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Blood Sugar Joint Pain

Can High Blood Sugar Cause Joint And Muscle Pain?

Can High Blood Sugar Cause Joint And Muscle Pain?

Diabetes can cause changes in your musculoskeletal system, which is the term for your muscles, bones, joints, ligaments, and tendons. These changes can cause numerous conditions that may affect your fingers, hands, wrists, shoulders, neck, spine, or feet. Symptoms of diabetes-related musculoskeletal problems include muscle pain, joint pain or stiffness, lessened ability to move your joints, joint swelling, deformities, and a “pins and needles” sensation in the arms or legs. Some musculoskeletal problems are unique to diabetes. Others also affect people without diabetes. For instance, diabetes can cause skin changes such as thickening, tightness, or nodules under the skin, particularly in the hands. Carpal tunnel syndrome is frequently seen in people with diabetes, as is trigger finger (a catching or locking of the fingers), although these conditions are commonly seen in people without diabetes, as well. The shoulder joint may also be affected in diabetes. And, of course, the feet are susceptible to problems caused by diabetes. Most of these conditions can be successfully treated with anti-inflammatory medications, steroid injections, or other therapies. It is important to mention any troubling symptoms to your doctor. Ask yourself the following questions, which address some of the more frequent symptoms people have when diabetes affects their muscles, ligaments, tendons, or joints. If you answer “yes” to any, consult your doctor. • Do you have stiffness in your hands that affects your ability to move or use them? • Do your fingers get “locked” in certain positions? • Do you have numbness or tingling in your hands, arms, or legs? • Do you have stiffness or decreased motion in your shoulders? • Do you have muscle pain or swelling? Continue reading >>

Are There Certain Foods That Cause Muscle And Joint Pain?

Are There Certain Foods That Cause Muscle And Joint Pain?

Although research has not proven conclusively that particular foods can increase or decrease the muscle and joint pain of rheumatoid arthritis, people who suffer from joint pain often experience gastrointestinal imbalances associated with inflammation and allergens. It is important to pinpoint food sensitivities and problem foods specific to your body if you have digestive problems and joint pain. Video of the Day Although it is wise to request a blood test from your doctor to ascertain which foods are causing you health problems, you can check your diet to see if certain foods commonly associated with inflammation are causing you joint pain. Fried foods and fast food, prepackaged meals, white flour, processed grains and all forms of sugar, raw or refined, can cause muscle and joint pain. Sugar is stressful, and blood sugar spikes can promote inflammation. Most fats can also contribute to inflammatory pain. These include the partially hydrogenated trans fats in potato chips, processed baked goods and margarine. Also potentially inflammatory are vegetable oils such as safflower oil, corn oil, soy-based oils, sunflower oil and the saturated fats in fatty meats, lard and butter. Alan Goldhamer, osteopathic physician at the TrueNorth Health Center in Santa Rosa, California, reports that animal protein and animal fat are the major dietary promoters of arthritic pain. If you eat red meat, your immune system considers the protein to be an antigen and manufactures antibodies to fight it, forming antigen complexes. The immune system usually eliminates these from the body. In people sensitive to animal protein, these antigen complexes are not eliminated and can be packed into various tissues and joints around the body, causing inflammation. Nightshade vegetables such as potatoes, Continue reading >>

Identifying And Treating Diabetes Joint Pain

Identifying And Treating Diabetes Joint Pain

Diabetes and joint pain are considered to be independent conditions. Joint pain may be a response to an illness, injury, or arthritis. It can be chronic (long-term) or acute (short-term). Diabetes is caused by the body not using the hormone insulin correctly, or insufficient production of it, which affects blood sugar levels. What would a hormone and blood sugar-related condition have to do with joint health? Diabetes is associated with widespread symptoms and complications. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 47 percent of people with arthritis also have diabetes. There is an undeniably strong link between the two conditions. Diabetes can damage joints, a condition called diabetic arthropathy. Unlike pain caused by immediate trauma, the pain of arthropathy happens over time. Other symptoms include: thick skin changes in the feet painful shoulders carpal tunnel syndrome A joint is the place where two bones come together. Once a joint wears down, the protection it provides is lost. Joint pain from diabetic arthropathy comes in different forms. Charcot’s joint occurs when diabetic nerve damage causes a joint to break down. Also called neuropathic arthropathy, this condition is seen in the feet and ankles in people with diabetes. Nerve damage in the feet is common in diabetes, which may lead to Charcot’s joint. A loss of nerve function leads to numbness. People who walk on numb feet are more likely to twist and injure ligaments without knowing it. This places pressure on the joints, which can eventually cause them to wear down. Severe damage leads to deformities in the foot and other affected joints. Bone deformities in Charcot’s joint may be prevented through early intervention. Signs of the condition include: painful joints swelling or redn Continue reading >>

7 Worst Foods For Your Joints

7 Worst Foods For Your Joints

Have you been trying to figure out the source of your joint pain? Has your quality of life reduced because of uncomfortable and persistent joint pain? Joints occur where the bones in the body connect and are an important part of our daily lives. When damage to the joints occurs, pain is a typical result or consequence. Unfortunately, joint pain occurs more frequently in people and this can include a number of conditions such as cartilage damage, sprains, bursitis, rheumatoid arthritis, strains, osteoarthritis and other conditions. While the actual cause of joint pain may vary, one common element associated with joint pain is inflammation. Hence, by controlling, reducing or eliminating inflammation, you could also directly influence any joint pain you may have. Does this sound too good to be true? Well, embrace the good news! You can minimize or eliminate joint pain by getting rid of the inflammation associated with joint pain. Inflammation can cause pain as a person moves the joint. While anti-inflammatory drugs and other medications may help, eliminating, reducing or avoiding certain foods may be an effective way to get rid of joint pain and keep such pain away. The key is to figure out foods and related food items that can promote inflammation. These foods or food items may not be the actual source of the joint pain, but intake of these items could severely worsen inflammation around the joints. The following are 7 worst foods for your joints: 1. Sugar Yes, many weight loss experts discuss the reduction or elimination of sugar from one’s diet. In addition, cutting out sugar could also do wonders for your joints. Joints get painful when inflammation occurs and sugar is great at causing inflammation. Hence, this is really a no-brainer. Once sugar enters the blood stre Continue reading >>

Joint Disorders & Joint Pain In Children

Joint Disorders & Joint Pain In Children

Joint pain can arise as a symptom of hypothyroid (too little thyroid hormone), hyperthyroid (too much thyroid hormone) or diabetes (high blood sugar). Your child’s thyroid gland is a butterfly-shaped gland located at the base of the neck, just above the collarbone. It produces hormones that control the body’s metabolism. When this gland under-produces the thyroid hormone or overproduces the hormone, children may experience joint pain. If your child has diabetes, it means his or her body does not produce (type 1) or use (type 2) the hormone insulin effectively. Insulin is responsible for allowing glucose to enter the body’s cells to be used as energy. When this mechanism is damaged, children suffer from high blood sugar. Diabetes causes musculoskeletal changes that lead to symptoms such as joint inflammation, pain and stiffness. Being overweight, a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, can also cause joint pain, as extra weight puts stress on the joints. Summary Type 2 diabetes, previously called adult-onset diabetes is the most common type of diabetes. With type 2 diabetes, the body does not use insulin correctly. Expanded Overview Type 2 diabetes is a disease that has as its main symptom a high level of sugar (glucose) in the blood. It is the most common form of diabetes. It is often called non-insulin-dependent diabetes, or adult-onset diabetes. With type 2 diabetes, the fat, liver and muscle cells don’t work properly with insulin to use or to store the glucose that is in the diet. This is called “insulin resistance.” When the glucose can’t get into the cells, it remains in the blood and builds up until there is too much. This is called hyperglycemia. It is common for people with type 2 diabetes to show no symptoms early in life. It can be years before sympto Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Chapter 6 HYPOGLYCEMIA What is hypoglycemia and what causes it? In a society where sugar is consumed at alarming rates, some people find out from blood analysis that their blood sugar or glucose is low, that is, in medical terms, they are "hypoglycemic" ('hypo' refers to low and 'glycemia' means sugar). People that suffer from too much sugar in the blood are referred to as being "hyperglycemic" or using the more common terms, are prediabetic or diabetic. There needs to be a certain level of sugar in the blood for normal body functioning. The body regulates this sugar level by the secretion of regulating hormones one of which is insulin produced by the pancreas. As the level of insulin rises, the blood sugar level falls. Less insulin results in increased blood sugar levels. For most people, this insulin level fluctuation is a normal process but when the pancreas acts abnormally, problems develop. Although hypoglycemia can be caused by many complex factors such as emotional and physical stresses, large amounts of alcohol consumed on a daily basis, coffee, smoking, nutritional and enzyme deficiencies, and many other medical conditions, the large consumption of refined carbohydrates, (especially sugars) in the diet, allergies and hypothyroidism (low functioning thyroid gland) are among the most common factors leading to hypoglycemia. When refined sugar (sucrose) is ingested, a large percentage of it is immediately absorbed into the blood putting a strain on the pancreas to secrete insulin in abnormal amounts. Sugar consumption requires chromium which helps the pancreas and body cells regulate sugar levels. Excess sugars deplete our chromium and B Vitamin reserves. Caffeine, alcohol, tobacco, and stress further weakens the pancreas. Constant abuse of the pancreas can cause i Continue reading >>

Do Simvastatin Side Effects Include Diabetes And Joint Pain?

Do Simvastatin Side Effects Include Diabetes And Joint Pain?

Many physicians tell us that even if statins increase the risk for diabetes, the drug benefits far outweigh any increase in blood glucose. But diabetes is a challenging condition to treat. Then there are the twin complications of muscle and joint pain. Most of the drug company research shows that simvastatin side effects are barely different from those brought on by placebo. The conclusion is often that simvastatin and related drugs do not really cause muscle pain or weakness and do not contribute to joint problems. Readers tell a different story. A Simvastatin Experience: Q. I took simvastatin for many years to control my cholesterol. Soon after I started taking it, I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. I don’t know if there is a connection. About six months ago I stopped taking simvastatin; my hips and knees no longer hurt. My latest lab results show an increase in LDL to a bit over the standard range. My HDL is OK. I had also experienced sexual problems, but I attributed those to paroxetine I took for depression. I stopped taking the paroxetine about two months ago and the sexual difficulties have completely disappeared. I feel much better after eliminating both drugs. A. Simvastatin can raise blood sugar and make people more prone to type 2 diabetes. A fascinating study showed that people taking a different statin, pravastatin, together with paroxetine had elevated blood glucose levels not caused by either drug alone (Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics, July 2011). Do Simvastatin Side Effects Include Joint Pain? The official prescribing information for simvastatin suggests that in the pre-marketing controlled clinical trials the most common adverse reactions that led to treatment discontinuation were: gastrointestinal disorders, myalgia [muscle pain and weakness Continue reading >>

Oh Sugar, Really? You’re Giving Me Joint Pain And Inflammation?

Oh Sugar, Really? You’re Giving Me Joint Pain And Inflammation?

1.3k Sharing Slavery is alive and well in our society, but it’s not what you may think. Americans1 are slaves to sugar, and the bonds are tightening every year at a rate of nearly 2%. Back in the 1700s, before the conveniences of modern industrialized life, we consumed, on average, 4 pounds of sugar per year. Nowadays, it’s more like 78 pounds per year. This infographic puts our sugar indulgence in perspective. And how is that affecting us? Is it any wonder or coincidence that disease rates have followed a similar sharp increase, as we have been adopting a high-sugar/high-refined carbohydrate diet over the years? It has taken us many years to finally connect the dots between sugar and disease. It has been a long road because first, we had to come to understand inflammation and disease and then sugar and inflammation. We also went through a phase of fearing and blaming fat, while turning a blind eye to and cranking up our sugar consumption via highly processed foods and beverages. It starts with chronic inflammation and intestinal permeability (leaky gut) It is now common knowledge that chronic, low-grade inflammation is where disease starts. Inflammation is the body’s immune response to conditions like infection, injury, fatty acid imbalance or foreign substances like undigested proteins or bacterial waste products called endotoxins finding their way into the bloodstream. They maneuver their way into the bloodstream when the tightly fitting cells of the intestinal mucosal lining spread apart, which is called intestinal permeability. This occurs for a number of reasons. One big reason is gut microbial imbalance, which can result from antibiotic use and/or a low-fiber/high- sugar diet. Another probable cause of intestinal permeability is emulsifiers in pharmaceutica Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Pain

Diabetic Foot Pain

by Kenneth B. Rehm, DPM Includes photo of Dr. Kenneth B. Rehm, DPM Diabetes is one of the most common reasons people seek relief for painful feet. With diabetes, four types of foot problems may arise in the feet. Nerve Problems due to Diabetes The most common contributor to diabetic foot pain is a nerve problem called Peripheral Neuropathy. This is where the nerves are directly affected by the disease process. There are basically three types of peripheral neuropathy: sensory, motor, and autonomic neuropathy. A large percentage of pain diabetic patients complain of is due to sensory neuropathy. This can show up as "sensitive pain," where the amount of pain is not proportional to the amount of insult that is causing it. For instance, just touching the skin or putting a sheet over your feet in bed could be painful. This can be present at the same time as numbness in the feet. Sensory neuropathy symptoms can include burning, tingling or a stabbing pain. Relief is foremost on someone's mind when painful neuropathy has raised its ugly head. The first thing to do is to check your blood sugar for the past several weeks to see if there has been a trend toward high blood sugar (Editor's Note: The A1c test is traditionally employed to determine this, and should be repeated about every three months.) Persistent high blood sugar can contribute to this type of pain. Massaging your feet with a diabetic foot cream, or using a foot roller, often takes the edge off the pain. Vitamin B preparations are often recommended; and there are a variety of prescription medications that do work. Using cushioned, supportive shoes and foot support inserts is always needed to protect the feet from the pounding, rubbing and irritating pressures that contribute to neuropathic pain. Motor neuropathy can Continue reading >>

What's Causing Your Joint And Nerve Pain?

What's Causing Your Joint And Nerve Pain?

It’s natural to feel a little discomfort in your hands, fingers, feet, and ankles from time to time. Joint pain is a part of getting older and can have a number of causes. But that ache in your foot or arm could also be a problem with a nerve caused by your diabetes. And that’s an issue that could be serious and require quick attention. So how do you tell the difference? It’s the leading cause of disability in the U.S. It affects more than 50 million adults. Often referred to as arthritis, it’s broadly defined as discomfort where two or more bones meet. Though often mild, sometimes sporadic, and rarely an emergency, the pain can be severe, making it hard to move the joint. If you have it, you’ll probably notice changes to your joint like: Stiffness Less range in motion Swelling Redness Tenderness or warmth A tougher time using it A difference in shape The causes of joint pain vary greatly. It could be: Muscle strains or sprains A broken or dislocated bone Gout Hypothyroidism Leukemia Lupus Osteoarthritis Rickets Lyme disease Rheumatoid arthritis Your doctor might call it diabetic neuropathy. It’s pain in your nerves, not in your bones. It happens when high blood sugar harms the nerve fibers. You can get it anywhere in your body, but it most often affects your legs and feet. Anywhere from 60%-70% of people with diabetes have some sort of neuropathy. Most get it after having the disease for 10 years or more. There are many types. But the two most likely to cause problems with your joints are peripheral and autonomic neuropathy. This is the most common form of diabetic joint pain. It affects your legs, arms, hands, feet, fingers, and toes. With ongoing diabetes, joints can no longer respond like they should to the strain and stress placed on them. As a result, Continue reading >>

Sugar, Inflammation, And Achy Knees

Sugar, Inflammation, And Achy Knees

Having a whole lotta sugar takes its toll on the body. It has been linked with weight gain, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, dental caries, liver disease, accelerated ageing, and the list goes on! But could too much of the sweet stuff be contributing to our body’s creaks and pains? Let’s see! Joint pain and inflammation Inflammation is a term we hear a lot with respect to health. We are told that anti-inflammatory foods are great for us, and things that cause inflammation tend to cause trouble. This is true to an extent. An inflammatory response is a normal part of the human defence system. The swelling, redness, pain and heat experienced when we cut our thumb is a reflection of the influx of chemical warriors coming to save the day, kick starting the healing process. We need inflammation to heal wounds, clear debris, and fight pathogens, to stand strong in the face of adversity! But when inflammation is present long-term, all those warriors, such as cytokines, can get a little carried away, and begin to damage parts of our body that are otherwise quite healthy. Including our joints, which can present as arthritis. Oh my achy knees! Common forms of arthritis include gout, ankylosing spondylitis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA), with fibromyalgia a related condition. RA is an autoimmune condition, where the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks its own tissues thinking it as some pathogenic terrorist! Whilst there may be genetic predisposition, triggers are unknown. What we do know is inflammation is rife and damaging to the joints,2 and as with many autoimmune conditions, diet may have a large role to play in its presentation. OA is not an autoimmune condition like its rheumatoid cousin. It is less aggressive and more gradual in onset, but featu Continue reading >>

Bone And Joint Problems Associated With Diabetes

Bone And Joint Problems Associated With Diabetes

If you have diabetes, you're at increased risk of various bone and joint disorders. Certain factors, such as nerve damage (diabetic neuropathy), arterial disease and obesity, may contribute to these problems — but often the cause isn't clear. Learn more about various bone and joint disorders, including symptoms and treatment options. Charcot joint What is it? Charcot (shahr-KOH) joint, also called neuropathic arthropathy, occurs when a joint deteriorates because of nerve damage — a common complication of diabetes. Charcot joint primarily affects the feet. What are the symptoms? You might have numbness and tingling or loss of sensation in the affected joints. They may become warm, red and swollen and become unstable or deformed. The involved joint may not be very painful despite its appearance. How is it treated? If detected early, progression of the disease can be slowed. Limiting weight-bearing activities and use of orthotic supports to the affected joint and surrounding structures can help. Diabetic hand syndrome What is it? Diabetic hand syndrome, also called diabetic cheiroarthropathy, is a disorder in which the skin on the hands becomes waxy and thickened. Eventually finger movement is limited. What causes diabetic hand syndrome isn't known. It's most common in people who've had diabetes for a long time. What are the symptoms? You may be unable to fully extend your fingers or press your palms together flat. How is it treated? Better management of blood glucose levels and physical therapy can slow the progress of this condition, but the limited mobility may not be reversible. Osteoporosis What is it? Osteoporosis is a disorder that causes bones to become weak and prone to fracture. People who have type 1 diabetes have an increased risk of osteoporosis. What are Continue reading >>

Foods That May Trigger Joint Pain: Here's What Not To Eat

Foods That May Trigger Joint Pain: Here's What Not To Eat

Joint pain is one of the commonly experienced issues across the world. While most cases are attributed to wrong posture, weak bones, or lack of nutrients, many other instances of joint pain are the result of some injury or other medical conditions like rheumatism, arthritis, and osteoarthritis among others. While it is imperative to understand the exact cause of your joint pain, it is also essential to have an understanding that dietary choices can also help tame or aggravate your pain. Experts suggest that consuming food items that are inflammatory in nature may add to your ongoing joint pain and can even trigger it if you are susceptible to experiencing it. Adding a host of anti-inflammatory foods items may in turn help bring relief. Foods that Can Trigger Joint Pain The essential idea here is to keep a check on inflammation. Though more and more research needs to be called upon to establish this as a fact in entirety, but largely, inflammation causing food items may worsen or at times trigger joint and muscle pain. Some of the most recent studies express that foods rich in sugar, trans fats, processed ingredients and purines are inversely related to the health of our joints. Blood sugar spikes may up the inflammatory response in the body, thereby inducing pain. Follow the list given below to make smarter dietary choices and manage your joint pain better or keep it at bay. "Few items that instantly raise the inflammatory response in the body would include refines sugar, refined flours and carbs, and of course trans fats and saturated fats. People who are overweight are at a higher risk of experiencing joint pain as their joints and bones carry more weight than what they are actually supposed to," said Dr. Ritika Sammadar, Chief Nutritionist at Max Super Specialty, Sak Continue reading >>

Can High Blood Sugar Cause Joint Pain?

Can High Blood Sugar Cause Joint Pain?

Joint pain is an annoying symptom felt by millions of people around the world each day. Sitting for too long, obesity, Arthritis, repetitive stress are all factors that are pointed out as the most common causes of joint pain in either the hip or the knee or the back. But did you ever think that your high blood sugar can be a significant factor for your joint pain? According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 47 percent of the Arthritis patients are suffering from Diabetes at the same time. We cannot deny the obvious link between these two conditions, can we? It is clear as a day that diabetes is actually worsening the arthritis symptoms and adds up to the joint pain that you are already feeling. So if you are suffering from Diabetes and Arthritis at the same time, or if you are just dealing with Diabetes, please do follow us through to find out how exactly are these two conditions associated and how you can act to reduce your joint pain. Is Your High Blood Sugar The Reason That Causes Your Joint Pain? It is no secret that Diabetes Mellitus causes various health problems regarding all of the body’s systems. However, what may surprise a lot of people is finding out that Diabetes can actually worsen their joint pain or even cause one if not present before. One study published in the Acta Medica Scandinavica talked about a diagnosis known as the Diabetic shoulder. Diabetic shoulder, also known as frozen shoulder, is a condition in which the capsule of the shoulder joint becomes swollen and thickened causing decreased mobility, pain, and persistent stiffness to occur. It is not that Diabetes is the only cause for this condition, however, within patients suffering from Diabetes, the symptoms of the frozen shoulder are much more severe and harder to treat. Ano Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms And Ranges

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms And Ranges

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) definition and facts Hypoglycemia is the medical term for low blood sugar. It typically occurs as a side effect of medications for diabetes. The normal range of blood glucose is from 70 to 100 mg/dL in an individual without diabetes, Most people will feel the effects and symptoms of low blood sugar when blood glucose levels are lower than 50 mg/dL. Low blood sugar is treated by giving a readily absorbed source of sugar, including soft drinks, juice, or foods containing sugar. If the hypoglycemia has progressed to the point at which the patient cannot take anything by mouth, an injection of glucagon may be given. Glucagon is a hormone that causes a fast release of glucose from the liver. Hypoglycemia or low blood sugar is syndrome that results from low blood sugar. The severity and symptoms of hypoglycemia can vary from person to person. Blood tests can diagnose low blood sugar, and symptoms resolve when the levels of sugar in the blood return to the normal range. The medical term for blood sugar is blood glucose. What can cause low blood sugar? Despite advances in the treatment of diabetes, low blood sugar episodes occur as a side effect of many treatments for diabetes. In fact, these episodes are often the limiting factor in achieving optimal blood sugar control, because many medications that are effective in treating diabetes carry the risk of lowering the blood sugar level too much, causing symptoms. In large scale studies looking at tight control in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, low blood sugars occurred more often in the patients who were managed most intensively. This is important for patients and physicians to recognize, especially as the goal for treating patients with diabetes becomes tighter control of blood sugar. While peopl Continue reading >>

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