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Are Dogs In Ketosis

Dr. Ian Billinghurst’s Targeted Nutritional Therapy, Which Includes A Ketogenic Diet, Can Kill Your Dog’s Cancer

Dr. Ian Billinghurst’s Targeted Nutritional Therapy, Which Includes A Ketogenic Diet, Can Kill Your Dog’s Cancer

Download Interview Transcript World-renowned veterinarian, author and the father of raw pet food, Dr. Ian Billinghurst, has written a new book about treating cancer with nutrition Dr. B’s book, “Pointing the Bone at Cancer,” lays out the science behind the use of a ketogenic diet in treating cancer in dogs, cats and humans Dr. B has successfully treated dogs with many different cancers, including aggressive lymphomas and mammary tumors, and seen them live years longer, with an excellent quality of life By Dr. Becker I'm very excited today to be interviewing the father of raw pet food, Dr. Ian Billinghurst, or Dr. B, as he is often called. Dr. Billinghurst is a very well-known veterinarian and author who wrote the first books on raw feeding. For that, we are forever indebted to him. Today Dr. B is here to discuss his latest book, "Pointing the Bone at Cancer." I asked him to talk about what inspired him to write a book about cancer in dogs, cats and humans. 'Cancer Is a Problem That Has a Lot to Do With Nutrition' "This was a book I most definitely had to write," says Dr. B. "I had no choice. We, as veterinarians and as medical doctors, are losing this war against cancer. This is a war that we've been fighting for hundreds of years, but very specifically, since Richard Nixon began that first battle against cancer in the 1970s, when he initiated all that research. That research, unfortunately, has done very little to defeat cancer." "This whole problem became very personal to me when members of my own family developed cancer," he continued. "I watched them pass away under the current standard of care. I knew this didn't have to be. As a veterinary practitioner for many years, and as someone who advocates raw feeding and evolutionary nutrition, I also watched my own Continue reading >>

Make Your Own Healthy Dog Food

Make Your Own Healthy Dog Food

Make healthy dog food that contains everything your furry baby needs to thrive. These raw dog food pucks use much of the food scraps you would normally throw away, saving you money and improving your dog’s health. Kevin and I have two dogs. Lexy, a 9 year old German Shepherd Border Collie Cross whose loyalty runs deep. And Pebbles, a 6 year old Pomeranian with an attitude that just won’t quit. I’ve always been interested in feeding them a raw food diet, but wasn’t really sure where to start. Sadly, there isn’t much out there on how to do this the right (and safe) way. All I knew is that I wasn’t going to buy the raw food dog food pucks at the pet store for a whopping $7 per serving… twice a day… per dog. I don’t even spend that much money on my own food. Pebbles was diagnosed with hypothyroidism in May, which catapulted my slight interest in feeding our dogs a raw food diet to an all out obsession to figuring out how to make raw dog food happen in our house for the least amount of money. That same week, I spent oodles of hours formulating the perfect homemade dog food for both of them. Lexy is 50 pounds and Pebbles is 5 pounds. So already, there had to be a drastic difference in the food I made for each of them. Combined with Pebbles’ thyroid condition, and I had my work cut out for me… or so I thought. Making homemade dog food is actually really simple. Especially if you have an Instant Pot. You don’t need one to do this, but it’s much easier. Use the coupon code HEALTHFUL for $10 off your Instant Pot. While you can do this 100% raw, after chatting with a couple of vets about it, I’ve developed a 50/50 raw to cooked formula. Raw where it counts, cooked where it benefits them and their little bodies! Our little ones have been on this food for Continue reading >>

Low-carb And Ketogenic Diets For Dogs With Diabetes

Low-carb And Ketogenic Diets For Dogs With Diabetes

Finding the Best Diet for Your Dog with Diabetes Deciding what kind of food to feed a healthy dog is difficult enough, but when your dog is diagnosed with a life-threatening disease like diabetes, it becomes even more important to pick the right diet plan. Unfortunately, most pet parents are still feeding their dogs commercially canned and kibble food. While these types of food are extremely popular and can be found in many stores, the truth is commercial pet food is not good for pets and is at the root of the crisis in our pets’ health. According to Dogs Naturally Magazine, feeding your pet commercial dog food is essentially like giving your pet fast food every day. And, as we all know, a constant diet of fast food leads to many health problems down the line. Why You Need to Avoid Commercial Pet Food But what exactly is in commercial dog food that makes it so bad for our pets? Starches, for one thing. Not-so-fun fact: did you know that it takes a minimum of 40 percent starches to get kibble to stick together? Almost all commercial dog foods are loaded with high sugar and high glycemic index ingredients like corn, rice, peas, potatoes, and other low-grade non-meat fillers. Sadly, these fillers cause rapid glucose spikes that can contribute to or worsen your pet’s diabetes. A Diet Low in Carbohydrates According to Dr. Karen Becker, “… 90 percent of pet foods out there contain totally inappropriate ingredients that are not nourishing and actually create low-grade inflammatory processes, diabetes, and obesity. All the same health issues occurring in the pet world are occurring in the human realm in terms of overall health. Sugar, of course, causes an insulin release. Insulin then causes blood sugar to drop. Cortisol is then released to rebalance blood sugar. So dog Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Dogs

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Dogs

My dog is diabetic. He has been doing pretty well overall, but recently he became really ill. He stopped eating well, started drinking lots of water, and got really weak. His veterinarian said that he had a condition called “ketoacidosis,” and he had to spend several days in the hospital. I’m not sure I understand this disorder. Diabetic ketoacidosis is a medical emergency that occurs when there is not enough insulin in the body to control blood sugar (glucose) levels. The body can’t use glucose properly without insulin, so blood glucose levels get very high, and the body creates ketone bodies as an emergency fuel source. When these are broken down, it creates byproducts that cause the body’s acid/base balance to shift, and the body becomes more acidic (acidosis), and it can’t maintain appropriate fluid balance. The electrolyte (mineral) balance becomes disrupted which can lead to abnormal heart rhythms and abnormal muscle function. If left untreated, diabetic ketoacidosis is fatal. How could this disorder have happened? If a diabetic dog undergoes a stress event of some kind, the body secretes stress hormones that interfere with appropriate insulin activity. Examples of stress events that can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis include infection, inflammation, and heart disease. What are the signs of diabetic ketoacidosis? The signs of diabetic ketoacidosis include: Excessive thirst/drinking Increased urination Lethargy Weakness Vomiting Increased respiratory rate Decreased appetite Weight loss (unplanned) with muscle wasting Dehydration Unkempt haircoat These same clinical signs can occur with other medical conditions, so it is important for your veterinarian to perform appropriate diagnostic tests to determine if diabetic ketoacidosis in truly the issue at hand Continue reading >>

Dog Model Of Therapeutic Ketosis Induced By Oral Administration Of R,s-1,3-butanediol Diacetoacetate.

Dog Model Of Therapeutic Ketosis Induced By Oral Administration Of R,s-1,3-butanediol Diacetoacetate.

Abstract A high-fat, almost carbohydrate-free diet is used in children with intractable epilepsy to help control seizures by inducing a permanent state of ketosis. Esters of ketone bodies have been previously studied for their potential as parenteral and enteral nutrients. We tested in conscious dogs whether ketosis could be induced by repeated ingestion of R,S-1,3-butanediol diacetoacetate with or without carbohydrates. This ester is a water-soluble precursor of ketone bodies. Two constraints were imposed on this preclinical study: The rate of ester administration was limited to one half of the daily caloric requirement and to one half of the capacity of the liver to oxidize butanediol derived from ester hydrolysis. Under these conditions, the level of ketosis achieved in this dog model (0.8 mM) was lower than the level measured in children whose seizures were controlled by the ketogenic diet (1-3 mM). However, because humans may have a lower capacity for ketone body utilization than dogs, the doses of R,S-butanediol diacetoacetate used in the present study might induce higher average ketone body concentrations in humans than in dogs. Continue reading >>

What Causes High Ketones In A Canine?

What Causes High Ketones In A Canine?

A dog with a high level of ketones in his urine suffers from a condition known as ketonuria, usually resulting from a buildup of these substances in the dog's blood. A ketone is a type of acid, which, if allowed to accumulate in the blood, can lead to ketoacidosis, a potentially fatal condition. The main health conditions that can cause high ketone levels in a canine are starvation and diabetes. A dog's body breaks down the food that he eats into sugars, also called glucose, that the cells of the body use for energy. The dog's pancreas then produces the hormone insulin to regulate the amount of glucose that the body will absorb. If the insulin to regulate the glucose is insufficient, typically due to chronic diabetes mellitus, the body breaks down alternate sources of fuel for its cells; a dog's body that is starved of nutrition will do the same. One of these sources is the fat stored in the dog's body. When the body breaks down this fat, it produces as a by-product toxic acids known as a ketones. These ketones then build up in the dog's blood and also his urine, leading to ketoacidosis. Always consult an experienced veterinarian regarding the health and treatment of your pet. A dog suffering from high ketone levels in his blood and urine exhibits symptoms of weight loss, vomiting, increased thirst, decreased appetite, increased urination, lethargy, low body temperature and yellowing of the skin and gums, according to PetMD. The dog's breath may also have a sweet, fruity smell due to the presence of acetone caused by ketoacidosis, says VetInfo. To properly diagnose high ketone levels and ketoacidosis in your dog, a veterinarian will take blood tests and a urinalysis, which will also check your dog's blood glucose levels. Depending on the dog's physical condition, hospit Continue reading >>

What Is A Ketogenic Diet And Is It Suitable For Dogs?

What Is A Ketogenic Diet And Is It Suitable For Dogs?

Introduction The ketogenic diet was originally developed in the 1920s by Dr Russell Wilder at the Mayo Clinic to help control epilepsy in children. When effective anticonvulsant drugs became available in the 1940s, the popularity of the diet waned. It was not until the 1990s when scientific interest was renewed. There are now several variations. How Does the Ketogenic Diet Work? The diet forces the body to burn dietary fat rather than carbohydrate, and was originally designed to mimic the effects of fasting for extended periods. This is achieved by providing a high level of fat, a moderate level of protein and a low level of carbohydrate. Carbohydrates are normally converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fuelling brain function. However, when carbohydrates are restricted, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. These ketone bodies pass into the brain, and are used instead of glucose as a source of energy. The resultant elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood streams is called ketosis, and this leads to a reduction in the frequency of seizures. Scientific Evidence Clinicial trials of the ketogenic diet in the management of paediatric epilepsy show that it is a beneficial way to reduce seizures (in children), but studies outside of this area are limited. Results of a Ketogenic Food Trial for Dogs with Idiopathic Epilepsy (Edward E. Patterson. American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine. 2005) did not yield promising results, and there was no difference in seizure frequency between the dogs fed on a high fat, low carb diet and those fed on a diet with moderate levels of protein, fat and carbs. Why Didn’t the Study of a Ketogenic Diet in Dogs Show More Positive Results? It is believed Continue reading >>

How Laker, Nikki White’s Dog, Got Cured From Cancer And How He’s Doing Today

How Laker, Nikki White’s Dog, Got Cured From Cancer And How He’s Doing Today

Once when I accidentally liked one Instagram account, back then I would never think that I will find my soul friends - Nikki & Laker. When we began to talk I found out that 2 years ago, Laker was diagnosed with cancer. I immediately asked to share their happy ending with us! It's a true story, based on successful nutritional and chirurgical treatment so I honestly encourage you to read the FULL story. Pets are our family members, so how did you felt when you heard the diagnose? “It’s cancer.” My vet said to me over the phone, and everything else muddled deep into the distance. My head was swirling, I was alone and couldn’t feel my fingers. My breath halted in the exact place I left it before the phone call. The wooshing sounds of underwater submergence filled my headspace. I didn’t hear anything the vet said, but after I regained control of my awareness, my only words were “Get it off him now." When we dropped him off, I cried. That was the last time I would ever see his face the way he was born again. I had no idea how severe his scar would be. I imagined it a thin line like a human who had stitches. I cried for eight hours... When the vet called to say he was ready, he liken his scar to that of Harry Potter, and I imagined the cute stories we could tell with that. I saw him for the first time when we picked him up. His face bloodied and swollen and looked nothing like the petite zig-zag scar I imagined. It was thick, deep and inhibiting. Where did you hear about ketogenic diet? I found out about the ketogenic diet from Rodney Habib and his TED talk. Then I became friends with the fellows that worked at Ketopet and learned more about it. (P.S. KetoPet team are our best friends, who helped us to develop ROCKETO - our upgraded dog food formula. We highly reco Continue reading >>

Could A Change In Diet Cure Your Dog’s Cancer?

Could A Change In Diet Cure Your Dog’s Cancer?

0 In an unassuming gated compound in Georgetown, Texas, something amazing is taking place. KetoPet Sanctuary is taking in shelter dogs with incurable, terminal cancer—dogs with no other options who would otherwise be euthanized—and giving them a second chance, providing them with state of the art cancer treatment to miraculous result. Upon pulling up at the sanctuary, located along a rural road 45 minutes outside of Austin, Texas, pretty much the first thing one notes is the enthusiasm of all present. The team’s passion and excitement is contagious. Also visiting are representatives from two local shelters, both of which have sent their dogs with cancer to the sanctuary for treatment. They sing glowing praises of the efforts of the KetoPet team. Together we wander the idyllic 53-acre facility, currently housing 26 dogs undergoing cancer treatment, including Pit Bull-mix Bill Murray and white-muzzled Dachshund cross Martha, petting dogs and getting the low-down on the ground-breaking work being done here. The foundation of the KetoPet Sanctuary’s cancer-fighting approach is the ketogenic diet, which is designed to slow or halt tumor growth. The diet looks like this: 80 to 90% fat (oil such as coconut, olive or MCT), 5 to 15% protein (beef) and 5% carbohydrates (vegetables). Yes, the diet is extreme, but with reason. It’s predicated on the Warburg theory, put forth by Otto Warburg in 1924. Warburg hypothesized that cancer feeds on sugar (which is what carbohydrates break down to) but that it doesn’t process fats well. The takeaway: cut out the sugars/carbs and you’ll slow or stop the cancer. All the dogs have weekly blood work done to monitor and evaluate the metabolic impact of the diet. CT and PET scans, conducted every 60 days, evaluate their cancers and Continue reading >>

The Benefits And Dangers Of A Ketogenic Diet For Dogs

The Benefits And Dangers Of A Ketogenic Diet For Dogs

A ketogenic diet for dogs helps prevent seizures in dogs with epilepsy, according to a recent trial published in the British Journal of Medicine. Of the 21 dogs in the trial, seven experienced a 50% reduction in seizure frequency, while three became seizure free, said study author Tsz Hong Law, of the Royal Veterinary College in Hatfield, United Kingdom. Less than one percent of dogs have epilepsy, yet it is one of the most common neurological disorders in dogs. Should your pet switch to a ketogenic diet for dogs to treat his or her epilepsy? If your pup isn’t epileptic, why choose a ketogenic diet? If your pup is healthy, should you avoid a ketogenic diet for your dog? What is a Ketogenic Diet? Ketogenic diets include a high ratio of fat compared with protein and carbohydrates. The high fat content of the diet results in the conversion of fat to ketones – short-chain fats produced by the liver – which the body uses as energy in place of carbohydrates. Humans have treated epilepsy with ketogenic diets since the 1920s. However, it hasn’t been extensively studied in dogs. Why Choose a Ketogenic Diet? In addition to a potential reduction in seizures in epileptic dogs, ketogenic diets are also gaining popularity for cancer treatment. In 1924, Otto Warburg theorized cancer feeds on sugar, which is what carbohydrates become during digestion. However, cancer does not process fats well. As such, Warburg concluded patients could cut out sugars and carbs to slow cancer growth. KetoPet Sanctuary outside Austin, Texas utilizes the Warburg theory. The nonprofit sanctuary rescues dogs with terminal cancer. KetoPet claims to cure dog cancer with a combination of a ketogenic diet, metabolic conditioning (strenuous exercise), and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. However, their finding Continue reading >>

Does The Ketogenic Diet Work For Dogs?

Does The Ketogenic Diet Work For Dogs?

by WB Thomas DVM, Dipl.ACVIM(Neurology), University of Tennessee (reprinted with permission) T he ketogenic diet is a high-fat, low-protein, low-carbohydrate diet used to treat seizures in people, mostly children. The diet is carefully and individually calculated and rigidly controlled. The ketogenic diet gets its name because the high fat content of the diet results in conversion of fat to ketones that are utilized as an energy source in place of carbohydrates. Although the diet has never been shown to be safe and effective for the treatment of epilepsy in dogs, it is discussed here because many people have heard of the diet and wonder if it is useful to treat canine epilepsy. History Fasting has been a treatment for epilepsy since biblical times. In 1921, the American pediatrician Rawle Geylin, reported the successful use of fasting to treat epilepsy in children. The antiseizure effects of starvation were attributed to the ketosis and acidosis resulting from starvation. When there is no ready supply of carbohydrates in the diet, the body utilizes other available stores of energy instead. In people, this results in the production of ketones, such as acetone, acetic acid, and p-hydroxybutyric acid. Accumulation of these substances in the body is referred to as ketoacidosis or ketosis. In 1921, Wilder proposed that the antiseizure effects of fasting could be obtained if ketosis was produced by feeding a diet very low in carbohydrates and high in fats. The Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN, USA) developed such a diet and subsequent reports found that the diet improved seizure control in about 60% of children with epilepsy. Throughout the 1930's the ketogenic diet was widely used, since available drugs, namely bromide and phenobarbital, were sometimes ineffective or had serious s Continue reading >>

Faqs – Keto Pet

Faqs – Keto Pet

FAQs What is the ketogenic diet? A ketogenic diet is one that is high in fat, adequate in protein, and low in carbohydrates (carbs). When non-fibrous carbs are significantly reduced, protein is moderate, and dietary fat is increased, the body will naturally switch its primary fuel source from carbohydrates to fat. Once a person or dog begins using fat for fuel instead of glucose, the liver breaks down those fats into ketone bodies which are then used for energy by tissues throughout the body. This process induces a healthy metabolic state called ketosis. Who is a ketogenic diet ideal for? The ketogenic diet has been used since the 1920s as a therapy for children with drug resistant epilepsy, and is currently being studied as a therapy for cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), traumatic brain injury (TBI), diabetes, and autism. At KetoPet, we consider the ketogenic diet “species appropriate” as it closely mimics how a dog might eat in the wild. It is a nutritional approach that is also used by people interested in improving human health and performance. What is a 2:1 ketogenic diet ratio? A 2:1 ketogenic ratio refers to a diet that has twice the amount of calories from fat to the amount of protein and net carbohydrates combined (fat: protein+ carbohydrate). In terms of percentages, this equates to 82% of calories from fat, 17% of calories from protein, and 1% coming from net carbohydrates. Is this the ratio you give the cancer dogs? What if my dog doesn’t have cancer? At KetoPet, we give our dogs with cancer a raw ketogenic diet that is made up of 82% of calories coming from fat (2:1 ratio). This ratio allows each dog to easily transition into ketosis with minimal side effects. We monitor every dog’s blood glucose levels, blood keton Continue reading >>

Study Looks At Nutritional Management Of Canine Epilepsy

Study Looks At Nutritional Management Of Canine Epilepsy

Epilepsy is far and away the most common cause of seizures in dogs. While it is an inherited disease in some breeds, it can occur in dogs of all breeds, shapes, and sizes. Dogs with epilepsy typically experience their first seizure between one and six years of age. Epilepsy is a “rule-out diagnosis,” meaning there is no specific test to define that a dog has it. Rather, the diagnosis is made after ruling out other known causes of seizures. The mainstay therapy for canine epilepsy consists of anti-seizure medications, using an individual drug or a combination of them. The impact of nutrition on seizure control was discussed in a recent article appearing in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. Here are the article highlights: Ketogenic diets treating epilepsy Diets that cause the body to produce an abundance of ketones (an acetone-like product made when fat is used as the primary energy source) have been used to treat epilepsy in people. Such ketogenic diets are very high in fat, low in carbohydrates, and are calorie restricted. Typically, the ratio of fat to combined carbohydrates and protein is 4:1 or 3:11. It is uncertain exactly how ketogenic diets provide benefit for some people with epilepsy. It is known that, in a state of starvation, ketones are the primary source of energy for the brain. An increased concentration of ketones on a regular basis appears to diminish seizure activity. Additionally, higher levels of omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids may subdue seizures by decreasing the excitability of nervous tissue and altering levels of brain chemicals called neurotransmitters1,2. Approximately two thirds of humans with epilepsy who consume a ketogenic diet experience a reduction in their seizures. These diets do have their Continue reading >>

Rodney Habib, Vegetables, Canine Cancer, And The Keto Diet

Rodney Habib, Vegetables, Canine Cancer, And The Keto Diet

My Chat with Rodney Habib Yesterday, Answers Pet Food published an infographic sharing how one can achieve ketosis through feeding their food, sharing the ratios that Rodney mentioned in my chat with him. This is a fantastic start for people who want to feed their dogs a keto diet to defeat cancer, help their dogs lose weight, or reverse diabetes or seizures. For those of us who can't afford a 100% premade raw diet, I recommend finding a local raw food co-op and seeing if they can begin offering Answers Pet Food or using the below infographic and resources (further below) as a guide to creating a DIY keto diet for dogs. The Benefits of Vegetables for Dogs The topic of adding vegetables to a raw food diet for dogs is brought up in discussion regularly in my raw feeding group and we have four paths when it comes to feeding vegetables to dogs… Some raw feeders don't believe dogs need vegetables, so they don't add them to the raw meals. Some raw feeders create a meal that is up to 25% pureed vegetables to take advantage of the additional nutrients. Some raw feeders add green vegetables when a dog is on a diet; they help the dog feel full and curb hunger. Some raw feeders add fermented vegetables to take advantage of the additional nutrients and natural probiotics. I began adding vegetables to my dogs' diet consistently upon a recommendation from my veterinarian. Instead of replacing protein with vegetables, I add 3 tablespoons to each of my dogs' meals. I don't stick with one recipe, choosing to alternate ingredients; for instance, in the summer, I add blueberries and cored apples to the mix. This week, the veggie mix includes: parsley kale spinach celery brown mushrooms I puree all of the ingredients, mixing everything together in a large stainless steel bowl, the transf Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet & Dogs

Ketogenic Diet & Dogs

If you've witnessed your dog having a seizure, it's a scene you don't want to see again. Medications can help control epileptic seizures in dogs, and certain dietary changes might make a difference. A ketogenic diet is one designed to limit seizures. If you try feeding your dog a ketogenic diet, do so only under your vet's supervision. Epileptic Seizures According to "Veterinary Practice News," epilepsy is the most common chronic neurological illness in canines, as many breeds are genetically predisposed to the disorder. While symptoms vary, dogs suffering from seizures might lose consciousness and exhibit muscle contraction and stiffness. Along with salivating excessively and throwing his head back, a dog could lose control of his bodily functions during seizures. Most seizures are brief, but those lasting more than a few minutes require an immediate trip to the emergency vet. Even if your dog appears fine after an initial seizure, take him to the vet for an examination. If seizures recur, he may be diagnosed with epilepsy. Traditional Treatment If your dog experiences seizures, your vet will likely prescribe phenobarbital or potassium bromide for control. In some severe cases, both drugs are prescribed. Diazepam, marketed under the brand name Valium, might be prescribed for constant seizing, but it loses effectiveness in canines over time. Once your dog is on medication, he must take it for the rest of his life. Ketogenic Diet People with epilepsy have responded successfully to a ketogenic diet. It consists of low amounts of carbohydrates and proteins but high levels of fat. When fed a large amount of fat and little in the way of carbs, the body converts the fat to ketones, which it uses for energy instead of carbohydrates. It was the treatment of choice for children Continue reading >>

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