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Alcoholic Ketoacidosis Wiki

Ketoacidosis

Ketoacidosis

Ketoacidosis is a metabolic state associated with high concentrations of ketone bodies, formed by the breakdown of fatty acids and the deamination of amino acids. The two common ketones produced in humans are acetoacetic acid and β-hydroxybutyrate. Ketoacidosis is a pathological metabolic state marked by extreme and uncontrolled ketosis. In ketoacidosis, the body fails to adequately regulate ketone production causing such a severe accumulation of keto acids that the pH of the blood is substantially decreased. In extreme cases ketoacidosis can be fatal.[1] Ketoacidosis is most common in untreated type 1 diabetes mellitus, when the liver breaks down fat and proteins in response to a perceived need for respiratory substrate. Prolonged alcoholism may lead to alcoholic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis can be smelled on a person's breath. This is due to acetone, a direct by-product of the spontaneous decomposition of acetoacetic acid. It is often described as smelling like fruit or nail polish remover.[2] Ketosis may also give off an odor, but the odor is usually more subtle due to lower concentrations of acetone. Treatment consists most simply of correcting blood sugar and insulin levels, which will halt ketone production. If the severity of the case warrants more aggressive measures, intravenous sodium bicarbonate infusion can be given to raise blood pH back to an acceptable range. However, serious caution must be exercised with IV sodium bicarbonate to avoid the risk of equally life-threatening hypernatremia. Cause[edit] Three common causes of ketoacidosis are alcohol, starvation, and diabetes, resulting in alcoholic ketoacidosis, starvation ketoacidosis, and diabetic ketoacidosis respectively.[3] In diabetic ketoacidosis, a high concentration of ketone bodies is usually accomp Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Seen in patients with recent history of binge drinking with little/no nutritional intake Anion gap metabolic acidosis associated with acute cessation of ETOH consumption after chronic abuse Characterized by high serum ketone levels and an elevated AG Consider other causes of elevated AG, as well as co-ingestants Concomitant metabolic alkalosis can occur from dehydration (volume depletion) and emesis Ethanol metabolism depletes NAD stores[1] Results in inhibition of Krebs cycle, depletion of glycogen stores, and ketone formation High NADH:NAD also results in increased lactate production Acetoacetate is metabolized to acetone so elevated osmolal gap may also be seen Differential Diagnosis Starvation Ketosis Binge drinking ending in nausea, vomiting, and decreased intake Positive serum ketones Wide anion gap metabolic acidosis without alternate explanation Urine ketones may be falsely negative or low Lab measured ketone is acetoacetate May miss beta-hydroxybutyrate Consider associated diseases (ie pancreatitis, rhabdomyolysis, hepatitis, infections) Oral nutrition if able to tolerate Consider bicarb if life-threatening acidosis (pH <7.1) unresponsive to fluid therapy Discharge home after treatment if able to tolerate POs and acidosis resolved Consider admission for those with severe volume depletion and/or acidosis Hypoglycemia is poor prognostic feature, indicating depleted glycogen stores See Also Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows rigorous standards of quality and accountability. A.D.A.M. is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A.M.'s editorial policy , editorial process and privacy policy . A.D.A.M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. Copyright 1997-2016, A.D.A.M., Inc. Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

the entire wiki with video and photo galleries find something interesting to watch in seconds Alcoholic ketoacidosis is a common reason for admission of alcohol dependent persons in hospitals emergency rooms. The term refers to a metabolic acidosis syndrome caused by increased ketone levels in serum . Glucose concentration is usually normal or a little lower. In 1940, Drs Edward S. Dillon, W. Wallace, and Leon S. Smelo, first described alcoholic ketoacidosis as a distinct syndrome , they stated that "because of the many and complex factors, both physiologic and pathologic , which influence the acid-base balance of the body, a multitude of processes may bring about the state of acidosis as an end result." [1] In the 1971, David W. Jenkins and colleagues described cases of three nondiabetic patients with a history of chronic heavy alcohol misuse and recurrent episodes of ketoacidosis , this group also proposed a possible underlying mechanism for this metabolic disturbance, naming it alcoholic ketoacidosis. [2] Patients regularly report nausea , vomiting, and pain in abdomen which are the most commonly observed complaints, this syndrome is rapidly reversible and, if taken care of has a low mortality. Other patients present tachypnoea , tachycardia , and hypotension . [3] The main differences between patients with diabetic ketoacidosis is that patients with alcoholic ketoacidosis are usually alert and lucid despite the severity of the acidosis and marked ketonaemia. [4] However, there are cases where alcoholic ketoacidosis can cause death of the patient if not treated with administration of dextrose and saline solutions. [5] Dillon, E.; Dyer, W. Wallace; Smelo, L. S. (November 1940). "Ketone Acidosis in Nondiabetic Adults". Medical Clinics of North America. 24 (6): 1813182 Continue reading >>

Wikizero - Ketoacidosis

Wikizero - Ketoacidosis

Ketoacidosis is a metabolic state associated with high concentrations of ketone bodies , formed by the breakdown of fatty acids and the deamination of amino acids . The two common ketones produced in humans are acetoacetic acid and -hydroxybutyrate . Ketoacidosis is a pathological metabolic state marked by extreme and uncontrolled ketosis . In ketoacidosis, the body fails to adequately regulate ketone production causing such a severe accumulation of keto acids that the pH of the blood is substantially decreased. In extreme cases ketoacidosis can be fatal. [1] Ketoacidosis is most common in untreated type 1 diabetes mellitus , when the liver breaks down fat and proteins in response to a perceived need for respiratory substrate . Prolonged alcoholism may lead to alcoholic ketoacidosis . Ketoacidosis can be smelled on a person's breath. This is due to acetone , a direct by-product of the spontaneous decomposition of acetoacetic acid . It is often described as smelling like fruit or nail polish remover. [2] Ketosis may also give off an odor, but the odor is usually more subtle due to lower concentrations of acetone. Treatment consists most simply of correcting blood sugar and insulin levels, which will halt ketone production. If the severity of the case warrants more aggressive measures, intravenous sodium bicarbonate infusion can be given to raise blood pH back to an acceptable range. However, serious caution must be exercised with IV sodium bicarbonate to avoid the risk of equally life-threatening hypernatremia . Three common causes of ketoacidosis are alcohol , starvation , and diabetes , resulting in alcoholic ketoacidosis, starvation ketoacidosis, and diabetic ketoacidosis respectively. [3] In diabetic ketoacidosis, a high concentration of ketone bodies is usually acc Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus.[1] Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness.[1] A person's breath may develop a specific smell.[1] Onset of symptoms is usually rapid.[1] In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes.[1] DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances.[1] Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids.[1] DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies.[3] DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine.[1] The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin.[1] Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin.[3] Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium.[1] Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked.[1] Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection.[6] In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended.[1][6] Rates of DKA vary around the world.[5] In the United Kingdom, about 4% of people with type 1 diabetes develop DKA each year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year.[1][5] DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost univ Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic ketoacidosis is a metabolic complication of alcohol use and starvation characterized by hyperketonemia and anion gap metabolic acidosis without significant hyperglycemia. Alcoholic ketoacidosis causes nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Diagnosis is by history and findings of ketoacidosis without hyperglycemia. Treatment is IV saline solution and dextrose infusion. Alcoholic ketoacidosis is attributed to the combined effects of alcohol and starvation on glucose metabolism. Alcohol diminishes hepatic gluconeogenesis and leads to decreased insulin secretion, increased lipolysis, impaired fatty acid oxidation, and subsequent ketogenesis, causing an elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis. Counter-regulatory hormones are increased and may further inhibit insulin secretion. Plasma glucose levels are usually low or normal, but mild hyperglycemia sometimes occurs. Diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion; similar symptoms in an alcoholic patient may result from acute pancreatitis, methanol or ethylene glycol poisoning, or diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). In patients suspected of having alcoholic ketoacidosis, serum electrolytes (including magnesium), BUN and creatinine, glucose, ketones, amylase, lipase, and plasma osmolality should be measured. Urine should be tested for ketones. Patients who appear significantly ill and those with positive ketones should have arterial blood gas and serum lactate measurement. The absence of hyperglycemia makes DKA improbable. Those with mild hyperglycemia may have underlying diabetes mellitus, which may be recognized by elevated levels of glycosylated Hb (HbA1c). Typical laboratory findings include a high anion gap metabolic acidosis, ketonemia, and low levels of potassium, magnesium, and phosphorus. Detection of acidosis may be com Continue reading >>

Wikitox - 2.1.7.1.3.1 Biguanides

Wikitox - 2.1.7.1.3.1 Biguanides

Biguanide overdose has a significant mortality and is associated with an induced lactic acidosis which may be severe. Lactic acidosis associated with phenformin therapy has been reported to have a mortality rate of up to 50% in published cases and requires intensive supportive care with very careful and gradual correction of the acidosis. It is likely that a large part of the mortality relates to the underlying causes of the lactic acidosis (made worse by the phenformin) and the pre-existing state of the patients. Based on very limited evidence, the use of glucose/insulin infusions, dichloroacetate and haemodialysis are all probably beneficial. Metformin seems much less likely to be associated with lactic acidosis during routine therapy. In overdose, metformin induced lactic acidosis can be extremely severe but is often surprisingly well tolerated. There are two forms of lactic acidosis with biguanides. One is a biguanide associated acidosis (MALA) where there is a pre-existing cause of lactic acidosis in an unwell patient which is exacerbated by the biguanide. The mortality and morbidity is related mainly to the underlying issues in the patient and may be very high. The second is a biguanide induced lactic acidosis (MILA) where the sole cause of the acidosis is high concentrations of the biguanide such as accumulation in renal insufficiency or overdose. The mechanism of the development of the lactic acidosis is not well understood. It is believed to result from the inhibition of microsomal enzymes involved in glucose metabolism including those involved in gluconeogenesis from lactate and pyruvate and also inhibit the enzyme pyruvate dehydrogenase which converts pyruvate into acetyl-coenzyme-A. They have numerous other actions that are believed to be important in their Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows rigorous standards of quality and accountability. A.D.A.M. is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A.M.'s editorial policy, editorial process and privacy policy. A.D.A.M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. Copyright 1997-2017, A.D.A.M., Inc. Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

What is alcoholic ketoacidosis? Cells need glucose (sugar) and insulin to function properly. Glucose comes from the food you eat, and insulin is produced by the pancreas. When you drink alcohol, your pancreas may stop producing insulin for a short time. Without insulin, your cells won’t be able to use the glucose you consume for energy. To get the energy you need, your body will start to burn fat. When your body burns fat for energy, byproducts known as ketone bodies are produced. If your body is not producing insulin, ketone bodies will begin to build up in your bloodstream. This buildup of ketones can produce a life-threatening condition known as ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis, or metabolic acidosis, occurs when you ingest something that is metabolized or turned into an acid. This condition has a number of causes, including: shock kidney disease abnormal metabolism In addition to general ketoacidosis, there are several specific types. These types include: alcoholic ketoacidosis, which is caused by excessive consumption of alcohol diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), which mostly develops in people with type 1 diabetes starvation ketoacidosis, which occurs most often in women who are pregnant, in their third trimester, and experiencing excessive vomiting Each of these situations increases the amount of acid in the system. They can also reduce the amount of insulin your body produces, leading to the breakdown of fat cells and the production of ketones. Alcoholic ketoacidosis can develop when you drink excessive amounts of alcohol for a long period of time. Excessive alcohol consumption often causes malnourishment (not enough nutrients for the body to function well). People who drink large quantities of alcohol may not eat regularly. They may also vomit as a result of drinking too Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Definition Diabetic ketoacidosis is a dangerous complication of diabetes mellitus in which the chemical balance of the body becomes far too acidic. Description Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) always results from a severe insulin deficiency. Insulin is the hormone secreted by the body to lower the blood sugar levels when they become too high. Diabetes mellitus is the disease resulting from the inability of the body to produce or respond properly to insulin, required by the body to convert glucose to energy. In childhood diabetes, DKA complications represent the leading cause of death, mostly due to the accumulation of abnormally large amounts of fluid in the brain (cerebral edema). DKA combines three major features: hyperglycemia, meaning excessively high blood sugar kevels; hyperketonemia, meaning an overproduction of ketones by the body; and acidosis, meaning that the blood has become too acidic. Insulin deficiency is responsible for all three conditions: the body glucose goes largely unused since most cells are unable to transport glucose into the cell without the presence of insulin; this condition makes the body use stored fat as an alternative source instead of the unavailable glucose for energy, a process that produces acidic ketones, which build up because they require insulin to be broken down. The presence of excess ketones in the bloodstream in turn causes the blood to become more acidic than the body tissues, which creates a toxic condition. Causes and symptoms DKA is most commonly seen in individuals with type I diabetes, under 19 years of age and is usually caused by the interruption of their insulin treatment or by acute infection or trauma. A small number of people with type II diabetes also experience ketoacidosis, but this is rare give Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Go to: CHARACTERISATION In 1940, Dillon et al1 described a series of nine patients who had episodes of severe ketoacidosis in the absence of diabetes mellitus, all of whom had evidence of prolonged excessive alcohol consumption. It was not until 1970 that Jenkins et al2 described a further three non‐diabetic patients with a history of chronic heavy alcohol misuse and recurrent episodes of ketoacidosis. This group also proposed a possible underlying mechanism for this metabolic disturbance, naming it alcoholic ketoacidosis. Further case series by Levy et al, Cooperman et al, and Fulop et al were subsequently reported, with remarkably consistent features.3,4,5 All patients presented with a history of prolonged heavy alcohol misuse, preceding a bout of particularly excessive intake, which had been terminated several days earlier by nausea, severe vomiting, and abdominal pain. Clinical signs included tachypnoea, tachycardia, and hypotension. In 1974, Cooperman's series of seven ketoacidotic alcoholic patients all displayed diffuse epigastric tenderness on palpation.4 In contrast to patients with diabetic ketoacidosis, the patients were usually alert and lucid despite the severity of the acidosis and marked ketonaemia. When altered mental status occurred, this was clearly attributable to other causes. Laboratory results included absent blood alcohol with normal or low blood glucose level, no glycosuria, and a variably severe metabolic acidosis with a raised anion gap. This acidosis appeared to result from the accumulation in plasma of lactate and ketone bodies including beta‐hydroxybutyrate (BOHB) and acetoacetate (AcAc).3 Cooperman et al found that near patient testing for ketone bodies using nitroprusside test (Acetest, Ketostix) produced a low to moderate result in th Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic ketoacidosis is a common reason for admission of alcohol dependent persons in hospitals emergency rooms. The term refers to a metabolic acidosis syndrome caused by increased ketone levels in serum . Glucose concentration is usually normal or a little lower. In 1940, Drs Edward S. Dillon, W. Wallace, and Leon S. Smelo, first described alcoholic ketoacidosis as a distinct syndrome . They stated that "because of the many and complex factors, both physiologic and pathologic , which influence the acid-base balance of the body, a multitude of processes may bring about the state of acidosis as an end result." [1] In the 1971, David W. Jenkins and colleagues described cases of three nondiabetic patients with a history of chronic heavy alcohol misuse and recurrent episodes of ketoacidosis . This group also proposed a possible underlying mechanism for this metabolic disturbance, naming it alcoholic ketoacidosis. [2] Patients regularly report nausea , vomiting, and pain in abdomen which are the most commonly observed complaints. This syndrome is rapidly reversible and, if taken care of has a low mortality. Other patients present tachypnoea , tachycardia , and hypotension . [3] The main differences between patients with diabetic ketoacidosis is that patients with alcoholic ketoacidosis are usually alert and lucid despite the severity of the acidosis and marked ketonaemia. [4] However, there are cases where alcoholic ketoacidosis can cause death of the patient if not treated with administration of dextrose and saline solutions. [5] Dillon, E.; Dyer, W. Wallace; Smelo, L. S. (November 1940). "Ketone Acidosis in Nondiabetic Adults". Medical Clinics of North America. 24 (6): 18131822. doi : 10.1016/S0025-7125(16)36653-6 . Jenkins, David W.; Eckel, Robert E.; Craig, James W. Continue reading >>

File:cat Mudpiles - Causes Of High Anion-gap Metabolic Acidosis.svg

File:cat Mudpiles - Causes Of High Anion-gap Metabolic Acidosis.svg

File:Cat mudpiles - causes of high anion-gap metabolic acidosis.svg DescriptionCat mudpiles - causes of high anion-gap metabolic acidosis.svg English: Causes of high anion-gap metabolic acidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis, Alcoholic ketoacidosis, Starvation ketoacidosis Paracetamol/Acetaminophen, Phenformin, Paraldehyde Iron, Isoniazid, Inborn errors of metabolism Ethanol (due to lactic acidosis), Ethylene glycol This SVGdiagram uses embedded textthat can be easily translated using a text editor. Learn more . I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby publish it under the following license: This file is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication . The person who associated a work with this deed has dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law. You can copy, modify, distribute and perform the work, even for commercial purposes, all without asking permission. Commons Zero, Public Domain Dedicationfalsefalse Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. This file contains additional information such as Exif metadata which may have been added by the digital camera, scanner, or software program used to create or digitize it. If the file has been modified from its original state, some details such as the timestamp may not fully reflect those of the original file. The timestamp is only as accurate as the clock in the camera, and it may be completely wrong. Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Background In 1940, Dillon and colleagues first described alcoholic ketoacidosis (AKA) as a distinct syndrome. AKA is characterized by metabolic acidosis with an elevated anion gap, elevated serum ketone levels, and a normal or low glucose concentration. [1, 2] Although AKA most commonly occurs in adults with alcoholism, it has been reported in less-experienced drinkers of all ages. Patients typically have a recent history of binge drinking, little or no food intake, and persistent vomiting. [3, 4, 5] A concomitant metabolic alkalosis is common, secondary to vomiting and volume depletion (see Workup). [6] Treatment of AKA is directed toward reversing the 3 major pathophysiologic causes of the syndrome, which are: This goal can usually be achieved through the administration of dextrose and saline solutions (see Treatment). Continue reading >>

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