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Alkalosis Vs Acidosis

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(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv/) Eve Van Cauter, Professor of Medicine at the University of Chicago, directs the the Sleep, Metabolism and Health Center. She explores how sleep loss and poor sleep quality are risk factors for obesity and diabetes. Series: "UCSF Center for Obesity Assessment, Study and Treatment" [12/2012] [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 24581]

Types Of Disturbances

The different types of acid-base disturbances are differentiated based on: Origin: Respiratory or metabolic Primary or secondary (compensatory) Uncomplicated or mixed: A simple or uncomplicated disturbance is a single or primary acid-base disturbance with or without compensation. A mixed disturbance is more than one primary disturbance (not a primary with an expected compensatory response). Acid-base disturbances have profound effects on the body. Acidemia results in arrythmias, decreased cardiac output, depression, and bone demineralization. Alkalemia results in tetany and convulsions, weakness, polydipsia and polyuria. Thus, the body will immediately respond to changes in pH or H+, which must be kept within strict defined limits. As soon as there is a metabolic or respiratory acid-base disturbance, body buffers immediately soak up the proton (in acidosis) or release protons (alkalosis) to offset the changes in H+ (i.e. the body compensates for the changes in H+). This is very effective so minimal changes in pH occur if the body is keeping up or the acid-base abnormality is mild. However, once buffers are overwhelmed, the pH will change and kick in stronger responses. Remember tha Continue reading >>

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  1. sonias

    3 This is my topic for this week in nursing school, respiratory & metabolic acidosis/ alkalosis. I am having trouble breaking it down. Can someone please help me understand this please? Any and all help is greatly appreciated.

  2. Esme12

    Normal values:
    PH = 7.35 - 7.45
    C02 = 35 - 45
    HC03 = 21-26
    Respiratory acidosis = low ph and high C02
    hypoventilation (eg: COPD, narcs or sedatives, atelectasis)
    *Compensated by metabolic alkalosis (increased HC03)
    For example:
    ph 7.20 C02 60 HC03 24 (uncompensated respiratory acidosis)
    ph 7.33 C02 55 HC03 29 (partially compensated respiratory acidosis)
    ph 7.37 C02 60 HC03 37 (compensated respiratory acidosis)
    Respiratory alkalosis : high ph and low C02
    hyperventilation (eg: anxiety, PE, pain, sepsis, brain injury)
    *Compensated by metabolic acidosis (decreased HC03)
    examples:
    ph 7.51 C02 26 HC03 25 (uncompensated respiratory alkalosis)
    ph 7.47 C02 32 HC03 20 (partially compensated respiratory alkalosis)
    ph 7.43 C02 30 HC03 19 (compensated respiratory alkalosis)
    Metabolic acidosis : low ph and low HC03
    diabetic ketoacidosis, starvation, severe diarrhea
    *Compensated by respiratory alkalosis (decreased C02)
    examples:
    ph 7.23 C02 36 HC03 14 (uncompensated metabolic acidosis)
    ph 7.31 C02 30 HC03 17 (partially compensated metabolic acidosis)
    ph 7.38 C02 26 HC03 20 (compensated metabolic acidosis)
    Metabloic alkalosis = high ph and high HC03
    severe vomiting, potassium deficit, diuretics
    *Compensated by respiratory acidosis (increased C02)
    example:
    ph 7.54 C02 44 HC03 29 (uncompensated metabolic alkalosis)
    ph 7.50 C02 49 HC03 32 (partially compensated metabolic alkalosis)
    ph 7.44 C02 52 HC02 35 (compensated metabolic alkalosis)
    *Remember that compensation corrects the ph.
    Now a simple way to remember this......
    CO2 = acid, makes things acidic
    HCO3 = base, makes things alkalotic
    Remember ROME
    R-Respiratory
    O-Opposite
    M-Metabolic
    E-Equal
    Ok always look at the pH first...
    pH<7.35 = acidosis
    pH>7.45 = alkalosis
    Then, if the CO2 is high or low, then it is respiratory...If the HCO3 is high or low then it is metabolic. How you remember that is that the respiratory system is involved with CO2 (blowing air off or slowing RR), and the kidneys (metabolic) are involved with HCO3 (excreting or not excreting).
    Here is how you think thru it: pH = 7.25 CO2 = 40 HCO3 = 17
    Ok, first, the pH is low so think acidosis. CO2 is WNL. HCO3 is low. Draw arrows if it helps. The abnormal values are both low (think Equal). Metabolic imbalances are equal. So, this must be metabolic acidosis!
    Now, for compensation...If you have a metabolic imbalance, the respiratory system is going to try to compensate. Respiratory = CO2. If the CO2 is normal in the ABG, then there is no compensation going on. Compensation in acidosis will decrease the CO2 because you want to get rid of the acid (CO2). In alkalosis, it will increase because you want to add more acid (CO2)
    If you have a respiratory imbalance, the kidneys will try to compensate. Kidneys = HCO3. If the HCO3 is normal in the ABG, then there is no compensation going on. Compensation in acidosis will increase HCO3 because you want to hold on to the base to make it more alkalotic. In alkalosis, it will decrease because you want to excrete the base to make it more acidic.

  3. Esme12

    Check out this tutorial
    Interactive Online ABG's acid base

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
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A short hand-drawn tutorial to explain the basic mechanisms behind simple respiratory acidosis/alkalosis, and the compensatory mechanisms that can be used to correct them

Acid/base (alkalosis Vs Acidosis, Metabolic Vs Respiratory)

This is the general way to approach an acid-base disturbance. They’re not really as bad as they seem at first. You just need to remember that CO2 is acidic and HCO3- is basic. So an increase in CO2 makes the body acidotic and an increase in HCO3- makes the body alkalotic. It’s also good to remember to calculate the anion gap when doing these calculations. AG = Na – (Cl- + HCO3-) it’s just the cations minus the anions. If this gap between the cations and anions is large, it means that the anions are stacking their team and have an extra anion helping out. The classic mnemonic is MUDPILES Methanol Uremia Diabetic ketoacidosis Paraldehyde Isopropyl alcohol Lactic acidosis Ethylene glycol Salicylates If the anion gap is big, it’s good to look at the ratio between the change in the gap and the change in the HCO3-. Increase in AG < decrease in HCO3- = coexisting non-anion gap metabolic acidosis Increase in AG > decrease in HCO3- = coexisting metabolic alkalosis Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. sonias

    3 This is my topic for this week in nursing school, respiratory & metabolic acidosis/ alkalosis. I am having trouble breaking it down. Can someone please help me understand this please? Any and all help is greatly appreciated.

  2. Esme12

    Normal values:
    PH = 7.35 - 7.45
    C02 = 35 - 45
    HC03 = 21-26
    Respiratory acidosis = low ph and high C02
    hypoventilation (eg: COPD, narcs or sedatives, atelectasis)
    *Compensated by metabolic alkalosis (increased HC03)
    For example:
    ph 7.20 C02 60 HC03 24 (uncompensated respiratory acidosis)
    ph 7.33 C02 55 HC03 29 (partially compensated respiratory acidosis)
    ph 7.37 C02 60 HC03 37 (compensated respiratory acidosis)
    Respiratory alkalosis : high ph and low C02
    hyperventilation (eg: anxiety, PE, pain, sepsis, brain injury)
    *Compensated by metabolic acidosis (decreased HC03)
    examples:
    ph 7.51 C02 26 HC03 25 (uncompensated respiratory alkalosis)
    ph 7.47 C02 32 HC03 20 (partially compensated respiratory alkalosis)
    ph 7.43 C02 30 HC03 19 (compensated respiratory alkalosis)
    Metabolic acidosis : low ph and low HC03
    diabetic ketoacidosis, starvation, severe diarrhea
    *Compensated by respiratory alkalosis (decreased C02)
    examples:
    ph 7.23 C02 36 HC03 14 (uncompensated metabolic acidosis)
    ph 7.31 C02 30 HC03 17 (partially compensated metabolic acidosis)
    ph 7.38 C02 26 HC03 20 (compensated metabolic acidosis)
    Metabloic alkalosis = high ph and high HC03
    severe vomiting, potassium deficit, diuretics
    *Compensated by respiratory acidosis (increased C02)
    example:
    ph 7.54 C02 44 HC03 29 (uncompensated metabolic alkalosis)
    ph 7.50 C02 49 HC03 32 (partially compensated metabolic alkalosis)
    ph 7.44 C02 52 HC02 35 (compensated metabolic alkalosis)
    *Remember that compensation corrects the ph.
    Now a simple way to remember this......
    CO2 = acid, makes things acidic
    HCO3 = base, makes things alkalotic
    Remember ROME
    R-Respiratory
    O-Opposite
    M-Metabolic
    E-Equal
    Ok always look at the pH first...
    pH<7.35 = acidosis
    pH>7.45 = alkalosis
    Then, if the CO2 is high or low, then it is respiratory...If the HCO3 is high or low then it is metabolic. How you remember that is that the respiratory system is involved with CO2 (blowing air off or slowing RR), and the kidneys (metabolic) are involved with HCO3 (excreting or not excreting).
    Here is how you think thru it: pH = 7.25 CO2 = 40 HCO3 = 17
    Ok, first, the pH is low so think acidosis. CO2 is WNL. HCO3 is low. Draw arrows if it helps. The abnormal values are both low (think Equal). Metabolic imbalances are equal. So, this must be metabolic acidosis!
    Now, for compensation...If you have a metabolic imbalance, the respiratory system is going to try to compensate. Respiratory = CO2. If the CO2 is normal in the ABG, then there is no compensation going on. Compensation in acidosis will decrease the CO2 because you want to get rid of the acid (CO2). In alkalosis, it will increase because you want to add more acid (CO2)
    If you have a respiratory imbalance, the kidneys will try to compensate. Kidneys = HCO3. If the HCO3 is normal in the ABG, then there is no compensation going on. Compensation in acidosis will increase HCO3 because you want to hold on to the base to make it more alkalotic. In alkalosis, it will decrease because you want to excrete the base to make it more acidic.

  3. Esme12

    Check out this tutorial
    Interactive Online ABG's acid base

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

Alkaline water truth exposed. Don't drink alkaline water until you watch this. Learn the truth behind the big alkaline hype and learn why acids are not bad. In fact, we could not live without acids. We are made of all kinds of acids. Markus Rothkranz interviews medical expert James Sloane who explains the truth about acids and alkaline substances and how they affect our bodies. This important video explains scientifically why not to use baking soda or alkaline water as healing methods, despite what some people claim. A very educational an eye opening interview For related scientific study links, read more at http://www.AlkalineMyth.com James Sloane website: http://www.MedCapsules.com TheHealthyLife: http://www.markusworld.com/thehealthy... Our Raw Vegan Health Cookbook: http://www.markusworld.com/healthycoo... Facebook: http://www.markusworld.com/facebook/myth Instagram: http://www.markusworld.com/instagram/... Markus Rothkranz website: http://www.markusworld.com/Markus/myth Online Health Store: http://www.markusworld.com/products/myth German website: http://www.markusworld.com/german/myth Acid KILLS bacteria and turns off the yeast growth gene. Bacteria and pathogens thrive in an alkaline environment -the opposite of what the alkaline hype is saying. Read the scientific links below. Yeast starts to grow like crazy in an alkaline environment so strongly, it grows hyphae tentacles that burrow through your intestinal walls leading to leaky-gut syndrome which lets foreign-proteins into your bloodstream leading to allergic reactions, reduced energy and auto-immune disease. Runaway yeast then mutates into fungus which grows through the whole body, slowly eating it alive. Acids turn OFF the yeast growth gene. Acids protect your skin and all body parts from the outside world. Without an acidic environment, women would die if they had sex. Most men are filthy. That's why the vagina is naturally acidic. Our skin would be eaten alive by bacteria floating in the air. Our skin is therefore acidic to protect us. The same goes for our sinuses and digestive system. The only parts of our body that need to be alkaline is basically our mouth and blood because otherwise our teeth and bones would dissolve from acids. That is why our blood is SLIGHTLY alkaline 7.35 so our bones don't dissolve. Our body regulates blood pH so well, blood pH never changes. It can't because it it went up or down just a few percent, we would die. There is no overall body pH. Every body part requires it's own level to perform it's designed function. Below are links to scientific proof and tests. People think they can manipulate their body's pH by eating more "alkaline" foods. Chelated natural plant foods are NOT the same as alkaline water. Watch the video and pay attention. The main message here is to stop wasting time worrying what pH your food is, and start paying attention to if it's natural or not. In other words- are you eating fruits and vegetables, or bread, pasta, sugar and other crap? THAT'S what you should be focussing on, not pH. Your body does a perfect job regulating pH. Forget testing your urine or saliva. It's a waste of time. Urine and saliva pH testing has NOTHING to do with your blood pH. pH testing does NOT show what your pH is inside your body. What you are measuring is what your body is getting RID of. In other words, if you have too many alkaline substances in your body, it will get rid of those, and that's what you're measuring, not what's actually left inside your body. Watch the video and learn. We are MADE of amino ACIDS. Our body runs on acids. Vitamins are acids. Acids protect us from pathogens. The dirtiest part of the body is the mouth, which is alkaline. It's FULL of bacteria, some of it deadly if it gets into the bloodstream via bleeding gums. Watch the video and listen closely. Stop following what people with agendas are trying to convince you (especially MLM people!). That said, the pH water machine DOES have it's place, but not where you think. It's the ACID water you should be using, not the alkaline- and NOT for drinking, but for washing your hands, body, hair and clothes. It's great for disinfecting countertops, fruits and vegetables. I am not knocking the machine, just how it's used. Scientific Medical References: http://www.springerlink.com/content/0... http://ec.asm.org/cgi/content/full/5/... http://www.springerlink.com/content/j... http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/arti... http://www.cell.com/current-biology/a... http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/artic...

Acid & Alkaline Nutrition: Shattering The Myths

According to Guy Schenker, DC: Acid/alkaline imbalances always involve respiratory function Acid/alkaline imbalances always involve renal function "The respiratory and renal involvement in an acidosis or alkalosis may be either part of the cause of, or part of the compensation for the acidosis or alkalosis...The most alarming misconception among nutritionists concerned with pH balance, one seems to reign supreme in the minds of an appalling majority of doctors, is that ACIDOSIS is ubiquitous among the sick of this world. Acidosis, they have been given to believe, is an accompaniment to, and even the primary cause of, every disease, every pain, every state of ill health to afflict humankind. "Wouldn’t it be nice if it were that simple? Pump up your patients’ alkaline reserves and cure them of anything? "And an ALKALOSIS? No such thing? Acid is bad, this theory contends, and alkaline is good. And there is no way one can have too much of a good thing. "In truth excess alkalinity is just as harmful as excess acidity. To clear the confusion, all physiological systems are maintained through a negative feedback mechanism that operates in a dualistic manner. Dualistic means that for ev Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. sonias

    3 This is my topic for this week in nursing school, respiratory & metabolic acidosis/ alkalosis. I am having trouble breaking it down. Can someone please help me understand this please? Any and all help is greatly appreciated.

  2. Esme12

    Normal values:
    PH = 7.35 - 7.45
    C02 = 35 - 45
    HC03 = 21-26
    Respiratory acidosis = low ph and high C02
    hypoventilation (eg: COPD, narcs or sedatives, atelectasis)
    *Compensated by metabolic alkalosis (increased HC03)
    For example:
    ph 7.20 C02 60 HC03 24 (uncompensated respiratory acidosis)
    ph 7.33 C02 55 HC03 29 (partially compensated respiratory acidosis)
    ph 7.37 C02 60 HC03 37 (compensated respiratory acidosis)
    Respiratory alkalosis : high ph and low C02
    hyperventilation (eg: anxiety, PE, pain, sepsis, brain injury)
    *Compensated by metabolic acidosis (decreased HC03)
    examples:
    ph 7.51 C02 26 HC03 25 (uncompensated respiratory alkalosis)
    ph 7.47 C02 32 HC03 20 (partially compensated respiratory alkalosis)
    ph 7.43 C02 30 HC03 19 (compensated respiratory alkalosis)
    Metabolic acidosis : low ph and low HC03
    diabetic ketoacidosis, starvation, severe diarrhea
    *Compensated by respiratory alkalosis (decreased C02)
    examples:
    ph 7.23 C02 36 HC03 14 (uncompensated metabolic acidosis)
    ph 7.31 C02 30 HC03 17 (partially compensated metabolic acidosis)
    ph 7.38 C02 26 HC03 20 (compensated metabolic acidosis)
    Metabloic alkalosis = high ph and high HC03
    severe vomiting, potassium deficit, diuretics
    *Compensated by respiratory acidosis (increased C02)
    example:
    ph 7.54 C02 44 HC03 29 (uncompensated metabolic alkalosis)
    ph 7.50 C02 49 HC03 32 (partially compensated metabolic alkalosis)
    ph 7.44 C02 52 HC02 35 (compensated metabolic alkalosis)
    *Remember that compensation corrects the ph.
    Now a simple way to remember this......
    CO2 = acid, makes things acidic
    HCO3 = base, makes things alkalotic
    Remember ROME
    R-Respiratory
    O-Opposite
    M-Metabolic
    E-Equal
    Ok always look at the pH first...
    pH<7.35 = acidosis
    pH>7.45 = alkalosis
    Then, if the CO2 is high or low, then it is respiratory...If the HCO3 is high or low then it is metabolic. How you remember that is that the respiratory system is involved with CO2 (blowing air off or slowing RR), and the kidneys (metabolic) are involved with HCO3 (excreting or not excreting).
    Here is how you think thru it: pH = 7.25 CO2 = 40 HCO3 = 17
    Ok, first, the pH is low so think acidosis. CO2 is WNL. HCO3 is low. Draw arrows if it helps. The abnormal values are both low (think Equal). Metabolic imbalances are equal. So, this must be metabolic acidosis!
    Now, for compensation...If you have a metabolic imbalance, the respiratory system is going to try to compensate. Respiratory = CO2. If the CO2 is normal in the ABG, then there is no compensation going on. Compensation in acidosis will decrease the CO2 because you want to get rid of the acid (CO2). In alkalosis, it will increase because you want to add more acid (CO2)
    If you have a respiratory imbalance, the kidneys will try to compensate. Kidneys = HCO3. If the HCO3 is normal in the ABG, then there is no compensation going on. Compensation in acidosis will increase HCO3 because you want to hold on to the base to make it more alkalotic. In alkalosis, it will decrease because you want to excrete the base to make it more acidic.

  3. Esme12

    Check out this tutorial
    Interactive Online ABG's acid base

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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