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Am I In Ketosis Quiz

Quiz: Are You Eating Too Much Protein?

Quiz: Are You Eating Too Much Protein?

Protein-packed meal plans like the ketogenic or paleo diets have exploded in popularity and companies now sell packaged foods, such as cereals and cookies, with added protein. There is little doubt this nutrient is an essential part of a healthy and balanced diet but how much is too much? Test your protein smarts with this short quiz, developed with celebrity fitness trainer Chris Powell. Watch the Video This quiz was recently featured on Could You Die From Eating Too Much Protein? Your Video is Loading Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

"Ketosis" is a word you'll probably see when you're looking for information on diabetes or weight loss. Is it a good thing or a bad thing? That depends. Ketosis is a normal metabolic process, something your body does to keep working. When it doesn't have enough carbohydrates from food for your cells to burn for energy, it burns fat instead. As part of this process, it makes ketones. If you're healthy and eating a balanced diet, your body controls how much fat it burns, and you don't normally make or use ketones. But when you cut way back on your calories or carbs, your body will switch to ketosis for energy. It can also happen after exercising for a long time and during pregnancy. For people with uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a sign of not using enough insulin. Ketosis can become dangerous when ketones build up. High levels lead to dehydration and change the chemical balance of your blood. Ketosis is a popular weight loss strategy. Low-carb eating plans include the first part of the Atkins diet and the Paleo diet, which stress proteins for fueling your body. In addition to helping you burn fat, ketosis can make you feel less hungry. It also helps you maintain muscle. For healthy people who don't have diabetes and aren't pregnant, ketosis usually kicks in after 3 or 4 days of eating less than 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. That's about 3 slices of bread, a cup of low-fat fruit yogurt, or two small bananas. You can start ketosis by fasting, too. Doctors may put children who have epilepsy on a ketogenic diet, a special high-fat, very low-carb and protein plan, because it might help prevent seizures. Adults with epilepsy sometimes eat modified Atkins diets. Some research suggests that ketogenic diets might help lower your risk of heart disease. Other studies show sp Continue reading >>

Carbohydrate Sensitivity Quiz

Carbohydrate Sensitivity Quiz

ARE YOU CARBOHYDRATE-SENSITIVE? Take my carbohydrate sensitivity quiz to find out! Do you feel sleepy or foggy 2 hours or less after eating a meal or snack that contains sugars or starches? Yes Do you tend to gain weight around your middle, instead of in your hips and thighs? Yes Do you feel hungry when you shouldn’t need any more food? Yes Do you frequently crave sweets, starches, or dairy products? Yes Do you wake up in the middle of the night and have a hard time getting back to sleep unless you eat something sweet or starchy? Yes Do you get irritable, restless, tense, or anxious in the early evening before dinner? Yes Do you have a hard time controlling how much sugar or starch you eat? Yes Do you have symptoms of “hypoglycemia” if you don’t eat every 2-3 hours? [Typical hypoglycemic symptoms include feeling shaky, panicky, irritable, anxious, or lightheaded when you’re hungry.] Yes Do any of the following diseases run in your immediate family? Do you often binge on sweets, starches, or dairy products? Yes Do you prefer sweets and starches over all other types of food? Yes Do sweets and starches make you feel temporarily less depressed or less anxious? Yes Do you feel you need to carry food with you wherever you go? Yes Do you tend to get panicky or hungry while exercising? Yes Women only: Do you feel much more emotional in the days prior to your period? Yes Your carbohydrate sensitivity score is 0. What does my score mean? The more YES answers you have, the more likely it is that you are sensitive to carbohydrates (insulin resistant), and the more seriously you should consider cutting back on carbohydrates in your diet. How can I be sure my symptoms are due to carbohydrates? These symptoms are just a collection of common clues. For more accurate informati Continue reading >>

Can You Survive A Day Eating Low-carb?

Can You Survive A Day Eating Low-carb?

People cut carbs for all kinds of reasons. But what TF does "low-carb" actually mean? Some people do it because they've heard it'll help them lose body fat, get swole, or avoid that mid-afternoon energy crash. (Btw, if you're curious about what carbs even are and what they do, you can learn all about them here.) It turns out that there aren't really universally accepted, hard-and-fast numbers that define what it means to go low-carb for all people in all circumstances. After all, every body is different, and what could be just enough carbs for one person might be too few carbs for someone else. BUT there are some numbers that experts and researchers use as benchmarks. For example, a 2015 study on carbohydrate restriction considered less than 130 grams of carbs a day to be a low-carb intake (the authors noted that this is also the American Diabetes Association's recommended daily carb minimum), and 20–50 grams per day to be a very low-carb intake. All nutritional values have been taken from the US Department of Agriculture's Food Composition Databases, and from brand websites and product labels. Continue reading >>

Blog: My Six Week Ketogenic Diet Experiment

Blog: My Six Week Ketogenic Diet Experiment

Disclaimer: The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of Catalyst. This blog is not meant in any way as medical advice. Please consult a medical profession before commencing any new eating regime. What would you say if I told you there’s a diet where you can eat all the food you normally deny yourself, stop counting tedious calories, shift some weight, gain extra muscle and get an energy boost too? If you’re anything like me you’d be asking ‘where do I sign up?’! So when I heard about the ketogenic diet from a colleague I was immediately intrigued. This simply sounded too good to be true. Could I really eat fat and get lean? Enjoy peanut butter treats and squeeze into my skinny jeans? Never one to shy away from a challenge, I decided to see for myself, and so my six week experiment with the ketogenic diet began….. So what actually is a ketogenic, or ‘keto’, eating plan? In its most simple form, this is an extremely low-carb, high-fat diet. By lowering your carb intake your body is pushed into a metabolic state known as ketosis (key –tow –sis), where your body switches from burning carbs as its primary energy source to burning fat. To be more precise, it uses ketone bodies or ketones from the breakdown of fatty acids in the liver. Hence the name, ketosis. Now fatty fuel can come from a meal you’ve just eaten or from the stores of fat on your body (aka, the evil muffin top). While it may sound a little questionable, ketosis is actually an entirely natural metabolic process that the body initiates to help us survive when our food intake is low. Typically our body runs on glucose derived from the breakdown of carbs – this is because glucose is the easiest molecule for the body to convert and use as energy, so it will b Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Definition Ketosis is the presence of excess ketones in the body and may also appear as the term dietary ketosis (more below). Ketosis is generally not life-threatening. Ketoacidosis is a severe form of ketosis. The term may appear in reference to diabetes, as diabetic ketoacidosis or the consumption of too much alcohol as alcoholic ketoacidosis. Such cases can have serious health effects, particularly if the ketoacidosis goes untreated for long periods of time. Consult our more extensive discussion of ketones for details on their chemical structure, naming and more. Additional Info Ketones are a normal byproduct of fat metabolism (the breaking down of fat into energy). Normally, your body is efficient at removing these, but when certain enzymes are absent or damaged, the concentration of ketones in the body can build up. Ketosis indicates a blood ketone concentration between 0.3 and 7.0 mmol/L and ketoacidosis reflects levels of 7.0 mmol/L or higher. Ketoacidosis gets its name because high blood ketone levels lower the pH of your blood to 7.3 or lower. Severe and/or prolonged cases of ketoacidosis can lead to coma and death if not properly treated. Certain individuals are predisposed towards ketosis or ketoacidosis. For example, those with diabetes have insufficient insulin levels and their bodies have difficulty processing glucose (sugar). If a diabetic does not alter his or her diet to reduce sugar intake and/or take additional insulin, their body will break down fat, leading to a rise in ketone levels. The complexities of diabetes and ketoacidosis are beyond the scope of this discussion; see the links under Further Reading for more information. Popular low-carbohydrate diets (such as Atkins) encourage the breakdown of fat and can induce so-called dietary ketosis, bu Continue reading >>

The Definitive Guide To The Ketogenic Diet

The Definitive Guide To The Ketogenic Diet

If you want to lose weight or build muscle faster and think the ketogenic diet might help, you want to read this article. How did a diet meant for treating epileptic seizures turn into a popular weight loss fad? That’s the story of the ketogenic diet, which was introduced in 1921 by an endocrinologist named Dr. Henry Geyelin. Geyelin, presenting at the annual meeting of the American Medical Association, explained that the ancient Greeks had discovered that fasting was an effective method of managing epileptic seizures. Hippocrates wrote about it and, like Geyelin, found that the seizures would return once eating resumed. Why? What was it about fasting that suppressed the seizures? Well, epileptic seizures are triggered by electrical abnormalities in the brain. The causes can vary, from genetics to brain injury, but more common is chronic inflammation throughout the body. Geyelin found that when people fast, two major changes occur in the blood: glucose levels fall and ketone levels rise. You’ve probably heard of glucose, also known as blood sugar, but not ketones, which are carbon-oxygen molecules produced by the liver that cells can use for energy instead of glucose. This finding fascinated Geyelin and he set out to determine if similar effects could be achieved without starvation. A decade of work proved they could, and the “ketogenic diet,” as it would be later called, was born. The purpose of the ketogenic diet is to maintain a state of ketosis, wherein the body’s primary energy source is ketones, not glucose. Early studies showed it was an extremely effective treatment for seizures, but in 1938, it was eclipsed by the anticonvulsant drug phenytoin. This medication became the standard treatment for epilepsy, effectively retiring the ketogenic diet from cli Continue reading >>

How To Detect Ketosis

How To Detect Ketosis

How can you tell if your low-carbing efforts have been effective enough to induce ketosis? Learn how to check your ketones! The state of ketosis The state of ketosis means that the body has switched from depending on carbohydrates for energy to burning fats for fuel. This means not only dietary fats (olive oil, guacamole, deep-fried pig ears), but also all the jiggly bits around your waist — clearly a desirable state for anyone looking to shed extra weight. When the body metabolizes fat, it generates molecules called ketones (also known as ketone bodies). As you restrict carbohydrate intake and amp up the dietary fat, more fat is metabolized and a greater quantity of ketones are created. Most of the cells in your body — including those in your brain — are able to use ketones for energy, although many people experience a few days’ adjustment period, often called the low carb flu. One of the varieties of ketones generated — acetone — cannot be used by the body and is excreted as waste, mostly in the urine and the breath. Conveniently, this makes it very simple to measure whether or not you are in ketosis. Upon entering ketosis, some people report a distinct change in the smell of their breath as a result of the extra released acetone. It could be “fruity” — it’s been likened to overripe apples — or even “metallic.” If you notice this happening during your first few days of changing your diet, it could be a good sign you’re in ketosis. The unusual smell isn’t anything dangerous, but it could be annoying. Drinking plenty of water should help, or get yourself some sugar-free gum. Most people report “keto-breath” diminishing after the first few weeks. Detecting ketones in urine The more accurate way — and the one we recommend — to check f Continue reading >>

How To Know If The Ketogenic Diet Is Right For You

How To Know If The Ketogenic Diet Is Right For You

It’s almost a universally accepted fact that diets leave you hungry. After all, that rumbling tummy two hours after mealtime (not to mention, strict and time-consuming calorie counting) is the reason most New Year’s resolutions fail by February, right? But Dr. Jacob Wilson and Ryan Lowery, the authors of The Ketogenic Bible, say you don’t need to go hungry or count calories to lose weight. The ketogenic diet, also referred to as “keto,” is a dieting method gaining popularity from people with diabetes to CrossFitters. “The ketogenic diet induces ketosis, which is a state where your body is running primarily off of fat and ketones,” explains Wilson, instead of sugar from carbs. “That can occur through lowering your carbohydrates and having very high fat intake.” Specifically, the ketogenic diet targets about 80 percent of calories from fat, 15 percent from protein and 5 percent from carbohydrates. RELATED: Why You Should Eat More Fat and Less Sugar The Upside of Ketosis While this method may have gained popularity among athletes and other hard-core fitness buffs, they’re far from the only ones who will see benefits from this method. “When you implement a well-formulated proper ketogenic diet, you can see improvement in performance and body composition at the same time,” says Lowery. You’ll look leaner and shed fat, but you won’t feel sapped of energy like when you decrease calories. The bonus is you won’t experience the post-meal crash associated with a higher-carb diet, he says. Lowery also says that for most ketogenic diet newbies, there won’t be a need to count overall calories either. As long as you’re paying attention to your diet and inducing ketosis through high-fat and low-carb consumption, most dieters automatically hit a calorie Continue reading >>

Keto Quiz

Keto Quiz

How much do you know about the Keto Diet? Take this quiz and find out! See If You Get To Keto Pro! In general, a Keto diet aims to reduce intake of foods that are high in ... Continue reading >>

The Complete Beginner’s Guide To The Ketogenic Diet

The Complete Beginner’s Guide To The Ketogenic Diet

The ketogenic diet is a low-carb, high-fat diet that involves reducing carbs low enough to induce a metabolic state called ketosis. This type of low-carb eating has been shown in several studies to help people lose weight and lower risk factors for cardiovascular disease.(1, 2, 3, 4) Recent studies are also finding that the diet is safer for long term use than once was thought. (5) Ketogenic diet studies also reveal potential benefits for improvingtype 2 diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer’s, and epilepsy. (6, 7, 8, 9) To find out if the ketogenic diet is right for you, this article gives you a complete guide explaining all you need to know. Just keep in mind the ketogenic diet, while it’s terrific for weight loss, it may not be right for certain people. It’s important to undergo a health screen by your doctor to determine if you have any contraindications or other health related circumstances that would prevent you from starting this diet. (see faq below) Take the Quiz: Discover your unique Metabolic Type to burn fat as quickly as possible! Click here to take our quick (and shockingly accurate) "What's Your Metabolic Type" Quiz right now and find out your unique metabolic type and your unique #1 fat burning blocker... Here’s How The Ketogenic Diet Works A ketogenic diet is a low-carb, high-fat, moderate-protein diet. Carbohydrates are limited to 50 grams per day and sometimes even lower at 20-30 grams per day. Lowering carbs to this extent puts the body into a metabolic state called ketosis. Ketosis is a natural process the body undergoes when food intake is low. During a starvation state, we produce ketone bodies, which are produced by the liver from the metabolism of fats. The aim of a ketogenic diet is to reduce carbohydrates to starve the body of its primary energy Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis? - Definition & Symptoms

What Is Ketosis? - Definition & Symptoms

What is ketosis? It's actually a normal part of your body's metabolic processes, but sometimes things get out of balance, and too many ketones begin building up. Learn how this happens, what the symptoms are, and how it's treated. What is Ketosis? Ketosis is actually a normal part of your body's metabolic processes. Your body derives energy from breaking down the food you eat, and a lot of your initial energy comes from carbohydrates. However, when the body no longer has any carbohydrate stores to draw upon, it will begin burning fat for energy. This results in a buildup of ketones. So if, for example, you are on an extremely low-carb diet, your body will switch to make energy through the process of ketosis. Ketosis can also be triggered on purpose to help burn fat levels. However, high levels of ketones in the blood can sometimes hurt your body, because it leads to dehydration and alters the chemical composition of your blood. Symptoms of Ketosis You can test your body's ketosis levels by buying strips that test your urine for four types of ketones that can be present. High ketone levels can be dangerous because they actually alter your blood, making it more acidic (known as ketoacidosis). If the blood becomes too acidic, it is no longer compatible with the body, and it can cause coma or even death. Inducing ketoacidosis is possible when there is an over-consumption of alcohol, extreme fasting or starvation, or over-active thyroid functioning. If a diet is well-balanced, low carbohydrate consumption should not induce ketosis; however, avoiding carbohydrates all together can lead to problems. Proper hydration is important all the time, though it is particularly important during dieting of any kind. Diabetics are at risk of extreme ketosis when their insulin levels are t Continue reading >>

Further Section

Further Section

Further Section Quiz of the Month Answers (1) Arterial pH 7.15 and PaC02 21 mm Hg are char acteristic of a metabolic acidosis. His serum anion gap (AG) is 30mmol/l (135 -101 mmol/l), a normal AG being 16 ± 4 mmol/l. A high-AG metabolic acidosis must be caused by accumulation of organic acid anions such as lactate or ketone bodies or ingestion of an organic acid like salicylate, cyanide, methanol (metabo lized to formaldehyde and formic acid), paraldehyde, or ethylene glycol. In view of the presence of ketones in the urine and lactate in the blood, the most likely cause of the high-AG metabolic acidosis is a combined ‘alcoholic’ ketoacidosis and lactic acidosis. Assuming his acid-base status had been normal prior to the present illness [HCO3] 25 mmol/l and AG 16 mmol/l), the AtHCO^] is 18 mmol/l and the AAG 14 mmol/l. The 4-mmol/l discrepancy between the A[HCC > 3] and the AAG is likely due to the presence of another acid-base disturbance – either a normal-AG metabolic acidosis or a primary respiratory alkalosis. The diarrhea that accompanied the present illness would seem the most likely cause of a normal-AG metabolic acidosis, since he had not been drinking battery acid. A renal acidification defect associated with hypokalemia and a urine pH less than 5.5 (e.g., proximal renal tubular acidosis) would be unusual. The most likely cause of hyperventilation in a nonhypoxemic cirrhotic patient is the cirrhosis itself, which is associated with high circulating levels of ammonia and progesterone and with arteriolovenular shunting in the brain and lungs. (2) Alcoholic patients may present with ketosis caused by starvation, diabetic ketoacidosis (when severe pan creatic damage has led to endocrine insufficiency), or withdrawal from ethanol after a prolong Continue reading >>

10 Things You Need To Know About The Ketogenic Diet

10 Things You Need To Know About The Ketogenic Diet

1. Overview The ketogenic or “keto” diet is a low-carb, high-fat diet designed to promote your body’s metabolism running on fats and ketones rather than carbohydrates and sugars. Ketones are the byproduct of lipolysis, the breakdown of lipids (fats).[1] What you should know: While similar to the more popular Atkins diet, the ketogenic diet is designed to promote ketosis, the fat metabolism often associated with fasting. 2. Brief History In 1921 endocrinologist Rollin Woodyatt discovered ketone bodies found in the liver following periods of starvation or while consuming a diet rich in fats. Russell Wilder continued this research in the early 1920s and found that this “ketogenics diet” was beneficial in the treatment of epilepsy and it gained popularity as an epilepsy therapy during the early 1900s. 3. Fat burning Sticking to a keto diet can help your body become a fat burning machine. The keto diet provides benefits similar of those experienced while fasting, weight loss as one example, without actually fasting! The magic happens in your liver, it converts this new steady supply of dietary fats into ketones to fuel your body and brain and in the process, your liver accesses your stored body fat and burns that as well.[2] 4. Stabilizes blood sugar Following a ketogenic diet lowers blood sugar and the associated insulin levels. Without the constant peaks and troughs of blood glucose and the release of insulin, your body will become more insulin sensitive and responsive to “normalized” levels of insulin.[3] 5. Reduces Sugar Cravings Your body will adapt to the ketogenic diet and once used to being in ketosis, it will begin to “prefer” ketones over sugars and glucose. This is a good place to be, with your body no longer craving sugar and now preferring prot Continue reading >>

Ketosis Symptoms

Ketosis Symptoms

Source Ketosis is the name for a state achieved on a low-carbohydrate diet. According to WebMD, when you are in ketosis, it means your body is burning fat for energy. When that happens, your body releases ketones into your bloodstream, and you are in ketosis. This state may cause a host of temporary symptoms. Understanding the Symptoms Many dieters develop symptoms that let them know ketones are present. For many people beginning a low-carb diet, ketosis kicks in after a few days of strict adherence to the diet. In fact, many low-carbohydrate plans, such as Atkins and paleo, have an initial phase in which dieters take in extremely low amounts of carbohydrates (usually less than 25 grams per day) to kick start ketosis. You can test for ketones in the urine using ketosis strips, or rely on symptoms to tell you ketosis has been achieved. Early Stages Symptoms of ketosis vary, depending how long you've been in the state. In the early stages, the symptoms may be a bit unpleasant. However, as your body adapts to ketones in the bloodstream, symptoms may decrease. Early symptoms usually last for several days or up to a week in some people. This period of symptoms is sometimes called the keto flu. It may continue until your body is used to burning fat instead of glucose. Afterwards, the levels of ketones should lessen, but that doesn't mean you aren't losing weight. It means your body has found a balance and is no longer producing excess ketones. According to Diet Doctor, early stage symptoms include: Flu-like symptoms, such as fatigue and headache Nausea Brain fog Constipation Leg cramps Feeling unusually thirsty Irritability Heart palpitations Dry mouth Ketosis breath, which smells fruity and unpleasant Decreased energy and weakness Dizziness Sleep problems Cold hands and feet Continue reading >>

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