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Are Dogs In Ketosis

Diabetes With Ketone Bodies In Dogs

Diabetes With Ketone Bodies In Dogs

Studies show that female dogs (particularly non-spayed) are more prone to DKA, as are older canines. Diabetic ketoacidosis is best classified through the presence of ketones that exist in the liver, which are directly correlated to the lack of insulin being produced in the body. This is a very serious complication, requiring immediate veterinary intervention. Although a number of dogs can be affected mildly, the majority are very ill. Some dogs will not recover despite treatment, and concurrent disease has been documented in 70% of canines diagnosed with DKA. Diabetes with ketone bodies is also described in veterinary terms as diabetic ketoacidosis or DKA. It is a severe complication of diabetes mellitus. Excess ketone bodies result in acidosis and electrolyte abnormalities, which can lead to a crisis situation for your dog. If left in an untreated state, this condition can and will be fatal. Some dogs who are suffering from diabetic ketoacidosis may present as systemically well. Others will show severe illness. Symptoms may be seen as listed below: Change in appetite (either increase or decrease) Increased thirst Frequent urination Vomiting Abdominal pain Mental dullness Coughing Fatigue or weakness Weight loss Sometimes sweet smelling breath is evident Slow, deep respiration. There may also be other symptoms present that accompany diseases that can trigger DKA, such as hypothyroidism or Cushing’s disease. While some dogs may live fairly normal lives with this condition before it is diagnosed, most canines who become sick will do so within a week of the start of the illness. There are four influences that can bring on DKA: Fasting Insulin deficiency as a result of unknown and untreated diabetes, or insulin deficiency due to an underlying disease that in turn exacerba Continue reading >>

Study Looks At Nutritional Management Of Canine Epilepsy

Study Looks At Nutritional Management Of Canine Epilepsy

Epilepsy is far and away the most common cause of seizures in dogs. While it is an inherited disease in some breeds, it can occur in dogs of all breeds, shapes, and sizes. Dogs with epilepsy typically experience their first seizure between one and six years of age. Epilepsy is a “rule-out diagnosis,” meaning there is no specific test to define that a dog has it. Rather, the diagnosis is made after ruling out other known causes of seizures. The mainstay therapy for canine epilepsy consists of anti-seizure medications, using an individual drug or a combination of them. The impact of nutrition on seizure control was discussed in a recent article appearing in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. Here are the article highlights: Ketogenic diets treating epilepsy Diets that cause the body to produce an abundance of ketones (an acetone-like product made when fat is used as the primary energy source) have been used to treat epilepsy in people. Such ketogenic diets are very high in fat, low in carbohydrates, and are calorie restricted. Typically, the ratio of fat to combined carbohydrates and protein is 4:1 or 3:11. It is uncertain exactly how ketogenic diets provide benefit for some people with epilepsy. It is known that, in a state of starvation, ketones are the primary source of energy for the brain. An increased concentration of ketones on a regular basis appears to diminish seizure activity. Additionally, higher levels of omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids may subdue seizures by decreasing the excitability of nervous tissue and altering levels of brain chemicals called neurotransmitters1,2. Approximately two thirds of humans with epilepsy who consume a ketogenic diet experience a reduction in their seizures. These diets do have their Continue reading >>

What Causes High Ketones In A Canine?

What Causes High Ketones In A Canine?

A dog with a high level of ketones in his urine suffers from a condition known as ketonuria, usually resulting from a buildup of these substances in the dog's blood. A ketone is a type of acid, which, if allowed to accumulate in the blood, can lead to ketoacidosis, a potentially fatal condition. The main health conditions that can cause high ketone levels in a canine are starvation and diabetes. A dog's body breaks down the food that he eats into sugars, also called glucose, that the cells of the body use for energy. The dog's pancreas then produces the hormone insulin to regulate the amount of glucose that the body will absorb. If the insulin to regulate the glucose is insufficient, typically due to chronic diabetes mellitus, the body breaks down alternate sources of fuel for its cells; a dog's body that is starved of nutrition will do the same. One of these sources is the fat stored in the dog's body. When the body breaks down this fat, it produces as a by-product toxic acids known as a ketones. These ketones then build up in the dog's blood and also his urine, leading to ketoacidosis. Always consult an experienced veterinarian regarding the health and treatment of your pet. A dog suffering from high ketone levels in his blood and urine exhibits symptoms of weight loss, vomiting, increased thirst, decreased appetite, increased urination, lethargy, low body temperature and yellowing of the skin and gums, according to PetMD. The dog's breath may also have a sweet, fruity smell due to the presence of acetone caused by ketoacidosis, says VetInfo. To properly diagnose high ketone levels and ketoacidosis in your dog, a veterinarian will take blood tests and a urinalysis, which will also check your dog's blood glucose levels. Depending on the dog's physical condition, hospit Continue reading >>

Make Your Own Healthy Dog Food

Make Your Own Healthy Dog Food

Make healthy dog food that contains everything your furry baby needs to thrive. These raw dog food pucks use much of the food scraps you would normally throw away, saving you money and improving your dog’s health. Kevin and I have two dogs. Lexy, a 9 year old German Shepherd Border Collie Cross whose loyalty runs deep. And Pebbles, a 6 year old Pomeranian with an attitude that just won’t quit. I’ve always been interested in feeding them a raw food diet, but wasn’t really sure where to start. Sadly, there isn’t much out there on how to do this the right (and safe) way. All I knew is that I wasn’t going to buy the raw food dog food pucks at the pet store for a whopping $7 per serving… twice a day… per dog. I don’t even spend that much money on my own food. Pebbles was diagnosed with hypothyroidism in May, which catapulted my slight interest in feeding our dogs a raw food diet to an all out obsession to figuring out how to make raw dog food happen in our house for the least amount of money. That same week, I spent oodles of hours formulating the perfect homemade dog food for both of them. Lexy is 50 pounds and Pebbles is 5 pounds. So already, there had to be a drastic difference in the food I made for each of them. Combined with Pebbles’ thyroid condition, and I had my work cut out for me… or so I thought. Making homemade dog food is actually really simple. Especially if you have an Instant Pot. You don’t need one to do this, but it’s much easier. Use the coupon code HEALTHFUL for $10 off your Instant Pot. While you can do this 100% raw, after chatting with a couple of vets about it, I’ve developed a 50/50 raw to cooked formula. Raw where it counts, cooked where it benefits them and their little bodies! Our little ones have been on this food for Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Linked To Seizure Reduction In Dogs With Epilepsy

Ketogenic Diet Linked To Seizure Reduction In Dogs With Epilepsy

A ketogenic diet rich in medium-chain triacylgylycerols achieved clinically meaningful levels of ketosis and helped prevent seizures in dogs with epilepsy, according to a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial. A ketogenic diet rich in medium-chain triacylgylycerols (TAG) achieved clinically meaningful levels of ketosis and helped prevent seizures in dogs with epilepsy, according to a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial published in the British Journal of Nutrition. Of 21 dogs in the trial, three became seizure-free, and another seven experienced at least a 50% drop in seizure frequency while on the diet, said Tsz Hong Law, BSc, MRes, of the Royal Veterinary College in Hatfield, United Kingdom. Epilepsy affects an estimated 0.6% to 0.75% of dogs, making it one of the most common canine neurological disorders. Seizures in about a third of affected dogs are refractory to currently available treatments, the investigators noted. “A myriad of anecdotal reports and some published literature have suggested the importance of dietary manipulation in seizure management,” they added. A ketogenic diet, which is characterized by a high ratio of fat compared with protein and carbohydrates, has been used in human epilepsy since the early 1920s, but this and other nonpharmacologic treatments for epilepsy are not used in routine veterinary practice, and seldom have been studied in dogs. Therefore, the researchers recruited 18 purebred and three mixed-breed adult dogs with a diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy and a history of at least three seizures in the past 3 months. The dogs averaged 4.6 years of age and were as old as 12 years. All were receiving phenobarbital, and 18 dogs also were receiving potassium bromide for seizure control. Continue reading >>

Best Dog Food For Dogs With Seizures/epilepsy

Best Dog Food For Dogs With Seizures/epilepsy

If you have a dog that is having seizures due to epilepsy then you already know that it’s a condition that’s not always easy to manage. Even with medication – the usual way to treat epilepsy – seizures can occur. The very nature of epilepsy means that the cause of the seizures has been hard to diagnose. Of course, dogs can have seizures that are not due to epilepsy, such as kidney problems, liver disorders, hypoglycemia, heart problems, infections, brain tumors, medications, and many other things. Many dog lovers turn to their dog’s diet as a way to try to control the seizures. Diets for Epileptic Dogs There are actually more opinions about how to feed a dog with epilepsy than proven diets or dog foods. Many web sites and dog lovers provide information about how to feed epileptic dogs (or dogs with seizures in general). They may even refer to research – but it is usually anecdotal and not scientific. Bloggers may know of cases (sometimes many cases) where a particular diet has helped but they do not have scientific evidence. The fact is that there are no specific dog foods made for dogs with seizures or for dogs with epilepsy. Not at this time. Dog food companies do not even make prescription diets for dogs with epilepsy. This is probably because seizures can be due to so many different causes; and because idiopathic epilepsy has unknown causes. Yes, it’s hard to believe that there is a canine condition for which dog food companies have not yet created a dog food, but it’s true. With that said, changing a dog’s diet does help some dogs who have seizures. There are also some prescription dog foods sometimes prescribed for other conditions that also seem to help dogs with seizures. However, these foods work on a case by case basis. They can help some dog Continue reading >>

The Benefits And Dangers Of A Ketogenic Diet For Dogs

The Benefits And Dangers Of A Ketogenic Diet For Dogs

A ketogenic diet for dogs helps prevent seizures in dogs with epilepsy, according to a recent trial published in the British Journal of Medicine. Of the 21 dogs in the trial, seven experienced a 50% reduction in seizure frequency, while three became seizure free, said study author Tsz Hong Law, of the Royal Veterinary College in Hatfield, United Kingdom. Less than one percent of dogs have epilepsy, yet it is one of the most common neurological disorders in dogs. Should your pet switch to a ketogenic diet for dogs to treat his or her epilepsy? If your pup isn’t epileptic, why choose a ketogenic diet? If your pup is healthy, should you avoid a ketogenic diet for your dog? What is a Ketogenic Diet? Ketogenic diets include a high ratio of fat compared with protein and carbohydrates. The high fat content of the diet results in the conversion of fat to ketones – short-chain fats produced by the liver – which the body uses as energy in place of carbohydrates. Humans have treated epilepsy with ketogenic diets since the 1920s. However, it hasn’t been extensively studied in dogs. Why Choose a Ketogenic Diet? In addition to a potential reduction in seizures in epileptic dogs, ketogenic diets are also gaining popularity for cancer treatment. In 1924, Otto Warburg theorized cancer feeds on sugar, which is what carbohydrates become during digestion. However, cancer does not process fats well. As such, Warburg concluded patients could cut out sugars and carbs to slow cancer growth. KetoPet Sanctuary outside Austin, Texas utilizes the Warburg theory. The nonprofit sanctuary rescues dogs with terminal cancer. KetoPet claims to cure dog cancer with a combination of a ketogenic diet, metabolic conditioning (strenuous exercise), and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. However, their finding Continue reading >>

Faqs – Keto Pet

Faqs – Keto Pet

FAQs What is the ketogenic diet? A ketogenic diet is one that is high in fat, adequate in protein, and low in carbohydrates (carbs). When non-fibrous carbs are significantly reduced, protein is moderate, and dietary fat is increased, the body will naturally switch its primary fuel source from carbohydrates to fat. Once a person or dog begins using fat for fuel instead of glucose, the liver breaks down those fats into ketone bodies which are then used for energy by tissues throughout the body. This process induces a healthy metabolic state called ketosis. Who is a ketogenic diet ideal for? The ketogenic diet has been used since the 1920s as a therapy for children with drug resistant epilepsy, and is currently being studied as a therapy for cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), traumatic brain injury (TBI), diabetes, and autism. At KetoPet, we consider the ketogenic diet “species appropriate” as it closely mimics how a dog might eat in the wild. It is a nutritional approach that is also used by people interested in improving human health and performance. What is a 2:1 ketogenic diet ratio? A 2:1 ketogenic ratio refers to a diet that has twice the amount of calories from fat to the amount of protein and net carbohydrates combined (fat: protein+ carbohydrate). In terms of percentages, this equates to 82% of calories from fat, 17% of calories from protein, and 1% coming from net carbohydrates. Is this the ratio you give the cancer dogs? What if my dog doesn’t have cancer? At KetoPet, we give our dogs with cancer a raw ketogenic diet that is made up of 82% of calories coming from fat (2:1 ratio). This ratio allows each dog to easily transition into ketosis with minimal side effects. We monitor every dog’s blood glucose levels, blood keton Continue reading >>

Effects Of A Ketogenic Diet On Adhd-like Behavior In Dogs With Idiopathic Epilepsy.

Effects Of A Ketogenic Diet On Adhd-like Behavior In Dogs With Idiopathic Epilepsy.

Abstract OBJECTIVES: Epilepsy in humans and rodent models of epilepsy can be associated with behavioral comorbidities including an increased prevalence of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms and seizure frequency have been successfully reduced in humans and rodents using a ketogenic diet (KD). The aims of this study were (i) to describe the behavioral profile of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy (IE) while on a standardized nonketogenic placebo diet, to determine whether ADHD-like behaviors are present, and (ii) to examine the effect of a ketogenic medium chain triglyceride diet (MCTD) on the behavioral profile of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy (IE) compared with the standardized placebo control diet, including ADHD-like behaviors. METHODS: A 6-month prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover dietary trial comparing the effects of the MCTD with a standardized placebo diet on canine behavior was carried out. Dogs diagnosed with IE, with a seizure frequency of at least 3 seizures in the past 3months (n=21), were fed the MCTD or placebo diet for 3months and were then switched to the alternative diet for 3months. Owners completed a validated behavioral questionnaire to measure 11 defined behavioral factors at the end of each diet period to report their dogs' behavior, with three specific behaviors hypothesized to be related to ADHD: excitability, chasing, and trainability. RESULTS: The highest scoring behavioral factors in the placebo and MCTD periods were excitability (mean±SE: 1.910±0.127) and chasing (mean±SE: 1.824±0.210). A markedly lower trainability score (mean±SE: 0.437±0.125) than that of previously studied canine populations was observed. The MCTD resulted in a significant Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet For Dogs

Ketogenic Diet For Dogs

Ketogenic Diet For Dogs: Ketosis What is a Ketogenic Diet? Ketogenic diets formulate a high ratio of fat compared with protein and carbohydrates. Utilizing high fat content in the diet results in the conversion of fat to ketones. Ketones are short-chain fats produced by the liver – which the body uses as energy in place of carbohydrates. Based in the science which shows cancer cells thrive on sugar (glucose), and as the primary source of glucose is carbohydrates, eliminating these kills the cancer cells. In 1924, Otto Warburg theorized cancer feeds on sugar, which is what carbohydrates become during digestion. Cancer can not process fats well. Warburg concluded patients could cut out sugars and carbs to slow cancer growth. Additionally current key supporters and practitioners include Dr Greg Oglivy of the “Canine Cancer Diet”. DR Oglivy also promotes drastic reductions in carbohydrates. His diet differs slightly with regards to fat content. Dr. Dominic D’Agostino is an assistant professor at the University of South Florida College of Medicine. He claims that a low-carb, high-fat, calorie-restricted ketogenic diet literally starves cancer cells. Dr. Dominic D’Agostino has stated “We’ve found that diet therapy can be effective in prolonging survival in mice with aggressive metastatic cancer,”. Dr D’Agostina notes that it is the underlying inflammation from these high carbohydrate diets that promotes cancer, but also other diseases such as diabetes, obesity and Alzheimer’s. Thomas Sandberg, founder and CEO of Long Living Pets Research in Oakley, Utah says the keto diet can reverse cancer in dogs and cats and help them live significantly longer. Sandberg has an pretty extensive 15 years of research indicates a raw, grain-free ketogenic diet dramatically Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diets For Dogs

Ketogenic Diets For Dogs

KETOGENIC DIETS FOR DOGS – By Alice Messler In recent years, there are more and more people jumping on the ketogenic craze. In humans, ketogenic diets have been shown to aid in weight loss, help build muscle, treat epilepsy, migraines, depression, diabetes, and most importantly cancer. Beyond showing benefits in humans, there has been a lot of recent research into how ketogenic diets can benefit our canine companions. History So, what’s the science behind this keto-craze? First it’s time for a little history lesson. Back in the 1920s-30s there was a scientist by the name of Otto Heinrich Warburg that discovered a unique distinction in the metabolic cycle of cancer cells. Cancer cells, unlike normal cells can only multiply and divide when provided with glucose. Normal human cells on the other hand have a built in back-up generator. In times of stress, human cells can complete cell processes relying on ketones as fuel as opposed to the favored glucose. Cancer cells don’t have this back-up generator. So if there’s no glucose, the cancer cells will essentially ‘starve’ and in theory be unable to multiply. This discovery was later called the Warburg Effect. This was big news in the science community, rightfully so, until Watson and Crick (and an under credited Rosalind Franklin….. but that’s a different story) decided to discover the structure of human DNA. Warburg went on the win a Nobel prize for his discovery of the nature and mode of action of respiratory enzymes, but the science surrounding Warburg’s discovery sort of fell by the wayside as the science community became obsessed with finding out more and more about human DNA. In recent years, a lot of scientists have been revisiting the framework laid down by Warburg and the science surrounding the Wa Continue reading >>

Is The Ketogenic Diet Curing Dogs Of Cancer?

Is The Ketogenic Diet Curing Dogs Of Cancer?

Originally published on The Bloq Vote for Cali in the Hero Dog Awards – help raise awareness for the KetoPet Sanctuary and the benefits of a ketogenic diet against metabolic disease. Vote here before April 27 and spread Cali’s courageous story. 1 vote per day, per person, so vote often! Right now, on a 53-acre plot of land outside Austin, Texas, the nonprofit KetoPet Sanctuary is doing something incredible. It isn’t your typical canine rescue facility. KPS goes out of its way to rescue dogs with incurable, terminal cancer from kill shelters. These are animals that the general public has all but left for dead. Instead of writing off the canine companions to their fate, KPS fights back by providing groundbreaking cancer treatment. And here’s the craziest part, it’s a fight they’re winning. KPS co-founder Ron Penna explains, “We’re using a ketogenic diet that is halting and reversing cancer – because only nutrition works on the many, many levels required to make the reversals to metabolism required to create an environment where cancer can't take hold. We don't use nutrition as our main tool against cancer because we have some sort of ideological leaning towards food as medicine but rather because the nutritional protocol we use is more powerful than any drug currently available.” The key to the diet Penna speaks of is something that most Americans used to be told to avoid – fat. The idea is to essentially eliminate the only fuel source cancer cells can really use - glucose. In 1926, Nobel Prize Winning scientist Otto Warburg developed the Warburg Theory of Cancer, which states that cancer and tumor growth are enabled by feeding on glucose through a process called glycolysis. The hypothesis theorizes that starving the cancer cells should stop metastas Continue reading >>

Could A Ketogenic Diet Cure Your Dogs Cancer?

Could A Ketogenic Diet Cure Your Dogs Cancer?

For decades, dog owners have been following one new diet trend after another. From grain-free to raw and limited-ingredient diets, there’s always something new to try. More recently, people have begun to feed their dogs a ketogenic diet as a way to treat or cure their cancer. There is no question that what we feed our dogs impact their health but will feeding a dog with cancer a ketogenic diet cure them? Read on to find out. What is a ketogenic diet? A ketogenic diet is one that’s high in fat, contains moderate levels of proteins and is very low in carbohydrates. But why feed your dog such a diet? What does giving them fewer carbs and more fat lead to? All of the cells in our body need energy to grow and survive. They get this energy from different sources. The primary source from which cells derive energy is glucose, a simple sugar that circulates in the blood. It get broken down into various products and ultimately produces energy which the body’s cells use a fuel to carry out their various functions. Carbohydrates are a good source of glucose. So when you feed your dog carbohydrates, they’re digested and broken down into glucose which provides your dog’s cells with the energy they need. But when the availability of carbohydrates is limited, an alternative source of cellular energy is needed. This alternative source is usually fat. When fats rather than carbohydrates are used for energy, it results in the production of glycerol and fatty acids, rather than glucose. It also pushes the body into the metabolic state called ketosis. During ketosis, fats are metabolised (broken down) by the liver, which leads to the production of ketone bodies. These ketone bodies are then transported via the blood to tissues, where they’re eventually converted into energy. Amo Continue reading >>

Diet Which Induces Ketosis In A Canine Or Feline

Diet Which Induces Ketosis In A Canine Or Feline

COMPOSITION AND METHOD Background Of The Invention Diet has been used in an attempt to manage conditions in man for many years. Obesity is often times directly related to the total and type of caloric intake for man over a given period of time. Diabetes first line of control is usually an attempt at management through diet. Similarly an attempt to limit high cholesterol values, hypertension, and urinary stone formation is frequently attempted by diet. In man, it has additionally been observed that a diet, which brings about a state of ketosis, that is increased ketone bodies, has met with some success in controlling the seizures associated with epilepsy. In lower mammals, such as dogs, experiments to create a state of ketosis through the use of starvation has met with only limited attainment, JJ. de Bruijne, International Journal of Obesity ( 1979) 3, 239-247, see a further study on prolonged fasting in dogs by ]. ']. de Bruijne, Metabolism (1981 ) Vol. 30, no. 2, 190-194. No ketotic state has been reported to have been achieved for a dog through use of a designed diet that uses a relatively high fat level combined with a relatively low carbohydrate level. The same lack of information concerning felines and lack of attainment of ketosis through use of diet, complete in all nutrients, is also present. It has now been discovered that a state of ketosis can be achieved in lower mammals through the use of diet, in general a diet that is relatively high in fat and relatively low in carbohydrates. This alteration of metabolism, ketosis, can be useful in the management of various medical or behavioral conditions including but not limited to seizures, more specifically those related to idiopathic epilepsy; body weight regulation; behavior problems; muscle metabolism; carbohydra

What Is A Ketogenic Diet And Is It Suitable For Dogs?

What Is A Ketogenic Diet And Is It Suitable For Dogs?

Introduction The ketogenic diet was originally developed in the 1920s by Dr Russell Wilder at the Mayo Clinic to help control epilepsy in children. When effective anticonvulsant drugs became available in the 1940s, the popularity of the diet waned. It was not until the 1990s when scientific interest was renewed. There are now several variations. How Does the Ketogenic Diet Work? The diet forces the body to burn dietary fat rather than carbohydrate, and was originally designed to mimic the effects of fasting for extended periods. This is achieved by providing a high level of fat, a moderate level of protein and a low level of carbohydrate. Carbohydrates are normally converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fuelling brain function. However, when carbohydrates are restricted, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. These ketone bodies pass into the brain, and are used instead of glucose as a source of energy. The resultant elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood streams is called ketosis, and this leads to a reduction in the frequency of seizures. Scientific Evidence Clinicial trials of the ketogenic diet in the management of paediatric epilepsy show that it is a beneficial way to reduce seizures (in children), but studies outside of this area are limited. Results of a Ketogenic Food Trial for Dogs with Idiopathic Epilepsy (Edward E. Patterson. American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine. 2005) did not yield promising results, and there was no difference in seizure frequency between the dogs fed on a high fat, low carb diet and those fed on a diet with moderate levels of protein, fat and carbs. Why Didn’t the Study of a Ketogenic Diet in Dogs Show More Positive Results? It is believed Continue reading >>

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