extra weight puts stress on the joints. Summary Type 2 diabetes, previously called adult-onset diabetes is the most common type of diabetes. With type 2 diabetes, the body does not use insulin correctly. Expanded Overview Type 2 diabetes is a disease that has as its main symptom a high level of sugar (glucose) in the blood. It is the most common form of diabetes. It is often called non-insulin-dependent diabetes, or adult-onset diabetes. With type 2 diabetes, the fat, liver and muscle cells don’t work properly with insulin to use or to store the glucose that is in the diet. This is called “insulin resistance.” When the glucose can’t get into the cells, it remains in the blood and builds up until there is too much. This is called hyperglycemia. It is common for people with type 2 diabetes to show no symptoms early in life. It can be years before sympto Continue reading >>

Sugar, Inflammation, And Achy Knees

Sugar, Inflammation, And Achy Knees

Having a whole lotta sugar takes its toll on the body. It has been linked with weight gain, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, dental caries, liver disease, accelerated ageing, and the list goes on! But could too much of the sweet stuff be contributing to our body’s creaks and pains? Let’s see! Joint pain and inflammation Inflammation is a term we hear a lot with respect to health. We are told that anti-inflammatory foods are great for us, and things that cause inflammation tend to cause trouble. This is true to an extent. An inflammatory response is a normal part of the human defence system. The swelling, redness, pain and heat experienced when we cut our thumb is a reflection of the influx of chemical warriors coming to save the day, kick starting the healing process. We need inflammation to heal wounds, clear debris, and fight pathogens, to stand strong in the face of adversity! But when inflammation is present long-term, all those warriors, such as cytokines, can get a little carried away, and begin to damage parts of our body that are otherwise quite healthy. Including our joints, which can present as arthritis. Oh my achy knees! Common forms of arthritis include gout, ankylosing spondylitis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA), with fibromyalgia a related condition. RA is an autoimmune condition, where the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks its own tissues thinking it as some pathogenic terrorist! Whilst there may be genetic predisposition, triggers are unknown. What we do know is inflammation is rife and damaging to the joints,2 and as with many autoimmune conditions, diet may have a large role to play in its presentation. OA is not an autoimmune condition like its rheumatoid cousin. It is less aggressive and more gradual in onset, but featu Continue reading >>

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