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Are Ketones Bad During Pregnancy?

Is Keto Safe During Pregnancy? Nutritionists Don't Recommend It

Is Keto Safe During Pregnancy? Nutritionists Don't Recommend It

When you find out you're pregnant, a million questions pop into your mind. If it's your first pregnancy, two million questions pop into your mind. One of the most common questions about pregnancy is whether or not you can keep your diet the same as it was before pregnancy. This is an especially important question to ask if you've been on a low-carb diet such as keto. You need to know: is keto safe during pregnancy? According to the official keto website, the keto diet is a low-carb diet where the body produces ketones in the liver to be used as energy rather than carbohydrates. Much like other low-carb, high-fat diets, the keto diet promises significant results when it comes to weight loss. But can a diet that recommends 20 grams or less of carbohydrates a day help provide proper nutrition for you and your baby? According to nutritionist and health coach Erin Lorrain, the answer is no. Lorrain isn't a fan of the keto diet for regular women, let alone pregnant women. "The keto diet essentially tricks your body into thinking you're starving, causing your body to go into ketosis," Lorrain says. She goes on to explain that when you eat carbohydrates, your body produces glucose and insulin — two substances you need to survive. "Glucose and insulin help control your energy levels," Lorrain says. "And in order to maintain a healthy, balanced, diet, you should have healthy, balanced levels of glucose and insulin." This means you shouldn't survive solely on carbohydrates, but you shouldn't cut them out, either. Just like glucose is one of the main sources of energy for your body, glucose is a main source of energy for your growing baby, according to a study done by Yale University. The study goes on to state that to heavily restrict any source of energy during your child's dev Continue reading >>

Causes & Diet For Ketones In Urine During Pregnancy

Causes & Diet For Ketones In Urine During Pregnancy

Ketone bodies are formed as a result of metabolism of fatty acids. There are primarily three kinds produced by fatty acid metabolism, viz. acetone, aceto-acetic acid, and beta-hydroxybutyric acid. These ketones are formed in the kidney and liver and are transported to other body tissues and converted to energy in the citric acid cycle.As such, nominal production of ketones is required for normal functioning of the body. However, when there is excessive production of ketone bodies, the latter gets accumulated in the blood and begins to appear in the urine. This condition is medically referred to as ketonuria. Yellow urine during pregnancy may become a cause for concern for many women. However it ... Even women who are suffering from diabetes can have a healthy pregnancy, with the help of ... Every month, an egg is released from the ovaries. If this egg is fertilized by sperm, it ... Pregnancy brings with it numerous changes in a woman’s body and these changes have ... Causes of Ketones formation in Urine (Ketonuria) Some of the causes of ketonuria are metabolic disorders like diabetes and renal glycosuria, abnormal dietary patterns like starving or fasting, low carbohydrate intake, anorexia, and prolonged vomiting. One of the other causes of ketonuria is enhanced rate of metabolism, which is predominantly seen during pregnancy, lactation, and even in hyperthyroidism.The impact of ketones in urine during pregnancy is still a matter of apprehension. Some researchers believe that high ketones in urine during pregnancy can cause lower IQ and lack of concentration and memory in the offspring, while others deny this. There is no definitive research to support this belief, and as such, it cannot be inferred that presence of ketones in urine during pregnancy can adversely affe Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

"Ketosis" is a word you'll probably see when you're looking for information on diabetes or weight loss. Is it a good thing or a bad thing? That depends. Ketosis is a normal metabolic process, something your body does to keep working. When it doesn't have enough carbohydrates from food for your cells to burn for energy, it burns fat instead. As part of this process, it makes ketones. If you're healthy and eating a balanced diet, your body controls how much fat it burns, and you don't normally make or use ketones. But when you cut way back on your calories or carbs, your body will switch to ketosis for energy. It can also happen after exercising for a long time and during pregnancy. For people with uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a sign of not using enough insulin. Ketosis can become dangerous when ketones build up. High levels lead to dehydration and change the chemical balance of your blood. Ketosis is a popular weight loss strategy. Low-carb eating plans include the first part of the Atkins diet and the Paleo diet, which stress proteins for fueling your body. In addition to helping you burn fat, ketosis can make you feel less hungry. It also helps you maintain muscle. For healthy people who don't have diabetes and aren't pregnant, ketosis usually kicks in after 3 or 4 days of eating less than 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. That's about 3 slices of bread, a cup of low-fat fruit yogurt, or two small bananas. You can start ketosis by fasting, too. Doctors may put children who have epilepsy on a ketogenic diet, a special high-fat, very low-carb and protein plan, because it might help prevent seizures. Adults with epilepsy sometimes eat modified Atkins diets. Some research suggests that ketogenic diets might help lower your risk of heart disease. Other studies show sp Continue reading >>

Urine Tests For Diabetes: Glucose Levels And Ketones

Urine Tests For Diabetes: Glucose Levels And Ketones

The human body primarily runs on glucose. When your body is low on glucose, or if you have diabetes and don’t have enough insulin to help your cells absorb the glucose, your body starts breaking down fats for energy. Ketones (chemically known as ketone bodies) are byproducts of the breakdown of fatty acids. The breakdown of fat for fuel and the creation of ketones is a normal process for everyone. In a person without diabetes, insulin, glucagon, and other hormones prevent ketone levels in the blood from getting too high. However, people with diabetes are at risk for ketone buildup in their blood. If left untreated, people with type 1 diabetes are at risk for developing a condition called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). While rare, it’s possible for people with type 2 diabetes to experience DKA in certain circumstances as well. If you have diabetes, you need to be especially aware of the symptoms that having too many ketones in your body can cause. These include: If you don’t get treatment, the symptoms can progress to: a fruity breath odor stomach pain trouble breathing You should always seek immediate medical attention if your ketone levels are high. Testing your blood or urine to measure your ketone levels can all be done at home. At-home testing kits are available for both types of tests, although urine testing continues to be more common. Urine tests are available without a prescription at most drugstores, or you can buy them online. You should test your urine or blood for ketones when any of the following occurs: Your blood sugar is higher than 240 mg/dL. You feel sick or nauseated, regardless of your blood sugar reading. To perform a urine test, you urinate into a clean container and dip the test strip into the urine. For a child who isn’t potty-trained, a pa Continue reading >>

Ketones During Pregnancy – Causes And Preventions

Ketones During Pregnancy – Causes And Preventions

Presence of ketones in urine especially during pregnancy poses a serious impact on the health of a woman. Moreover, it is one such problem that many of the pregnant women are facing. Though, it is a not a matter of serious complication, it could turn alarming at a certain point. What Are Ketones? Ketones are elements derived from the breakdown of fat which the body utilizes to produce energy during emergency concerns like starvation or glucose deficiency. The body receives essential energy from the consumption of food and it gets converted into glucose and blood sugar. The access with blood sugar is obtained through insulin. When you are faced with detecting Ketones in Pregnancy, you must understand that the pregnancy hormones boost the body hormones against insulin. This indicates that the cells of body do not acquire sufficient glucose from blood and consequently a pregnant woman is not able to gain enough energy through breaking down of carbohydrates. The body attempts to search for alternative energy sources, like the fat reserves and ketones are the by-product of this process. Causes for the presence of ketones There are various factors that lead to ketone’ presence in the urine, and they are as listed below: You have been dehydrated. A bad diet or a diet that is not nutritious may result in your body breaking down fat instead of carbohydrates for energy. It is possible that you do not get sufficient calories from the diet or the time space between meals may be too long. Other possibilities are that you may be skipping meals or snacks. You must be careful to have your meals on time to avoid ketones and other problems, especially during pregnancy. Some of the natural signs of pregnancy, such as nausea, throwing up could also make you feel DE-energised and pose you Continue reading >>

Guest Blog Post: Is It Safe To Go Low Carb During Pregnancy?

Guest Blog Post: Is It Safe To Go Low Carb During Pregnancy?

Today my friend and colleague, Lily Nichols, a fellow registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator, shares her insight on carbohydrate-restricted diets during pregnancy. This is a controversial topic that I believe deserves more attention and investigation, which Lily does brilliantly in the following article. Is It Safe to Go Low Carb During Pregnancy? With the wide adoption of low-carbohydrate diets, many people question if they are safe during pregnancy. While quite a few women use a lower carbohydrate diet to conceive (since they are especially useful for women struggling with infertility[1]), most medical professionals discourage women from continuing this diet during pregnancy. I find it ironic that if you tell your doctor that you plan to eat low carb during pregnancy, they’ll say it’s unsafe, but if you say you plan to eat a diet based on fresh vegetables, meat, fish, eggs, dairy, nuts, seeds, and a little fruit, they’ll encourage you to stay the course. The controversy over the safety of low carbohydrate diets in pregnancy stems primarily from misconceptions around ketosis. It’s incorrect, but widely accepted, that ketosis during pregnancy is harmful to a developing baby. When I first dove into the research, I was shocked to find that studies on healthy, non-diabetic pregnant women (eating a “regular” diet) show a marked elevation in ketones after a 12-18 hour fast, which is akin to eating dinner at 8pm and having breakfast at 8am (or skipping breakfast entirely).[2] What’s more interesting is that pregnancy actually seems to favor a state of ketosis. Compared to non-pregnant women, blood ketone concentrations are about 3-fold higher in healthy pregnant women after an overnight fast.[3] And in late pregnancy, metabolism shifts to a state o Continue reading >>

Ketones In Urine

Ketones In Urine

I know this is an old post, but people may still be checking for answers. I work in a laboratory where we do urinalysis constantly all day every day. In a pregnant woman, you can see ketones in the urine in two, but separate, circumstances. First is ketones in combination with any urine glucose (sugar) level. This may be a sign of gestational diabetes and you should start asking your doctor questions about it. Second is ketones by themselves. I'm 12 weeks pregnant and had ketones in my urine and was instructed by my doctor to go to the ER and get IV fluids. This was directly related to my eating habits, which at that point were near null because of the morning sickness. Because I was eating so little, and barely able to keep water down, my body was using my fat stores to supply nutrients to the baby. This breakdown of fat in such large amounts causes ketones as a waste product, which is then excreted through your urine. Ketones occur in the absence of carbs, when your body starts to use fat for calories. You will see ketones when you are eating very low calorie, very low carb, or have impaired insulin function. Ketones are concentrated in a state of dehydration. Excess glucose in urine indicates eating too many carbs (if you're diabetic) and/or impaired insulin function. Both are hallmarked by sweet smelling urine. Make sure you eat small meals during the day and add a night time snack, with a protein, to prevent ketosis while sleeping. If you think you have diabetes see a physician. I am 38 weeks pregnant and my urin showed high ketones this week. My blood sugar was in "acceptable" level; however, my doctor said that the presence of ketones in my urine means I need to drink alot more water because my body is converting carbs to sugar faster than I can exp Continue reading >>

Video: What You Need To Know About Keto And Pregnancy

Video: What You Need To Know About Keto And Pregnancy

Is eating ketogenic safe for a pregnant woman? Whether I would continue to eat high-fat, low-carb, ketogenic if I got pregnant tomorrow. There’s a lot of misinformation on the interwebs about whether a high-fat eating style is safe for pregnancy. Today, I’m sharing whether I would continue to eat high-fat, low-carb, ketogenic if I got pregnant tomorrow. I bust through some keto pregnancy myths, breakdown the ketogenic eating style that may respond best for pregnant ladies and share how to reduce water retention and all around puffiness throughout your pregnancy. A must-watch if you’re eating high-fat, or interested in eating high-fat, and plan to be pregnant at some point in your life. For video transcription, scroll down. Highlights… Why it’s widely accepted that ketosis is dangerous for pregnant women How many ketones a fetus needs to flourish 5 ways to slightly adjust a ketogenic eating style to work for your pregnancy Resources… Are you pregnant or planning to be? How will you approach your eating style while pregnant? Let’s chat about it in the comments… Hey, ladies. I’m assuming that the individuals watching this show today are going to be primarily women because today we’re talking about pregnancy and whether or not eating high fat is okay when you’re pregnant or eating more ketogenic. Congratulations if you are trying to get pregnant or you’re already pregnant. That is awesome. I am super happy for you. Maybe you are eating ketogenic or more fat fueled like what I outlined in my program or you’re eating more high fat and you’re wondering like, “Is this safe for the growing baby inside me?” First off, I can’t tell you what to do specifically but what I can do is share what I would do if I were in your position. Preparing for this Continue reading >>

Ketosis During Pregnancy – Is It Safe?

Ketosis During Pregnancy – Is It Safe?

Ketosis is a state of metabolism in adults where the energy is supplied to the body by ketones present in the blood rather than glycolysis, where the energy comes from glucose. People often land up in a dilemma while judging whether ketosis is safe during pregnancy or not. The diet of a woman has to undergo certain changes in case she nears pregnancy. However, you should be aware of the effects of ketosis before you opt for such a diet. The body of a woman undergoes a lot of changes during pregnancy. Food choices are important when she tries to conceive. Here, you will have a detailed information about ketosis before and during pregnancy. Ketosis before Pregnancy Although people think that ketosis during pregnancy is harmful, in reality, it can help you get pregnant. If you want to draw your energy from ketone particles, you should plan a ketogenic diet. For an ordinary person, it is safe and even women trying to get pregnant can stick to such a meal. These meals are low-carb diets, and people can switch to these diets when they get pregnant. Well, it is important to know that ketosis is safe before you get pregnant. However, the norms are a bit different during pregnancy and you should stick to the rules. Read on to know whether it is safe during pregnancy or not. If you had heard that ketosis is harmful during pregnancy, you might be confusing it with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). This is completely different from ketosis that we are speaking of here. DKA has no relevance with nutritional ketosis and it is a far more harmful syndrome. It occurs in diabetic people where the level of insulin is not managed properly. It disrupts the balance of acid and base in the body. The level of blood sugar in the case of DKA is around three times the normal conditions. This situation Continue reading >>

Ketones In Gestational Diabetes

Ketones In Gestational Diabetes

As part of your gestational diabetes management, your doctor may ask you to test for ketones in your morning urine. If you have gestational diabetes, you should know about insulin, glucose, and ketones. When you eat, your body breaks down foods into usable sources of energy. Glucose is the sugar that results. Your body needs glucose for energy and your baby needs it to grow. In order to get glucose out of your blood and into your cells, insulin is required. Insulin is a hormone that you produce in your pancreas. "In gestational diabetes, hormones produced during pregnancy can interfere with insulin and make it hard to use glucose. If the pancreas cannot produce enough insulin to overcome the effects of the hormones, the blood sugar will rise," explains Louise McDonald, RN, clinical manager of maternity and pediatrics at Cleveland Clinic Home Care. "The body cannot use sugar without enough insulin. That causes the body to break down fats as a source of energy. Ketones are the waste products that are left over when the body burns some of its own fat for fuel. The ketones pass from the bloodstream into the urine," says McDonald. Why Are Ketones Important in Gestational Diabetes? The treatment of gestational diabetes is aimed at keeping your blood sugar under control. This is done with a combination of diet, exercise, and sometimes insulin treatment. Finding ketones in your urine is a warning sign that your blood sugar control is out of balance. High blood sugar. If you are taking in more sugar in your diet than your insulin can manage, your blood sugar goes up. This is dangerous for you and your baby. If your baby is exposed to more sugar then the baby needs, the baby will grow too fast. This condition, called macrosomia, can lead to problems during delivery. Low blood sug Continue reading >>

Expecting Our Paleo Baby

Expecting Our Paleo Baby

Here is a picture of my partner. She usually does not want to appear on my blog, but I convinced her to make an exception today. Judging by the not completely flat stomach, you might think that LCHF is bad for the weight. Although you’d also have to consider that she is nine months pregnant, with our first baby. We’ll see the final results around September 3. But so far avoiding sugar, bread, rice and pasta has been quite a success story. Common Problems Many pregnant women these days gain a disturbing amount of weigh, get all swollen and may be diagnosed with high blood pressure or even gestational diabetes. Check out the ring on my partners right hand. The midwife could hardly believe it when we were there last week, but there is not the slightest problem with rings. There is no swelling. Perhaps my darling has drawn a lucky ticket in the genetic lottery. But this spring, that’s not what it looked like. She became increasingly swollen, especially over the lower legs, and it was getting painful. The difference is that she ate considerably more carbs back then, because all the recommendations said that is important during pregnancy. I didn’t believe in those guidelines. But that didn’t matter much – you don’t get to be a prophet in your own home. The solution The turnaround came during the low carb cruise in early May. She talked to Dr Michael D. Fox , a specialist in fertility, who said that of course the swelling would go away if she avoided carbs, and yes, it was completely safe. He said that pregnant women are usually extra sensitive to sugar and starch (something that professor Lustig has later explained the reason for). So she abruptly stopped eating sugar, bread, pasta, potatoes and rice. And in two days (with plenty of urination) all the swelling w Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Once You’re Diagnosed

Gestational Diabetes: Once You’re Diagnosed

If you’re a pregnant woman, probably one of the last things you want to hear is that you have gestational diabetes. Your thoughts might range from, “What did I do to cause this?” to “Will my baby be OK?” First, keep in mind that it’s perfectly normal to feel scared and worried. Second, while gestational diabetes (GDM) is indeed serious, remember that, with proper management, you can have a healthy baby. Once you’re diagnosed If you find out that you have GDM, be prepared to learn a lot about diabetes! You’ll likely be referred to a diabetes educator and/or a dietitian. You might also be referred to an endocrinologist, a doctor who specializes in diabetes and other endocrine disorders. In most cases, you’ll be seen by a member of your health-care team about every two weeks. Be prepared to start checking your blood glucose with a meter, following a meal plan, checking your urine for ketones, recording your food and glucose levels, and possibly starting on insulin. In other words, be prepared to do some homework! Your team is there to support you and make sure that you receive the right treatment. Treating GDM There are a number of ways in which GDM is treated, and they all work together to help ensure that your blood glucose levels stay in a safe range throughout your pregnancy. Remember that the goal is to keep your blood glucose in a normal range; this is because, when blood glucose levels are too high, the extra glucose crosses the placenta to the baby. Too much glucose can cause your baby to be too large, and may cause other complications for both you and your baby during delivery and later on (such as Type 2 diabetes). Nutrition and meal planning. The saying that “you’re eating for two” during your pregnancy is partly correct. You ARE eating f Continue reading >>

Is Keto Dangerous While Pregnant, Breastfeeding, Or For Children?

Is Keto Dangerous While Pregnant, Breastfeeding, Or For Children?

A question I’ve come across seemingly increasingly in the past few months, is a variation of, is it safe for kids to eat keto, including women during pregnancy and breastfeeding? This is where a simple disambiguation between a well and poorly formulated diet should end the discussion but let’s dig a little bit deeper into the concerns themselves, studies on children, the validity thereof, what a good diet is and context. One of the applications of a well formulated ketogenic diet has been in treatment of PCOS with much success, though more research is needed. You can search for yourself to find more info on this and the specifics with lots of other blogs and anecdotes covering it out there, but between weight loss and improved hormone regulation from better food choices it’s a way to manage symptoms and issues associated with the disorder. Many women who see improvements have noted they end up with a surprise pregnancy after starting low carb. Though usually planned or at least semi-planned, you can find near endless anecdotes of despite several years of trying, a sudden ketobaby happened after a few weeks or months of low carb. Just search through //www.reddit.com/r/xxketo and /r/ketobabies for personal accounts thereof. If you’ve done prior research into keto, you should already know that improvements in endocrine function are one of the benefits with plenty of evidence to support it. So if you’ve found yourself with a surprise baby thanks to keto the next question is, can you, should you, or is it dangerous to continue while pregnant? Ketosis and Pregnancy: Thanks to Japan and low carb as a treatment for diabetes we do have some research done regarding the application of a low carb diet in pregnant mothers on ketone levels and their role. Aside from this, c Continue reading >>

Effects Of A Ketogenic Diet During Pregnancy On Embryonic Growth In The Mouse

Effects Of A Ketogenic Diet During Pregnancy On Embryonic Growth In The Mouse

Go to: The increasing use of the ketogenic diet (KD), particularly by women of child-bearing age, raises a question about its suitability during gestation. To date, no studies have thoroughly investigated the direct implications of a gestational ketogenic diet on embryonic development. To fill this knowledge gap we imaged CD-1 mouse embryos whose mothers were fed either a Standard Diet (SD) or a KD 30 days prior to, as well as during gestation. Images were collected at embryonic days (E) 13.5 using Optical Projection Tomography (OPT) and at E17.5 using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). An anatomical comparison of the SD and KD embryos revealed that at E13.5 the average KD embryo was volumetrically larger, possessed a relatively larger heart but smaller brain, and had a smaller pharynx, cervical spinal cord, hypothalamus, midbrain, and pons, compared with the average SD embryo. At E17.5 the KD embryo was found to be volumetrically smaller with a relatively smaller heart and thymus, but with enlarged cervical spine, thalamus, midbrain and pons. A ketogenic diet during gestation results in alterations in embryonic organ growth. Such alterations may be associated with organ dysfunction and potentially behavioral changes in postnatal life. Keywords: Ketogenic diet, Low-carbohydrate diet, Embryonic development, CD-1 mouse, Mouse imaging, Optical projection tomography, Magnetic resonance imaging An illustration of the animal-to-animal variation within the SD group at E13.5. The coloured traces are outlines of all linearly-aligned individual SD images, and the white region is a mask of the final average image. Click on the image to see a larger version. Embryonic size difference at E17.5. (A) A consensus average of all E17.5 embryos constructed using the SD and KD MRI embryo im Continue reading >>

Is Keto Safe For Pregnant Women?

Is Keto Safe For Pregnant Women?

Ketosis during pregnancy is a controversial topic. Health authorities and bloggers often praise low-carb diets for their ability to reverse infertility. But when it comes to low-carb during pregnancy, many of these same “experts” warn against the “dangers” of burning fat for fuel while pregnant. Most conventional medicine doctors would likely condemn this dietary choice as well. But is there any evidence to back up all of the fear mongering? The Evidence There are a few studies which on the surface seem to suggest possible complications with ketosis during pregnancy. Upon further investigation, however, they fall short of rational scrutiny. There aren’t many studies on pregnant women in ketosis. This likely due to the ethics and liability concerns involved with experimenting on vulnerable populations. It is important to note though that mountains of anecdotal evidence suggest that an intelligently formulated ketogenic is not only safe but may actually be beneficial to both mom and baby. Despite this, however, most mainstream doctors and media outlets have conflated ketosis with a dangerous condition called ketoacidosis and thus trumpet the dangers of keto during pregnancy. Ketosis vs. Ketoacidosis Much of the worry surrounding ketosis and pregnancy stems from a conflation of dietary ketosis with a dangerous metabolic state called ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis happens to diabetics and involves extremely high levels of glucose and ketones in the blood. Ketoacidosis is very different from ketosis and should not be a concern for non-diabetic pregnant women. So is ketosis safe during pregnancy? The Keto Pregnancy Connection Far from being harmful, ketosis is actually a natural part of every pregnancy. In fact, pregnant women are able to enter ketosis 3 times more quic Continue reading >>

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