diabetestalk.net

Are Ketones Bad During Pregnancy?

A Sweet Journey To Motherhood

A Sweet Journey To Motherhood

I wrote recently that my Endo instructed me to eat a snack around 2 or 3 in the morning in an attempt to eliminate the ketones I have been observing first thing in the morning. I was not happy about this early morning chore, but I am just trying to kep my eye on the prize: a healthy baby. I’ve been eating the snack all week and so far my ketones in the morning have dropped to negative or trace, so the snack seems to be working. But then I got to wondering … what is the big deal with a couple of ketones, anyway? Just because I am burning a little fat overnight instead of sugar, as long as my BGs are good, what’s the problem? I mean, I started this journey in the overweight category, so it is not like I am wasting away to nothing here. There is plenty of nourishment in the form of fat to be had for my growing baby. So I started researching. Naturally, Google was my first stop. I found surprisingly little about ketones short of a couple of very generic explanations of what ketones are and why we spill them. This article by Joslin, in particular, has a good basic explanation. As a refresher, when the body burns fat for fuel, ketones are produced and “spilled” in the urine. For us diabetics, this usually happens when we do not have enough insulin in our systems to convert the sugar in our blood to energy. Instead we burn fat and spill both the ketones and the sugar in our urine. This was not news to me. And because my blood sugars were good, the ketones were apparently due to a shortage of energy stores. That is, my baby was using up all of my excess energy stores and then some. As a result, my body was burning fat to keep up. What I really wanted to know, though, was how these ketones are affecting my baby? Sadly, there just does not seem to be much out there. The Continue reading >>

Is Keto Safe For Pregnant Women?

Is Keto Safe For Pregnant Women?

Ketosis during pregnancy is a controversial topic. Health authorities and bloggers often praise low-carb diets for their ability to reverse infertility. But when it comes to low-carb during pregnancy, many of these same “experts” warn against the “dangers” of burning fat for fuel while pregnant. Most conventional medicine doctors would likely condemn this dietary choice as well. But is there any evidence to back up all of the fear mongering? The Evidence There are a few studies which on the surface seem to suggest possible complications with ketosis during pregnancy. Upon further investigation, however, they fall short of rational scrutiny. There aren’t many studies on pregnant women in ketosis. This likely due to the ethics and liability concerns involved with experimenting on vulnerable populations. It is important to note though that mountains of anecdotal evidence suggest that an intelligently formulated ketogenic is not only safe but may actually be beneficial to both mom and baby. Despite this, however, most mainstream doctors and media outlets have conflated ketosis with a dangerous condition called ketoacidosis and thus trumpet the dangers of keto during pregnancy. Ketosis vs. Ketoacidosis Much of the worry surrounding ketosis and pregnancy stems from a conflation of dietary ketosis with a dangerous metabolic state called ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis happens to diabetics and involves extremely high levels of glucose and ketones in the blood. Ketoacidosis is very different from ketosis and should not be a concern for non-diabetic pregnant women. So is ketosis safe during pregnancy? The Keto Pregnancy Connection Far from being harmful, ketosis is actually a natural part of every pregnancy. In fact, pregnant women are able to enter ketosis 3 times more quic Continue reading >>

Dangers Of Dehydration & Ketones In Pregnancy

Dangers Of Dehydration & Ketones In Pregnancy

I just spent the last weekend in the hospital getting a lesson from my doctor on the dangers of dehydration and ketones. It's common enough in pregnancy that I felt I would share with all of you. I was not even aware I was dehydrated, as I didn't feel any of the symptoms I will describe below. What is dehydration? Simply put, it's where your body eliminates more water than is being replaced. In your first trimester this is usually brought on my vomiting caused by "morning" sickness. Other culprits can be airplane travel and humidity. It is vitally important that you are drinking plenty of water throughout the entire day. A good rule of thumb is one glass for you; one glass for baby once per hour. Later in pregnancy, 2nd and 3rd trimester, dehydration can cause preterm labor. Actually, dehydration is the third most common reason that women experience preterm labor. When your doctor has you pee in a cup, they are checking for many things, one of them being dehydration and the other being ketones. Dehydration Symptoms: Signs and symptoms of dehydration include: Thirst. This is the first sign, and probably the most ignored. Listen to your body – if you’re thirsty, your body is trying to tell you something. You should try to maintain a schedule of drinking at least one glass of water an hour (more if needed). Dizziness. Dehydration may lead to feelings of dizziness, lightheadedness or vertigo, especially when standing up, bending over, or kneeling. This dizziness symptom is due to low blood pressure caused by dehydration. Headaches. Dehydration is a major cause of headaches, particularly migraines, in pregnant moms and non-pregnant folks alike. Don’t dismiss your headaches as hormonal (although, those can be a contributor). Make sure you’re drinking at least 10 pints Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Once You’re Diagnosed

Gestational Diabetes: Once You’re Diagnosed

If you’re a pregnant woman, probably one of the last things you want to hear is that you have gestational diabetes. Your thoughts might range from, “What did I do to cause this?” to “Will my baby be OK?” First, keep in mind that it’s perfectly normal to feel scared and worried. Second, while gestational diabetes (GDM) is indeed serious, remember that, with proper management, you can have a healthy baby. Once you’re diagnosed If you find out that you have GDM, be prepared to learn a lot about diabetes! You’ll likely be referred to a diabetes educator and/or a dietitian. You might also be referred to an endocrinologist, a doctor who specializes in diabetes and other endocrine disorders. In most cases, you’ll be seen by a member of your health-care team about every two weeks. Be prepared to start checking your blood glucose with a meter, following a meal plan, checking your urine for ketones, recording your food and glucose levels, and possibly starting on insulin. In other words, be prepared to do some homework! Your team is there to support you and make sure that you receive the right treatment. Treating GDM There are a number of ways in which GDM is treated, and they all work together to help ensure that your blood glucose levels stay in a safe range throughout your pregnancy. Remember that the goal is to keep your blood glucose in a normal range; this is because, when blood glucose levels are too high, the extra glucose crosses the placenta to the baby. Too much glucose can cause your baby to be too large, and may cause other complications for both you and your baby during delivery and later on (such as Type 2 diabetes). Nutrition and meal planning. The saying that “you’re eating for two” during your pregnancy is partly correct. You ARE eating f Continue reading >>

Causes & Diet For Ketones In Urine During Pregnancy

Causes & Diet For Ketones In Urine During Pregnancy

Ketone bodies are formed as a result of metabolism of fatty acids. There are primarily three kinds produced by fatty acid metabolism, viz. acetone, aceto-acetic acid, and beta-hydroxybutyric acid. These ketones are formed in the kidney and liver and are transported to other body tissues and converted to energy in the citric acid cycle.As such, nominal production of ketones is required for normal functioning of the body. However, when there is excessive production of ketone bodies, the latter gets accumulated in the blood and begins to appear in the urine. This condition is medically referred to as ketonuria. Yellow urine during pregnancy may become a cause for concern for many women. However it ... Even women who are suffering from diabetes can have a healthy pregnancy, with the help of ... Every month, an egg is released from the ovaries. If this egg is fertilized by sperm, it ... Pregnancy brings with it numerous changes in a woman’s body and these changes have ... Causes of Ketones formation in Urine (Ketonuria) Some of the causes of ketonuria are metabolic disorders like diabetes and renal glycosuria, abnormal dietary patterns like starving or fasting, low carbohydrate intake, anorexia, and prolonged vomiting. One of the other causes of ketonuria is enhanced rate of metabolism, which is predominantly seen during pregnancy, lactation, and even in hyperthyroidism.The impact of ketones in urine during pregnancy is still a matter of apprehension. Some researchers believe that high ketones in urine during pregnancy can cause lower IQ and lack of concentration and memory in the offspring, while others deny this. There is no definitive research to support this belief, and as such, it cannot be inferred that presence of ketones in urine during pregnancy can adversely affe Continue reading >>

Urine Tests For Diabetes: Glucose Levels And Ketones

Urine Tests For Diabetes: Glucose Levels And Ketones

The human body primarily runs on glucose. When your body is low on glucose, or if you have diabetes and don’t have enough insulin to help your cells absorb the glucose, your body starts breaking down fats for energy. Ketones (chemically known as ketone bodies) are byproducts of the breakdown of fatty acids. The breakdown of fat for fuel and the creation of ketones is a normal process for everyone. In a person without diabetes, insulin, glucagon, and other hormones prevent ketone levels in the blood from getting too high. However, people with diabetes are at risk for ketone buildup in their blood. If left untreated, people with type 1 diabetes are at risk for developing a condition called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). While rare, it’s possible for people with type 2 diabetes to experience DKA in certain circumstances as well. If you have diabetes, you need to be especially aware of the symptoms that having too many ketones in your body can cause. These include: If you don’t get treatment, the symptoms can progress to: a fruity breath odor stomach pain trouble breathing You should always seek immediate medical attention if your ketone levels are high. Testing your blood or urine to measure your ketone levels can all be done at home. At-home testing kits are available for both types of tests, although urine testing continues to be more common. Urine tests are available without a prescription at most drugstores, or you can buy them online. You should test your urine or blood for ketones when any of the following occurs: Your blood sugar is higher than 240 mg/dL. You feel sick or nauseated, regardless of your blood sugar reading. To perform a urine test, you urinate into a clean container and dip the test strip into the urine. For a child who isn’t potty-trained, a pa Continue reading >>

What Are Ketones?

What Are Ketones?

Ketones are an acid remaining when the body burns its own fat. When the body has insufficient insulin (or cannot use sufficient insulin), it cannot get glucose (sugar) from the blood into the body's cells to use as energy and will instead begin to burn fat stores. When the body is burning too much fat, it may cause ketones to become present as by product shown in your urine. Burning fat instead of glucose can lead to a condition called ketosis. It can make you feel poorly, with lack of energy. If you have healthy or low BMI it can also be dangerous as you may also lose too much weight. Testing for ketones Your urine is usually tested for ketones during your diabetes clinic appointments. You may also be tested for ketones if you have been taken into hospital with high blood sugar levels. Ketones are detected by testing the urine with a dip stick. They are measured on a scale with 0 being lowest and 4++ being the highest. The test sticks can be purchased from a pharmacy or online and in some cases you may be prescribed test strips for home testing for if you get blood sugar levels over a certain level. Your diabetes midwife will usually complete ketone tests when you attend clinic appointments, so it is not necessary to purchase dip sticks for home use unless you're advised to by a medical professional. Blood ketones can also be tested and are much more accurate than the urine dip sticks. Type 1 diabetics may be given ketone blood testing monitors. Why are ketones common in ladies diagnosed with gestational diabetes? Ketones can be detected when you have not eaten for a long period of time and may be found in samples taken in the morning due to fasting overnight. It is common for mothers with gestational diabetes to develop ketones due to limiting too many carbohydrates f Continue reading >>

Is Safe While Pregnant And/or Breastfeeding?

Is Safe While Pregnant And/or Breastfeeding?

KETO//OS is quite safe during pregnancy and while breastfeeding. It is recommended to choose the caffeine free Keto//OS and drink plenty of water. Ketones naturally exist in the body, and are created as a normal process of fat metabolism. KETO//OS simply provides these ketones from an exogenous source, but they have the same beneficial impact. However, if you suffer from any medical conditions, it is always safe to consult your health care provider prior to starting any new nutritional supplement. Continue reading >>

Is Keto Safe During Pregnancy? Nutritionists Don't Recommend It

Is Keto Safe During Pregnancy? Nutritionists Don't Recommend It

When you find out you're pregnant, a million questions pop into your mind. If it's your first pregnancy, two million questions pop into your mind. One of the most common questions about pregnancy is whether or not you can keep your diet the same as it was before pregnancy. This is an especially important question to ask if you've been on a low-carb diet such as keto. You need to know: is keto safe during pregnancy? According to the official keto website, the keto diet is a low-carb diet where the body produces ketones in the liver to be used as energy rather than carbohydrates. Much like other low-carb, high-fat diets, the keto diet promises significant results when it comes to weight loss. But can a diet that recommends 20 grams or less of carbohydrates a day help provide proper nutrition for you and your baby? According to nutritionist and health coach Erin Lorrain, the answer is no. Lorrain isn't a fan of the keto diet for regular women, let alone pregnant women. "The keto diet essentially tricks your body into thinking you're starving, causing your body to go into ketosis," Lorrain says. She goes on to explain that when you eat carbohydrates, your body produces glucose and insulin — two substances you need to survive. "Glucose and insulin help control your energy levels," Lorrain says. "And in order to maintain a healthy, balanced, diet, you should have healthy, balanced levels of glucose and insulin." This means you shouldn't survive solely on carbohydrates, but you shouldn't cut them out, either. Just like glucose is one of the main sources of energy for your body, glucose is a main source of energy for your growing baby, according to a study done by Yale University. The study goes on to state that to heavily restrict any source of energy during your child's dev Continue reading >>

Guest Blog Post: Is It Safe To Go Low Carb During Pregnancy?

Guest Blog Post: Is It Safe To Go Low Carb During Pregnancy?

Today my friend and colleague, Lily Nichols, a fellow registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator, shares her insight on carbohydrate-restricted diets during pregnancy. This is a controversial topic that I believe deserves more attention and investigation, which Lily does brilliantly in the following article. Is It Safe to Go Low Carb During Pregnancy? With the wide adoption of low-carbohydrate diets, many people question if they are safe during pregnancy. While quite a few women use a lower carbohydrate diet to conceive (since they are especially useful for women struggling with infertility[1]), most medical professionals discourage women from continuing this diet during pregnancy. I find it ironic that if you tell your doctor that you plan to eat low carb during pregnancy, they’ll say it’s unsafe, but if you say you plan to eat a diet based on fresh vegetables, meat, fish, eggs, dairy, nuts, seeds, and a little fruit, they’ll encourage you to stay the course. The controversy over the safety of low carbohydrate diets in pregnancy stems primarily from misconceptions around ketosis. It’s incorrect, but widely accepted, that ketosis during pregnancy is harmful to a developing baby. When I first dove into the research, I was shocked to find that studies on healthy, non-diabetic pregnant women (eating a “regular” diet) show a marked elevation in ketones after a 12-18 hour fast, which is akin to eating dinner at 8pm and having breakfast at 8am (or skipping breakfast entirely).[2] What’s more interesting is that pregnancy actually seems to favor a state of ketosis. Compared to non-pregnant women, blood ketone concentrations are about 3-fold higher in healthy pregnant women after an overnight fast.[3] And in late pregnancy, metabolism shifts to a state o Continue reading >>

Effects Of A Ketogenic Diet During Pregnancy On Embryonic Growth In The Mouse

Effects Of A Ketogenic Diet During Pregnancy On Embryonic Growth In The Mouse

Go to: The increasing use of the ketogenic diet (KD), particularly by women of child-bearing age, raises a question about its suitability during gestation. To date, no studies have thoroughly investigated the direct implications of a gestational ketogenic diet on embryonic development. To fill this knowledge gap we imaged CD-1 mouse embryos whose mothers were fed either a Standard Diet (SD) or a KD 30 days prior to, as well as during gestation. Images were collected at embryonic days (E) 13.5 using Optical Projection Tomography (OPT) and at E17.5 using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). An anatomical comparison of the SD and KD embryos revealed that at E13.5 the average KD embryo was volumetrically larger, possessed a relatively larger heart but smaller brain, and had a smaller pharynx, cervical spinal cord, hypothalamus, midbrain, and pons, compared with the average SD embryo. At E17.5 the KD embryo was found to be volumetrically smaller with a relatively smaller heart and thymus, but with enlarged cervical spine, thalamus, midbrain and pons. A ketogenic diet during gestation results in alterations in embryonic organ growth. Such alterations may be associated with organ dysfunction and potentially behavioral changes in postnatal life. Keywords: Ketogenic diet, Low-carbohydrate diet, Embryonic development, CD-1 mouse, Mouse imaging, Optical projection tomography, Magnetic resonance imaging An illustration of the animal-to-animal variation within the SD group at E13.5. The coloured traces are outlines of all linearly-aligned individual SD images, and the white region is a mask of the final average image. Click on the image to see a larger version. Embryonic size difference at E17.5. (A) A consensus average of all E17.5 embryos constructed using the SD and KD MRI embryo im Continue reading >>

Urine Tests During Pregnancy

Urine Tests During Pregnancy

Urine tests provide your doctor or midwife with important information about diseases or conditions that could potentially affect you or your growing baby. That's why at each prenatal visit, you'll be asked to give a urine sample as part of your regular exam. This sample is used to help determine if you have diabetes, kidney disease, or a bladder infection by measuring the levels of sugar, protein, bacteria, or other substances in your urine. The test is routine and painless and could prevent a lot of trouble down the road. What does a urine test involve? Urine can be collected any time of day. You will most likely be given a sterile cup to collect a sample before your exam. Before urinating, use a sterile towelette to wipe your genitals from front to back, and then release a small amount of urine into the toilet -- this prevents the sample from being contaminated with bacteria or other secretions that may invalidate the results. Put the container in your urine stream, and collect at least one to two ounces. This sample is then checked with chemically treated testing strips or sticks, and the results are usually available right away. If more analysis is necessary, your urine may be sent to a lab for additional assessment. What can a urine test detect? Sugar Typically, there is very little or no sugar (glucose) in urine during pregnancy. But when blood sugar levels in the body are too high, excess sugar can end up in the urine. This can be seen with gestational diabetes, a form of diabetes that only develops during pregnancy. It occurs when pregnancy hormones disrupt the body's ability to use insulin, a chemical that turns blood sugar into energy. A doctor often orders a blood test for diabetes early in your pregnancy if he or she knows you have other risk factors, like a Continue reading >>

Raspberry Ketones During Pregnancy - Uses And Side Effects You Should Be Aware Of

Raspberry Ketones During Pregnancy - Uses And Side Effects You Should Be Aware Of

Have you gained a lot of weight during pregnancy? Are you feeling bad that you no longer fit into your old jeans? Is all of it too much for you to handle? Do you consume or plan to consume Raspberry Ketones as a supplementary for weight loss? Are you worried about the side effects of the same on your unborn baby? If yes, then read our post to understand how safe is raspberry ketones during pregnancy. What Are Raspberry Ketones? Raspberry Ketones are chemicals that occur in the Red Raspberry. The chemical not only promotes weight loss but also helps increase the mass of a lean body. Scientists conclude that Raspberry Ketones have a similar molecular structure like capsicum which prevents weight gain. In light of these conclusions, an experiment on mice that proved that Raspberry Ketones do trigger weight loss. Raspberry Ketones has become popular since it was advertised worldwide in 2012. After many satisfied customers, this product is termed as a miracle weight loss supplement. Raspberry Ketones help boost the metabolism rate of the body. The supplement actively works on the hormone called as adiponectin that causes the weight gain of the human body (1). [ Read: Is It Safe To Lose Weight During Pregnancy ] Raspberry Ketones Effectiveness And Uses: The primary uses of Raspberry Ketones are: Hair Gain: Studies prove that using Raspberry Ketones on the scalp will help in hair gain. Weight Loss: Many satisfied customers have seconded this statement that Raspberry Ketones help in weight loss. Skin Care: Studies prove that the application of Raspberry Ketones helps skin tightening and improves its elasticity. [ Read: Consumption Of Fish Oil During Pregnancy ] Side Effects Of Taking Raspberry Ketones While Pregnant: Can you take raspberry ketones when pregnant? Raspberry Keton Continue reading >>

Are Ketones In Urine During Pregnancy A Problem

Are Ketones In Urine During Pregnancy A Problem

Most women are flustered by frequent urine and blood tests for monitoring healthy pregnancy. Routine checkups paired with dietary restrictions are not a pleasant experience for any women. However, any condition should not be overlooked during those laborious nine months of gestation. If your urine report indicates presence of ketones, then stop and read below! Although ketones in urine during pregnancy may not lead to complications in pregnancy, here’s some food for thought: What are ketones? Ketones are acid bodies which are produced when fat is broken down by the body instead of carbohydrates to keep the body working. Causes This usually happens, when there is shortage of carbohydrates in body, probably when one has not eaten for a long time. Secondly, if the body is unable to obtain glucose from blood, then the liver breaks down fats which produces ketones. The lower rate of insulin in blood, like when suffering from diabetes or pancreatic disorders may not be producing sufficient quantities of insulin to break down sugar/glucose from the food we eat in usable form. Starvation: If carbohydrates are not provided to the body and the fat is continuously broken down to obtain energy, then resulting ketones keep accumulating which then become detectable in blood and urine. Dehydration Low-carbohydrate diet: When pregnant, one needs approx 300 calories more per baby. If enough calories are not being provided to body, then liver breaks down fat or protein to obtain energy. Eating disorders: Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa Metabolic disorders Stress Symptoms vomiting or nausea excessive sweating weakness fatigue headache dizziness bad breath abdominal pain feeling thirsty all the time If you experience any of the above symptoms during pregnancy, its sensible to inform yo Continue reading >>

Ketones In Gestational Diabetes

Ketones In Gestational Diabetes

As part of your gestational diabetes management, your doctor may ask you to test for ketones in your morning urine. If you have gestational diabetes, you should know about insulin, glucose, and ketones. When you eat, your body breaks down foods into usable sources of energy. Glucose is the sugar that results. Your body needs glucose for energy and your baby needs it to grow. In order to get glucose out of your blood and into your cells, insulin is required. Insulin is a hormone that you produce in your pancreas. "In gestational diabetes, hormones produced during pregnancy can interfere with insulin and make it hard to use glucose. If the pancreas cannot produce enough insulin to overcome the effects of the hormones, the blood sugar will rise," explains Louise McDonald, RN, clinical manager of maternity and pediatrics at Cleveland Clinic Home Care. "The body cannot use sugar without enough insulin. That causes the body to break down fats as a source of energy. Ketones are the waste products that are left over when the body burns some of its own fat for fuel. The ketones pass from the bloodstream into the urine," says McDonald. Why Are Ketones Important in Gestational Diabetes? The treatment of gestational diabetes is aimed at keeping your blood sugar under control. This is done with a combination of diet, exercise, and sometimes insulin treatment. Finding ketones in your urine is a warning sign that your blood sugar control is out of balance. High blood sugar. If you are taking in more sugar in your diet than your insulin can manage, your blood sugar goes up. This is dangerous for you and your baby. If your baby is exposed to more sugar then the baby needs, the baby will grow too fast. This condition, called macrosomia, can lead to problems during delivery. Low blood sug Continue reading >>

More in ketosis