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Alcoholic Ketosis Symptoms

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Workup When a chronic alcoholic presents with signs of AKA, the clinician should carefully evaluate the patient, obtain a history, perform a physical exam, and order the appropriate laboratory tests. Laboratory tests and results A comprehensive metabolic profile will allow the medical team to determine the overall clinical picture of the patient. This includes measurement of serum electrolytes, glucose, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, lipase, amylase, and plasma osmolality. Also, urinalysis is helpful to detect ketones. Another useful tool is the blood alcohol level [8]. Finally, critically ill patients with positive ketones must have an analysis of their arterial blood gas (ABG) and serum lactate levels. With regards to expected findings, all patients demonstrate ketonuria and a majority display ketonemia. Also common are electrolyte imbalances such as hypokalemia, hyponatremia, hypophosphatemia, and hypomagnesemia. Additionally, the serum glucose may range from low to modest elevation while another abnormality is an increased osmolar gap (secondary to increased acetone and possibly ethanol). Most importantly, AKA is typically characterized by a high anion gap metabolic acidosis, which may be complicated by metabolic alkalosis secondary to concurrent vomiting. In cases where the pH is normal, the increased anion gap is an indicator of ketoacidosis. If there is a normal gap, this is the result of the excretion of ketoacid ions. Additionally, lactic acidosis is observed in more than 50% of cases due to hypoperfusion [9]. Differential diagnoses Differentials include diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA),however, the absence of hyperglycemia excludes this. Pancreatitis may also present similar to AKA and should be ruled out. If alcohol intoxication is not conclusive, serum me Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis: A Case Report And Review Of The Literature

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis: A Case Report And Review Of The Literature

Go to: CASE REPORT We present a 64-year-old female who presented with generalized abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and shortness of breath. Arterial blood gas analysis showed significant acidaemia with a pH of 7.10, bicarbonate of 2.9 mmol/l and lactate of 11.7 mmol/l. Serum ketones were raised at 5.5 mmol/l. Capillary blood glucose was noted to 5.8 mmol/l. The anion gap was calculated and was elevated at 25 mmol/l. The diagnosis of DKA was queried after initial triage. However, following senior medical review, given a recent history of drinking alcohol to excess, the diagnosis of AKA was felt more likely. Whilst a decreased conscious level may have been expected, our patient was lucid enough to report drinking one to two bottles of wine per day for the past 30 years, with a recent binge the day prior to admission. Subsequent fluid resuscitation and monitoring were instituted. Further biochemical investigation after treatment showed a rapid decline in the level of ketones and normalization of pH. Our patient had a multidisciplinary team (MDT) looking after her care, whilst she was an inpatient, including acute medical and gastroenterology doctors and nurses, dietitians, alcohol specialist nurse, physiotherapists and occupational therapists. Following resuscitation, our patient had plasma electrolyte levels corrected, nutritional supplementation provided and completed an alcohol detoxification regimen. Given the early recognition of AKA and concurrent management, our patient had a good outcome. She was discharged home and has been well on follow-up appointments. Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis: Causes, Symptoms, Treatment, Prognosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis: Causes, Symptoms, Treatment, Prognosis

Ketoacidosis is a medical condition in which the food that is ingested by an individual is either metabolized or converted into acid. Alcoholic Ketoacidosis is a condition in which there is development of Ketoacidosis as a result of excessive alcohol intake for a long period of time and less ingestion of food resulting in malnutrition. Drinking excessive alcohol causes the individual to be able to eat less food. Additionally, if excess alcohol is ingested then it may lead to vomiting which further worsens the nutritional status of the individual which results in formation of excess acids resulting in Alcoholic Ketoacidosis. The symptoms caused by Alcoholic Ketoacidosis include abdominal pain, excessive fatigue, persistent vomiting, and the individual getting dehydrated due to frequent vomiting episodes and less fluid intake. If an individual has a history of alcohol abuse and experiences the above mentioned symptoms then it is advised that the individual goes to the nearest emergency room to get evaluated and if diagnosed treated for Alcoholic Ketoacidosis. As stated above, the root cause of Alcoholic Ketoacidosis is drinking excessive amounts of alcohol for a prolonged period of time. When an individual indulges in binge drinking he or she is not able to take in enough food that is required by the body to function. This eventually results in malnourishment. Additionally, vomiting caused by excessive drinking also results in loss of vital nutrients and electrolytes from the body such that the body is not able to function normally. This results in the insulin that is being produced by the body becoming less and less. All of these ultimately results in the development of Alcoholic Ketoacidosis. An individual may develop symptoms within a day after binge drinking, dependin Continue reading >>

Chapter 221. Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Chapter 221. Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Woods WA, Perina DG. Woods W.A., Perina D.G. Woods, William A., and Debra G. Perina.Chapter 221. Alcoholic Ketoacidosis. In: Tintinalli JE, Stapczynski J, Ma O, Cline DM, Cydulka RK, Meckler GD, T. Tintinalli J.E., Stapczynski J, Ma O, Cline D.M., Cydulka R.K., Meckler G.D., T Eds. Judith E. Tintinalli, et al.eds. Tintinalli's Emergency Medicine: A Comprehensive Study Guide, 7e New York, NY: McGraw-Hill; 2011. Accessed March 27, 2018. Woods WA, Perina DG. Woods W.A., Perina D.G. Woods, William A., and Debra G. Perina.. "Chapter 221. Alcoholic Ketoacidosis." Tintinalli's Emergency Medicine: A Comprehensive Study Guide, 7e Tintinalli JE, Stapczynski J, Ma O, Cline DM, Cydulka RK, Meckler GD, T. Tintinalli J.E., Stapczynski J, Ma O, Cline D.M., Cydulka R.K., Meckler G.D., T Eds. Judith E. Tintinalli, et al. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill, 2011, Alcoholic ketoacidosis is a wide anion gap metabolic acidosis most often associated with acute cessation of alcohol consumption after chronic alcohol abuse and is typically associated with nausea, vomiting, and vague GI complaints. 1 Alcohol metabolism combined with little or no glycogen reserves results in elevated ketoacid levels. Although alcoholic ketoacidosis is usually seen in chronic alcoholics, it has been described in first-time binge drinkers. Repeated episodes can occur. 2 Although with proper treatment this illness is self limited, death has been reported from presumed excessive ketonemia. 24 Ethanol metabolism requires nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and the enzymes alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase to convert ethanol to acetyl coenzyme A. Acetyl coenzyme A may be metabolized directly, resulting in ketoacid production, used as substrate for the Krebs cycle, or used for free fatty acid synthesis ( Figu Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic ketoacidosis is a metabolic complication of alcohol use and starvation characterized by hyperketonemia and anion gap metabolic acidosis without significant hyperglycemia. Alcoholic ketoacidosis causes nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Diagnosis is by history and findings of ketoacidosis without hyperglycemia. Treatment is IV saline solution and dextrose infusion. Alcoholic ketoacidosis is attributed to the combined effects of alcohol and starvation on glucose metabolism. Alcohol diminishes hepatic gluconeogenesis and leads to decreased insulin secretion, increased lipolysis, impaired fatty acid oxidation, and subsequent ketogenesis, causing an elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis. Counter-regulatory hormones are increased and may further inhibit insulin secretion. Plasma glucose levels are usually low or normal, but mild hyperglycemia sometimes occurs. Diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion; similar symptoms in an alcoholic patient may result from acute pancreatitis, methanol or ethylene glycol poisoning, or diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). In patients suspected of having alcoholic ketoacidosis, serum electrolytes (including magnesium), BUN and creatinine, glucose, ketones, amylase, lipase, and plasma osmolality should be measured. Urine should be tested for ketones. Patients who appear significantly ill and those with positive ketones should have arterial blood gas and serum lactate measurement. The absence of hyperglycemia makes DKA improbable. Those with mild hyperglycemia may have underlying diabetes mellitus, which may be recognized by elevated levels of glycosylated Hb (HbA1c). Typical laboratory findings include a high anion gap metabolic acidosis, ketonemia, and low levels of potassium, magnesium, and phosphorus. Detection of acidosis may be com Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic Acidosis

Patient professional reference Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find one of our health articles more useful. See also separate Lactic Acidosis and Arterial Blood Gases - Indications and Interpretations articles. Description Metabolic acidosis is defined as an arterial blood pH <7.35 with plasma bicarbonate <22 mmol/L. Respiratory compensation occurs normally immediately, unless there is respiratory pathology. Pure metabolic acidosis is a term used to describe when there is not another primary acid-base derangement - ie there is not a mixed acid-base disorder. Compensation may be partial (very early in time course, limited by other acid-base derangements, or the acidosis exceeds the maximum compensation possible) or full. The Winter formula can be helpful here - the formula allows calculation of the expected compensating pCO2: If the measured pCO2 is >expected pCO2 then additional respiratory acidosis may also be present. It is important to remember that metabolic acidosis is not a diagnosis; rather, it is a metabolic derangement that indicates underlying disease(s) as a cause. Determination of the underlying cause is the key to correcting the acidosis and administering appropriate therapy[1]. Epidemiology It is relatively common, particularly among acutely unwell/critical care patients. There are no reliable figures for its overall incidence or prevalence in the population at large. Causes of metabolic acidosis There are many causes. They can be classified according to their pathophysiological origin, as below. The table is not exhaustive but lists those that are most common or clinically important to detect. Increased acid Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic ketoacidosis is the buildup of ketones in the blood. Ketones are a type of acid that form when the body breaks down fat for energy. The condition is an acute form of metabolic acidosis, a condition in which there is too much acid in body fluids. Causes Alcoholic ketoacidosis is caused by very heavy alcohol use. It most often occurs in a malnourished person who drinks large amounts of alcohol every day. Symptoms Symptoms of alcoholic ketoacidosis include: Nausea and vomiting Abdominal pain Changed level of alertness, which may lead to coma Loss of appetite Exams and Tests Tests may include: Blood alcohol level Blood chemistries and liver function tests CBC (complete blood count), measures red and white blood cells, and platelets, which help blood to clot) Prothrombin time (PT), a different measure of blood clotting, often abnormal from liver disease) Toxicology (poison) screening Treatment Treatment may involve fluids (salt and sugar solution) given through a vein. You may need to have frequent blood tests. You may get vitamin supplements to treat nutritional deficiencies caused by excess alcohol use. People with this condition are usually admitted to the hospital, often to the intensive care unit (ICU). Additional medicines may be given to prevent alcohol withdrawal. Outlook (Prognosis) Prompt medical attention improves the overall outlook. How severe the alcohol use is, and the presence of liver disease or other problems, may also affect the outlook. Possible Complications This can be a life-threatening condition. Complications may include: When to Contact a Medical Professional If you or someone else has symptoms of alcoholic ketoacidosis, seek emergency medical help. Prevention Limiting the amount of alcohol you drink may help prevent this condition. Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic ketoacidosis is the build up of ketones in the blood. Ketones are a type of acid that form when the body breaks down fat for energy. The condition is an acute form of metabolic acidosis. Alcoholic ketoacidosis is caused by excessive alcohol use. It is most often seen in a malnourished person who drinks large amounts of alcohol every day. Abdominal pain Altered level of alertness, which may lead to coma (unresponsiveness) Fatigue Slow, sluggish, lethargic movement Irregular deep, rapid breathing (Kussmaul's sign) Loss of appetite Nausea and vomiting Symptoms of dehydration, such as dizziness and light-headedness Arterial blood gases Blood alcohol level Blood chemistries, such as CHEM-20 Toxicology (poison) screening Prompt medical attention improves the overall outlook. If you or someone else has symptoms of alcoholic ketoacidosis, seek emergency medical help. This can be a life-threatening disorder. Patients with alcoholic ketoacidosis often have or develop gastrointestinal bleeding, pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), and pneumonia. Treatment may involve fluids (salt and sugar solution) given through a vein. You may need to have your blood taken frequently. People with this condition are admitted to the hospital, often to the intensive care unit (ICU). Cho KC, Fukagawa M, Kurokawa K. Fluid and electrolyte disorders. In: McPhee SJ, Papadakis MA, eds. Current Medical Diagnosis and Treatment. 48th ed. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill; 2009:chap 21. DuBose TD Jr. Acidosis and alkalosis. In: Fauci A , Kasper D, Longo DL, et al, eds. Harrison's Principals of Internal Medicine. 17th ed. New York, NY: McGraw Hill; 2008:chap 48. Reviewed By: Jacob L. Heller, MD, Emergency Medicine, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, Clinic. Also reviewed by David Zi Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Ketoacidosis - alcoholic Alcoholic ketoacidosis is the buildup of ketones in the blood. Ketones are a type of acid that form when the body breaks down fat for energy. Causes Alcoholic ketoacidosis is caused by very heavy alcohol use. It most often occurs in a malnourished person who drinks large amounts of alcohol every day. Symptoms Symptoms of alcoholic ketoacidosis include: Nausea and vomiting Abdominal pain Changed level of alertness, which may lead to coma Slow, sluggish movements Loss of appetite Exams and Tests Tests may include: Arterial blood gases (measure the acid/base balance and oxygen level in blood) Blood alcohol level Blood chemistries, and liver function tests CBC (complete blood count, measures red and white blood cells, and platelets, which help blood to clot) Prothrombin time (PT, a different measure of blood clotting, often abnormal from liver disease) Toxicology (poison) screening Treatment Treatment may involve fluids (salt and sugar solution) given through a vein. You may need to have frequent blood tests. You may get vitamin supplements to treat nutritional deficiencies caused by excess alcohol use. People with this condition are usually admitted to the hospital, often to the intensive care unit (ICU). Additional medicines may be given to prevent alcohol withdrawal. Outlook (Prognosis) Prompt medical attention improves the overall outlook. How severe the alcoholism is, and the presence of liver disease or other problems, may also affect the outlook. Possible Complications This can be a life-threatening condition. Complications may include: When to Contact a Medical Professional If you or someone else has symptoms of alcoholic ketoacidosis, seek emergency medical help. Prevention Limiting the amount of alcohol you drink may help prevent this cond Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis: How Does It Happen?

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis: How Does It Happen?

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis can be acquired through alcohol use and starvation. It is characterized by an excess acid in the bloodstream, which often leads symptoms like vomiting and abdominal pain. If you ingest something that is metabolized or turned into acid, this will lead to ketoacidosis. Abdominal pain, fatigue, vomiting, and dehydration are the common symptoms of alcoholic ketoacidosis. Binge alcohol drinking often leads to repetitive vomiting, often causing a person to lose appetite. The stored normal sugars or glucose in the liver may decrease if vomiting and starvation go on for days. Low stored normal sugars accompanied by starvation will lead to low blood glucose levels and soon a decrease in insulin secretion. The cells will have a hard time getting energy from the glucose that is in the blood. Due to insufficient energy, the cells will switch to a backup mechanism to obtain energy; hence, create ketones. With the production of ketones that provide energy to the cells, it can make the blood too acidic (ketoacidosis). Ketoacidosis may also co-occur with diabetes except that in alcoholic ketoacidosis, the blood glucose levels are low. Glucose (sugar) and insulin are needed by cells to function well. The source of glucose is from the food you eat, whereas pancreas produces insulin. The production of insulin may be interrupted for a short period of time when you drink alcohol and the glucose in your body will not be consumed if insulin is not present. In no time, the body will start to burn fat as an alternative source of energy. The ketone bodies are produced when fats are burned as a source of energy for cells. This byproduct will begin to build in your bloodstream if insulin is not produced in the body. Medically, it can be life-threatening and may lead to ketoa Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

There is a lot of confusion about the term ketosis among medical professionals as well as laypeople. It is important to understand when and why nutritional ketosis occurs, and why it should not be confused with the metabolic disorder we call ketoacidosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state where the liver produces small organic molecules called ketone bodies. Most cells in the body can use ketone bodies as a source of energy. When there is a limited supply of external energy sources, such as during prolonged fasting or carbohydrate restriction, ketone bodies can provide energy for most organs. In this situation, ketosis can be regarded as a reasonable, adaptive physiologic response that is essential for life, enabling us to survive periods of famine. Nutritional ketosis should not be confused with ketoacidosis, a metabolic condition where the blood becomes acidic as a result of the accumulation of ketone bodies. Ketoacidosis can have serious consequences and may need urgent medical treatment. The most common forms are diabetic ketoacidosis and alcoholic ketoacidosis. What Is Ketosis? The human body can be regarded as a biologic machine. Machines need energy to operate. Some use gasoline, others use electricity, and some use other power resources. Glucose is the primary fuel for most cells and organs in the body. To obtain energy, cells must take up glucose from the blood. Once glucose enters the cells, a series of metabolic reactions break it down into carbon dioxide and water, releasing energy in the process. The body has an ability to store excess glucose in the form of glycogen. In this way, energy can be stored for later use. Glycogen consists of long chains of glucose molecules and is primarily found in the liver and skeletal muscle. Liver glycogen stores are used to mai Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis Versus Ketosis

Ketoacidosis Versus Ketosis

Some medical professionals confuse ketoacidosis, an extremely abnormal form of ketosis, with the normal benign ketosis associated with ketogenic diets and fasting states in the body. They will then tell you that ketosis is dangerous. Testing Laboratory Microbiology - Air Quality - Mold Asbestos - Environmental - Lead emsl.com Ketosis is NOT Ketoacidosis The difference between the two conditions is a matter of volume and flow rate*: Benign nutritional ketosis is a controlled, insulin regulated process which results in a mild release of fatty acids and ketone body production in response to either a fast from food, or a reduction in carbohydrate intake. Ketoacidosis is driven by a lack of insulin in the body. Without insulin, blood sugar rises to high levels and stored fat streams from fat cells. This excess amount of fat metabolism results in the production of abnormal quantities of ketones. The combination of high blood sugar and high ketone levels can upset the normal acid/base balance in the blood and become dangerous. In order to reach a state of ketoacidosis, insulin levels must be so low that the regulation of blood sugar and fatty acid flow is impaired. *See this reference paper. Here's a table of the actual numbers to show the differences in magnitude: Body Condition Quantity of Ketones Being Produced After a meal: 0.1 mmol/L Overnight Fast: 0.3 mmol/L Ketogenic Diet (Nutritional ketosis): 1-8 mmol/L >20 Days Fasting: 10 mmol/L Uncontrolled Diabetes (Ketoacidosis): >20 mmol/L Here's a more detailed explanation: Fact 1: Every human body maintains the blood and cellular fluids within a very narrow range between being too acidic (low pH) and too basic (high pH). If the blood pH gets out of the normal range, either too low or too high, big problems happen. Fact 2: The Continue reading >>

The Syndrome Of Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

The Syndrome Of Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

To further elucidate the clinical spectrum of alcoholic ketoacidosis (AKA). A case series of 74 patients with AKA defined as a wide anion gap metabolic acidosis unexplained by any other disorder or toxin, including any patient with a history of chronic alcohol abuse. The setting was the Medical Emergency Department at Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta, Georgia, a university-affiliated inner-city hospital. AKA is a common disorder in the emergency department, more common than previously thought. The acid-base abnormalities are more diverse than just a wide-gap metabolic acidosis and often include a concomitant metabolic alkalosis, hyperchloremic acidosis, or respiratory alkalosis. Lactic acidosis is also common. Semiquantitative serum acetoacetate levels were positive in 96% of patients. Elevated blood alcohol levels were present in two thirds of patients in whom alcohol levels were determined, and levels consistent with intoxication were seen in 40% of these patients. Electrolyte disorders including hyponatremia, hypokalemia, hypophosphatemia, hyperglycemia, hypocalcemia, and hypomagnesemia were common on presentation. The most common symptoms were nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. The most common physical findings were tachycardia, tachypnea, and abdominal tenderness. Altered mental status, fever, hypothermia, or other abnormal findings were uncommon and reflected other underlying processes. AKA is a common disorder in chronic malnourished alcoholic persons. The acid-base abnormalities reflect not only the ketoacidosis, but also associated extracellular fluid volume depletion, alcohol withdrawal, pain, sepsis, or severe liver disease. Although the pathophysiology is complex, the syndrome is rapidly reversible and has a low mortality. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Evaluation And Treatment

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Evaluation And Treatment

Diabetic ketoacidosis is characterized by a serum glucose level greater than 250 mg per dL, a pH less than 7.3, a serum bicarbonate level less than 18 mEq per L, an elevated serum ketone level, and dehydration. Insulin deficiency is the main precipitating factor. Diabetic ketoacidosis can occur in persons of all ages, with 14 percent of cases occurring in persons older than 70 years, 23 percent in persons 51 to 70 years of age, 27 percent in persons 30 to 50 years of age, and 36 percent in persons younger than 30 years. The case fatality rate is 1 to 5 percent. About one-third of all cases are in persons without a history of diabetes mellitus. Common symptoms include polyuria with polydipsia (98 percent), weight loss (81 percent), fatigue (62 percent), dyspnea (57 percent), vomiting (46 percent), preceding febrile illness (40 percent), abdominal pain (32 percent), and polyphagia (23 percent). Measurement of A1C, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, serum glucose, electrolytes, pH, and serum ketones; complete blood count; urinalysis; electrocardiography; and calculation of anion gap and osmolar gap can differentiate diabetic ketoacidosis from hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, gastroenteritis, starvation ketosis, and other metabolic syndromes, and can assist in diagnosing comorbid conditions. Appropriate treatment includes administering intravenous fluids and insulin, and monitoring glucose and electrolyte levels. Cerebral edema is a rare but severe complication that occurs predominantly in children. Physicians should recognize the signs of diabetic ketoacidosis for prompt diagnosis, and identify early symptoms to prevent it. Patient education should include information on how to adjust insulin during times of illness and how to monitor glucose and ketone levels, as well as i Continue reading >>

The Syndrome Of Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

The Syndrome Of Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Abstract purpose: To further elucidate the clinical spectrum of alcoholic ketoacidosis (AKA). patients and methods: A case series of 74 patients with AKA defined as a wide anion gap metabolic acidosis unexplained by any other disorder or toxin, including any patient with a history of chronic alcohol abuse. The setting was the Medical Emergency Department at Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta, Georgia, a university-affiliated inner-city hospital. results: AKA is a common disorder in the emergency department, more common than previously thought. The acid-base abnormalities are more diverse than just a wide-gap metabolic acidosis and often include a concomitant metabolic alkalosis, hyperchloremic acidosis, or respiratory alkalosis. Lactic acidosis is also common. Semiquantitative serum acetoacetate levels were positive in 96% of patients. Elevated blood alcohol levels were present in two thirds of patients in whom alcohol levels were determined, and levels consistent with intoxication were seen in 40% of these patients. Electrolyte disorders including hyponatremia, hypokalemia, hypophosphatemia, hyperglycemia, hypocalcemia, and hypomagnesemia were common on presentation. The most common symptoms were nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. The most common physical findings were tachycardia, tachypnea, and abdominal tenderness. Altered mental status, fever, hypothermia, or other abnormal findings were uncommon and reflected other underlying processes. conclusions: AKA is a common disorder in chronic malnourished alcoholic persons. The acid-base abnormalities reflect not only the ketoacidosis, but also associated extracellular fluid volume depletion, alcohol withdrawal, pain, sepsis, or severe liver disease. Although the pathophysiology is complex, the syndrome is rapidly reve Continue reading >>

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