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Baking Soda For Respiratory Acidosis

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What is ALKALOSIS? What does ALKALOSIS mean? ALKALOSIS meaning - ALKALOSIS pronunciation - ALKALOSIS definition - ALKALOSIS explanation - How to pronounce ALKALOSIS? Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Alkalosis is the result of a process reducing hydrogen ion concentration of arterial blood plasma (alkalemia). In contrast to acidemia (serum pH 7.35 or lower), alkalemia occurs when the serum pH is higher than normal (7.45 or higher). Alkalosis is usually divided into the categories of respiratory alkalosis and metabolic alkalosis or a combined respiratory/metabolic alkalosis. Respiratory alkalosis is caused by hyperventilation, resulting in a loss of carbon dioxide. Compensatory mechanisms for this would include increased dissociation of the carbonic acid buffering intermediate into hydrogen ions, and the related excretion of bicarbonate, both of which lower blood pH. Hyperventilation-induced alkalosis can be seen in several deadly central nervous system diseases such as strokes or Rett syndrome. Metabolic alkalosis can be caused by repeated vomiting, resulting in a loss of hydrochloric acid within the stomach content. Severe dehydration, and the consumption of alkali are other causes. It can also be caused by administration of diuretics and endocrine disorders such as Cushing's syndrome. Compensatory mechanism for metabolic alkalosis involve slowed breathing by the lungs to increase serum carbon dioxide, a condition leaning toward respiratory acidosis. As respiratory acidosis often accompanies the compensation for metabolic alkalosis, and vice versa, a delicate balance is created between these two conditions. Metabolic alkalosis is usually accompanied by low blood potassium concentration, causing, e.g., muscular weakness, muscle pain, and muscle cramps (from disturbed function of the skeletal muscles), and muscle spasms (from disturbed function of smooth muscles). It may also cause low blood calcium concentration. As the blood pH increases, blood transport proteins, such as albumin, become more ionized into anions. This causes the free calcium present in blood to bind more strongly with albumin. If severe, it may cause tetany.

Acidosis And Alkalosis

A list of those foods which are acidic in nature and those which are alkaline in nature can be found on the following web sites. As a general rule, vegan food, especially vegetables and greens, tend to be alkaline in nature, whereas meat and dairy products, and also oils/fats (of both plant and animal origin) tend to be acidic in nature (when digested). Most fruit is alkaline producing, although a small minority is acid producing (e.g. cranberries, blueberries, plums etc. All dried fruits are classified as acid producing, and also sweet for food combining. If you eat a snack of dried fruit instead of fresh fruit, you will be amazed at how much lower your urine pH is for the rest of the day. Grains and beans are also in general acid producing, although Millet is considered Alkaline producing. Foods containing protein are broken down into amino acids, which are of course acidic, so the more protein sources one ingests, the more acidic one's diet will be. Sprouted grains and beans are less acid producing than their unsprouted forms. Oils are of course acids by their chemical nature, be they essentil fatty acids or saturated fats. Fermented foods (e.g. raw Tempeh, Miso or fermented ve Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. WhoAteMyPsyche

    I've been trying to find the science between how the body reacts in ketosis vs someone who just tries to keep their carbs low. I know some people can be in ketosis with 50 carbs or less, but I do not think that is the case for most people.
    When I first started losing weight I was keeping my carbs between 40-50, and lost between 80-90 lbs. doing that. I then started doing more research (I stalled for a long time) and switched to keto and keep my carbs below 20. However, I'm working on a blog post trying to explain keto and would like to be able to explain, intelligently, the difference in ketosis vs "lowish" carbs.

    Can anyone point me to good research on this? Thank you!

  2. Fiorella

    Honestly, I think the best data or research is testing your own body, as in n=1. Starting at 20 g carbs is a starter's template. From there, you may need to go lower, or get away with pushing it higher. Let's say someone comes up with a bell curve showing where people have there carbs set at. It will still be a snapshot in time, possibly skewed to men/women only, age groups, metabolic diseases, athletic/sedentary, etc. Also, some people noticed that with time, the carb level requirement changed as their bodies health modified, too.

  3. WhoAteMyPsyche

    I completely agree that everyone is different and that the carb levels can change over time. I know, at least in my experience, just because someone knows about low carb doesn't mean they know what ketosis is. When I first started I was going off a plan I had followed in the 90s (Protein Power Plan) and knew nothing about ketosis. I had heard the term "keto" thrown around by a few people but just thought it was a different way of saying the same thing - Protein Power, Atkins, etc. So I guess the key is telling people WHAT keto is and why lowering your carbs works. They can then take that info and learn for themselves what works for them.

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Sodium Bicarbonate Therapy In Patients With Metabolic Acidosis

The Scientific World Journal Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 627673, 13 pages Nephrology Division, Hospital General Juan Cardona, Avenida Pardo Bazán, s/n, Ferrol, 15406 A Coruña, Spain Academic Editor: Biagio R. Di Iorio Copyright © 2014 María M. Adeva-Andany et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract Metabolic acidosis occurs when a relative accumulation of plasma anions in excess of cations reduces plasma pH. Replacement of sodium bicarbonate to patients with sodium bicarbonate loss due to diarrhea or renal proximal tubular acidosis is useful, but there is no definite evidence that sodium bicarbonate administration to patients with acute metabolic acidosis, including diabetic ketoacidosis, lactic acidosis, septic shock, intraoperative metabolic acidosis, or cardiac arrest, is beneficial regarding clinical outcomes or mortality rate. Patients with advanced chronic kidney disease usually show metabolic acidosis due to increased unmeasured anions and hyperchloremia. It has been suggested tha Continue reading >>

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  1. bpeterson2

    > ultra low carbing and depression/anxiety

    Hi-
    been low carbing since aug '03. started off on south beach, had great, fast results (down 10 pounds, with 15-pound goal) and found it easy to follow. what i noticed is that I stayed on a very, very restrictive version, eating little or no breads, pastas, vegetables, and fruits. I didn't exclude them, just really did embrace them. I guess I was enjoying the weight loss and wanted it to continue. with the exception of a bowl of granola-like cereal and some fruit, I pretty muhc avoided all carbs.
    My question - looking back, i noticed that within a month or so of starting the diet, I began suffering pretty good anxiety. yes, my life grew more stressful, but I felt that i was becoming easily overwhelmed. generally, i felt jittery, nervous with little reason why. this lasted for more than a year, when I entered into a kiund of full-blown anxiety. I am currently in therapy and take an anti-dpressant, which has given me a lot of reliet. However, I'm still not me. the one constant has been my ultra low carb diet. this last week i began eating complex carbs and feel so much better. Anyone else had this kind of reaction to very low carb dieting?
    Thanks,
    Brent

  2. Nancy LC

    I'm glad you're eating more healthily! Get those veggies, and fruits if you're so inclined, back into the diet. Some people just don't do well on extremely low-carb. You might be one of them!

  3. Nancy LC

    Wow, you sure posted this same thing in a lot of places.

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Anion gap usmle - anion gap metabolic acidosis normal anion gap metabolic acidosis

Acidosis

The kidneys and lungs maintain the balance (proper pH level) of chemicals called acids and bases in the body. Acidosis occurs when acid builds up or when bicarbonate (a base) is lost. Acidosis is classified as either respiratory or metabolic acidosis. Respiratory acidosis develops when there is too much carbon dioxide (an acid) in the body. This type of acidosis is usually caused when the body is unable to remove enough carbon dioxide through breathing. Other names for respiratory acidosis are hypercapnic acidosis and carbon dioxide acidosis. Causes of respiratory acidosis include: Chest deformities, such as kyphosis Chest injuries Chest muscle weakness Chronic lung disease Overuse of sedative drugs Metabolic acidosis develops when too much acid is produced in the body. It can also occur when the kidneys cannot remove enough acid from the body. There are several types of metabolic acidosis: Diabetic acidosis (also called diabetic ketoacidosis and DKA) develops when substances called ketone bodies (which are acidic) build up during uncontrolled diabetes. Hyperchloremic acidosis is caused by the loss of too much sodium bicarbonate from the body, which can happen with severe diarrhea. Continue reading >>

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  1. Liang-Hai Sie

    Type I diabetic will develop a ketoacidotic hyperglycemic diabetic coma, and die if not getting their insulin, type 2 diabetics will have (very) high blood glucose levels, but most won’t develop a ketoacidotic hyperglycemic diabetic coma. While this isn’t good for their health, they aren’t in immediate danger of dying.

  2. Satyabrat Mahali

    Of adults with diabetes, only 14% use insulin, 13% use insulin and oral medication, 57% take oral medication only, and 16% control blood sugar with diet and exercise alone, according to the CDC.

  3. Mags Hussey

    Originally Answered: What would happen if a type 1 diabetic did not take their insulin for an extended period of time?

    A person with type 1 diabetes, depending on length of time since diagnosis, has essentially no insulin production. I say essentially nil, because studies have shown that winners of 50 year medals (surviving 50 years T1 is rare enough you get a national award, ceremony and medal), about 75% of those with the least diabetic complications have been found to have a little C-peptide production. That means their bodies still battle to keep producing beta cells (beta cells producing insulin and c-peptide being a cleavage product off insulin which is easily measurable) and their bodies immune system keep killing them off. I digress. Even those with tiny c-peptide production will die without insulin, the question is when. Days would be my estimate. C- peptide is also used a medication nowadays to prevent diabetes complications.
    I've had T1 30 years. If I omit insulin for 12 hours (background/basal and bolus) and eat regular foods, my blood glucose level would be over 33.3 mmol on the meter i.e. Unreadable. I would have very high blood ketones (which means acidic blood and cells not able to access glucose for energy so fat has broken down uncontrollably to feed the body instead causing an unwelcome acidic environment). and I would now require hospitalisation. If I took no insulin but went without food, specifically avoiding carbohydrates which drive glucose higher, I might make it to 2–3 days instead before needing hospitalidation as low carb can stop the body reaching such high blood glucose levels so quickly. But it would get to >33.3 mmol unreadable in 2–3 days regardless. Restabilisation isn't just a matter of taking insulin at that point. We are often tempted to take a giant stick of insulin to deal with ourselves but this is not advised.
    The body is too dehydrated, the blood is thick and acidic, pH as low as 6.9-7.0 (normal 7.4). Bicarbonate is low, Potassium and sodium electrolytes are imbalanced due to excess urination so hourly blood arterial gases for Co2, bicarbonate, pH and potassium are forced upon you. A saline IV perhaps with bicarbonate and /potassium is inserted depending on your blood results. An ekg is on you non stop as the potassium and sodium imbalance has wrecked your heart rhythm. Your input of fluid by IV and output by vomit (there's a lot of that) and urine is tallied up and tried to be balanced out. With the IV drip. Your kidneys might have shut down. Temporarily or permanently. It would seem obvious that The big concern is of course to lower your blood glucose, but done too rapidly or not at all and the brain tissue swells, causing brain injury, coma and death. Look up kisses for kycie, whose t1 diabetes was misdiagnosed and thus endured brain swelling and passed tragically 7 months later. This happens all too often. But it is the cause of death in 3% of known t1s. A bout of no insulin for 2–3 days whether accidental or purposeful can mean death, a stay in ICU, a week in hospital to correct slowly. It is an ugly way to die.
    There are early signs a person is not taking sufficient insulin if a person is not checking their glucose or hasn't access to a meter or is not yet diagnosed - heavy breathing, acetone breath, stomach pains, vomiting. Weight loss (I lose 3kg in one day of no insulin). Frequent urination, incessant drinking and thirst. Fatigue, lethargy, stupor, coma. Kids being out of sorts, not growing, wetting the bed, soaked diapers, moodiness in teens and adults.

    If you have diabetes, don't mess with your insulin. You dice with death but risk being brain injured, on dialysis or comatose forever.

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