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Are Ketones Acidic Or Alkaline

25+ Ph Balancing Foods For The Keto Diet

25+ Ph Balancing Foods For The Keto Diet

There are lots of pH balancing foods on the keto diet, despite it being full of meat which can naturally lower your pH – not a good thing! A keto diet is full of meat and can naturally lower your pH, which can do a whole host of bad things to your body. When your body is acidic, you can actually breed cancer rather than scaring it away, (and one of my main reasons for going keto is to scare cancer away!). Thankfully, there are lots of pH balancing foods on the keto diet. Three years ago I went to a natural health clinic where they tested my pH. This was about a month after being in ketosis for the first time. One major red flag that came up was that my pH was around 6 when it’s supposed to be between 6.4 and 7.4, ideally closer to the 7.4. In fact, they say Cancer dies at a pH of 8. A pH of 6 might not look far off, but it is. A reading of 5.5 is acidosis. Anything below 7 is acidic. To confirm whether you have low pH, all you have to do is buy some pH strips at your local medical supplies store (or online, or perhaps at your local pharmacist, but CVS doesn’t have them.) I keep them in my bathroom. I also run a business, so my stress levels are high all day, every day, which can contribute to a low pH (aka being highly acidic). What also contributes is a diet full o’ meat, amongst other things. When your pH is low, you also absorb 20% less oxygen too; It’s not healthy. Adding pH balancing foods to your diet can help, and is pretty much necessary for a balanced keto diet. It can’t be bacon and eggs all the time! Adding pH balancing foods to your day Something I was told when I got this diagnosis was that when you follow a ketogenic diet, it’s really important to drink lemon water every day. You might think lemons would make a person more acidic, but one web Continue reading >>

The Alkaline Diet: Balancing Acid And Base

The Alkaline Diet: Balancing Acid And Base

If you thought fashion was subject to trends, you should take a look at diets. A couple of weeks ago I wrote about the raw food diet. This week, I’ll focus on what’s called the “alkaline diet,” which is sometimes called the “alkaline acid diet.” Getting Your “pH-acts” Straight My guess is that most of you took chemistry at some point in your school career. Unless you completely tuned out, you may remember a discussion of acid-base balance, which is measured by something called “pH.” The human body has a particular range of pH that it needs to be at for good health. The pH is simply a measure of acid-base balance in the body. A pH of 0 is very acidic, 7 is neutral, and a 14 is very alkaline. In normal situations, the body likes to be at a pH of 7.35 to 7.45. The stomach, however, which is very acidic (thanks to hydrochloric acid), has a much lower pH of 1.35 to 3.50. In a condition known as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), ketones, which are acids, build up in the blood and urine. If DKA isn’t treated promptly, the condition may be life-threatening. Why an Alkaline Diet? The premise behind the alkaline diet dates back, not surprisingly, to our hunter-gatherer ancestors. Way back then, the diet consisted largely of fresh fruit, roots, vegetables, and tubers. Things apparently went awry when grains, meats, sugars, and dairy foods were introduced, and the diet became more “acidic.” Promoters of the alkaline diet believe that the typical Western diet (which definitely has its flaws) makes the blood more acidic and upsets the acid-base balance in the body. In addition, an acidic diet is believed (by proponents of the alkaline diet) to lead to a loss of potassium, magnesium, calcium, and sodium from the body. Hence, the alkaline diet should be followed to Continue reading >>

Ketone

Ketone

Not to be confused with ketone bodies. Ketone group Acetone In chemistry, a ketone (alkanone) /ˈkiːtoʊn/ is an organic compound with the structure RC(=O)R', where R and R' can be a variety of carbon-containing substituents. Ketones and aldehydes are simple compounds that contain a carbonyl group (a carbon-oxygen double bond). They are considered "simple" because they do not have reactive groups like −OH or −Cl attached directly to the carbon atom in the carbonyl group, as in carboxylic acids containing −COOH.[1] Many ketones are known and many are of great importance in industry and in biology. Examples include many sugars (ketoses) and the industrial solvent acetone, which is the smallest ketone. Nomenclature and etymology[edit] The word ketone is derived from Aketon, an old German word for acetone.[2][3] According to the rules of IUPAC nomenclature, ketones are named by changing the suffix -ane of the parent alkane to -anone. The position of the carbonyl group is usually denoted by a number. For the most important ketones, however, traditional nonsystematic names are still generally used, for example acetone and benzophenone. These nonsystematic names are considered retained IUPAC names,[4] although some introductory chemistry textbooks use systematic names such as "2-propanone" or "propan-2-one" for the simplest ketone (CH3−CO−CH3) instead of "acetone". The common names of ketones are obtained by writing separately the names of the two alkyl groups attached to the carbonyl group, followed by "ketone" as a separate word. The names of the alkyl groups are written alphabetically. When the two alkyl groups are the same, the prefix di- is added before the name of alkyl group. The positions of other groups are indicated by Greek letters, the α-carbon being th Continue reading >>

The Rate Of The Alkaline Chlorination Of Ketones

The Rate Of The Alkaline Chlorination Of Ketones

Note: In lieu of an abstract, this is the article's first page. This user does not have a subscription to this publication. Please contact your librarian to recommend that your institution subscribe to this publication. Purchase temporary access to this content. Use your free ACS Member Universal Access (if available) Continue reading >>

Emedicinehealth Medical Reference From Healthwise

Emedicinehealth Medical Reference From Healthwise

A A A Urine Test Test Overview A urine test checks different components of urine, a waste product made by the kidneys. A regular urine test may be done to help find the cause of symptoms. The test can give information about your health and problems you may have. The kidneys take out waste material, minerals, fluids, and other substances from the blood to be passed in the urine. Urine has hundreds of different body wastes. What you eat and drink, how much you exercise, and how well your kidneys work can affect what is in your urine. More than 100 different tests can be done on urine. A regular urinalysis often includes the following tests: Color. Many things affect urine color, including fluid balance, diet, medicines, and diseases. How dark or light the color is tells you how much water is in it. Vitamin B supplements can turn urine bright yellow. Some medicines, blackberries, beets, rhubarb, or blood in the urine can turn urine red-brown. Clarity. Urine is normally clear. Bacteria, blood, sperm, crystals, or mucus can make urine look cloudy. Odor. Urine does not smell very strong, but it has a slightly "nutty" odor. Some diseases cause a change in the odor of urine. For example, an infection with E. coli bacteria can cause a bad odor, while diabetes or starvation can cause a sweet, fruity odor. Specific gravity. This checks the amount of substances in the urine. It also shows how well the kidneys balance the amount of water in urine. The higher the specific gravity, the more solid material is in the urine. When you drink a lot of fluid, your kidneys make urine with a high amount of water in it, which has a low specific gravity. When you do not drink fluids, your kidneys make urine with a small amount of water in it, which has a high specific gravity. pH. The pH is Continue reading >>

Acid-base Balance And Blood Ph

Acid-base Balance And Blood Ph

Acid-base Balance and pH Blood pH The term pH means potentials of Hydrogen. Acidity and alkalinity are expressed on the pH scale, which ranges from 0 (strongly acidic) to 14 (strongly basic, or alkaline). A pH of 7.0, in the middle of this scale, is neutral. Blood is normally slightly basic, alkaline, with a pH range of 7.35 to 7.45. To function properly, the body maintains the pH of blood close to 7.40. An important property of blood is its degree of acidity and alkalinity, and this is referred to as acid-base balance. The acidity or alkalinity of the blood is indicated on the pH scale. - The acidity level increases when the level of acidic compounds in the blood rises or when the level of alkaline compounds in the blood falls. Alkalinity levels increases with the reverse process. - The level of acidic or alkaline compounds in the body rises through increased intake, production, or decreased elimination and falls through decreased intake, production, or increased elimination. The Importance of Blood pH Blood pH and Cell Health; we live and die at a cellular level. The blood pH has a serious effect on all of the body’s systems and the body uses different mechanisms to control the blood’s acid-base balance. The blood’s acid-base balance is controlled by the body because even minor deviations from the normal range can severely affect the brain, arteries, the heart, muscles, and many organs. It can contribute to overwhelming the body leading to serious disease such as cancer. “Inflammatory disorders often increase the risk of cancer” - Merck: Risk Factors for Cancer “If the pH deviates too far in either direction, cells become poisoned by their own toxic waste and die. An imbalance pH can cause serious health problems and can lead to the progression of most deg Continue reading >>

Ketone Bodies

Ketone Bodies

Ketone bodies Acetone Acetoacetic acid (R)-beta-Hydroxybutyric acid Ketone bodies are three water-soluble molecules (acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, and their spontaneous breakdown product, acetone) that are produced by the liver from fatty acids[1] during periods of low food intake (fasting), carbohydrate restrictive diets, starvation, prolonged intense exercise,[2], alcoholism or in untreated (or inadequately treated) type 1 diabetes mellitus. These ketone bodies are readily picked up by the extra-hepatic tissues, and converted into acetyl-CoA which then enters the citric acid cycle and is oxidized in the mitochondria for energy.[3] In the brain, ketone bodies are also used to make acetyl-CoA into long-chain fatty acids. Ketone bodies are produced by the liver under the circumstances listed above (i.e. fasting, starving, low carbohydrate diets, prolonged exercise and untreated type 1 diabetes mellitus) as a result of intense gluconeogenesis, which is the production of glucose from non-carbohydrate sources (not including fatty acids).[1] They are therefore always released into the blood by the liver together with newly produced glucose, after the liver glycogen stores have been depleted (these glycogen stores are depleted after only 24 hours of fasting)[1]. When two acetyl-CoA molecules lose their -CoAs, (or Co-enzyme A groups) they can form a (covalent) dimer called acetoacetate. Beta-hydroxybutyrate is a reduced form of acetoacetate, in which the ketone group is converted into an alcohol (or hydroxyl) group (see illustration on the right). Both are 4-carbon molecules, that can readily be converted back into acetyl-CoA by most tissues of the body, with the notable exception of the liver. Acetone is the decarboxylated form of acetoacetate which cannot be converted Continue reading >>

Oxidation Of Aldehydes And Ketones

Oxidation Of Aldehydes And Ketones

This page looks at ways of distinguishing between aldehydes and ketones using oxidizing agents such as acidified potassium dichromate(VI) solution, Tollens' reagent, Fehling's solution and Benedict's solution. Why do aldehydes and ketones behave differently? You will remember that the difference between an aldehyde and a ketone is the presence of a hydrogen atom attached to the carbon-oxygen double bond in the aldehyde. Ketones don't have that hydrogen. The presence of that hydrogen atom makes aldehydes very easy to oxidize (i.e., they are strong reducing agents). Because ketones do not have that particular hydrogen atom, they are resistant to oxidation, and only very strong oxidizing agents like potassium manganate (VII) solution (potassium permanganate solution) oxidize ketones. However, they do it in a destructive way, breaking carbon-carbon bonds. Provided you avoid using these powerful oxidizing agents, you can easily tell the difference between an aldehyde and a ketone. Aldehydes are easily oxidized by all sorts of different oxidizing agents: ketones are not. What is formed when aldehydes are oxidized? It depends on whether the reaction is done under acidic or alkaline conditions. Under acidic conditions, the aldehyde is oxidized to a carboxylic acid. Under alkaline conditions, this couldn't form because it would react with the alkali. A salt is formed instead. Building equations for the oxidation reactions If you need to work out the equations for these reactions, the only reliable way of building them is to use electron-half-equations. The half-equation for the oxidation of the aldehyde obviously varies depending on whether you are doing the reaction under acidic or alkaline conditions. Under acidic conditions: Under alkaline conditions: These half-equations are Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis Versus Ketosis

Ketoacidosis Versus Ketosis

Some medical professionals confuse ketoacidosis, an extremely abnormal form of ketosis, with the normal benign ketosis associated with ketogenic diets and fasting states in the body. They will then tell you that ketosis is dangerous. Testing Laboratory Microbiology - Air Quality - Mold Asbestos - Environmental - Lead emsl.com Ketosis is NOT Ketoacidosis The difference between the two conditions is a matter of volume and flow rate*: Benign nutritional ketosis is a controlled, insulin regulated process which results in a mild release of fatty acids and ketone body production in response to either a fast from food, or a reduction in carbohydrate intake. Ketoacidosis is driven by a lack of insulin in the body. Without insulin, blood sugar rises to high levels and stored fat streams from fat cells. This excess amount of fat metabolism results in the production of abnormal quantities of ketones. The combination of high blood sugar and high ketone levels can upset the normal acid/base balance in the blood and become dangerous. In order to reach a state of ketoacidosis, insulin levels must be so low that the regulation of blood sugar and fatty acid flow is impaired. *See this reference paper. Here's a table of the actual numbers to show the differences in magnitude: Body Condition Quantity of Ketones Being Produced After a meal: 0.1 mmol/L Overnight Fast: 0.3 mmol/L Ketogenic Diet (Nutritional ketosis): 1-8 mmol/L >20 Days Fasting: 10 mmol/L Uncontrolled Diabetes (Ketoacidosis): >20 mmol/L Here's a more detailed explanation: Fact 1: Every human body maintains the blood and cellular fluids within a very narrow range between being too acidic (low pH) and too basic (high pH). If the blood pH gets out of the normal range, either too low or too high, big problems happen. Fact 2: The Continue reading >>

The Acid-alkaline Myth: Part 2

The Acid-alkaline Myth: Part 2

I don’t buy it. Where is the evidence? It does not exit. Interestingly, Mercola keeps harping on how there is no evidence that root canals are safe, yet he provides no real evidence to back his claim. I am not a big fan of Mercola anyway. In my opinion he has become too sensationalistic in his writings hyping stuff up and presenting just flat out false information. I have written rebuttals to many of his bogus claims a number of times. You can find many of these on my MedCapsules.com site by searching for “Mercola” on the site. Mercola is on the board of the Weston Price Foundation, which in my opinion is just as much of a joke. For example, Mercola and the Western Price Foundation keep posting completely bogus information on soy since its biggest competition is the beef and dairy industries that help support the Western Price Foundation. The one I find most ridiculous and funny is their claim that consuming soy is the equivalent of taking 5 birth control pills due to soy’s high phytoestrogen content. Not only is this an outrageous lie, but it is also funny because Mercola claims flax seed a “health food”. Apparently Mercola does not realize that flax seed is nearly 4 times higher in phytoestrogens than raw soy!!! In addition, Mercola sells resveratrol, which is a concentrated phytoestrogen. And he makes no mention of the naturally occurring estrogen in beef and dairy that is thousands of times more powerful than the phytoestrogens found in ALL plants. This is just one of many claims made by Mercola I have debunked so I don’t put any real faith in anything he claims anymore. In fact, the article by Mercola you linked gives a great example how Mercola really sensationalizes his articles. He is discussing how Price was able to cause heart attacks and disease Continue reading >>

Reactions Of Aldehydes And Ketones

Reactions Of Aldehydes And Ketones

Aldehydes and ketones undergo a variety of reactions that lead to many different products. The most common reactions are nucleophilic addition reactions, which lead to the formation of alcohols, alkenes, diols, cyanohydrins (RCH(OH)C&tbond;N), and imines R 2C&dbond;NR), to mention a few representative examples. The main reactions of the carbonyl group are nucleophilic additions to the carbon‐oxygen double bond. As shown below, this addition consists of adding a nucleophile and a hydrogen across the carbon‐oxygen double bond. Due to differences in electronegativities, the carbonyl group is polarized. The carbon atom has a partial positive charge, and the oxygen atom has a partially negative charge. Aldehydes are usually more reactive toward nucleophilic substitutions than ketones because of both steric and electronic effects. In aldehydes, the relatively small hydrogen atom is attached to one side of the carbonyl group, while a larger R group is affixed to the other side. In ketones, however, R groups are attached to both sides of the carbonyl group. Thus, steric hindrance is less in aldehydes than in ketones. Electronically, aldehydes have only one R group to supply electrons toward the partially positive carbonyl carbon, while ketones have two electron‐supplying groups attached to the carbonyl carbon. The greater amount of electrons being supplied to the carbonyl carbon, the less the partial positive charge on this atom and the weaker it will become as a nucleus. The addition of water to an aldehyde results in the formation of a hydrate. The formation of a hydrate proceeds via a nucleophilic addition mechanism. 1. Water, acting as a nucleophile, is attracted to the partially positive carbon of the carbonyl group, generating an oxonium ion. Acetal formation reacti Continue reading >>

Why Are Aldehydes And Ketones Neutral And Not Acidic/basic?

Why Are Aldehydes And Ketones Neutral And Not Acidic/basic?

This question is quite general, and as other answers have pointed out, depends on what you mean by acidic/basic. The other answers have already covered the Lewis bit, so I will focus a bit more on the Bronsted-Lowry and Arrhenius definitions. In water, almost all aldehydes and ketones do not dissociate to give the H+ or OH- ion, which is the Arrhenius definition. However, the alpha position of acetylacetone is considered acidic by the Bronsted-Lowry definition, and can be deprotonated by strong bases to give the conjugated enone after tautomerism. This is due to the stability of the conjugate base. Continue reading >>

What Is The Ph Of The Blood In A Diabetic Patient When His Glucose Levels Are Appropriate?

What Is The Ph Of The Blood In A Diabetic Patient When His Glucose Levels Are Appropriate?

Diabetes causes your body's pH levels to become more acidic and develop a condition called ketoacidosis, the American Diabetes Association explains. Your body's pH level refers to the acidity or alkalinity of the fluids in your body. Diabetes impairs your body's ability to properly utilize the glucose in your blood. Instead, your body is forced to convert fat into energy through a process that develops into ketoacidosis. Diagnosing ketoacidosis involves testing blood for the presence of ketones, the University of Maryland Medical Center explains. There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is congenital, and its symptoms appear as early as childhood, MayoClinic.com explains. Type 1 diabetes is characterized by your body's inability to produce insulin, the hormone needed for cells to metabolize glucose into energy. Type 2 diabetes is essentially defined by acquired insulin resistance that usually manifests in adulthood. Both types of diabetes cause increased thirst, frequent urination, unexplained weight loss, hypertension and ketoacidosis. Left untreated, both types of diabetes lead to complications that damage your cardiovascular system, kidneys and nerves due to the accumulated glucose in your blood. Complications due to diabetes such as ketoacidosis are fatal if not treated. Ketones are the acidic byproducts of fat breakdown that accumulate when your body uses fat instead of glucose as a source of fuel, MedlinePlus, a service of the National Institutes of Health, explains. As your ketone levels increase, your body becomes more acidic. Ketones are present in both types of diabetes but are generally more typical of type 1 diabetes. Ketones are also sometimes present in urine. Acetone and acetoacetic acid are examples of ketones. Ketoacidosis does not happen o Continue reading >>

5 Tweaks To Make The Ketogenic Diet Even More Effective: A Doctor Explains

5 Tweaks To Make The Ketogenic Diet Even More Effective: A Doctor Explains

"Fitting into a size-8 dress again feels great, I sleep better, I'm not snappy with my kids as often, but here's the real deal breaker," my 43-year-old patient Michelle told me on her fourth visit. Excitedly, she continued, "I feel comfortable enough in my own body that my husband and I are having sex again. I'm actually initiating it!" As an obstetrician-gynecologist who has struggled with her weight in the past, I am surprised by none of Michelle's success. She had arrived at my office about six weeks before, wanting to lose around 40 pounds. Michelle frequently felt tired yet struggled to fall asleep, had a familial history of type 2 diabetes, and her bedroom life had (as she described it) "hit zero." Yet on that fourth visit—after following a ketogenic diet—Michelle glowed with newfound energy and vigor. Her blood work confirmed glowing health: dramatically improved blood pressure, lipids, insulin sensitivity, and inflammatory markers. Studies confirm a ketogenic diet can create those benefits and more. Though the diet was originally designed to help control epilepsy, studies today show ketogenic diets benefit numerous conditions including weight gain, cancer, type 2 diabetes, low energy levels, and aging. Being in ketosis—the metabolic state that the ketogenic activates—simply means you're not eating enough carbohydrates to provide your body glucose, its primary fuel. Fortunately, your body has an alternative fuel called ketones derived from fat breakdown. In other words, on a ketogenic diet your body harnesses fat as an efficient energy source for your brain, heart, and other organs. Please don't confuse nutritional ketosis with diabetic ketoacidosis, a life-threatening complication of type 1 diabetes. Nutritional ketosis involves the regulated, controlled Continue reading >>

Urine Test Types: Ph, Ketones, Proteins, And Cells

Urine Test Types: Ph, Ketones, Proteins, And Cells

Urine as a Diagnostic Tool A long time ago, disgusting as it may be, people used to actually taste and drink urine in order to try and diagnose a patient's disease! I'm not even kidding you. Thankfully, modern-day doctors do not have to resort to such disgusting and even dangerous methods. One of the reasons the doctor barbers of yesteryear used to drink their patient's urine was to see if it had a sweet taste, often indicative of diabetes mellitus. Finding the sweet-tasting glucose in the urine was covered in detail in another lesson, so we'll focus on other important measurements here instead. Interpreting Urine pH One value that can be measured in the urine is known as urine pH. pH is a measure of the acidity or alkalinity of a substance. If the pH is low, then it is acidic. If the pH is high, then it is basic, or alkaline. To remember which is which, I'll give you a little trick that has worked for me. If you grew up watching cartoons, you probably saw some comical ones where cartoonish robbers poured acid on the roof of a bank vault and waited while the acid ate its way downward into the vault, so the robbers could get down there to steal all the cash. If you can recall that acid likes to eat its way downward into things, then you'll remember that acidic substances go down the pH scale. That is to say, their pH numbers are lower than basic substances. Normal urine pH is roughly 4.6-8, with an average of 6. Urine pH can increase, meaning it will become more basic, or alkaline, due to: A urinary tract infection Kidney failure The administration of certain drugs such as sodium bicarbonate Vegetarian diets On the flip side, causes for a decreased, or acidic, urine pH, include: Metabolic or respiratory acidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis, a complication of diabetes mellitus Continue reading >>

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