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Are Cats In Ketosis

Ketogenic Raw Food Diet Helps Dogs And Cats Fight Cancer And Live Longer

Ketogenic Raw Food Diet Helps Dogs And Cats Fight Cancer And Live Longer

Studies show the low-carb, high-fat ketogenic diet can combat epilepsy and cancer in mice and humans, but animal researcher Thomas Sandberg says the keto diet can reverse cancer in dogs and cats and help them live significantly longer. Sandberg, founder and CEO of Long Living Pets Research in Oakley, Utah, said his 15 years of research indicates a raw, grain-free ketogenic diet dramatically boosts longevity for dogs and cats. Sandberg, who launched his 30-year research project in 2000, has been tracking the health of 1,000 dogs around the world. He discovered that dogs and cats thrive on a grain-free, ketogenic raw food diet consisting of raw meat, offal and bones. “Dogs are pure carnivores and do not thrive on your average commercial dog food,” Sandberg told TheImproper. “The only food they can properly digest, metabolize and utilize is raw meat.” Sandberg detailed the optimal diet for canines in his book, Learn How to Add Years To Your Dog’s Life. “I have studied dogs’ and cats’ digestive systems since 1997 and believe feeding them a simple diet of raw meats, edible bones and organ meats will promote a healthy immune system,” he said. “The result is a long, healthy life way past what is the expected lifespan of most breeds that are fed commercial dog food.” Sandberg continued: “I have studied dogs’ and cats’ digestive systems since 1997 and believe feeding them a simple diet of raw meats, edible bones and organ meats will promote a healthy immune system.” Thomas, who was born in Norway, said the commercial kibble that most dog owners feed their pets causes them to get sick, fat and die early. Sandberg believes you can dramatically extend a dog’s life (even two-fold) simply by limiting their intake of unhealthy carbs and feeding them wha Continue reading >>

Ketosis In An Evolutionary Context

Ketosis In An Evolutionary Context

Humans are unique in their remarkable ability to enter ketosis. They’re also situated near the top of the food chain. Coincidence? During starvation, humans rapidly enter ketosis; they do this better than king penguins, and bears don’t do it at all. Starvation ketosis Humans maintain a high level of functionality during starvation. We can still hunt & plan; some would even argue it’s a more finely tuned state, cognitively. And that’s important, because if we became progressively weaker and slower, chances of acquiring food would rapidly decline. Perhaps this is why fasting bears just sleep most of the time: no ketones = no bueno..? Animals with a low brain/carcass weight ratio (ie, small brain) don’t need it. Babies and children have a higher brain/carcass weight ratio, so they develop ketosis more rapidly than adults. Is this a harmful process? No, more likely an evolutionary adaptation which supports the brain. The brain of newborn babies consumes a huge amount of total daily energy, and nearly half comes from ketones. A week or so later, even after the carbohydrate content of breast milk increases, they still don’t get “kicked out of ketosis” (Bourneres et al., 1986). If this were a harmful state, why would Nature have done this? …and all those anecdotes, like babies learn at incredibly rapid rates… coincidence? Maybe they’re myths. Maybe not. Ketosis in the animal kingdom Imagine a hibernating bear: huge adipose tissue but small brain fuel requirement relative to body size and total energy expenditure. No ketosis, because brain accounts for less than 5% of total metabolism. In adult humans, this is around 19-23%, and babies are much higher (eg, Cahill and Veech, 2003 & Hayes et al., 2012). For the rest of this article and more, head over to Pat Continue reading >>

Causes Symptoms And Treatment Of Feline Diabetes

Causes Symptoms And Treatment Of Feline Diabetes

Feline diabetes (also called diabetes mellitus) is similar in nature to human diabetes and occurs in middle age or older cats. Diabetes is a disease in which the pancreas does not produce enough insulin (the hormone that controls how the body absorbs and uses sugar) or the insulin produced is not effective at controlling blood sugar levels.. Your cat needs insulin to metabolize or use sugar, fat and protein for energy. Without insulin, sugar builds up in the blood and spills into the urine. Sugar in the urine causes your cat to pass large amounts of urine and to drink lots of water. The level of sugar in the brain controls appetite. Without insulin, the brain becomes sugar deprived and your cat becomes constantly hungry, even though she is experiencing weight loss due to the improper use of nutrients from the diet. Untreated diabetic cats are more likely to develop infections and commonly get bladder, kidney, or skin infections. There are two types of feline diabetes: Uncomplicated diabetes: your cat will not be extremely ill and show basic signs of the disease such as excessive drinking, frequent urination and susceptibility to kidney and bladder infections. Diabetes with ketoacidosis: your cat would be very ill and may be vomiting and depressed. Ketoacidosis happens when Ketosis and Acidosis occurs. Ketosis is the accumulation of substances called ketone bodies in the blood. Acidosis is increased acidity of the blood. Cat with feline diabetes will sometimes regain the ability to produce their own insulin in the pancreas. Cats that developed diabetes after receiving long term glucocorticoids or hormones are more likely to stop needing insulin after a while compared to cats that developed diabetes without a known cause. Your diabetic cat should be evaluated by a veterin Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet For Dogs

Ketogenic Diet For Dogs

Common Sense Prevention A ' Ketogenic Diet ' for dogs is kind of a trendy phrase these days. There is sound reasoning behind this keto diet idea. I have to tell you honestly though, it makes me laugh that people and vets are only just figuring this out now. Hasn't anyone been paying attention for the last millions of years. Hello? Anybody there? I laugh, not because it's funny, but because it's obvious. Mother Nature has been providing such a diet for wild dogs since the beginning of time. She provides meat/bones/organs in the form of the prey animal. Since you most likely won't be throwing a carcass off the front porch, it would be a good idea to observe the food in the picture above. Look at it closely. What do you see? Meat, bones, organ meat, some green tripe ( the greyish looking stuff ) and a raw egg. You will also notice that there are no vegetables or fruit in the bowl. Dogs are carnivores not omnivores, and so have no dietary need for carbohydrates in the form of plant food, at all. What they do need, is the predigested stomach contents ( green tripe ) of the herbivore prey animal. Herbivores eat plants and grasses. This is the plant food that the deer would eat, for example. The deer's stomach has already broken down and predigested the plants into a form of food that the carnivore ( wolves, coyotes, dogs ) can efficiently digest and use. This is how Mother Nature authentically serves up plant food to carnivorous canids. There are no grains, carrots, sweet potatoes, peas, green beans, pumpkin, apples, banana, blueberries or any other silly thing commonly found in dog food, commercial or raw. A Low Inflamation Keto Diet As Cancer Treatment Nutrition For Dogs The last century has produced a ton of research showing that people, as well as dogs and cats, will bene Continue reading >>

Diabetes Complications In Dogs And Cats: Diabetes Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetes Complications In Dogs And Cats: Diabetes Ketoacidosis (dka)

Unfortunately, we veterinarians are seeing an increased prevalence of diabetes mellitus in dogs and cats. This is likely due to the growing prevalence of obesity (secondary to inactive lifestyle, a high carbohydrate diet, lack of exercise, etc.). So, if you just had a dog or cat diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, what do you do? First, we encourage you to take a look at these articles for an explanation of the disease: Diabetes Mellitus (Sugar Diabetes) in Dogs Once you have a basic understanding of diabetes mellitus (or if you already had one), this article will teach you about life-threatening complications that can occur as a result of the disease; specifically, I discuss a life-threatening condition called diabetes ketoacidosis (DKA) so that you know how to help prevent it! What is DKA? When diabetes goes undiagnosed, or when it is difficult to control or regulate, the complication of DKA can occur. DKA develops because the body is so lacking in insulin that the sugar can’t get into the cells -- resulting in cell starvation. Cell starvation causes the body to start breaking down fat in an attempt to provide energy (or a fuel source) to the body. Unfortunately, these fat breakdown products, called “ketones,” are also poisonous to the body. Symptoms of DKA Clinical signs of DKA include the following: Weakness Not moving (in cats, hanging out by the water bowl) Not eating to complete anorexia Large urinary clumps in the litter box (my guideline? If it’s bigger than a tennis ball, it’s abnormal) Weight loss (most commonly over the back), despite an overweight body condition Excessively dry or oily skin coat Abnormal breath (typically a sweet “ketotic” odor) In severe cases DKA can also result in more significant signs: Abnormal breathing pattern Jaundice Ab Continue reading >>

Does Your Cat Have Bad Breath?

Does Your Cat Have Bad Breath?

There are different causes for halitosis in cats — some far more serious than others. Your best strategy is to schedule an appointment with your vet. Cats are well known for being exceptionally clean animals. They take pride in their appearance — grooming constantly to remove any offensive odors that might make them detectable to both predators and prey. Occasionally, however, cats sometimes do emit a foul odor. Although there are several possible reasons for a cat to be malodorous, halitosis (bad breath) is the most common cause of fetid felines. The common causes Periodontal disease — inflammation of the tissues surrounding the teeth — is by far the most common cause of bad breath in cats. Periodontal disease is initiated by a build-up of plaque, the sticky bacteria-laden coating on the tooth surface. As the immune system responds to the plaque, the gums become inflamed. Gum inflammation is called gingivitis, and it is the first stage of periodontal disease. Bad breath often accompanies the gingivitis. As inflammation progresses, the second phase of periodontal disease — periodontitis — occurs. Periodontitis is a condition where both the soft tissues and the bony tissues are affected. Cats may develop receding gums, bone loss and continuing halitosis. If not removed from the tooth, plaque mineralizes into tartar (also called calculus) in a few days. Calculus requires professional removal by your veterinarian. Although periodontal disease and gingivitis tend to develop as cats age, gingivitis can occur in cats as young as six months. These cats often have little or no calculus accumulation. We call this condition “juvenile-onset gingivitis,” and it is a common cause of halitosis in kittens. The exact cause of this condition is unknown, but experts belie Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

Not to be confused with Ketoacidosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state in which some of the body's energy supply comes from ketone bodies in the blood, in contrast to a state of glycolysis in which blood glucose provides energy. Ketosis is a result of metabolizing fat to provide energy. Ketosis is a nutritional process characterised by serum concentrations of ketone bodies over 0.5 mM, with low and stable levels of insulin and blood glucose.[1][2] It is almost always generalized with hyperketonemia, that is, an elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood throughout the body. Ketone bodies are formed by ketogenesis when liver glycogen stores are depleted (or from metabolising medium-chain triglycerides[3]). The main ketone bodies used for energy are acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate,[4] and the levels of ketone bodies are regulated mainly by insulin and glucagon.[5] Most cells in the body can use both glucose and ketone bodies for fuel, and during ketosis, free fatty acids and glucose synthesis (gluconeogenesis) fuel the remainder. Longer-term ketosis may result from fasting or staying on a low-carbohydrate diet (ketogenic diet), and deliberately induced ketosis serves as a medical intervention for various conditions, such as intractable epilepsy, and the various types of diabetes.[6] In glycolysis, higher levels of insulin promote storage of body fat and block release of fat from adipose tissues, while in ketosis, fat reserves are readily released and consumed.[5][7] For this reason, ketosis is sometimes referred to as the body's "fat burning" mode.[8] Ketosis and ketoacidosis are similar, but ketoacidosis is an acute life-threatening state requiring prompt medical intervention while ketosis can be physiological. However, there are situations (such as treatment-resistant Continue reading >>

Ketosis Breath: Causes & Solutions For Bad Breath

Ketosis Breath: Causes & Solutions For Bad Breath

Ultra-low carb diets have grown in popularity over recent years. These so-called “keto diets” aim to facilitate rapid weight loss, through the consumption of minimal carbohydrates. Keto diets have become understandably popular on account of their rapid results, together with the practical benefits of consuming healthy volumes of the right foods, making hunger less of a problem than on more typical calorie-controlled diets. However keto diets are not without their issues, and one of the most common complaints comes in the form of “ketosis breath”. Quite simply many individuals making use of very low carb diets suffer from pungent and unpleasant breath. The question is what can be done to counteract such a problem? The Cause of Ketosis Breath In order to learn how to get rid of keto breath, we first need to understand why breath can smell under such a regime. As it turns out there are two potential reasons(1), both of which can operate independently, or in conjunction. Ketone Release The most typical source of energy used by the body is glucose. This is typically derived from carbohydrates, where the digestive system breaks down complex sugars into simple glucose molecules. On very low carb diets, however, the body is unable to utilize such a fuel. Instead, the liver utilizes the fat present in the body as an energy source, producing “ketones” in the process(2). This is known as “ketosis” – and is the process from where keto diets get their unusual name. These ketone bodies come in three common forms; acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetone(3). In large quantities they are removed from the body in the urine or through exhalation. Ketones can have quite a characteristic smell; they often make the dieter’s breath smell quite sweet and fruity, quit Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

"Ketosis" is a word you'll probably see when you're looking for information on diabetes or weight loss. Is it a good thing or a bad thing? That depends. Ketosis is a normal metabolic process, something your body does to keep working. When it doesn't have enough carbohydrates from food for your cells to burn for energy, it burns fat instead. As part of this process, it makes ketones. If you're healthy and eating a balanced diet, your body controls how much fat it burns, and you don't normally make or use ketones. But when you cut way back on your calories or carbs, your body will switch to ketosis for energy. It can also happen after exercising for a long time and during pregnancy. For people with uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a sign of not using enough insulin. Ketosis can become dangerous when ketones build up. High levels lead to dehydration and change the chemical balance of your blood. Ketosis is a popular weight loss strategy. Low-carb eating plans include the first part of the Atkins diet and the Paleo diet, which stress proteins for fueling your body. In addition to helping you burn fat, ketosis can make you feel less hungry. It also helps you maintain muscle. For healthy people who don't have diabetes and aren't pregnant, ketosis usually kicks in after 3 or 4 days of eating less than 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. That's about 3 slices of bread, a cup of low-fat fruit yogurt, or two small bananas. You can start ketosis by fasting, too. Doctors may put children who have epilepsy on a ketogenic diet, a special high-fat, very low-carb and protein plan, because it might help prevent seizures. Adults with epilepsy sometimes eat modified Atkins diets. Some research suggests that ketogenic diets might help lower your risk of heart disease. Other studies show sp Continue reading >>

Diabetes With Ketone Bodies In Cats

Diabetes With Ketone Bodies In Cats

Diabetes Mellitus with Ketoacidosis in Cats The term “ketoacidosis” refers to a condition in which levels of acid abnormally increased in the blood due to presence of “ketone bodies.” Meanwhile, diabetes is a medical condition in which the body cannot absorb sufficient glucose, thus causing a rise the blood sugar levels. In diabetes with ketoacidosis, ketoacidosis immediately follows diabetes. It should be considered a dire emergency, one in which immediate treatment is required to save the life of the animal. Typically, the type of condition affects older cats; in addition, female cats are more prone diabetes with ketoacidosis than males. Symptoms and Types Weakness Lethargy Depression Lack of appetite (anorexia) Muscle wasting Rough hair coat Dehydration Dandruff Sweet breath odor Causes Although the ketoacidosis is ultimately brought on by the cat's insulin dependency due to diabetes mellitus, underlying factors include stress, surgery, and infections of the skin, respiratory, and urinary tract systems. Concurrent diseases such as heart failure, kidney failure, asthma, cancer may also lead to this type of condition. Diagnosis You will need to give a thorough history of your cat’s health, including the onset and nature of the symptoms, to your veterinarian. He or she will then perform a complete physical examination, as well as a biochemistry profile and complete blood count (CBC). The most consistent finding in patients with diabetes is higher than normal levels of glucose in the blood. If infection is present, white blood cell count will also high. Other findings may include: high liver enzymes, high blood cholesterol levels, accumulation in the blood of nitrogenous waste products (urea) that are usually excreted in the urine (azotemia), low sodium levels Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis In Cats – Causes, Symptoms & Treatment

Ketoacidosis In Cats – Causes, Symptoms & Treatment

Ketoacidosis in cats at a glance Ketoacidosis is a serious complication of diabetes in which ketones and blood sugar levels build up in the body due to insufficient levels of insulin which is required to move glucose into the cells for energy. As a result, the body uses fat as an alternate energy source which produces ketones causing the blood to become too acidic. Common causes include uncontrolled diabetes, missed or insufficient insulin, surgery, infection, stress and obesity. Symptoms of ketoacidosis include increased urination and thirst, dehydration, nausea, diarrhea, confusion, rapid breathing which may later change to laboured breathing. What is diabetic ketoacidosis? Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening complication of diabetes characterised by metabolic acidosis (increased acids in the blood), hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) and ketonuria (ketones in the urine). It is caused by a lack of or insufficient amounts of insulin which is required to move glucose from the bloodstream and into the cells to be used for energy. When this occurs, the body begins to search for alternate sources of energy and begins to break down fat. When fat is broken down (metabolised) into fatty acids, waste products known as ketones (acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, acetone) are released from the liver and accumulate in the bloodstream (known as ketonemia). This causes the blood to become too acidic (metabolic acidosis). As well as metabolic acidosis, ketones also cause central nervous depression.The body will try to get rid of the ketones by excreting them out of the body via the urine, increased urine output leads to dehydration, making the problem worse. Meanwhile, the unused glucose remains in the bloodstream, resulting in hyperglycemia (high blood sugar).Insulin Continue reading >>

The Benefits And Dangers Of A Ketogenic Diet For Dogs

The Benefits And Dangers Of A Ketogenic Diet For Dogs

A ketogenic diet for dogs helps prevent seizures in dogs with epilepsy, according to a recent trial published in the British Journal of Medicine. Of the 21 dogs in the trial, seven experienced a 50% reduction in seizure frequency, while three became seizure free, said study author Tsz Hong Law, of the Royal Veterinary College in Hatfield, United Kingdom. Less than one percent of dogs have epilepsy, yet it is one of the most common neurological disorders in dogs. Should your pet switch to a ketogenic diet for dogs to treat his or her epilepsy? If your pup isn’t epileptic, why choose a ketogenic diet? If your pup is healthy, should you avoid a ketogenic diet for your dog? What is a Ketogenic Diet? Ketogenic diets include a high ratio of fat compared with protein and carbohydrates. The high fat content of the diet results in the conversion of fat to ketones – short-chain fats produced by the liver – which the body uses as energy in place of carbohydrates. Humans have treated epilepsy with ketogenic diets since the 1920s. However, it hasn’t been extensively studied in dogs. Why Choose a Ketogenic Diet? In addition to a potential reduction in seizures in epileptic dogs, ketogenic diets are also gaining popularity for cancer treatment. In 1924, Otto Warburg theorized cancer feeds on sugar, which is what carbohydrates become during digestion. However, cancer does not process fats well. As such, Warburg concluded patients could cut out sugars and carbs to slow cancer growth. KetoPet Sanctuary outside Austin, Texas utilizes the Warburg theory. The nonprofit sanctuary rescues dogs with terminal cancer. KetoPet claims to cure dog cancer with a combination of a ketogenic diet, metabolic conditioning (strenuous exercise), and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. However, their finding Continue reading >>

Measurement Of Β-hydroxybutyrate In Cats With Nonketotic Diabetes Mellitus, Diabetic Ketosis, And Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Measurement Of Β-hydroxybutyrate In Cats With Nonketotic Diabetes Mellitus, Diabetic Ketosis, And Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Ketone bodies are produced by the liver and are used as an energy source when glucose is not available. The 2 main ketone bodies are acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate (β-HB), while acetone is the least abundant ketone body.13 Beta-hydroxybutyrate is derived from the reduction of acetoacetate in the mitochondria of the liver, and acetone is generated by spontaneous decarboxylation of acetoacetate. Patients suffering from diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) display hyperglycemia, glucosuria, ketonuria, ketonemia, and metabolic acidosis.9 The most popular method for the detection of ketone bodies is the urine dipstick method. Commercial ketone tests for urine are based on the Legal reaction, in which acetoacetate reacts with nitroprusside to produce a purple-colored complex on the test strip. If glycine is added to the test reagent, the Legal reaction can also detect acetone. However, β-HB cannot be detected by using this method.13 Measurement of ketones in blood rather than in urine helps eliminate the risk of false negatives due to insensitivity and false positives due to drug interference.24 In urine samples, the nitroprusside reaction has been reported to give false-positive results in the presence of drugs containing sulfhydryl groups. False-negative readings have been reported when the test strips have been exposed to air for an extended time, after large intakes of vitamin C, or when bacteria in the urine metabolize acetoacetate.17 Moreover, the measurement of ketone bodies is influenced by renal function.8 Another difficulty is the subjective evaluation of the color change of the urine stick. In human beings, the ketone body ratio in DKA is initially 3:1 (β-HB:acetoacetate) and rises to as high as 10–20:1, leading to an underdiagnosis of hyperketonemia when testing Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketosis And Ketoacidosis In Cats

Diabetic Ketosis And Ketoacidosis In Cats

To determine clinical signs, clinicopathologic abnormalities, prevalence of concurrent disease, treatment, complications of treatment, and outcome in cats with diabetic ketosis (DK) or diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Retrospective study. 42 cats with DK or DKA. Medical records of diabetic cats with ketonuria were reviewed. In 26 cats, diabetes was newly diagnosed; in 16, diabetes had been diagnosed previously and cats had been treated with insulin (n = 14) or sulfonylurea drugs (2). Common clinical findings were lethargy, anorexia, polyuria, polydipsia, and weight loss. Common laboratory findings were hyperglycemia, hyponatremia, hypochloremia, hypokalemia, hypocalcemia, hypophosphatemia, low total CO2 content, hyperosmolality, high serum alanine transaminase activity, azotemia, glycosuria, and ketonuria. Concurrent disorders were identified in 39 cats and included hepatic lipidosis, cholangiohepatitis, pancreatitis, chronic renal failure, urinary tract infection, and neoplasia. Treatment of DK and DKA included administration of regular crystalline (34 cats), NPH (6), or ultralente (2) insulin, intravenous (38) or subcutaneous (4) administration of fluids, and enterall parenteral or administration of antibiotics (42). Complications during treatment included abnormalities in serum electrolyte concentrations (27 cats), hemolytic anemia (4), hypoglycemia (3), and neurologic abnormalities unrelated to hypoglycemia (2). Eleven cats died or were euthanatized during the initial hospitalization period for treatment of DK or DKA. Azotemia, metabolic acidosis, and hyperosmolality were more severe in cats that died than in cats that survived. Differences in regard to treatment or complications were not apparent between cats that died and cats that survived. The 31 cats that survived Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet To Treat Cancer

Ketogenic Diet To Treat Cancer

« 22 Human Medicines That Work For Pets | Home | Chihuahua Eats 3 Chocolate Cookies: What Should You Do? » Ketogenic Diet To Treat Cancer There is increasing talk about a ‘new’ diet in people that is showing impressive results in treating cancer in people, and it may help with our pets. The diet specifically eliminates carbohydrates, replacing them with healthy fats and protein. As in NO kibble to be fed to your dogs or cats. The underlying science of this is based on research which shows cancer cells thrive on sugar (glucose), and as the primary source of glucose is carbohydrates, eliminating these kills the cancer cells. This is not a new concept in that the Canine Cancer Diet by Dr Greg Oglivy also dramatically lowers carbohydrates- this diet though is unique in the amount of fat. Dr. Dominic D’Agostino is an assistant professor at the University of South Florida College of Medicine. He claims that a low-carb, high-fat, calorie-restricted ketogenic diet literally starves cancer cells. In an interview on the examiner he said: “We’ve found that diet therapy can be effective in prolonging survival in mice with aggressive metastatic cancer,” These same anti-cancer properties have also been observed in human cancer patients and reported in published studies. The cancer-fighting ketogenic diet “formula” is roughly 75% fat, 23% protein, and 2% carbs. Dr D’Agostina notes that it is the underlying inflammation from these high carbohydrate diets that promotes cancer, but also other diseases such as diabetes, obesity and Alzheimer’s. Currently there is a research group called Ketopet which presently formulates ketogenic diets for dogs and cats with cancer as part of the “Pet Cancer Trial” Their website is at petcancertrial.com In researching this artic Continue reading >>

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