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Alcoholic Lactic Acidosis Treatment

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine. The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin. Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin. Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium. Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked. Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection. In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended. Rates of DKA vary around the world. About 4% of people with type 1 diabetes in United Kingdom develop DKA a year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year. DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost universally fatal. The risk of death with adequate and timely treatment is currently around 1–4%. Up to 1% of children with DKA develop a complication known as cerebral edema. The symptoms of an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a period of about 24 hours. Predominant symptoms are nausea and vomiting, pronounced thirst, excessive urine production and abdominal pain that may be severe. Those who measure their glucose levels themselves may notice hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels). In severe DKA, breathing becomes labored and of a deep, gasping character (a state referred to as "Kussmaul respiration"). The abdomen may be tender to the point that an acute abdomen may be suspected, such as acute pancreatitis, appendicitis or gastrointestinal perforation. Coffee ground vomiting (vomiting of altered blood) occurs in a minority of people; this tends to originate from erosion of the esophagus. In severe DKA, there may be confusion, lethargy, stupor or even coma (a marked decrease in the level of consciousness). On physical examination there is usually clinical evidence of dehydration, such as a dry mouth and decreased skin turgor. If the dehydration is profound enough to cause a decrease in the circulating blood volume, tachycardia (a fast heart rate) and low blood pressure may be observed. Often, a "ketotic" odor is present, which is often described as "fruity", often compared to the smell of pear drops whose scent is a ketone. If Kussmaul respiration is present, this is reflected in an increased respiratory rate.....

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Increased production of ketone bodies due to: Dehydration (nausea/vomiting, ADH inhibition) leads to increased stress hormone production leading to ketone formation Depleted glycogen stores in the liver (malnutrition/decrease carbohydrate intake) Elevated ratio of NADH/NAD due to ethanol metabolism Increased free fatty acid production Elevated NADH/NAD ratio leads to the predominate production of β–hydroxybutyrate (BHB) over acetoacetate (AcAc) Dehydration Fever absent unless there is an underlying infection Tachycardia (common) due to: Dehydration with associated orthostatic changes Concurrent alcohol withdrawal Tachypnea: Common Deep, rapid, Kussmaul respirations frequently present Nausea and vomiting Abdominal pain (nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain are the most common symptoms): Usually diffuse with nonspecific tenderness Epigastric pain common Rebound tenderness, abdominal distension, hypoactive bowel sounds uncommon Mandates a search for an alternative, coexistent illness Decreased urinary output from hypovolemia Mental status: Minimally altered as a result of hypovolemia and possibly intoxication Altered mental status mandates a search for other associated conditions s Continue reading >>

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  1. bakerman

    Metformin diarrhea

    In another thread I discussed chronic diarrhea since starting metformin (1500mg/day) five years ago.
    I discussed this with my PCP and he has changed my med to Glipizide 2.5mg/day
    So, my question is: IF the metformin is the problem, how long will it take to flush from my body and stop causing diarrhea ?

  2. furball64801

    Each is different could be weeks or who knows sure hope it works for you,

  3. Nicoletti

    I switched from regular metformin to the extended-release metformin and the diarrhea stopped right away.

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Anion gap usmle - anion gap metabolic acidosis normal anion gap metabolic acidosis

Severe Metabolic Acidosis In The Alcoholic: Differential Diagnosis And Management

1 A chronic alcoholic with severe metabolic acidosis presents a difficult diagnostic problem. The most common cause is alcoholic ketoacidosis, a syndrome with a typical history but often misleading laboratory findings. This paper will focus on this important and probably underdiagnosed syndrome. 2 The disorder occurs in alcoholics who have had a heavy drinking-bout culminating in severe vomiting, with resulting dehydration, starvation, and then a β- hydroxybutyrate dominated ketoacidosis. 3 Awareness of this syndrome, thorough history-taking, physical examination and routine laboratory analyses will usually lead to a correct diagnosis. 4 The treatment is simply replacement of fluid, glucose, electrolytes and thiamine. Insulin or alkali should be avoided. 5 The most important differential diagnoses are diabetic ketoacidosis, lactic acidosis and salicylate, methanol or ethylene glycol poisoning, conditions which require quite different treatment. 6 The diagnostic management of unclear cases should always include toxicological tests, urine microscopy for calcium oxalate crystals and calculation of the serum anion and osmolal gaps. 7 It is suggested here, however, that the value of th Continue reading >>

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  1. GolfIsWhyImBroke

    I switched to a keto diet about 2 weeks ago and I have gotten my macros almost right on the button at 60/35/5 over the last 4-5 days (learning curve!). Are there any physical cues that you get from your body that tells you that you are in a ketogenic state? Also, how long does it usually take to get there? Thanks guys!

  2. tiltedcanvas

    Sometimes your pee will be filmy or have more bubbles in it. It also could smell a lot stronger than usual. You also will notice a pretty major change in your breath - could be fruity/sweet/overripe fruit or metallic. Could just be gross and make your mouth taste weird or unpleasant. Occasionally your body odor can change or become stronger...
    Other early keto adaption 'symptoms' can be
    Extra energy
    Waking up without an alarm, way earlier than regular, rearing to go.
    Sleeping better
    Lack of an appetite
    Vivid dreams
    None of these are sure signs, and not everyone has all if any of them. Eat less than 20g of carbs per day, and you're more than likely in keto.

  3. madhousesfill

    Vivid dreams? So this is the cause. I've been having nightmares EVERY NIGHT.

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Alcoholism is disease, heres some resources to help you fight back: Responsible Drinking: A Moderation Management Approach http://amzn.to/1ZdgP9f I Need to Stop Drinking!: How to get back your self-respect. http://amzn.to/1VEqbeU Why You Drink and How to Stop: A Journey to Freedom: http://amzn.to/1Q8pAv2 Alcoholics Anonymous: The Big Book: http://amzn.to/1N0rttl Alcoholics: Dealing With an Alcoholic Family Member, Friend or Someone You Love: http://amzn.to/1j9cvH4 Watch more How to Understand Alcoholism videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/517398-... The question that has been asked of me is if alcoholism can lead to diabetes. And if so, how? The answer is chronic alcohol use can lead to diabetes. The way it leads to diabetes is that chronic alcohol use can cause inflammation of the pancreas, and chronic inflammation of the pancreas can affect the production of insulin in the body. And that's what causes diabetes. So that is why alcohol can be an actual primary determinate of diabetes. The other way that heavy alcohol use can lead to diabetes or exacerbate diabetes is that alcohol has a high content of sugar. So if one is already diabetic, alcohol is really not indicated because of its sugar content. So, again, alcohol can actually be a primary cause of diabetes by chronically inflaming the pancreas, or it can actually make diabetes worse and interfere with the diabetes treatment because of the high sugar content in alcohol.

Alcoholism And Lactic Acidosis

Learn more about the SDN Exhibition Forums for exclusive discounts and contests. So the way I understood this is that both alcohol metabolism and latcate to pyrvuate conversion require NAD, and with too much alcohol consumption the body uses up all the NAD for alcohol metabolism right? The part that I'm a bit troubled with this mechanism is that unless we are doing extreme exercise, we don't really generate lactic acid. In most cases, the body uses oxidative phosphorylation, right? So lactic acidosis will most likely occur when you drink alcohol and then do extreme exercise, correct? SDN Members don't see this ad. About the ads. My understanding is that high NADH levels from EtOH metab drives the pyruvate -> lactate conversion. So you don't need to be exercising +drinking, either will do it on their own. I actually enjoy your questions, though some things are really easily looked up. The several different causes of lactic acidosis: I actually enjoy your questions, though some things are really easily looked up. The several different causes of lactic acidosis: But the reasons behind why lactic acidosis occurs for these is significantly different.... For example, in exercise- lactic Continue reading >>

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  1. MKChitown

    Hi - I'm new to Keto (8 days in), new to the forum, and catching up on 2KD podcasts. So far so good, but I'm impatient and want keto-adaptation ASAP. I seem to be cold all the time. I know that it's cold outside, but even with warm clothes and a blanket, I am cold all the time, even indoors.
    Anyone else have this happen in the beginning?
    thanks all, happy to join the group.

    Michelle

  2. Izerian

    If you're 8 days in, that could be a symptom of carb withdrawal? (Keto flu) just a thought. I experienced similar feelings.

  3. AnnaLeeMI

    I was very very cold at first too. I started October 1st. It didn't help that I had recently also shaved most of my head. I would have to sleep with a hoodie and extra blankets.

    It got better, and I felt warmer if I ate some fat. Like if I noticed my hands were all of the sudden cold eating some pure fat helped.

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