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Blood Sugar Joint Pain

78: Lap Band Removal, Blood Sugar Rising Taking Insulin, Joint Pain, High Liver Function Test, Thriving In Lower Level Of Ketosis

78: Lap Band Removal, Blood Sugar Rising Taking Insulin, Joint Pain, High Liver Function Test, Thriving In Lower Level Of Ketosis

If you are interested in the low-carb, moderate protein, high-fat, ketogenic diet, then this is the podcast for you. We zero in exclusively on all the questions people have about how being in a state of nutritional ketosis and the effects it has on your health. There are a lot of myths about keto floating around out there and our two amazing cohosts are shooting them down one at a time. Keto Talk is cohosted by 10-year veteran health podcaster and international bestselling author Jimmy Moore from “Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb” and Arizona osteopath and certified bariatric physician Dr. Adam Nally from “Doc Muscles”who thoroughly share from their wealth of experience on the ketogenic lifestyle each and every Thursday. We love hearing from our fabulous Ketonian listeners with new questions–send an email to Jimmy at [email protected] And if you’re not already subscribed to the podcast on iTunes and listened to the past episodes, then you can do that and leave a review HERE. Listen in today as Jimmy and Doc Muscles celebrate the Doc’s final show as co-host of Keto Talk and anwser your low-carb, high-fat, ketogenic questions in Episode 78. As Jimmy and Dr. Nally said in this episode, this is not goodbye, but just so long for now as they continue to work together on their Keto Living line of supplements as well as their forthcoming book The Keto Cure, due out this November. JIMMY AND DR. ADAM NALLY’S KETO LIVING SUPPLEMENTS You can set up automatic monthly payments there.THE PERFECT KETO SUPPLEMENT NOTICE OF DISCLOSURE: Paid sponsorship KEY QUOTE: “Keep the fat high. the carbs low, and keep ketoing on!” — Dr. Adam Nally MAKE KETO EASIER WITH FBOMB JIMMYLOVESFBOMB FOR 10% OFF YOUR FIRST FOOD ORDER NOTICE OF DISCLOSURE: Paid sponsorship Here’s wh Continue reading >>

Arthritis & Diabetes

Arthritis & Diabetes

What do diabetes and arthritis have in common? Plenty. People with diagnosed diabetes are nearly twice as likely to have arthritis, indicating a diabetes-arthritis connection. Diabetes occurs when the body does not produce or use the hormone insulin sufficiently. Insulin shuttles glucose from foods into cells so it can be converted into energy. Without insulin, glucose remains in your blood (raising blood glucose levels), your cells create less energy and you feel fatigued. What starts off as a hormonal problem can evolve into joint problems, in addition to the widely known cardiovascular problems. Diabetes causes musculoskeletal changes that lead to symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness; swelling; nodules under the skin, particularly in the fingers; tight, thickened skin; trigger finger; carpal tunnel syndrome; painful shoulders; and severely affected feet. After having had diabetes for several years, joint damage – called diabetic arthropathy – can occur. Continue reading >>

7 Worst Foods For Your Joints

7 Worst Foods For Your Joints

Have you been trying to figure out the source of your joint pain? Has your quality of life reduced because of uncomfortable and persistent joint pain? Joints occur where the bones in the body connect and are an important part of our daily lives. When damage to the joints occurs, pain is a typical result or consequence. Unfortunately, joint pain occurs more frequently in people and this can include a number of conditions such as cartilage damage, sprains, bursitis, rheumatoid arthritis, strains, osteoarthritis and other conditions. While the actual cause of joint pain may vary, one common element associated with joint pain is inflammation. Hence, by controlling, reducing or eliminating inflammation, you could also directly influence any joint pain you may have. Does this sound too good to be true? Well, embrace the good news! You can minimize or eliminate joint pain by getting rid of the inflammation associated with joint pain. Inflammation can cause pain as a person moves the joint. While anti-inflammatory drugs and other medications may help, eliminating, reducing or avoiding certain foods may be an effective way to get rid of joint pain and keep such pain away. The key is to figure out foods and related food items that can promote inflammation. These foods or food items may not be the actual source of the joint pain, but intake of these items could severely worsen inflammation around the joints. The following are 7 worst foods for your joints: 1. Sugar Yes, many weight loss experts discuss the reduction or elimination of sugar from one’s diet. In addition, cutting out sugar could also do wonders for your joints. Joints get painful when inflammation occurs and sugar is great at causing inflammation. Hence, this is really a no-brainer. Once sugar enters the blood stre Continue reading >>

Can High Blood Sugar Cause Joint Pain?

Can High Blood Sugar Cause Joint Pain?

Joint pain is an annoying symptom felt by millions of people around the world each day. Sitting for too long, obesity, Arthritis, repetitive stress are all factors that are pointed out as the most common causes of joint pain in either the hip or the knee or the back. But did you ever think that your high blood sugar can be a significant factor for your joint pain? According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 47 percent of the Arthritis patients are suffering from Diabetes at the same time. We cannot deny the obvious link between these two conditions, can we? It is clear as a day that diabetes is actually worsening the arthritis symptoms and adds up to the joint pain that you are already feeling. So if you are suffering from Diabetes and Arthritis at the same time, or if you are just dealing with Diabetes, please do follow us through to find out how exactly are these two conditions associated and how you can act to reduce your joint pain. Is Your High Blood Sugar The Reason That Causes Your Joint Pain? It is no secret that Diabetes Mellitus causes various health problems regarding all of the body’s systems. However, what may surprise a lot of people is finding out that Diabetes can actually worsen their joint pain or even cause one if not present before. One study published in the Acta Medica Scandinavica talked about a diagnosis known as the Diabetic shoulder. Diabetic shoulder, also known as frozen shoulder, is a condition in which the capsule of the shoulder joint becomes swollen and thickened causing decreased mobility, pain, and persistent stiffness to occur. It is not that Diabetes is the only cause for this condition, however, within patients suffering from Diabetes, the symptoms of the frozen shoulder are much more severe and harder to treat. Ano Continue reading >>

Foods That May Trigger Joint Pain: Here's What Not To Eat

Foods That May Trigger Joint Pain: Here's What Not To Eat

Joint pain is one of the commonly experienced issues across the world. While most cases are attributed to wrong posture, weak bones, or lack of nutrients, many other instances of joint pain are the result of some injury or other medical conditions like rheumatism, arthritis, and osteoarthritis among others. While it is imperative to understand the exact cause of your joint pain, it is also essential to have an understanding that dietary choices can also help tame or aggravate your pain. Experts suggest that consuming food items that are inflammatory in nature may add to your ongoing joint pain and can even trigger it if you are susceptible to experiencing it. Adding a host of anti-inflammatory foods items may in turn help bring relief. Foods that Can Trigger Joint Pain The essential idea here is to keep a check on inflammation. Though more and more research needs to be called upon to establish this as a fact in entirety, but largely, inflammation causing food items may worsen or at times trigger joint and muscle pain. Some of the most recent studies express that foods rich in sugar, trans fats, processed ingredients and purines are inversely related to the health of our joints. Blood sugar spikes may up the inflammatory response in the body, thereby inducing pain. Follow the list given below to make smarter dietary choices and manage your joint pain better or keep it at bay. "Few items that instantly raise the inflammatory response in the body would include refines sugar, refined flours and carbs, and of course trans fats and saturated fats. People who are overweight are at a higher risk of experiencing joint pain as their joints and bones carry more weight than what they are actually supposed to," said Dr. Ritika Sammadar, Chief Nutritionist at Max Super Specialty, Sak Continue reading >>

Joint Disorders & Joint Pain In Children

Joint Disorders & Joint Pain In Children

Joint pain can arise as a symptom of hypothyroid (too little thyroid hormone), hyperthyroid (too much thyroid hormone) or diabetes (high blood sugar). Your child’s thyroid gland is a butterfly-shaped gland located at the base of the neck, just above the collarbone. It produces hormones that control the body’s metabolism. When this gland under-produces the thyroid hormone or overproduces the hormone, children may experience joint pain. If your child has diabetes, it means his or her body does not produce (type 1) or use (type 2) the hormone insulin effectively. Insulin is responsible for allowing glucose to enter the body’s cells to be used as energy. When this mechanism is damaged, children suffer from high blood sugar. Diabetes causes musculoskeletal changes that lead to symptoms such as joint inflammation, pain and stiffness. Being overweight, a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, can also cause joint pain, as extra weight puts stress on the joints. Summary Type 2 diabetes, previously called adult-onset diabetes is the most common type of diabetes. With type 2 diabetes, the body does not use insulin correctly. Expanded Overview Type 2 diabetes is a disease that has as its main symptom a high level of sugar (glucose) in the blood. It is the most common form of diabetes. It is often called non-insulin-dependent diabetes, or adult-onset diabetes. With type 2 diabetes, the fat, liver and muscle cells don’t work properly with insulin to use or to store the glucose that is in the diet. This is called “insulin resistance.” When the glucose can’t get into the cells, it remains in the blood and builds up until there is too much. This is called hyperglycemia. It is common for people with type 2 diabetes to show no symptoms early in life. It can be years before sympto Continue reading >>

14 Ways To Reduce Joint Pain With Diabetes

14 Ways To Reduce Joint Pain With Diabetes

Diabetes can damage joints, making life and movement much harder. How does this happen, and what can we do about it? A lot. “Without properly functioning joints, our bodies would be unable to bend, flex, or even move,” says Sheri Colberg, PhD, author of The Diabetic Athlete, The 7 Step Diabetes Fitness Plan, and other books. Joint pain is often called “arthritis.” “A joint is wherever two bones come together,” Colberg writes. The bones are held in place by ligaments, which attach bones to each other, and by tendons, which attach bones to the muscles that move them. The ends of the bones are padded with cartilage, a whitish gel made from collagen, proteins, fiber, and water. Cartilage allows bones to move on each other without being damaged. Joint cartilage can be damaged by injuries or by wear and tear with hard use. “Aging alone can lead to some loss of [the] cartilage layer in knee, hip, and other joints,” says Colberg “but having diabetes potentially speeds up damage to joint surfaces.” Sometimes extra glucose sticks to the surfaces of joints, gumming up their movement. This stickiness interferes with movement and leads to wear-and-tear injury. High glucose levels also thicken and degrade the collagen itself. This is bad because tendons and ligaments are also largely made from collagen. Reduced flexibility of joints leads to stiffness, greater risk of physical injury, and falls. People with joint damage may reduce their physical activity due to discomfort and fear of falling. Reduced activity promotes heart disease and insulin resistance. Here are 14 things we can do to prevent and treat joint problems and to keep moving. • Stretching keeps muscles and tendons relaxed and aligned so they’ll move as needed. You might want to ask a physical ther Continue reading >>

Sugar Aches & Inflammation

Sugar Aches & Inflammation

Yes, you read that right. Sugar-aches. I don’t mean the sugar lust that comes from the aroma of fresh brownies or the Blizzard-of-the-month sign at the Dairy Queen®. I mean what happens after you consume high-sugar foods that in turn create inflammation, aches and pain throughout your body; in other words, sugar-aches. Do You Have Sugar-Aches? This achy feeling may appear as stiff joints, achy muscles, migraines, added asthma or PMS symptoms. Chronic sugar-aches can lead to giving up your favorite pastimes such as golf, gardening, or other activities because you're in too much pain. Let's back up. Where do your sugar-aches originate? They can come from a mocha and muffin at the coffee shop or maybe from a generous serving of pasta, or sub sandwich, at lunch. On the other hand, they may be from the hard to resist candy stash at your co-worker’s desk. You're probably getting the picture ... sugar is hiding, in high amounts in many beverages and foods. While you wouldn’t consume spoon after spoon of plain sugar, you may drink soda or eat popular foods that result in sugar-overload in your body without realizing it. Here's a simple equation to see how much sugar you are actually consuming, beyond what's listed on the label. 4 grams of carbohydrates = 1 teaspoon of sugar in your body. When you check product labels, look for serving size so you can complete the equation for the amount of food or beverage you want to consume. Sugar-Loaded Snacks to be Cautious of: Potato chips: A nine-ounce bag of chips breaks down into 32 teaspoons of sugar (most people can’t stop after four or five chips). If you wash down the chips with a soda, that’s another 16 or more teaspoons of sugar. Dots: One box of movie-theater sized Dots contains 5.5 servings. If you consume the whole b Continue reading >>

Why Everyone Needs To Understand “sugar Hangover,” Including The Physical And Emotional Symptoms

Why Everyone Needs To Understand “sugar Hangover,” Including The Physical And Emotional Symptoms

If you are experiencing brain fog, fatigue, headaches or depression, you may be eating too much sugar! Find out why even a little sugar has negative health affects, what to do about it and how to satisfy your sweet tooth naturally. Most of us are aware that sugar in all its forms can lead to health problems like: weight gain, lowered immunity, blood sugar problems, diabetes,acidic blood, adrenal fatigue and candida. But did you know that sugar can also cause hangovers? It’s true. If you haven’t given up sugar yet, pay close attention to how you feel after eating foods with sugar or even too many natural sugars in fruit. Here are some of th\e symptoms of sugar hangover1: Fuzzy thinking or foggy mind Fatigue or sleepiness after meals Gas, bloating or extended stomach after meals Headache Joint pain Constipation Diarrhea Skin problems Allergy symptoms Emotional - Mood swings like emotional highs and then lows (anger, sadness, lack of will power, depression, etc.) Many of them are actually similar to how you might feel after too much alcohol. And there’s a reason for that... Too much alcohol, just like too much sugar, affects your kidneys, liver, stomach and small intestines, which explains some of what is happening in your body. Dehydration, electrolyte imbalances, gastrointestinal disturbances and disruption of sleep are some of the results. And if you are aware of the symptoms of candida, they too carry a similarity. Candida floods your body with a toxic by-product called acetaldehyde. Acetaldehyde produces similar symptoms to an alcohol hangover. This serious toxin is poisonous to your tissues, is not easily eliminated and accumulates in your brain, spinal cord and muscles. Keeping in mind that your heart and intestines are muscles, you may now understand why you Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathic Pain Management

Diabetic Neuropathic Pain Management

Diabetic Neuropathic Pain Symptoms: Patients can experience diabetic neuropathic pain from damaged nerves that can feel like sharp pain, burning, tingling or numbness in the arms/hands and legs/feet. Diabetic Neuropathic Pain Causes: Diabetic neuropathic pain is caused when there is a prolonged exposure to high blood sugar/glucose levels, causing nerve damage in the body. Other factors that may contribute to diabetic neuropathic pain include inflammation, genetic factors, smoking and alcohol abuse. There are different types of diabetic neuropathy causing different types of pain symptoms. You may have more than one type causing more than one type of diabetic neuropathic pain symptom as well. Most of the diabetic neuropathic pain symptoms do develop gradually and may not be noticeable until significant nerve injury is present. The different types of diabetic neuropathy are listed below. Numbness. Tingling and burning sensations that may be worse at night. Decreased ability to feel pain in the feet causing unnoticed injury that can progress to infections. Commonly, patient can develop ulcers and infection causing deformity and bone and joint pain. Pain with movement. Allodynia or pain to light touch. Weakness. Mononeuropathy also called Focal Neuropathy: This is typically seen more commonly in older adults. The pain symptoms from this condition can occur suddenly but tends to improve and resolve over a period of weeks to months. A specific nerve gets injured, often in the head, torso or leg, but there usually is no associated long-term injury. The pain symptoms of mononeuropathy include: Double vision, difficulty focusing, pain in one eye. Paralysis on one side of the face (Bell’s palsy). Pain in specific area of the leg, thigh or foot. Chest or abdominal pain that can s Continue reading >>

Glucosamine – Supplement For Joint Pain

Glucosamine – Supplement For Joint Pain

We hear about glucosamine and see various glucosamine products in health food stores, in big box retailers, and, of course, online. But does it work? Used for alleviating joint and arthritic pain, glucosamine is a naturally occurring compound found within the cartilage of our joints and consists of several chains of sugars and proteins specifically bound together. Dietary supplements generally arise from the shells of shellfish. As mentioned, the big question about glucosamine is if it works. Many people say it does, although its formulation can be a critical point too. We’ll tell you about it here. To begin, please read Mandy’s story: More than 30 years ago, three adults with interest in natural alternatives “discovered” a glucosamine product. Each of the three suffered from achy joints and back pain. So each tried a glucosamine product. Each experienced relief. But each wondered what was the source of that relief? Was it the glucosamine or their desire to find some non-drug or painkiller product that actually worked? Were the effects in their joints or only in their heads? Two of those three adults were married and had a rescued Newfoundland dog, Mandy. Mandy was an older girl and no longer could manage the few steps from the ground to the front door. Her owners gave the 150-pound dog a full adult daily dose of glucosamine. After three days, Mandy was navigating steps with no issue. After a week, she was playing like a puppy again. Though that evidence appeared to be strongly compelling, they stopped giving Mandy any glucosamine at all to see if there was any difference with or without it. She was hobbling around again after two days and no longer could climb three simple steps several days later. They resumed the glucosamine and continued it daily for the res Continue reading >>

Reset Your Brain And Body For A Pain-free Life.

Reset Your Brain And Body For A Pain-free Life.

Sugar, in its many forms, is a menace. In 1988, the forward-thinking Nancy Appleton wrote a book entitled Lick the Sugar Habit, implicating sugar in 141 diseases. Today we understand that too much sugar – hiding under many names in endless combinations of glucose and fructose – causes a host of health problems, including PAIN. People with diagnosed diabetes are nearly twice as likely to have arthritis, indicating a diabetes-arthritis connection. But you don’t need to be diabetic or even pre-diabetic. How does sugar attack our joints? Sugar in its natural form found in most plant foods is designed to give our body energy. By nature, sugar is our friend. But how many of us eat by nature? That raw carrot is the perfect combination of fiber, nutrients and water relative to its natural sugar content…just what our body needs. Most manufactured foods, however, concentrate the sugar into amounts too much for our bodies, tipping our scales into an imbalanced, inflamed state. More and more patients are coming to me with chronic pain directly associated to insulin resistance, high HbA1C and CRP. These markers of inflammation signal a warning sign to the body. “I can’t digest all of this sugar!” If the body is a furnace with a steady slow-burning heat, too much sugar is a dousing of gas leading to a house fire. The cells designed to metabolize the sugar start to shut down so the body grows sluggish and unable to create energy from sugar. Simultaneously, the sugar builds up in the blood, increasing production of insulin. In excess, insulin, the “fat cell fertilizer” increases body fat, which adds more stress to the joints. The endless cycle of high blood sugar and insulin resistance leads to inflammation in the body resulting in arthritis, brittle tendons, and high Continue reading >>

How Rheumatoid Arthritis Can Affect Your Blood Sugar

How Rheumatoid Arthritis Can Affect Your Blood Sugar

When you hear the word “arthritis,” you probably think of joint pain, swelling and stiffness. But rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a disease that causes inflammation in your joints, can affect the rest of your body, too—sometimes in surprising ways. For example, studies have shown that people with RA are more likely to also have diabetes, a condition characterized by high blood sugar levels. From Joint Pain to Blood Sugar Woes It turns out that inflammation, which is a key feature of RA, may cause a buildup of sugar in the blood. Luckily, there’s a silver lining to the relationship between RA and blood sugar: Certain things that help manage your RA, like some lifestyle choices and medications, may also help prevent or control diabetes. Inflammation and Insulin Resistance So, how can inflammation lead to high blood sugar? The answer has to do with insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps a person’s cells absorb sugar from the blood so it can be used for energy. If the cells are unable to use insulin effectively, a condition known as insulin resistance, excess sugar can start to build up in the blood. Eventually, the person may develop type 2 diabetes. Remember that RA can cause widespread inflammation throughout the body. This inflammation, in turn, may increase the body’s risk of developing insulin resistance. Researchers are still studying exactly how inflammation contributes to insulin resistance. Two likely culprits are tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), proteins that are involved in joint inflammation. There’s evidence that both TNF and IL-6 may interfere with insulin’s ability to work properly. Tips to Help Manage Both Conditions Having RA doesn’t automatically mean you’ll develop insulin resistance or diabetes. But your risk is inc Continue reading >>

Are There Certain Foods That Cause Muscle And Joint Pain?

Are There Certain Foods That Cause Muscle And Joint Pain?

Although research has not proven conclusively that particular foods can increase or decrease the muscle and joint pain of rheumatoid arthritis, people who suffer from joint pain often experience gastrointestinal imbalances associated with inflammation and allergens. It is important to pinpoint food sensitivities and problem foods specific to your body if you have digestive problems and joint pain. Video of the Day Although it is wise to request a blood test from your doctor to ascertain which foods are causing you health problems, you can check your diet to see if certain foods commonly associated with inflammation are causing you joint pain. Fried foods and fast food, prepackaged meals, white flour, processed grains and all forms of sugar, raw or refined, can cause muscle and joint pain. Sugar is stressful, and blood sugar spikes can promote inflammation. Most fats can also contribute to inflammatory pain. These include the partially hydrogenated trans fats in potato chips, processed baked goods and margarine. Also potentially inflammatory are vegetable oils such as safflower oil, corn oil, soy-based oils, sunflower oil and the saturated fats in fatty meats, lard and butter. Alan Goldhamer, osteopathic physician at the TrueNorth Health Center in Santa Rosa, California, reports that animal protein and animal fat are the major dietary promoters of arthritic pain. If you eat red meat, your immune system considers the protein to be an antigen and manufactures antibodies to fight it, forming antigen complexes. The immune system usually eliminates these from the body. In people sensitive to animal protein, these antigen complexes are not eliminated and can be packed into various tissues and joints around the body, causing inflammation. Nightshade vegetables such as potatoes, Continue reading >>

What's Causing Your Joint And Nerve Pain?

What's Causing Your Joint And Nerve Pain?

It’s natural to feel a little discomfort in your hands, fingers, feet, and ankles from time to time. Joint pain is a part of getting older and can have a number of causes. But that ache in your foot or arm could also be a problem with a nerve caused by your diabetes. And that’s an issue that could be serious and require quick attention. So how do you tell the difference? It’s the leading cause of disability in the U.S. It affects more than 50 million adults. Often referred to as arthritis, it’s broadly defined as discomfort where two or more bones meet. Though often mild, sometimes sporadic, and rarely an emergency, the pain can be severe, making it hard to move the joint. If you have it, you’ll probably notice changes to your joint like: Stiffness Less range in motion Swelling Redness Tenderness or warmth A tougher time using it A difference in shape The causes of joint pain vary greatly. It could be: Muscle strains or sprains A broken or dislocated bone Gout Hypothyroidism Leukemia Lupus Osteoarthritis Rickets Lyme disease Rheumatoid arthritis Your doctor might call it diabetic neuropathy. It’s pain in your nerves, not in your bones. It happens when high blood sugar harms the nerve fibers. You can get it anywhere in your body, but it most often affects your legs and feet. Anywhere from 60%-70% of people with diabetes have some sort of neuropathy. Most get it after having the disease for 10 years or more. There are many types. But the two most likely to cause problems with your joints are peripheral and autonomic neuropathy. This is the most common form of diabetic joint pain. It affects your legs, arms, hands, feet, fingers, and toes. With ongoing diabetes, joints can no longer respond like they should to the strain and stress placed on them. As a result, Continue reading >>

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