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Bayer Ketostix Canada

A Quick Primer On The Ketone Test Strips...

A Quick Primer On The Ketone Test Strips...

A Quick primer on the Ketone Test Strips... Questions about ketones, ketosis, KetoStix, and its implications and misconceptions have always been one of the most common querries at Low Carb Luxury. We'll try and clear up some of those mysteries here. So... what are they? You'll hear them referred to as KetoStix (the original brand name), Urine Test Strips, Reagent Strips, Ketone Testing Strips, and Lipolysis Test Strips. Depending on the plan you follow and whether you are new to this way of life, or an old timer from the 70's, you'll be referring to them as one name or another if your plan calls for being in Ketosis. Please note, we're not here to debate the merits of Ketogenic vs non-Ketogenic diets here, so don't send me mail of disagreement. For me personally, being in Ketosis is my ideal state and keeps my body's systems at their best. The Ketosis we're talking about here is what Dr. Atkins refers to as "Benign Dietary Ketosis" (or BDK), and should never be confused with Acidosis — a dangerous state for diabetics and those in advanced starvation where acetone builds in the blood and tissues. People will sometimes tell you that producing ketones is dangerous for the body. This is simply misinformation. They're confusing ketosis (the state from a Ketogenic diet) with ketoacidosis (or acidosis) which occurs in uncontrolled diabetes and/or starvation. Ketones? Ketones are incompletely burned carbon fragments. The very fact that they are less efficient as fuel is what makes them give you that 'metabolic advantage.' Some of the calories burned are not used to their full capacity... hence the person can eat more calories when in ketosis than when not, and still lose the same amount of weight. Ketoacids are short (four carbons long.) It's important because in that way the Continue reading >>

Ketostix: What Are Ketostix And How Do I Use Them?

Ketostix: What Are Ketostix And How Do I Use Them?

If you’ve been reading up on keto dieting for a while, you’ve no doubt come across people talking about Ketostix (sometimes improperly spelled as ketosticks or keto sticks). What are ketostix? Why do you need them? We answer all that and more in our complete guide to Ketostix and ketone urinalysis testing. What are Ketostix? Simply put, Ketostix are small, thin plastic strips with a small reagent area on them. When Ketostix are dipped in urine (or passed through a stream of urine), the reagent area changes color to indicate the amount of ketones that are present in your urine. This is an important indicator for those on ketogenic diets because it lets us know that our body has adapted to ketosis and we are doing the diet right. Do I need to buy Ketostix? Yes and no. Ketostix serve two very important functions for ketogenic dieters: Troubleshooting: Beginners find Ketostix useful because it is an indicator that they are doing the ketogenic diet correctly and have indeed limited their carbohydrate consumption sufficiently to force the body into ketosis, thereby starting the process of burning fat for energy instead of carbohydrates. More advanced keto dieters use the strips to help figure out exactly how many carbohydrates they can eat before they are kicked out of ketosis. It can also help determine how different foods affect one’s ability to stay in ketosis. For example, some people’s bodies can handle sugar alcohols without having trouble staying in ketosis, and Ketostix can help diagnose this. Psychological Motivation: Quite simply, it feels great seeing Ketostix turn purple. It’s a little bit of positive reinforcement that those of us on keto diets sometimes require to keep us motivated. It might seem stupid to some, but committing to a ketogenic diet is no Continue reading >>

Evaluation Of Five Cowside Tests For Use With Milk To Detect Subclinical Ketosis In Dairy Cows

Evaluation Of Five Cowside Tests For Use With Milk To Detect Subclinical Ketosis In Dairy Cows

Abstract The objective of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of five ketone tests for use with milk to detect subclinical ketosis [defined as >1200 µmol of β-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA)/L of blood] in dairy cows. The tests studied were the Ketolac® BHB strip to detect BHBA (Hoechst, Unterschleiβheim, Germany) and four tests based on sodium nitroprusside to detect acetoacetate (Rothera tests) [Ketostix® strip (Bayer, Etobicoke, ON, Canada), Bioketone powder (Societé d’ Analyses Biopharmaceutiques, Laval, QC, Canada), KetocheckTM powder (Great States, St. Joseph, MO), and Utrecht powder (University of Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands)]. Milk samples (n = 529) from 266 cows in 25 Ontario dairy herds were used for this investigation. The Ketolac® BHB strip at 50 and 100 µmol of BHBA/L of milk showed sensitivities of 92 and 72%, respectively. This test was more sensitive for subclinical ketosis than were any of the Rothera tests. The sensitivities of the Rothera tests were 43, 33, 28, and 5%, respectively, for Utrecht powder, Bioketone powder, KetocheckTM powder, and Ketostix® strip. The Rothera tests were highly specific, as was the Ketolac BHB strip at 200, 500, and 1000 µmol of BHBA/L of milk (specificity, >97%). The prevalence of subclinical ketosis was highest during the first 6 wk of lactation, and a peak was detected during the 2nd wk of lactation. Of the tests evaluated in this study, Ketolac® BHB strip was the most useful to monitor subclinical ketosis in dairy herds. Continue reading >>

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