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Are Babies In Ketosis

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

"Ketosis" is a word you'll probably see when you're looking for information on diabetes or weight loss. Is it a good thing or a bad thing? That depends. Ketosis is a normal metabolic process, something your body does to keep working. When it doesn't have enough carbohydrates from food for your cells to burn for energy, it burns fat instead. As part of this process, it makes ketones. If you're healthy and eating a balanced diet, your body controls how much fat it burns, and you don't normally make or use ketones. But when you cut way back on your calories or carbs, your body will switch to ketosis for energy. It can also happen after exercising for a long time and during pregnancy. For people with uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a sign of not using enough insulin. Ketosis can become dangerous when ketones build up. High levels lead to dehydration and change the chemical balance of your blood. Ketosis is a popular weight loss strategy. Low-carb eating plans include the first part of the Atkins diet and the Paleo diet, which stress proteins for fueling your body. In addition to helping you burn fat, ketosis can make you feel less hungry. It also helps you maintain muscle. For healthy people who don't have diabetes and aren't pregnant, ketosis usually kicks in after 3 or 4 days of eating less than 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. That's about 3 slices of bread, a cup of low-fat fruit yogurt, or two small bananas. You can start ketosis by fasting, too. Doctors may put children who have epilepsy on a ketogenic diet, a special high-fat, very low-carb and protein plan, because it might help prevent seizures. Adults with epilepsy sometimes eat modified Atkins diets. Some research suggests that ketogenic diets might help lower your risk of heart disease. Other studies show sp Continue reading >>

Breastfeeding While In Ketosis: Round 2

Breastfeeding While In Ketosis: Round 2

Since my baby has been growing great, no issues breastfeeding, etc, and I found myself trending lower and lower in my daily carb counts; I decided I was going into full-on Keto again. I tend to average between 20 and 40 carbs per day. After a couple of days with this limit, I noticed Natalie wanted to nurse practically all day long. It seemed like a small drop in supply, as expected. However, the very next day my letdowns seemed normal, and I got the usual breaks between feedings. If some one else is consuming a high carb diet and wants to make the change with younger babies (~4+ months old), I would recommend starting at 100g carbs per day, and cutting 5g each day and monitoring your supply as you go along. More important than carb count while breastfeeding is your water and caloric intake. Be sure to be constantly drinking water; if you feel thirsty then you are already a little bit dehydrated. If you are having trouble with your calorie counts, I highly recommend MyFitnessPal. Great, intuitive site (and love the app!) with an extensive food database. Above all else, I recommend going gradually into ketosis and calorie restriction while breastfeeding, especially if your baby is young, and if you are not at home with the baby for unlimited nursing during the potential conversion. Check out my previous posts on breastfeeding while in ketosis - Low Carb or Keto While Breastfeeding Keto and Breastfeeding Introduction Keto While Breastfeeding: Days 1-5 Keto and the Breastfeeding Diet TIPS Continue reading >>

Is Keto Safe For Kids?

Is Keto Safe For Kids?

In short, yes. Thanks. Have a nice day. I have to be honest with you, I’m not sure why all the fuss about making sure kids are shielded from a ketogenic diet. If it’s healthy, why wouldn’t it be healthy for kids? Some points to consider: New born babies who are breastfed are ketogenic. They are getting the majority of their calories from the fat in their mother’s milk. And I don’t know a single person is actively advocates AGAINST breastfeeding. Historical documentation, provided by Anthropologists and Sociologists, have shown that cultures like the Masai and the Inuit, both of which were, essentially, ketogenic, had healthy, robust babies. And those babies grew up to be healthy, strong, tall, children and adults. It wasn’t until the refined, processed, sugar and flour heavy foods of the Western diet infiltrated their culture that their children started developing widespread health problems. So it is, somewhat, baffling to me when people warn or caution against kids eating keto. Keto is about whole foods, lots of good fats (which is essential for brain development), good protein (which is essential for growing bodies), and limited non-starchy vegetables. I don’t see what about that would be problematic for kids. It’s not like the physiology of children is so terribly different than that of adults. However, the most common refrain opposing keto for kids has to do with a study that was concluded in 2008. The study, apparently, showed that keto resulted in bone loss in children. Here’s the study. (And here’s a longer version). But what does the study actually show? First, it was a two part selection process. The first part was to find kids with epilepsy, who had not responded well to medication. The second part was to see how they responded to keto. If Continue reading >>

Breastfeeding On A Ketogenic Diet

Breastfeeding On A Ketogenic Diet

Breastfeeding on a ketogenic diet: my personal experience Having a baby is one of the most exciting and nerve wracking times in your life, one great big cocktail of emotions. With nine months to prepare, trying to absorb as much information as possible can make you panic rather than put your mind at ease. There’s an abundance of general information on the internet but a lot of this is conflicting and very confusing! I’ll seek to answer the question I know you’ll all be wondering. Breastfeeding on a ketogenic diet: Is it safe? I began my ketogenic journey during pregnancy in preparation for our daughter being born. Searching the internet for information on the ketogenic lifestyle and new mothers, I found the information on breastfeeding on a ketogenic diet was limited and very conflicting. Every mother wants to do what’s best for their child – I desperately wanted to give myself the best chance of breastfeeding our daughter as possible. My ultimate concern was that the keto lifestyle may prevent my ability to do this. I wanted to share my story with you in the hope that it may provide some of that missing resource that i was desperately seeking when my journey first began. The darkness After 12 weeks of being fully keto adapted, I was feeding my baby one afternoon and noticed that she was becoming very frustrated. She had only been feeding for a short while and began pulling at my boob, becoming very restless. Whilst looking for the cause of her frustration, to my horror I realised that my milk had completely dried up! I was immediately overwhelmed with blind panic. A moment of weakness, fuelled by sheer panic and a lack of sleep, resulted in me finding an excuse to get my hands on the forbidden foods – refined carbs and sugar! The cravings part of my brain h Continue reading >>

Ketosis In An Evolutionary Context

Ketosis In An Evolutionary Context

Humans are unique in their remarkable ability to enter ketosis. They’re also situated near the top of the food chain. Coincidence? During starvation, humans rapidly enter ketosis; they do this better than king penguins, and bears don’t do it at all. Starvation ketosis Humans maintain a high level of functionality during starvation. We can still hunt & plan; some would even argue it’s a more finely tuned state, cognitively. And that’s important, because if we became progressively weaker and slower, chances of acquiring food would rapidly decline. Perhaps this is why fasting bears just sleep most of the time: no ketones = no bueno..? Animals with a low brain/carcass weight ratio (ie, small brain) don’t need it. Babies and children have a higher brain/carcass weight ratio, so they develop ketosis more rapidly than adults. Is this a harmful process? No, more likely an evolutionary adaptation which supports the brain. The brain of newborn babies consumes a huge amount of total daily energy, and nearly half comes from ketones. A week or so later, even after the carbohydrate content of breast milk increases, they still don’t get “kicked out of ketosis” (Bourneres et al., 1986). If this were a harmful state, why would Nature have done this? …and all those anecdotes, like babies learn at incredibly rapid rates… coincidence? Maybe they’re myths. Maybe not. Ketosis in the animal kingdom Imagine a hibernating bear: huge adipose tissue but small brain fuel requirement relative to body size and total energy expenditure. No ketosis, because brain accounts for less than 5% of total metabolism. In adult humans, this is around 19-23%, and babies are much higher (eg, Cahill and Veech, 2003 & Hayes et al., 2012). For the rest of this article and more, head over to Pat Continue reading >>

Here’s What Research Says About Keto While Breastfeeding

Here’s What Research Says About Keto While Breastfeeding

Did you know that soon after babies are born they enter a natural state of ketosis? Yep, you read that right — research shows that newborn infants are in ketosis and remain in this normal, healthy state while breastfeeding[*][*]. Furthermore, research confirms that breast milk from healthy mothers is actually made up of 50-60% fat, and the cholesterol in breast milk supplies babies with almost six times the amount that most adults consume in their diets [*]. So, if babies are naturally born in ketosis and benefit from using fat and ketones for fuel, then why would it be an issue for a breastfeeding mother to follow a ketogenic diet/lifestyle? What Does the Research Say About Keto While Breastfeeding? Unfortunately, the current scientific literature surrounding the ketogenic diet and breastfeeding is extremely limited. However, one study performed in 2009 compared a low-carbohydrate, high fat (LCHF) diet to a high-carbohydrate, low fat (HCLF) diet in breastfeeding women[*]. Results from this study showed the following: Regardless of the diet, daily breast milk production and daily infant breast milk intake remained the same. Neither diet had an effect on milk lactose or protein concentration; however, milk fat concentration and the energy content of milk were higher during the LCHF diet than the HCLF diet. Infants’ energy intake (kcal/day) was higher during the LCHF diet than during the HCLF diet. The estimated average maternal energy expenditure and the sum of maternal energy expenditure plus milk energy content were higher during the LCHF diet than during the HCLF diet. Based on these results, researchers concluded that breastfeeding mothers could lose more weight while consuming a LCHF diet than a HCLF diet without affecting milk production and still supplying the Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Myth #1: Are Babies In Ketosis? Findings & Implications

Ketogenic Diet Myth #1: Are Babies In Ketosis? Findings & Implications

I’ve heard several times now about this idea that babies are in ketosis, and in other words are “keto-adapted.” This idea is then used to support the ketogenic diet in human adults. Let’s break this idea down here and examine its veracity. It’s important to define our terms. I’ve heard the saying “babies are in ketosis” rather than “infants are in ketosis” or “infants less than 6 months old are in ketosis.” What age group are we talking about? Infants are rapidly growing little people. Thus it become problematic already to assume that just because we have been in ketosis for a period of time during our breastfeeding careers we may be able to continue it as our bodies grow in every way and direction. So we’re really talking about infants, and more specifically, the typical age that breastfeeding occurs. Since this is pretty variable I can’t specify an exact age, but I’m guessing 12 months or less. It would also be interesting to discuss how the energy needs of infants may change as they develop physically. I would expect that as they learn to crawl, walk, and run, their bodies might start to prefer glucose. Adults who go on ketogenic diets typically go through an adaptation phase for the first two weeks of the diet. This adaptation period usually brings some discomfort, GI symptoms like constipation, and fatigue (which is often corrected with additional electrolytes). After this period, many people feel better and it is believed they have “adapted” to ketosis. Infants however are in a state of mild-ketosis. Their brains use ketones more so than the adult brain. From this paper (which has a very strong point of view and suggests that brains “prefer” ketones, which is up for debate): “Postnatally, the brain’s dependence on ketones Continue reading >>

Did You Know All Babies Are Born In Ketosis And Breastfeeding Keeps You In Ketosis?

Did You Know All Babies Are Born In Ketosis And Breastfeeding Keeps You In Ketosis?

Just a guy who wants to help make the world a healthier, happier place by spreading the word about the amazing benefits of the ketogenic diet and RapidKetosis. ​I am happily married to my beautiful wife, Audrey, of 24 years. And father of the two sweetest, kindest, and most caring girls ever - Katie & Olivia! I love Jesus Christ, my family and my friends, in that order. I really like the Dallas Cowboys, Spider-man, Journey and Def Leopard. I am the Co-Founder of RapidKetosis: Makers of RapidKetosis. I am a Certified Health Coach, Certified Personal Trainer, Author of two weight loss books, one award winning screenplay, and one graphic novel. I have had my film, The Benefits of Lifting Weights for Women win two film festivals and was shown at the Cannes Film Festival. ​I have helped thousands of friends lose thousands of pounds of fat over the last 25 years. I have two State of Georgia USAPL raw Bench Press Records. I will do whatever I can to help you understand the benefits of eating a high fat, low carb diet and how RapidKetosis helps get you into ketosis faster, easier and forever. ​Just ask. Continue reading >>

Neonatal Ketosis Is Not Rare: Experience Of Neonatal Screening Using Gas Chromatography-mass Spectrometry.

Neonatal Ketosis Is Not Rare: Experience Of Neonatal Screening Using Gas Chromatography-mass Spectrometry.

Abstract The causes and effects of transient neonatal ketosis, discovered during a pilot study of screening for abnormalities in neonatal metabolism using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, were investigated. Of the 21,342 neonates that were screened, 47 had significant ketosis. The organic acid profile accompanying ketosis in the urine of neonates followed the pattern of ketotic dicarboxylic aciduria in approximately half of the cases. Ketosis was more often found in neonates nourished by breast feeding (33 out of 47). Over half of the neonates showing ketosis (28 out of 47) were asymptomatic. When normal neonates and neonates testing positive for ketosis were compared, no statistically significant correlations were found with regard to birth mass, gestational period, or gender. However, neonates with ketosis tended to have low mass gain rates in the 5 days from birth and a statistically significant difference was found in this regard in comparison to normal neonates (P<0.0001). From the above results, development of ketosis in neonates was found to be possible even in normal subjects. Most ketosis in neonates was also found to depend largely on nourishment after birth. Existence of an asymptomatic ketosis category was also suggested. Continue reading >>

What Is A Ketogenic Diet?

What Is A Ketogenic Diet?

What Is a Ketogenic Diet? If medicine doesn't control seizures in epilepsy, sometimes doctors prescribe a ketogenic (or keto) diet. A ketogenic diet is a strict high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet that can reduce, and sometimes stop, seizures. It's called "ketogenic" because it makes ketones in the body. Ketones are made when the body uses fat for energy. By replacing carbs with fat in the diet, the body burns more fat and makes more ketones. The ketogenic diet is prescribed by a doctor. Kids on the diet need to be followed closely by a dietitian to make sure they follow the diet and get the nutrients they need. The diet starts with fasting during an overnight hospital stay. Who Needs a Ketogenic Diet? Children with seizures that are not well-controlled by medicines (called intractable epilepsy) and severe epilepsy syndromes (such as infantile spasms or Lennox-Gastaut syndrome) might benefit from a ketogenic diet. Studies show that the ketogenic diet also may help treat other conditions, such as diabetes, obesity, and even cancer. How Does a Ketogenic Diet Work? Although the ketogenic diet for epilepsy has been around since 1920, doctors aren't exactly sure how the higher ketone levels works. Some seizure types seem to respond better than others to the ketogenic diet. In babies, the keto diet is given in formula. Young children may be fed by a tube that is place in the stomach by a surgeon. This helps the child stay on the diet. How Long Do Kids Need a Ketogenic Diet? You should know if a ketogenic diet works for your child within a few months. If it does, your doctor may recommend weaning your child off the diet after 2 years of seizure control. The weaning process is done over several months to avoid triggering seizures. Some people stay on a ketogenic diet for years. Are Continue reading >>

Ketosis During Pregnancy – Is It Safe?

Ketosis During Pregnancy – Is It Safe?

Ketosis is a state of metabolism in adults where the energy is supplied to the body by ketones present in the blood rather than glycolysis, where the energy comes from glucose. People often land up in a dilemma while judging whether ketosis is safe during pregnancy or not. The diet of a woman has to undergo certain changes in case she nears pregnancy. However, you should be aware of the effects of ketosis before you opt for such a diet. The body of a woman undergoes a lot of changes during pregnancy. Food choices are important when she tries to conceive. Here, you will have a detailed information about ketosis before and during pregnancy. Ketosis before Pregnancy Although people think that ketosis during pregnancy is harmful, in reality, it can help you get pregnant. If you want to draw your energy from ketone particles, you should plan a ketogenic diet. For an ordinary person, it is safe and even women trying to get pregnant can stick to such a meal. These meals are low-carb diets, and people can switch to these diets when they get pregnant. Well, it is important to know that ketosis is safe before you get pregnant. However, the norms are a bit different during pregnancy and you should stick to the rules. Read on to know whether it is safe during pregnancy or not. If you had heard that ketosis is harmful during pregnancy, you might be confusing it with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). This is completely different from ketosis that we are speaking of here. DKA has no relevance with nutritional ketosis and it is a far more harmful syndrome. It occurs in diabetic people where the level of insulin is not managed properly. It disrupts the balance of acid and base in the body. The level of blood sugar in the case of DKA is around three times the normal conditions. This situation Continue reading >>

Initiating And Maintaining The Ketogenic Diet In Breastfed Infants

Initiating And Maintaining The Ketogenic Diet In Breastfed Infants

The ketogenic diet has been used as an effective treatment for intractable epilepsy since 1921. Its efficacy in the treatment of epilepsy in infants has been reported to be similar to that in older children. However, there have been no reports in the literature addressing the possibility of continuing breastfeeding during treatment with the ketogenic diet. The authors performed a retrospective chart review of the patients initiated on the ketogenic diet and identified 5 infants who continued to receive breast milk while on the ketogenic diet treatment. All 5 experienced a >90% reduction of seizures during the first month on the ketogenic diet treatment with continued breastfeeding. Four of the 5 were able to maintain >90% reduction of seizures for the duration of their time receiving breast milk while on the ketogenic diet treatment. Traditionally, infants have discontinued breastfeeding prior to diet initiation because of the concern that the carbohydrates in the breast milk will prevent attaining adequate levels of ketosis. It is the authors’ experience with these 5 patients that infants can continue to breastfeed while successfully using the ketogenic diet for seizure treatment. Nordli DR, Kuroda MM, Carroll J., et al. Experience with the ketogenic diet in infants. Pediatrics. 2001;108:129-133. Google Scholar, Medline Kossoff EH, Pyzik PL, McGrogan JR, Vinig EPG, Freeman JM Efficacy of the ketogenic diet for infantile spasms. Pediatrics . 2002;109:780-783. Google Scholar, Medline Jambaqúe I., Chiron C., Dumas C., Mumford J., Dulac O. Mental and behavioural outcome of infantile epilepsy treated by vigabatrin in tuberous sclerosis patients. Epilepsy Res. 2000;38:151-160. Google Scholar, Medline Freeman JM, Kossoff EH, Freeman JB, et al. The Ketogenic Diet: A Treatme Continue reading >>

Experience With The Ketogenic Diet In Infants.

Experience With The Ketogenic Diet In Infants.

Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness, tolerability, and adverse effects of the ketogenic diet in infants with refractory epilepsy. METHODS: A retrospective review of 32 infants who had been treated with the ketogenic diet at a large metropolitan institution. RESULTS: Most infants (71%) were able to maintain strong ketosis. The overall effectiveness of the diet in infants was similar to that reported in the literature for older children; 19.4% became seizure-free, and an additional 35.5% had >50% reduction in seizure frequency. The diet was particularly effective for patients with infantile spasms/myoclonic seizures. There were concomitant reductions in antiepileptic medications. The majority of parents reported improvements in seizure frequency and in their child's behavior and function, particularly with respect to attention/alertness, activity level, and socialization. The diet generally was well-tolerated, and 96.4% maintained appropriate growth parameters. Adverse events, all reversible and occurring in one patient each, included renal stone, gastritis, ulcerative colitis, alteration of mentation, and hyperlipidemia. CONCLUSION: The ketogenic diet should be considered safe and effective treatment for infants with intractable seizures. Continue reading >>

Your Brain On Ketones

Your Brain On Ketones

The modern prescription of high carbohydrate, low fat diets and eating snacks between meals has coincided with an increase in obesity, diabetes, and and increase in the incidence of many mental health disorders, including depression, anxiety, and eating disorders. In addition, many of these disorders are striking the population at younger ages. While most people would agree that diet has a lot to do with the development of obesity and diabetes, many would disagree that what we eat has much to do with our mental health and outlook. I believe that what we eat has a lot to do with the health of our brains, though of course mental illness (like physical illness) has multifactorial causes, and by no means should we diminish the importance of addressing all the causes in each individual. But let's examine the opposite of the modern high carbohydrate, low fat, constant snacking lifestyle and how that might affect the brain. The opposite of a low fat, snacking lifestyle would be the lifestyle our ancestors lived for tens of thousands of generations, the lifestyle for which our brains are primarily evolved. It seems reasonable that we would have had extended periods without food, either because there was none available, or we were busy doing something else. Then we would follow that period with a filling meal of gathered plant and animal products, preferentially selecting the fat. During the day we might have eaten a piece of fruit, or greens, or a grub we dug up, but anything filling or high in calories (such as a starchy tuber) would have to be killed, butchered, and/or carefully prepared before eating. Fortunately, we have a terrific system of fuel for periods of fasting or low carbohydrate eating, our body (and brain) can readily shift from burning glucose to burning what ar Continue reading >>

Are Babies In Ketosis?

Are Babies In Ketosis?

Yes! Studies have demonstrated that babies are commonly in a mild state of ketosis. It is thought that this is due to the high energy demand of their growing bodies. Sign up for Tips, Recipes, Transformation Stories, and more! Continue reading >>

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