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Best Time To Test Blood Ketones

Urine Tests For Diabetes: Glucose Levels And Ketones

Urine Tests For Diabetes: Glucose Levels And Ketones

The human body primarily runs on glucose. When your body is low on glucose, or if you have diabetes and don’t have enough insulin to help your cells absorb the glucose, your body starts breaking down fats for energy. Ketones (chemically known as ketone bodies) are byproducts of the breakdown of fatty acids. The breakdown of fat for fuel and the creation of ketones is a normal process for everyone. In a person without diabetes, insulin, glucagon, and other hormones prevent ketone levels in the blood from getting too high. However, people with diabetes are at risk for ketone buildup in their blood. If left untreated, people with type 1 diabetes are at risk for developing a condition called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). While rare, it’s possible for people with type 2 diabetes to experience DKA in certain circumstances as well. If you have diabetes, you need to be especially aware of the symptoms that having too many ketones in your body can cause. These include: If you don’t get treatment, the symptoms can progress to: a fruity breath odor stomach pain trouble breathing You should always seek immediate medical attention if your ketone levels are high. Testing your blood or urine to measure your ketone levels can all be done at home. At-home testing kits are available for both types of tests, although urine testing continues to be more common. Urine tests are available without a prescription at most drugstores, or you can buy them online. You should test your urine or blood for ketones when any of the following occurs: Your blood sugar is higher than 240 mg/dL. You feel sick or nauseated, regardless of your blood sugar reading. To perform a urine test, you urinate into a clean container and dip the test strip into the urine. For a child who isn’t potty-trained, a pa Continue reading >>

The Best Way To Monitor Ketone Levels

The Best Way To Monitor Ketone Levels

Awareness and appreciation of the “low-carb high-fat” ketogenic diet has been steadily growing over the last few years. Along with that, you hear the words ketosis and ketones used more commonly. That’s excellent, but many people don’t really know what it all actually means. ..What are ketones? And what does your body do with them? What are the proper levels of ketones you should have to be in ketosis? With so many people talking about the diet/lifestyle, it’s understandable that there is more misinformation as a result. So, let’s clear it all up in this post. First we’ll review the details of ketones – what they are, how they’re formed, etc. – and then we’ll talk about how to monitor them. Let’s dive in! Contents: First Off, What Exactly Are Ketones? Ketones, or ketone bodies, are byproducts created by the body in the process of breaking down (metabolizing) fat for energy, when carbohydrate levels in the body are low. It works like this… The body prefers to use glucose (from carbs) as its source of fuel. But when there isn’t a sufficient level of glucose, and glycogen levels are depleted, blood sugar and insulin levels are reduced, as the body looks for an alternative source of fuel: fat. This process can occur during fasting, starvation, extended periods of exercise, or in the case we’re referring to in this post and on this site: while adhering to a low-carb, high-fat, ketogenic diet. …When the body switches to metabolizing fats for energy – a process called beta-oxidation – instead of glucose, ketones are created as a fuel source for the body and the brain. It is this process which is referred to as ketosis or ketogenesis…Or, as some people like to say, switching from being a “sugar burner” to a “fat burner”. If you’re Continue reading >>

Abbott Precision Xtra Blood Glucose Meter Review

Abbott Precision Xtra Blood Glucose Meter Review

One of the biggest benefits of the Precision Xtra Blood Glucose Meter is the versatility that if offers those with diabetes. It is one of a select few meters that give you the ability to test both your blood sugar level and your blood ketone levels. This type of meter is extremely helpful especially for parents who have younger children with type 1 diabetes. Let’s take a look more in detail on the pros and cons of the Precision Xtra and what I really think about it overall. Pros Testing Blood Ketones: This is the one meter we always keep close to test for blood ketones. This comes in handy when the kids are sick or experiencing a high blood sugar in the middle of the night. It can be rather difficult to get a kiddo with a high blood sugar to get up and want to go test ketones by urinating on the ketodiastix. Instead you can easily test their ketones with one poke while testing their blood sugar levels. While urine strips still work great for the mornings or other times you experience high blood sugar levels, if you want to get a more accurate picture on if ketones are present, the blood ketones are the way to go. I suggest reading these articles: If you are not familiar with using a blood ketone meter, you may be confused when you first see your results, as they are different than blood sugar readings. When using the Precision Xtra Meter you can expect the following: Results Below 0.6 This is considered to be a normal range for blood ketone levels. I’ve found however, that when they hit 0.3 this is when you should pay close attention to ketones developing. 6 to 1.5 When you see numbers in this range, ketones are currently present. This is when you should make sure you are properly treating for ketones so that they do not develop into a problem later on. Contacting a Continue reading >>

Blood Ketone Meter

Blood Ketone Meter

Living a ketogenic lifestyle is one of the best decisions a person could make. This lifestyle allows the body to burn It's own stored fat which is stored in the body muscles as glycogen to produce energy as opposed to using glucose/sugar . It not only improves your health but also helps you lose the unwanted extra pounds. It can be very difficult to estimate the amount of ketones in the blood by keeping track of the low carbohydrates foods you take. Ketones can be measured using different methods. One can either use a urine test where you use urine sticks that turn a range of different colors once ketones are present. The other method is the use of blood strips and a blood ketone meter that is used to measure the ketone levels. A blood ketone meter is a device that is used to measure the amount of Ketones in the blood and it works the same way as a glucose meter.The latter is accurate and can help you to keep track of your ketone levels and also monitor the type food you take if you are leading a ketogenic lifestyle.That is why it is highly advisable to use a blood Ketone meter to be able to measure the ketone levels in your blood. A blood ketone meter is a small electronic device that simply tests the amount of Ketones in one's blood and the direct readings can be easily read on a digital display. It also gives accurate and quantitative assessments that are reliable to keep check of ones ketone levels. The blood ketone meter can be easily used at home since it is very simple to use. All you need to know is the acceptable ketone levels in a healthy person. There are various quantities that either indicate low or high presence of ketones in the blood. High ketone levels are indicated by a measurement above 3.0 mmol/L of ketones ,1-6 to 2.9 mmol/L for optimal ketone level Continue reading >>

What Are Ketones And Their Tests?

What Are Ketones And Their Tests?

A ketone test can warn you of a serious diabetes complication called diabetic ketoacidosis, or DKA. An elevated level of this substance in your blood can mean you have very high blood sugar. Too many ketones can trigger DKA, which is a medical emergency. Regular tests you take at home can spot when your ketone levels run too high. Then you can take insulin to lower your blood sugar level or get other treatments to prevent complications. What Exactly Are Ketones? Everyone has them, whether you have diabetes or not. Ketones are chemicals made in your liver. You produce them when you don't have enough of the hormone insulin in your body to turn sugar (or “glucose”) into energy. You need another source, so your body uses fat instead. Your liver turns this fat into ketones, a type of acid, and sends them into your bloodstream. Your muscles and other tissues can then use them for fuel. For a person without diabetes, this process doesn’t become an issue. But when you have diabetes, things can run out of control and you build up too many ketones in your blood. If the level goes too high, it can become life-threatening. Who Needs a Ketone Test? You might need one if you have type 1 diabetes. In this type, your immune system attacks and destroys cells in your pancreas that make insulin. Without it, your blood sugar rises. People with type 2 diabetes can also get high ketones, but it isn't as common as it is with type 1. Tests can show you when your level gets high so you can treat it before you get sick. When Should You Test? Your doctor will probably tell you to test your ketones when: Your blood sugar is higher than 250 milligrams/deciliter (mg/dl) for two days in a row You're sick or you've been injured You want to exercise and your blood sugar level is over 250 mg/dl Continue reading >>

Maybe It’s Time To Check Your Ketone Level?

Maybe It’s Time To Check Your Ketone Level?

Achieving ketosis is not required for most people to succeed on the Wheat Belly lifestyle. However, this can be an important issue to know about. Achieving ketosis is not just a means of accelerating weight loss, but also of enhancing mental and physical performance. You’ll experience this yourself, with heightened mental clarity, energy, and endurance in a ketogenic state. The grain-free lifestyle eliminates junk carbohydrates from the diet. – Tweet this. Some individuals find their weight loss efforts seem to plateau after some time on this diet. The occasional person will need to go the full low-carb mile and require a ketogenic state to achieve weight loss. To achieve a ketogenic state, virtually all carbohydrates will have to be eliminated in order to metabolize fats. An effective ketogenic diet is composed of near-zero (less than 20g net carbohydrates per day) intake of carbohydrates. This is combined with a higher than usual fat intake to quell hunger and divert the metabolism toward mobilization of body fat. You can detect ketosis by the fruity odor on the breath. – Tweet this. This being said, there are more accurate ways to confirm a ketogenic state. Urine can be tested using a dipstick for ketones, such as Ketostix. However, these can only detect ketones in the higher range, as are experienced by type 1 diabetics during diabetic ketoacidosis, a life-threatening state. Urine monitoring is therefore less sensitive for identifying the subtler levels of ketosis experienced physiologically, which makes urine testing inadequate for weight-loss purposes. The most assured and precise method to assess blood levels of ketones is with a finger stick, just like checking blood sugar. The only difference is in the timing. Unlike the after-meal checks for blood sugar, Continue reading >>

Testing For Ketones

Testing For Ketones

Testing for Ketones 3 Types of Ketones How to go about testing for Ketones? There are 3 types of ketone bodies. Acetone, Acetoacetate and Beta-Hydroxybutryate (BHB, though technically not really a ketone body) The body (the liver) converts long and medium chain fatty acids into BHB and Acetoacetate. BHB and Acetoacetate live in reversible equilibrium (they can transform back and forth). Acetoacetate can also be turned into acetone. After converted to acetone, it can not be converted back. Acetone is typically excreted through the urine or breath. If your body has been in ketosis for a while, you will see a reduction in acetoacetate. Muscles begin to use acetoacetate and turn it into Beta-Hydroxybutryate for fuel, so less is present in urine as you get more keto-adapted. This is the flaw of the urine test. It only tests for acetoacetate so it will go down as your body gets more efficient at using ketones for fuel. 3 Methods for Testing Ketones Urine strips only test acetoacetate. Ketonix only tests acetone in breath. Blood Strips test for Beta-Hydroxybutryate (BHB), what your body uses for fuel. 1. Urine Test Strips Pros: Cheap. Cons: Very inaccurate in testing level of ketosis. Our bodies excrete excess ketones in two ways. Through the urine or through the breath. When you are testing for ketones in urine you will typically see higher levels in early stages of a ketogenic diet because your body isn’t using ketones for fuel yet. After you are fully Keto-Adapted (2-4 weeks or so), you will see less and less ketones in your urine because your body in now using more ketones for fuel instead of excreting them through the urine or breath. The urine test strip is also very susceptible to changes based on your state of hydration. The more hydrated you are (and we should all b Continue reading >>

Monitoring For Compliance With A Ketogenic Diet: What Is The Best Time Of Day To Test For Urinary Ketosis?

Monitoring For Compliance With A Ketogenic Diet: What Is The Best Time Of Day To Test For Urinary Ketosis?

Go to: Methods The KetoPerformance study with its before-and-after comparison design was registered at germanctr.de as DRKS00009605 and took place from February to June 2016. Exclusion criteria included underweight, obesity, kidney stones, pregnancy, diabetes mellitus and any fatty acid-metabolism disorders. The study protocol was approved by the Ethics Commission of the Albert-Ludwig University Freiburg (494/14) and all subjects signed a written consent form. Twelve of the 42 subjects from the KetoPerformance study could be recruited for the present substudy. Experimental design and dietary intervention The experimental intervention consisted of a KD without caloric restriction lasting 6 weeks with a previous preparation period including detailed instructions during teaching classes and individual counselling by a dietitian. The subjects were free to follow a KD according to their personal preferences but were advised to reach a ratio by weight of approximately 1.8:1 fat to carbohydrate and protein combined, yielding a diet with 80, 15, and 5 % of total energy intake from fat, protein and carbohydrate, respectively. During the KD intervention's sixth week, our substudy subjects were instructed to measure urine and blood ketone concentrations at regular intervals in as close proximity as possible during a 24-h period from 07:00 to 07:00 in the morning. During the day (07:00 till 22:00) blood and urinary ketones were measured every full hour and every three hours, respectively. During the night, blood and urinary ketones were measured once at 03:00. In total blood and urine and ketones were measured 18 and 8 times, respectively, and were recorded in a table sheet. Subjects were asked to drink 400 ml of water every 3 h during the day to ensure sufficient urination and to Continue reading >>

How To Know If You’re In Ketosis: A Guide To Testing Ketone Levels

How To Know If You’re In Ketosis: A Guide To Testing Ketone Levels

Ketosis can be a powerful way to use your metabolism for fat loss, mental output, physical performance as well as many other health benefits. But how do you know if you’re actually in ketosis? As the old adage goes “test, don’t guess” when it comes to your health. In this guide, we’ll show exactly how to test your ketone levels to know if you’re in ketosis so you can make sure you’re getting all of the benefits that ketosis has to offer. There are three primary forms of ketones in your body, acetone, acetoacetate, and beta-hydroxybutryate. Each of these compounds do different things in the metabolism of ketosis and can be tested individually with differing techniques. Not all measurement is created equally, however, and some can be better than others for different purposes or times. The three different ketone bodies can be measured when they spill over into three different areas of your body: your breath, urine or blood. The good news is that all of these ketone level measurements can be done at home, by yourself. You don’t have to go to any lab or use any fancy high tech equipment. Tracking diligently, at least when you’re getting used to ketosis based diets, is important so you know how much you react to different variables like exercise, type and amount of food, and amounts of exogenous ketone supplements. Also, the optimal level of ketones for specific goals can vary per person. Knowing the amount where you thrive in the goal you want to achieve (and consistently checking if you’re hitting that amount) is the fastest way to reach your goals. Testing levels of ketones with urine strips (acetoacetate) One of the ketone bodies, acetoacetate, can be measured directly in the urine if they are in excessive levels. The way metabolic substrates get into Continue reading >>

How To Get A Free Blood Ketone Meter When Ketostix Fail

How To Get A Free Blood Ketone Meter When Ketostix Fail

When I initially started a ketogenic diet, I would use the urine test strips to monitor for ketones, which would tell me if I was in ketosis or not. I wish someone had told me about this free Blood Ketone Meter! However, I later found that my readings started to show nothing even though I had been eating a high fat, low carb diet. I wondered… what on earth was wrong? Why do Ketostix Stop Working? After doing some research, I found that once my body started to become accustom to a high fat diet and began to utilise the ketones for energy, the free ketones in my urine either did not exist or where not as strong. Ketostix work mainly off the concentration of ketones in your urine. This makes the long-term use of Ketostix useless, as they will eventually start to read blank. Ketostix start at a yellow colour (which means you are not in Ketosis) all the way up to a dark purple (which means you’re in fairly heavy ketosis). Click on the Image Below to get Ketostix in Australia The solution? Blood Ketone Meter! My girlfriend Adele loves to source out bargains at different chemists. As I came along to a few of these bargain hunting trips, I began to notice that I could use a device that is usually suitable for Diabetics called a Glucose Meter to monitor my ketones. Diabetics need to monitor their ketone levels as to avoid Ketone Acidosis (which can be very harmful). They need to be very precise due to the nature of health risks that ketosis can pose to diabetics. I wondered up to the counter to check the price of the device that also could check for Ketones. BAM! $70. I was not going to buy one from a chemist. You would have to be crazy! Later that night I started researching these devices on eBay. Low and behold, I stumbled across this device for $29. What I did not notice Continue reading >>

Nk N=1 Addendum: Hourly Weight, Blood Glucose And Blood Ketone Testing

Nk N=1 Addendum: Hourly Weight, Blood Glucose And Blood Ketone Testing

I’m coming up on the 9-month update of my n=1 experiment testing the concept of “nutritional ketosis” (NK) this next week, but I decided to do something over the past week as an addendum to the regular testing I’ve been doing. If you’ve been following my progress on this NK journey since I started it in May 2012 (if you missed any of my monthly updates, check out Day 1-30, Day 31-60, Day 61-90, Day 91-120, Day 121-150, Day 151-180, Day 181-210 and Day 211-240), I’ve been testing my blood glucose and blood ketone levels in the morning and at night as well as my weight first thing when I wake up. But just out of curiosity I wanted to up my game a bit and test every hour on the waking hour for one week examining my weight, blood sugar and blood ketone levels. I’ve noticed during my experiment that my ketone levels tend to be lower in the morning and higher at night, but I didn’t know what was happening in the hours throughout the day and wanted to know. Plus, I’ve been wondering what was going on with my blood sugar after meals and exercise. And just for fun (because the fluctuations that happen throughout the day are pretty much irrelevant), I tested my body weight fully clothed every hour as well. My poor fingers took a pummeling with about 20 finger pricks a day on average (sometimes the lancet didn’t go deep enough to produce enough blood with just one finger prick), but this information was totally worth the temporary pain. Let’s take a look at what happened along with a few observations: DAY 1 – SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 2013 Fun first day of testing. My blood sugar ranged from 70-94 (AWESOME!) with the greatest rise predictably after eating. Even still, the increase in blood glucose wasn’t that pronounced (predictable considering I’m eating v Continue reading >>

Why I Stopped Testing My Ketones On A Ketogenic Diet

Why I Stopped Testing My Ketones On A Ketogenic Diet

On measuring Ketones. Like many people, when I first started a Ketogenic diet in early 2014 I bought the Ketostix and just couldn’t wait to see the color change. And change it did! It was neat, and it provided motivation for me to continue. Eventually, I got a blood meter, a breath meter and spent lots of time (and money) testing ketones. Between a Ketonix Breath Ketone Analyzer, as well as dozens of blood ketone test strips, I’ve probably spent well over $500 testing ketones. The main thing I learned from my extensive ketone testing regimen is that the results vary widely and there’s little application to my goals. Eventually, I stopped testing and here are several reasons why: 1. Burning fatty acids from fat is the main benefit of a ketogenic diet On a ketogenic diet, some of the brain’s energetic demand is fueled by ketones, but the heart, muscles, etc. are fueled by fatty acids. Most of the energy we utilize both at rest and at sub-maximal exertion on a ketogenic diet is fatty acid, not ketones. Quoting Dr. Ron Rosedale on chasing ketones at the Keto Summit: “I don’t want people to have the mindset that it’s the ketones that are the benefit of the diet. They are a beneficial side effect, but the main benefit is that you are burning fatty acids from fat. The more fatty acids from fat you are burning, the less glucose you need to burn. And that’s really where you are getting the benefit…So ketones are great but the term ketogenic diet indicating that the diet is so good because you are generating all these ketones is a misinterpretation of the benefit. The main benefit is that you are burning fatty acids, and as a side effect of burning fatty acids you are producing ketones that your body can burn too!” 2. Urine Ketones aka “peetones” are ridic Continue reading >>

Ketones: Introduction To Testing Ketones

Ketones: Introduction To Testing Ketones

We’ve all had the question, or been asked the question: how do I know when I’m in ketosis? Should I feel different? Should I have increased mental clarity and focus? While one could give a case-by-case, yes-or-no type response for these questions, the best way is to simply test it out. The problem is that most of us don’t have access to a lab 24/7. Due to this issue, we have three possible ways to test ourselves for ketones from home, namely, urine strips, blood meters, or breath meters. Urine Test Strips There are numerous brands of urine strips to choose from if you decide to go this route and they can be easily obtained at your local drug store or online for a relatively inexpensive price. They can cost anywhere from $9-$20 for about 100 test strips. While this would seem to be the easiest way, it may not be the best way. Urine strips are coated with a chemical that reacts to the presence of acetoacetate (one type of ketone body). However, urine by definition is a waste product. So, while having ketones present in the urine may be a great indication that you are producing them, it could also mean that you are not utilizing them effectively. Also, we tend to see that individuals who have been on the diet for a long period of time and/or individuals that are leaner tend to show lighter or smaller traces of “ketones” on the strips compared to people starting the diet or who are significantly overweight. For this reason, this testing method may be great to let yourself know that you are on the right track with your ketogenic diet but it may not be the best way to know one you are keto-adapted. Blood Meters For a more reliable method of measuring ketones, a blood meter may be the way to go. Diabetics are familiar with the concept, as most glucose meters can also Continue reading >>

Lose Weight By Achieving Optimal Ketosis

Lose Weight By Achieving Optimal Ketosis

Do you want to lose weight? Here’s number 16 of my 18 best tips. All of the published tips can be found on the How to Lose Weight page. Before we get started, here’s a short recap of the tips so far: The first and most crucial piece of advice was to choose a low-carb diet. The next were eating when hungry, eating real food, eating only when hungry, measuring progress wisely, being persistent, avoiding fruit, beer and artificial sweeteners, review your medications, stressing less and sleeping more, eating less dairy and nut products, stocking up on vitamins and minerals, using intermittent fasting and finally, exercising smart. This is number sixteen: 16. Get into optimal ketosis Warning: Not recommended for type 1 diabetics, see below. We’ve now arrived at tip number 16. If you’re still having trouble losing weight, despite following the 15 pieces of advice listed above, it might be a good idea to bring out the heavy artillery: optimal ketosis. Many people stalling at weight plateaus while on a low carb diet have found optimal ketosis helpful. It’s what can melt the fat off once again. So how does this work? A quick run-through: The first tip was to eat low carb. This is because a low-carb diet lowers your levels of the fat-storing hormone insulin, allowing your fat deposits to shrink and release their stored energy. This tends to cause you to want to consume less calories than you expend – without hunger – and lose weight. Several of the tips mentioned above are about fine-tuning your diet to better this effect. Video course Do you know exactly how to eat a low-carb and high fat diet (LCHF)? This is required for ketosis. If not the easiest way is watching this high quality 11-minute video course on how to eat LCHF, and the most important things to think a Continue reading >>

5 Ways To Measure Your Ketones

5 Ways To Measure Your Ketones

5 Ways to Measure Your Ketones A ketogenic diet is a very low carbohydrate, moderate protein and high fat based nutrition plan. A ketogenic diet trains the individual’s metabolism to run off of fatty acids or ketone bodies. This is called fat adapted, when the body has adapted to run off of fatty acids/ketones at rest. Research has demonstrated that this nutrition plan improves insulin sensitivity and reduces inflammation throughout the body. This leads to greater fat metabolism and muscle development as well as a reduced risk of chronic disease. (1, 2). I get asked all the time how to measure the state of ketosis. There are several major ways and we will discuss those in this article. Measuring Your Ketones There are three types of ketone bodies: Acetone, Acetoacetate and Beta-Hydroxybutryate (BHB). Each of these three can be tested as acetone is a ketone released through the breath, acetoacetate is a ketone released through urine and BHB is (although not technically a ketone it acts like a ketone) in the blood stream and used by the cells for energy. 1. Blood Ketone Meter This measures BHB and is considered to be the most accurate way to measure ketone bodies. These have the ability to determine the ketone level in your blood precisely but they are also pricey and invasive. Personally, I freak out every time I have to prick my finger!! The Precision Xtra blood glucose and ketone meter is a good buy at $28-$30. The expensive part is the ketone test strips here which can cost $4 each. If you are looking at testing yourself every day it is going to cost you $120 a month and the $30 meter. Here is a starter kit you can get on Amazon Most people will enter into a light nutritional ketosis (between 0.5-1.0 mmol/L on the meter) within two or three days. It typically takes Continue reading >>

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