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Blood Sugar Joint Pain

What's Causing Your Joint And Nerve Pain?

What's Causing Your Joint And Nerve Pain?

It’s natural to feel a little discomfort in your hands, fingers, feet, and ankles from time to time. Joint pain is a part of getting older and can have a number of causes. But that ache in your foot or arm could also be a problem with a nerve caused by your diabetes. And that’s an issue that could be serious and require quick attention. So how do you tell the difference? It’s the leading cause of disability in the U.S. It affects more than 50 million adults. Often referred to as arthritis, it’s broadly defined as discomfort where two or more bones meet. Though often mild, sometimes sporadic, and rarely an emergency, the pain can be severe, making it hard to move the joint. If you have it, you’ll probably notice changes to your joint like: Stiffness Less range in motion Swelling Redness Tenderness or warmth A tougher time using it A difference in shape The causes of joint pain vary greatly. It could be: Muscle strains or sprains A broken or dislocated bone Gout Hypothyroidism Leukemia Lupus Osteoarthritis Rickets Lyme disease Rheumatoid arthritis Your doctor might call it diabetic neuropathy. It’s pain in your nerves, not in your bones. It happens when high blood sugar harms the nerve fibers. You can get it anywhere in your body, but it most often affects your legs and feet. Anywhere from 60%-70% of people with diabetes have some sort of neuropathy. Most get it after having the disease for 10 years or more. There are many types. But the two most likely to cause problems with your joints are peripheral and autonomic neuropathy. This is the most common form of diabetic joint pain. It affects your legs, arms, hands, feet, fingers, and toes. With ongoing diabetes, joints can no longer respond like they should to the strain and stress placed on them. As a result, Continue reading >>

7 Worst Foods For Your Joints

7 Worst Foods For Your Joints

Have you been trying to figure out the source of your joint pain? Has your quality of life reduced because of uncomfortable and persistent joint pain? Joints occur where the bones in the body connect and are an important part of our daily lives. When damage to the joints occurs, pain is a typical result or consequence. Unfortunately, joint pain occurs more frequently in people and this can include a number of conditions such as cartilage damage, sprains, bursitis, rheumatoid arthritis, strains, osteoarthritis and other conditions. While the actual cause of joint pain may vary, one common element associated with joint pain is inflammation. Hence, by controlling, reducing or eliminating inflammation, you could also directly influence any joint pain you may have. Does this sound too good to be true? Well, embrace the good news! You can minimize or eliminate joint pain by getting rid of the inflammation associated with joint pain. Inflammation can cause pain as a person moves the joint. While anti-inflammatory drugs and other medications may help, eliminating, reducing or avoiding certain foods may be an effective way to get rid of joint pain and keep such pain away. The key is to figure out foods and related food items that can promote inflammation. These foods or food items may not be the actual source of the joint pain, but intake of these items could severely worsen inflammation around the joints. The following are 7 worst foods for your joints: 1. Sugar Yes, many weight loss experts discuss the reduction or elimination of sugar from one’s diet. In addition, cutting out sugar could also do wonders for your joints. Joints get painful when inflammation occurs and sugar is great at causing inflammation. Hence, this is really a no-brainer. Once sugar enters the blood stre Continue reading >>

Could Your Blood Sugar Be Causing Your Joint Pain?

Could Your Blood Sugar Be Causing Your Joint Pain?

I know you’re aware that repetitive stress, sitting too long, being overweight, an old injury, poor posture and even ill fitting shoes can all contribute to joint pain whether that’s in your back, your knee or your neck. But are you aware that your blood sugar and how you manage it can be THE source of your joint aches and pains? You heard that right and here we go again… your diet and your body parts are most definitely connected. I know you’re aware of that and if you follow my articles, you know that certain foods like gluten and dairy can really be culprits for a whole host of health ailments. But now I’m not just talking about what you eat, I’m also talking about how you eat, when you eat, how much you eat, how fast you eat, the stress that is present when you eat and believe it or not, even if you eat! All of these aspects about eating are incredibly important when it comes to managing your blood sugar level. In other words, everything about your pattern of eating including what you eat results in either a stable blood sugar level that gently rolls up and down like the soft swells in the ocean on a very calm day, or it results in jagged spikes that soar upwards like the Eiffel Tower and plunge downward like a roller coaster or maybe your blood sugar rises but then keeps slipping to the bottom where you’ll simply want to eat again to revive your brain and yourself back to productivity. And I can’t leave out the blood sugar that promptly rises with eating but then stays up there like the world’s most efficient hot air balloon, never to come down but also never to really deliver the glucose in your meal all the way into your muscle cells for fuel. You’ll want to eat again even though you just ate, and you’ll particularly want something sweet sin Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Cause Fatigue, Body Ache?

Can Diabetes Cause Fatigue, Body Ache?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Wednesdays, it's Dr. Otis Brawley, chief medical officer at the American Cancer Society. Asked by Mike from Tennessee Can diabetes be a (possible) cause of fatigue, leg and lower back aches? I have had bursts of energy for 10 to 15 minutes, but then need to sit for about 10 minutes, and I'm ready to go full steam again. PLEASE, Thank You, Mike Expert answer Dear Mike: Thanks for an important question, as a lot of people with diabetes complain of these symptoms. The answer is that diabetes itself probably is not the cause of your fatigue, lower back and leg aches. The things that cause type 2 diabetes (also called adult onset diabetes), such as a weight problem and lack of exercise, are commonly the cause these symptoms. Fatigue incorporates three components: 1. The inability to initiate activity. 2. Reduced ability to maintain activity. 3. Difficulty with concentration and memory. Fatigue should be distinguished from sleepiness, shortness of breath on exertion and muscle weakness, although these can also be associated with fatigue. Fatigue lasting six months or more is referred to as chronic fatigue. Chronic fatigue is not necessarily the entity known as chronic fatigue syndrome, which is a diagnosis after exclusion of all other causes. Fatigue in anyone should be evaluated by a health care provider to exclude all possible causes and to get counseling on how to treat it. Other medical causes of fatigue are the side effect of drugs, thyroid dysfunction, high calcium levels, rheumatologic illnesses, adrenal, kidney or liver problems. Some infections such as tuberculosis or hepatitis can cause fatigue, and indeed, fatigue can be their only symptom. Depression is also a major cause of fatigue. While unus Continue reading >>

Sugar Aches & Inflammation

Sugar Aches & Inflammation

Yes, you read that right. Sugar-aches. I don’t mean the sugar lust that comes from the aroma of fresh brownies or the Blizzard-of-the-month sign at the Dairy Queen®. I mean what happens after you consume high-sugar foods that in turn create inflammation, aches and pain throughout your body; in other words, sugar-aches. Do You Have Sugar-Aches? This achy feeling may appear as stiff joints, achy muscles, migraines, added asthma or PMS symptoms. Chronic sugar-aches can lead to giving up your favorite pastimes such as golf, gardening, or other activities because you're in too much pain. Let's back up. Where do your sugar-aches originate? They can come from a mocha and muffin at the coffee shop or maybe from a generous serving of pasta, or sub sandwich, at lunch. On the other hand, they may be from the hard to resist candy stash at your co-worker’s desk. You're probably getting the picture ... sugar is hiding, in high amounts in many beverages and foods. While you wouldn’t consume spoon after spoon of plain sugar, you may drink soda or eat popular foods that result in sugar-overload in your body without realizing it. Here's a simple equation to see how much sugar you are actually consuming, beyond what's listed on the label. 4 grams of carbohydrates = 1 teaspoon of sugar in your body. When you check product labels, look for serving size so you can complete the equation for the amount of food or beverage you want to consume. Sugar-Loaded Snacks to be Cautious of: Potato chips: A nine-ounce bag of chips breaks down into 32 teaspoons of sugar (most people can’t stop after four or five chips). If you wash down the chips with a soda, that’s another 16 or more teaspoons of sugar. Dots: One box of movie-theater sized Dots contains 5.5 servings. If you consume the whole b Continue reading >>

Do Simvastatin Side Effects Include Diabetes And Joint Pain?

Do Simvastatin Side Effects Include Diabetes And Joint Pain?

Many physicians tell us that even if statins increase the risk for diabetes, the drug benefits far outweigh any increase in blood glucose. But diabetes is a challenging condition to treat. Then there are the twin complications of muscle and joint pain. Most of the drug company research shows that simvastatin side effects are barely different from those brought on by placebo. The conclusion is often that simvastatin and related drugs do not really cause muscle pain or weakness and do not contribute to joint problems. Readers tell a different story. A Simvastatin Experience: Q. I took simvastatin for many years to control my cholesterol. Soon after I started taking it, I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. I don’t know if there is a connection. About six months ago I stopped taking simvastatin; my hips and knees no longer hurt. My latest lab results show an increase in LDL to a bit over the standard range. My HDL is OK. I had also experienced sexual problems, but I attributed those to paroxetine I took for depression. I stopped taking the paroxetine about two months ago and the sexual difficulties have completely disappeared. I feel much better after eliminating both drugs. A. Simvastatin can raise blood sugar and make people more prone to type 2 diabetes. A fascinating study showed that people taking a different statin, pravastatin, together with paroxetine had elevated blood glucose levels not caused by either drug alone (Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics, July 2011). Do Simvastatin Side Effects Include Joint Pain? The official prescribing information for simvastatin suggests that in the pre-marketing controlled clinical trials the most common adverse reactions that led to treatment discontinuation were: gastrointestinal disorders, myalgia [muscle pain and weakness Continue reading >>

Identifying And Treating Diabetes Joint Pain

Identifying And Treating Diabetes Joint Pain

Diabetes and joint pain are considered to be independent conditions. Joint pain may be a response to an illness, injury, or arthritis. It can be chronic (long-term) or acute (short-term). Diabetes is caused by the body not using the hormone insulin correctly, or insufficient production of it, which affects blood sugar levels. What would a hormone and blood sugar-related condition have to do with joint health? Diabetes is associated with widespread symptoms and complications. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 47 percent of people with arthritis also have diabetes. There is an undeniably strong link between the two conditions. Diabetes can damage joints, a condition called diabetic arthropathy. Unlike pain caused by immediate trauma, the pain of arthropathy happens over time. Other symptoms include: thick skin changes in the feet painful shoulders carpal tunnel syndrome A joint is the place where two bones come together. Once a joint wears down, the protection it provides is lost. Joint pain from diabetic arthropathy comes in different forms. Charcot’s joint occurs when diabetic nerve damage causes a joint to break down. Also called neuropathic arthropathy, this condition is seen in the feet and ankles in people with diabetes. Nerve damage in the feet is common in diabetes, which may lead to Charcot’s joint. A loss of nerve function leads to numbness. People who walk on numb feet are more likely to twist and injure ligaments without knowing it. This places pressure on the joints, which can eventually cause them to wear down. Severe damage leads to deformities in the foot and other affected joints. Bone deformities in Charcot’s joint may be prevented through early intervention. Signs of the condition include: painful joints swelling or redn Continue reading >>

78: Lap Band Removal, Blood Sugar Rising Taking Insulin, Joint Pain, High Liver Function Test, Thriving In Lower Level Of Ketosis

78: Lap Band Removal, Blood Sugar Rising Taking Insulin, Joint Pain, High Liver Function Test, Thriving In Lower Level Of Ketosis

If you are interested in the low-carb, moderate protein, high-fat, ketogenic diet, then this is the podcast for you. We zero in exclusively on all the questions people have about how being in a state of nutritional ketosis and the effects it has on your health. There are a lot of myths about keto floating around out there and our two amazing cohosts are shooting them down one at a time. Keto Talk is cohosted by 10-year veteran health podcaster and international bestselling author Jimmy Moore from “Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb” and Arizona osteopath and certified bariatric physician Dr. Adam Nally from “Doc Muscles”who thoroughly share from their wealth of experience on the ketogenic lifestyle each and every Thursday. We love hearing from our fabulous Ketonian listeners with new questions–send an email to Jimmy at [email protected] And if you’re not already subscribed to the podcast on iTunes and listened to the past episodes, then you can do that and leave a review HERE. Listen in today as Jimmy and Doc Muscles celebrate the Doc’s final show as co-host of Keto Talk and anwser your low-carb, high-fat, ketogenic questions in Episode 78. As Jimmy and Dr. Nally said in this episode, this is not goodbye, but just so long for now as they continue to work together on their Keto Living line of supplements as well as their forthcoming book The Keto Cure, due out this November. JIMMY AND DR. ADAM NALLY’S KETO LIVING SUPPLEMENTS You can set up automatic monthly payments there.THE PERFECT KETO SUPPLEMENT NOTICE OF DISCLOSURE: Paid sponsorship KEY QUOTE: “Keep the fat high. the carbs low, and keep ketoing on!” — Dr. Adam Nally MAKE KETO EASIER WITH FBOMB JIMMYLOVESFBOMB FOR 10% OFF YOUR FIRST FOOD ORDER NOTICE OF DISCLOSURE: Paid sponsorship Here’s wh Continue reading >>

Are There Certain Foods That Cause Muscle And Joint Pain?

Are There Certain Foods That Cause Muscle And Joint Pain?

Although research has not proven conclusively that particular foods can increase or decrease the muscle and joint pain of rheumatoid arthritis, people who suffer from joint pain often experience gastrointestinal imbalances associated with inflammation and allergens. It is important to pinpoint food sensitivities and problem foods specific to your body if you have digestive problems and joint pain. Video of the Day Although it is wise to request a blood test from your doctor to ascertain which foods are causing you health problems, you can check your diet to see if certain foods commonly associated with inflammation are causing you joint pain. Fried foods and fast food, prepackaged meals, white flour, processed grains and all forms of sugar, raw or refined, can cause muscle and joint pain. Sugar is stressful, and blood sugar spikes can promote inflammation. Most fats can also contribute to inflammatory pain. These include the partially hydrogenated trans fats in potato chips, processed baked goods and margarine. Also potentially inflammatory are vegetable oils such as safflower oil, corn oil, soy-based oils, sunflower oil and the saturated fats in fatty meats, lard and butter. Alan Goldhamer, osteopathic physician at the TrueNorth Health Center in Santa Rosa, California, reports that animal protein and animal fat are the major dietary promoters of arthritic pain. If you eat red meat, your immune system considers the protein to be an antigen and manufactures antibodies to fight it, forming antigen complexes. The immune system usually eliminates these from the body. In people sensitive to animal protein, these antigen complexes are not eliminated and can be packed into various tissues and joints around the body, causing inflammation. Nightshade vegetables such as potatoes, Continue reading >>

5 Top Tips For Dealing With Arthritis And Joint Pain

5 Top Tips For Dealing With Arthritis And Joint Pain

According to official statistics published by the NHS, it is estimated that over 10 million people in the UK are living with arthritis. With the winter months often causing it to flare up for many of us, here are some top tips on pain management for arthritis. Ditch the Sugar High blood sugar levels, which are often caused by eating too many sweet, sugary and processed foods, can damage your joints through a process called glycation, where sugar bonds to proteins causing painful inflammation around the joints. Try swapping white bread and pasta to wholegrains and using natural sweeteners in your cooking such as dates and honey. If you’re struggling, you can always try our Equigluco, which helps balance your blood sugar levels and curb those sugary cravings. Cutting down on the sugar will also help to prevent you from piling on the pounds, which can ease the pressure on your joints. Let the Sun Shine Vitamin D not only supports the body with the absorption of calcium, which helps to ensure a strong bone density, but is also vital for a healthy immune system. This is particularly important, as some types of arthritis such as rheumatoid arthritis are autoimmune conditions, where the immune system mistakenly attacks our joint tissue. Make sure you’re eating plenty of foods rich in vitamin D such as fish, milk, fortified cereals and eggs, getting outdoors to take advantage of the sunshine, or for an extra help with pain management for rheumatoid arthritis take a supplement such as our Forte D 4000. Try Aerobic exercises Regular exercise is really important for those who suffer from stiff joints or arthritis. Although it might sometimes feel like the last thing you want to do, exercise can help to keep your joints supple and may aid reducing some of the pain. Try aerobic Continue reading >>

Foods That May Trigger Joint Pain: Here's What Not To Eat

Foods That May Trigger Joint Pain: Here's What Not To Eat

Joint pain is one of the commonly experienced issues across the world. While most cases are attributed to wrong posture, weak bones, or lack of nutrients, many other instances of joint pain are the result of some injury or other medical conditions like rheumatism, arthritis, and osteoarthritis among others. While it is imperative to understand the exact cause of your joint pain, it is also essential to have an understanding that dietary choices can also help tame or aggravate your pain. Experts suggest that consuming food items that are inflammatory in nature may add to your ongoing joint pain and can even trigger it if you are susceptible to experiencing it. Adding a host of anti-inflammatory foods items may in turn help bring relief. Foods that Can Trigger Joint Pain The essential idea here is to keep a check on inflammation. Though more and more research needs to be called upon to establish this as a fact in entirety, but largely, inflammation causing food items may worsen or at times trigger joint and muscle pain. Some of the most recent studies express that foods rich in sugar, trans fats, processed ingredients and purines are inversely related to the health of our joints. Blood sugar spikes may up the inflammatory response in the body, thereby inducing pain. Follow the list given below to make smarter dietary choices and manage your joint pain better or keep it at bay. "Few items that instantly raise the inflammatory response in the body would include refines sugar, refined flours and carbs, and of course trans fats and saturated fats. People who are overweight are at a higher risk of experiencing joint pain as their joints and bones carry more weight than what they are actually supposed to," said Dr. Ritika Sammadar, Chief Nutritionist at Max Super Specialty, Sak Continue reading >>

Glucosamine Supplements: Good For Joints But Possibly Risky For Diabetes

Glucosamine Supplements: Good For Joints But Possibly Risky For Diabetes

Glucosamine is a popular dietary supplement used by many who suffer from joint pain. Most dietary supplements make claims that aren’t backed by scientific research, but NIH reports that daily doses of glucosamine can lower pain. As a result, the supplements are recommended by many physicians. However, glucosamine is a sugar that uses some glucose processing pathways. It is processed mainly through the “Hexosamine Biosynthetic Pathway,” which is involved in both glucose transport and the development of insulin resistance-the main cause of type 2 diabetes.[1] Does that mean that these pills can be dangerous? A person with diabetes does not produce enough insulin to regulate blood sugar levels in the body. Without the right amount of insulin (which is what we mean by “insulin resistance”), glucose can not be properly absorbed and used, leading to too little or too much sugar circulating in the body.[1] More research is needed to determine whether glucosamine supplements can cause diabetes in healthy adults, but meanwhile, if you are already at risk for diabetes or have diabetes, you may want to think twice before taking glucosamine. Glucosamine is already used in laboratory settings and animal studies to induce insulin resistance for the purpose of studying the condition and drugs to treat it, so clearly scientists are confident it has that effect. We also know from animal studies that glucosamine interferes with the liver’s ability to control glucose production, glucose uptake by surrounding tissue, and insulin production in pancreatic beta-cell.[2] A study of healthy men and women taking 1500mg of glucosamine a day for six weeks, published in The American Journal of the Medical Sciences, concluded that adults who already have poor insulin sensitivity will inc Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms And Ranges

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms And Ranges

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) definition and facts Hypoglycemia is the medical term for low blood sugar. It typically occurs as a side effect of medications for diabetes. The normal range of blood glucose is from 70 to 100 mg/dL in an individual without diabetes, Most people will feel the effects and symptoms of low blood sugar when blood glucose levels are lower than 50 mg/dL. Low blood sugar is treated by giving a readily absorbed source of sugar, including soft drinks, juice, or foods containing sugar. If the hypoglycemia has progressed to the point at which the patient cannot take anything by mouth, an injection of glucagon may be given. Glucagon is a hormone that causes a fast release of glucose from the liver. Hypoglycemia or low blood sugar is syndrome that results from low blood sugar. The severity and symptoms of hypoglycemia can vary from person to person. Blood tests can diagnose low blood sugar, and symptoms resolve when the levels of sugar in the blood return to the normal range. The medical term for blood sugar is blood glucose. What can cause low blood sugar? Despite advances in the treatment of diabetes, low blood sugar episodes occur as a side effect of many treatments for diabetes. In fact, these episodes are often the limiting factor in achieving optimal blood sugar control, because many medications that are effective in treating diabetes carry the risk of lowering the blood sugar level too much, causing symptoms. In large scale studies looking at tight control in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, low blood sugars occurred more often in the patients who were managed most intensively. This is important for patients and physicians to recognize, especially as the goal for treating patients with diabetes becomes tighter control of blood sugar. While peopl Continue reading >>

Case Study: Reversing 11 Years Of Pain And Frustration With Type 2 Diabetes In Less Than 6 Months

Case Study: Reversing 11 Years Of Pain And Frustration With Type 2 Diabetes In Less Than 6 Months

I’d like to take a moment to recognize the incredible 6-month transformation of Cynthia Bronte, one of my clients working diligently at reversing insulin resistance. This is another story that reflects the amazing mental, physical and emotional transformation that can occur with a strategic approach to plant-focused high-carbohydrate nutrition. Diagnosis with Type 2 Diabetes Cynthia was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2003, in the midst of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), an acute life-threatening condition that typically marks the onset of type 1 diabetes. Cynthia’s symptoms of DKA were unmistakable, and included urinating more than 14 times per day, insatiable thirst and low energy. Cynthia was unaware that her fasting blood sugar was 5 times higher than normal, at 550 mg/dL (normal blood sugars range from 70 – 130 mg/dL). Treatment Protocol When Cynthia was first diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, she was instructed to consume a low carbohydrate diet in order to minimize blood sugar. She was instructed to eat foods that were high in protein and fat, while limiting her intake of fruits, artificial sweeteners, grains, pastas, rice, bread and cereal. As we’ve talked about in a previous article, she was initially instructed to minimize her intake of carbohydrates to minimize the amount of glucose that would eventually appear in her blood. Her diet plan followed what I refer to as “the linear diabetes nutrition model,” shown below. The problem with the linear model is that it does not address the underlying root cause of type 2 diabetes – insulin resistance. By eating a low carbohydrate diet, Cynthia was eating mainly fat and protein, resulting in increased lipid deposits in her liver and muscle tissue. In turn, increased fat storage in her liver and muscle resul Continue reading >>

Does High Blood Sugar Cause Joint Pain?

Does High Blood Sugar Cause Joint Pain?

Headline: Bitcoin & Blockchain Searches Exceed Trump! Blockchain Stocks Are Next! For the ultimate source on Arthritis Joint Pain, Joint Health News and Joint Relief Products, Head to Joint Health Magazine. Higher blood sugar levels can have a direct impact on the severity of joint related pain in people of virtually all age groups. Joint pain is a common issue, felt by tens of millions of patients in this country every year. And while arthritis or injuries are the two main causes, there are numerous other causes as well as many different triggers that can set off a flare up of joint related pain. Some are obvious and some are rather surprising. One that many people are shocked to find out about is high blood sugar. The fact is that elevated blood sugar levels can indeed impact your pain in several ways. Among younger people, this is usually experienced among diabetics. Diabetics have been shown to be much more susceptible to injury related issues in their joints like bursitis, tendinitis, and plantar fasciitis. Since younger people are generally more active, and since high levels of blood sugar can increase the chances of injuries, it makes sense that there’s a direct link between joint issues and sugar levels in the blood. Additionally, problems like sugar’s tendency to keep the metabolism overworking could lead to more difficulty letting muscles, tendons, and ligaments relax and in turn leads to an overall reduction in the body’s ability to heal itself. This occurs in patients of all ages, regardless of their specific joint related issue. As we age, our bodies begin to wear down. In the joints, this is obvious as arthritis. Older people are much more susceptible to this joint related issue, which causes inflammation, stiffness, and pain in the joints. It’s al Continue reading >>

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