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Are Ketosis Supplements Safe

How To Use (and Not To Use) Exogenous Ketones For Weight Loss

How To Use (and Not To Use) Exogenous Ketones For Weight Loss

“How do I use ketones to help me lose weight?” Great question. It’s worth the few minutes to understand how exogenous ketones can help people lose weight on a ketogenic diet, and not just jump to the conclusion that ketones = weight loss. Breaking Down Ketone Weight Loss Misconceptions The most common misconception (perhaps due to excessive marketing claims) is that taking ketone supplements will induce immediate weight loss. The purpose of this article is to explain how to use ketones as a piece of the puzzle in your weight loss lifestyle. Remember exogenous ketones are supplements. Very effective at what they do, but none the less, should be supplementary to a low carb/ketogenic style of eating that is geared towards weight loss (if weight loss is the goal). Ketones don’t cause weight loss, they help cause ketosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state where your body is using fatty acids for its primary source of energy. Just because you are using fat does not necessarily mean you are going to be losing weight or have a decrease in body fat percentage over an extended period of time. I have been in deep nutritional ketosis (>3.0mmol/dL) and had an increase in body fat percentage. I’ve also been in deep nutritional ketosis and had a decrease in body fat percentage. It all depends on how much fat and protein you are eating, in addition to being below a carb threshold that will induce ketosis. Please don’t take this to mean starve yourself. It just means that the average male American has over 40,000 calories in stored body fat and can, therefore, afford to eat a lower calorie ketogenic diet, and still survive (and thrive!). Take home message: Exogenous ketones are a tool to get you into ketosis or to boost your energy levels while already in ketosis. If your motive Continue reading >>

How To Use Exogenous Ketones

How To Use Exogenous Ketones

Exogenous Ketones were introduced in 2014, about the same time as I was recovering from having my daughter, and therefore very concerned about weight loss. But let’s back up for a bit, because if you’re here reading about Exogenous Ketones, and how to drink ketones for weight loss, let’s start at the beginning so you have a firm foundation to build if you do decided to take a ketone supplement for weight loss. First of all, Exogenous Ketones (we’ll get to exactly what those are in just a sec…hang in there) were introduced as the Ketogenic Diet started gaining popularity among the health and fitness community, as well as with the scientific community. Why? Well, it’s all about health. For so long, doctors and researchers have preached the benefits of a low-fat diet to prevent and correct all sort of things like heart disease, high cholesterol, obesity, etc. But….they may have been wrong. I am not a doctor, and do not have a medical degree, but I’ve done my homework, and I’ve lived (and am currently living) a ketogenic lifestyle. So I’ve done this, I’ve read loads and loads about it, and I’ve even been able to help many of my friends use the things I’ve learned to lead healthier lives. But, as with anything concerning your health, please make sure you have a discussion with your doctor before making a drastic change. Related: I lost 23 pounds in 60 days of Keto. Here’s how. Ok, legal stuff over, here’s what a Ketogenic Diet is: A Ketogenic Diet, also know as the Keto Diet, is a very high fat, very low carb, moderate protein diet that is very popular because it can cause you to lose body fat very fast, and study after study after study has linked Keto with benefits against cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer’s, epilepsy, and more. Eating Ketogenical Continue reading >>

How Does Fasting Affect Weight Loss?

How Does Fasting Affect Weight Loss?

The act of fasting DOES NOT help you lose weight. Here’s why… I’m a BIG advocate for intermittent fasting. As good as fasting is, it will not make you lose weight. However, being in a caloric deficit does. While sleeping you are in a fasted state. Upon wakening you want to hold off on eating in the morning so that the fat burning process can continue from when you were asleep. When eating first thing in the morning the fat burning process slows down and insulin is released. Cortisol levels are typically higher in the mornings and by fasting you keep insulin levels low If your cortisol levels are high in the morning and you spike insulin by eating first thing in the morning, you are more likely to store fat easier. If you wait to eat in the afternoon when cortisol begins to decline, this would be a good time to eat. As we said, eating releases insulin and we do not want to eat when cortisol levels are high. To make it simple, intermittent fasting controls the amount of insulin that is released within the body. If you are doing the 16–8 fasting protocol you are essentially eating in a 8 hour window and fasting for 16 hours. Insulin will be released only in that 8 hour window when you eat. Here’s where you have to be very careful if you are not used to intermittent fasting, by abstaining from food for longer periods of time could lead you to over-eat in your feeding window. Just because you fasted does not mean you can eat whatever you want. Your calories still have to be in a deficit. You have to coax the fat off your body and it’s a process that is very rewarding if done right. Be very careful with extreme diets. Most people can lose the weight fast but end up putting all the weight back on and MORE! Your body is smarter than you and you’ll back yourself in Continue reading >>

Pruvit Keto Os And Bio Max Review Best Fat Loss Ketone Supplement

Pruvit Keto Os And Bio Max Review Best Fat Loss Ketone Supplement

0320SHARES Share to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to PinterestPinterestPinterestShare to PrintPrintPrintShare to MoreAddthisMore Keto OS is a DRINK that puts your body into ketosis in 59 minutes or less, without changing your diet! Puts your body into FAT BURNING MODE! Pruvit KETO OS and Keto Max Review: Does KETO OS Work? Prüvit’s proprietary formula, KETO OS, has been researched, tested, and is doctor approved. It is the first natural consumer product on the market to provide elevated blood ketone levels to the body. Profession athlete’s body builders, and every day people are using our products for fat loss, muscle preservation, appetite suppression, increased focus, better sleep and more! You simply mix Keto OS with water and drink it, 1-2 times a day to benefit from the amazing effects of Ketones in your body. What is Keto? Pruvit – KETO OS Review Save 10% on your order today by choosing today and smart ship option! No coupon code needed, discount is automatically applied for you! Have Questions? Click live chat at the bottom of the screen! What are the side effects of KETO OS? I get asked that question a lot. I realize it’s because most supplements out there have nasty side effects and you are often miserable while taking them. Often, at the same time you are dieting and starving yourself while on those supplements. Restricting calories makes you tired, hungry, gives you mental fog and makes you CRANKY and HANGRY! This is why many fail. You are depriving yourself and that is not a normal lifestyle or a long term solution. You will eventually give up, and all that you accomplished will be lost. Many end up bingeing on bad foods because they starved themselves for so long, quickly gaining all their weight back that they lost. Keto OS is different because it Continue reading >>

Can A Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetic Take Keto//os?

Can A Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetic Take Keto//os?

Diabetic patients should only use this product under the care of a physician. In both T1 and T2 diabetes, patients have abnormal insulin signaling. In T1, the pancreas doesn’t make enough insulin, and in T2, the body’s tissues are resistant to insulin. Insulin helps transport glucose from the blood into the cells where it can be used for energy. In severely uncontrolled diabetes (typically someone not being treated for their condition), insulin signaling is wildly impaired, and an acute and life-threatening condition called ketoacidosis can occur. If a person is eating a standard diet wherein carbohydrate is a major portion of their macronutrient intake, their tissues are mostly burning glucose for fuel. Therefore, if insulin signaling is incredibly impaired, this will cause glucose to build up in the blood because it can’t get into the cells. Thus, the cells are basically starving even though there’s plenty of glucose in the blood. (This is sometimes referred to as “starvation in the land of plenty.”) This causes the liver to begin making ketones from stored fats, just as it would if you were starving from not eating anything. Insulin also plays a role in regulating ketone production, and normally it inhibits ketone production if it’s too high to keep ketones at a proper level in the blood. So, if the patient’s diabetes is too severely uncontrolled, it is possible that a situation called “runaway ketogenesis” occurs. The liver makes lots and lots of ketones in a short amount of time. Ketones are acids, and when at extremely high levels (typically >20mM), they can cause blood pH to drop, which can be very dangerous and/or fatal. This is diabetic ketoacidosis. Is being in therapeutic ketosis itself dangerous for a diabetic? No. There is substantial sc Continue reading >>

Exogenous Ketones: To Ketone Or Not To Ketone

Exogenous Ketones: To Ketone Or Not To Ketone

My thoughts on Exogenous Ketones After being contacted (following the Youtube Q&A) by several folks – both members of Ketogains and Internet strangers, I felt compelled to write as fair and even-handed a write-up on exogenous ketone supplementation as I feel can be mustered. I condition my response by saying this – I want to deal only in evidence and hypotheses grounded in biochemistry. I admit up front that this will probably become something of a treatise on what constitutes a well-formulated ketogenic diet. I don’t have the time (or the energy) to put together a document that covers all facets of the use of exogenous ketones in sufficient depth, so what I want to do is to address the folks that I see asking me about them most often – those who have excess body fat, and are looking to lose weight. They have been told about the potential benefits to fat loss via exogenous ketones, and they want to know if the hype is real. Those of you who know me (or read my previous post here) know that I like to respond with “it depends.” So…when the question is raised, “Should I supplement with exogenous ketones?” what do you think my answer will be? Probably not! (HA, I tricked you!)…but let’s explore why. As I’m sure this is going to be hotly debated enough (as the topic is raging in numerous ketogenic groups) there isn’t any value in dealing with speculation that doesn’t have a basis in science, nor in anecdotes. The challenge in dealing with exogenous ketone supplementation is two-fold: One side of the debate has a product to sell. Anytime someone’s livelihood is tied to your purchase of their product, bias and subjective interpretation of the evidence should be considered. The evidence (either for or against) their supplemental use by average schl Continue reading >>

Effects Of Exogenous Ketone Supplementation On Blood Ketone, Glucose, Triglyceride, And Lipoprotein Levels In Sprague–dawley Rats

Effects Of Exogenous Ketone Supplementation On Blood Ketone, Glucose, Triglyceride, And Lipoprotein Levels In Sprague–dawley Rats

Go to: Background Emerging evidence supports the therapeutic potential of the ketogenic diet (KD) for a variety of disease states, leading investigators to research methods of harnessing the benefits of nutritional ketosis without the dietary restrictions. The KD has been used as an effective non-pharmacological therapy for pediatric intractable seizures since the 1920s [1–3]. In addition to epilepsy, the ketogenic diet has elicited significant therapeutic effects for weight loss and type-2 diabetes (T2D) [4]. Several studies have shown significant weight loss on a high fat, low carbohydrate diet without significant elevations of serum cholesterol [5–12]. Another study demonstrated the safety and benefits of long-term application of the KD in T2D patients. Patients exhibited significant weight loss, reduction of blood glucose, and improvement of lipid markers after eating a well-formulated KD for 56 weeks [13]. Recently, researchers have begun to investigate the use of the KD as a treatment for acne, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), cancer, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), traumatic brain injury (TBI) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) with promising preliminary results [14–26]. The classical KD consists of a 4:1 ratio of fat to protein and carbohydrate, with 80–90 % of total calories derived from fat [27]. The macronutrient ratio of the KD induces a metabolic shift towards fatty acid oxidation and hepatic ketogenesis, elevating the ketone bodies acetoacetate (AcAc) and β-hydroxybutyrate (βHB) in the blood. Acetone, generated by decarboxylation of AcAc, has been shown to have anticonvulsant properties [28–32]. Ketone bodies are naturally elevated to serve as alternative metabolic substrates for extra-hepatic tissues during the prolonged reduction of glucose Continue reading >>

Does The Ketogenic Diet Work For Type 2 Diabetes?

Does The Ketogenic Diet Work For Type 2 Diabetes?

You’ve probably seen dozens of headlines about the ketogenic diet by now, which has made its way into popular culture largely by celebrities and supermodels giving the long-standing fad diet a repeated stamp of approval. Is this the diet to follow if you have diabetes? Studies suggest the answer isn’t so simple. Some science shows its meal plan may be helpful, while other research, like one study published in September 2016 in Nutrients, highlights the importance of whole grains in the diets of people with diabetes — a restricted food category in the ketogenic diet. While the keto diet can offer many potential benefits for diabetes management, following it requires pretty serious commitment. So take a beat before you take the plunge — and consider these questions that can help you and your medical team determine if it’s right for you: How Does the Ketogenic Diet Work Exactly? There’s a good reason the ketogenic diet is also referred to as a low-carb, high-fat diet. Indeed, following the ketogenic diet means reducing carbohydrate intake to typically less than 50 grams (g) of carbohydrates per day, while increasing fat and protein intake, according to a review published in August 2013 in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. To put that into perspective, an individual on an average, non-restricted diet can easily eat more carbohydrates than that in one typical meal — for instance, a turkey, cheese, and veggie sandwich on whole-grain bread with a small, 1 ounce (oz) bag of classic potato chips would come in at around 51 g of carbs. These dietary changes drive down insulin levels, eventually leading your body into a state of ketosis, during which it is burning fat rather than carbohydrates. What Are Some of the Potential Benefits of a Ketogenic Diet for Continue reading >>

Are There Any Side Effects Of Protein Powder? If Yes, How Do I Overcome Them?

Are There Any Side Effects Of Protein Powder? If Yes, How Do I Overcome Them?

Consuming high levels of protein in the form of protein powders or even from food alone can be detrimental for our health. Fat gain Adding extra protein to the diet in the form of protein powder adds extra calories. As excess protein cannot be stored in its original form in the body, if you are not burning these calories by doing a sufficient amount of physical activity, or doing enough weight bearing activities to build more muscle, these extra calories are likely to be converted to fat. (See also: How to burn more fat while exercising) An increase in protein intake as well as calories without an increase in physical activity levels is likely to result in an equal gain in both fat and muscle, which may not be exactly what you are looking for when you supplement protein powder. Bone loss High levels of protein intake generates a large amount of acid in the body due to the excess sulphates and phosphates that are introduced. The kidneys then try to restore the balance of acid by excreting more acid, at the same time the skeleton releases calcium which is also lost in the urine as a buffer. This results in the loss of calcium from bones which can increase the risk of osteoporosis if it occurs over a longer time frame, particularly in high risk groups such as women. There is a possibility however, that a diet which is high in alkaline fruit and vegetables in addition to protein may help to counteract this effect. Kidney damage High protein diets can put increased strain on the kidneys due to the need to excess waste products called ketones that are generated with such a diet and the need to excrete these products. For people with reduced kidney function this stress can worsen the condition and may even contribute to reduced function in people with healthy kidneys if follow Continue reading >>

Keto Basics

Keto Basics

If you follow the ebb and flow of the dietary industry, then you have probably heard of the term “ketosis,” “ketones,” or “the ketogenic diet.” You generally hear reference to them when we talk about low-carb, higher fat diets. In a society where low-fat/no-fat is pretty much the accepted standard, this whole low-carb/high-fat concept can seem a little… out there. Especially when there is so much confusion about what ketones are and what they do. THEN, I start talking about the possibility of supplementing with ketones – and people get even more confused. So let’s unpack all of this, learn a little more about ketones, and why taking a supplement might actually be a good thing. Let’s start with the basics. What ARE ketones and what is ketosis? When we think of the body’s natural fuel source, we think of glucose, or sugar. We know that our body needs to use sugar as a fuel, but what many people don’t realize is that fats can be an equally, and even superior, fuel source to the body. The process of ketosis refers to the body’s ability to use fats as its primary source of energy, over glucose. When the body burns fat, it produces three bi-products of fat breakdown, β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), acetoacetate (ACA) and acetone. These bi-products are called Ketones. This is a naturally occurring process and it’s what allows our bodies to survive during times of food restriction. When an individual begins to follow a low carbohydrate diet, the body has to look for another fuel source, and it turns to fatty acids and fat stores to provide that much needed energy. The liver breaks down the fat, and releases ketones into the blood to be used by the brain and other organs to produce energy. The interesting thing about ketones is that BHB may be a more effici Continue reading >>

How Should I Lose Weight As A 16 Year Old?

How Should I Lose Weight As A 16 Year Old?

At age 13, it might well be too late to start... That's a pretty ripe old age, so I am not sure if you will be able to perform most activities... I commend your spirit, but I fear it may be too late... Just kidding. It's great that you have put some thought into physical fitness. Let's get some terminology straight, however. Since otherwise, we might be talking of different things using the same words, all the while thinking we understand each other. 1) When you say lose "weight", you are really thinking of losing fat and NOT losing muscle. Ideally, you want to lose fat and gain muscle. 2) The above is true irrespective of whether you are a guy or a girl. Or from an alien species which has more than 2 genders. 3) In case you are female and are thinking, "no way, I definitely don't want to get bulky and look like a sasquatch", allow me to enumerate 2 things. One, gaining muscle and looking "bulky" do not need to occur simultaneously. Two, that is quite demeaning and belittle sasquatches! 4) An exception to point 1 is when you already have sufficiently low body fat. Too much of a good thing is invariably bad. Despite how much fat has been demonized in society, there is a need of fat for the proper functioning of the human body. How do you determine if you do need to lose weight (that is, lose fat)? There is no fool-proof way, but the BMI (Body mass index) method is the simplest and provides a rough estimate of the fat or not-fat question. Just don't take it too seriously. For one thing, BMI does not differentiate between bone weight, fat weight and muscle weight, so you can have body-builders and athletes with BMIs that would suggest they are overweight. "All that's fine and dandy, now how do I actually lose weight (Yes, yes, I meant fat and not muscle)?", you ask? There Continue reading >>

How Does The Ketogenic Diet Work?

How Does The Ketogenic Diet Work?

The Keto diet is not really a diet, but rather a lifestyle change. A Ketogenic diet is best described as a low carb, moderate protein, and high fat diet. This combination changes the way energy is used in the body. Fat is converted in the liver into fatty acids and ketone bodies. Another effect of the diet is that it lowers glucose levels and improves insulin resistance. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood, a state known as ketosis, leads to a reduction in the occurrence of epileptic seizures. Ketogenic Diet Macros Typically, the ketogenic diet consists of only 30-50 grams of carbohydrates a day. High in fat Moderate Protein The beginning of a ketogenic diet can be challenging for some who are not used to eating a very low carbohydrate diet. You’ll probably experience a lack of energy and brain fog as your body is in the beginning stages of making a metabolic shift. This shift is simply your body beginning to use fat for fuel rather than glucose. Your brain and body actually prefers to run on keytones rather than glucose for energy. The goal here is to use the fat on your body as fuel rather than glucose (from sugar or carbs) to burn fat and for overall daily energy requirements. For a full explanation as the ketogenic diet, please see more at: Fastest Method to Burn Fat WITHOUT Exercise Continue reading >>

The Fat-fueled Brain: Unnatural Or Advantageous?

The Fat-fueled Brain: Unnatural Or Advantageous?

Disclaimer: First things first. Please note that I am in no way endorsing nutritional ketosis as a supplement to, or a replacement for medication. As you’ll see below, data exploring the potential neuroprotective effects of ketosis are still scarce, and we don’t yet know the side effects of a long-term ketogenic diet. This post talks about the SCIENCE behind ketosis, and is not meant in any way as medical advice. The ketogenic diet is a nutritionist’s nightmare. High in saturated fat and VERY low in carbohydrates, “keto” is adopted by a growing population to paradoxically promote weight loss and mental well-being. Drinking coffee with butter? Eating a block of cream cheese? Little to no fruit? To the uninitiated, keto defies all common sense, inviting skeptics to wave it off as an unnatural “bacon-and-steak” fad diet. Yet versions of the ketogenic diet have been used to successfully treat drug-resistant epilepsy in children since the 1920s – potentially even back in the biblical ages. Emerging evidence from animal models and clinical trials suggest keto may be therapeutically used in many other neurological disorders, including head ache, neurodegenerative diseases, sleep disorders, bipolar disorder, autism and brain cancer. With no apparent side effects. Sound too good to be true? I feel ya! Where are these neuroprotective effects coming from? What’s going on in the brain on a ketogenic diet? Ketosis in a nutshell In essence, a ketogenic diet mimics starvation, allowing the body to go into a metabolic state called ketosis (key-tow-sis). Normally, human bodies are sugar-driven machines: ingested carbohydrates are broken down into glucose, which is mainly transported and used as energy or stored as glycogen in liver and muscle tissue. When deprived of d Continue reading >>

Are Protein Powders Safe?

Are Protein Powders Safe?

Are protein shakes good for you? You've seen those massive tubs of whey powder in the gym or your local supermarket, but are they actually necessary for the man in training? Do protein shakes work? Scott Laidler explains all. 'Protein shakes are a helpful, convenient solution...but they won't turn your body into a temple overnight What is a protein shake There are still many misconceptions regarding protein shakes. Firstly, people often mistake them for steroids – perhaps understandable, given the big promises that drive the products' marketing campaigns. But protein shakes are purely nutritional; unlike steroids, they have no direct influence on your hormones. Another source of confusion is the differentiation between a 'mass gainer' and a protein shake. Mass gainers are used as an aid to bulking up. They typically include a large amount of simple carbohydrates that get delivered straight to your muscles. These serve a purpose after a workout when the muscle's energy is depleted, but use them at the wrong time (as many do) and the end result is fat gain instead of fat burn. Protein shakes, by contrast, deliver amino acids to muscle cells, helping them to recover after strenuous workouts. Which protein shake should I chose? Whey is the most common base for the protein powder, as it contains all of the nine essential amino acids that facilitate the healing of damaged muscles. There are three main types of whey protein: isolate, hydrolysate, and concentrate. Isolate yields a high level of protein and is low on allergenics, making it a good option for the lactose intolerant. Hydrolysate is produced in a way that effectively means it has been predigested, so its rate of absorption by the body is super fast. Concentrate, meanwhile, is the cheapest option, as the effects of Continue reading >>

Exogenous Ketones: What They Are, Benefits Of Use And How They Work

Exogenous Ketones: What They Are, Benefits Of Use And How They Work

Exogenous ketones have become a popular nutritional supplement since their introduction in 2014. Like with any new supplement, though, there tends to be a lot of misinformation that you have to sift your way through to find the reliable data. So, this article does the hard work for you and gets right to what the true benefits and drawbacks of exogenous ketones are. We also cover what forms of ketones to consider, how they function in the body, and their role in future research. What Are Ketones? Our bodies use ketones via our mitochondria to generate energy. They are an alternative fuel source to glucose. Ketones are simple compounds because of their small molecular structure and weight. Specifically, they are organic (carbon-based) compounds that contain a central carbon atom double-bonded to an oxygen atom and two carbon-containing substituents, denoted by “R” (see chemical structure below). In humans, there are 3 different ketones produced by the mitochondria of the liver. These are also often referred to as ketone bodies. The three ketones are: Acetone Acetoacetic Acid Beta-Hydroxybutyric Acid (also known Beta Hydroxybuyrate or BHB). Other chemical names include 3-hydroxybutyric acid or 3-hydroxybutyrate. BHB is not technically a ketone since it contains a reactive OH-group in place of where a double-bonded oxygen normally would be as you can see in the diagram below. Yet, BHB still functions like a ketone in the body and converts into energy much like acetoacetate and acetone. This happens via the acetoacetate and acetyl-CoA pathway. Note that acetone conversion to acetyl-CoA is not efficient due to the need to convert acetone to acetoacetate via decarboxylation. However, BHB still functions like a ketone in the body and can be converted to energy (via acetoace Continue reading >>

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