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Alcoholic Ketoacidosis Wiki

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine. The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin. Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin. Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium. Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked. Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection. In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended. Rates of DKA vary around the world. About 4% of people with type 1 diabetes in United Kingdom develop DKA a year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year. DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost universally fatal. The risk of death with adequate and timely treatment is currently around 1–4%. Up to 1% of children with DKA develop a complication known as cerebral edema. The symptoms of an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a period of about 24 hours. Predominant symptoms are nausea and vomiting, pronounced thirst, excessive urine production and abdominal pain that may be severe. Those who measure their glucose levels themselves may notice hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels). In severe DKA, breathing becomes labored and of a deep, gasping character (a state referred to as "Kussmaul respiration"). The abdomen may be tender to the point that an acute abdomen may be suspected, such as acute pancreatitis, appendicitis or gastrointestinal perforation. Coffee ground vomiting (vomiting of altered blood) occurs in a minority of people; this tends to originate from erosion of the esophagus. In severe DKA, there may be confusion, lethargy, stupor or even coma (a marked decrease in the level of consciousness). On physical examination there is usually clinical evidence of dehydration, such as a dry mouth and decreased skin turgor. If the dehydration is profound enough to cause a decrease in the circulating blood volume, tachycardia (a fast heart rate) and low blood pressure may be observed. Often, a "ketotic" odor is present, which is often described as "fruity", often compared to the smell of pear drops whose scent is a ketone. If Kussmaul respiration is present, this is reflected in an increased respiratory rate.....

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic ketoacidosis is a metabolic complication of alcohol use and starvation characterized by hyperketonemia and anion gap metabolic acidosis without significant hyperglycemia. Alcoholic ketoacidosis causes nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Diagnosis is by history and findings of ketoacidosis without hyperglycemia. Treatment is IV saline solution and dextrose infusion. Alcoholic ketoacidosis is attributed to the combined effects of alcohol and starvation on glucose metabolism. Alcohol diminishes hepatic gluconeogenesis and leads to decreased insulin secretion, increased lipolysis, impaired fatty acid oxidation, and subsequent ketogenesis, causing an elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis. Counter-regulatory hormones are increased and may further inhibit insulin secretion. Plasma glucose levels are usually low or normal, but mild hyperglycemia sometimes occurs. Diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion; similar symptoms in an alcoholic patient may result from acute pancreatitis, methanol or ethylene glycol poisoning, or diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). In patients suspected of having alcoholic ketoacidosis, serum electrolytes (including magnesium), BUN and creatinine, glucose, Continue reading >>

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  1. blondecoyotee

    I'm pretty new to this so I'd love some feedback on how switching to the Keto way of eating affects women. Specifically her hormones and menstruation.

  2. AmandaJones

    My periods have become more "normal." I was on birth control for 16 years, and after I quit taking it, over two years ago now, my periods never went back to normal (pre birth control) until now. Before keto, I still had a lot of spotting before and after my period and that has been greatly reduced. Also, my period is now about three days longer than before. Idk if most would think of that as a good thing, but I have been trying to conceive for the last two years unsuccessfully, so a return to a normal five day period is a step in the right direction, I think, as I'm considering this an increase in the health of my uterine lining.

  3. nvmomketo

    I've been keto (mostly) for about a year and a half. In that time I've found that being keto has help with my cycles. I am more regular, have less pms (less fatigue, acne, migraines) and have even had less cramoing.

    ... All good considering I am in my 40s and probably dancing on the edge of perimenopause.

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What is KETOACIDOSIS? What does KETOACIDOSIS mean? KETOACIDOSIS meaning - KETOACIDOSIS definition - KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Ketoacidosis is a metabolic state associated with high concentrations of ketone bodies, formed by the breakdown of fatty acids and the deamination of amino acids. The two common ketones produced in humans are acetoacetic acid and ß-hydroxybutyrate. Ketoacidosis is a pathological metabolic state marked by extreme and uncontrolled ketosis. In ketoacidosis, the body fails to adequately regulate ketone production causing such a severe accumulation of keto acids that the pH of the blood is substantially decreased. In extreme cases ketoacidosis can be fatal. Ketoacidosis is most common in untreated type 1 diabetes mellitus, when the liver breaks down fat and proteins in response to a perceived need for respiratory substrate. Prolonged alcoholism may lead to alcoholic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis can be smelled on a person's breath. This is due to acetone, a direct by-product of the spontaneous decomposition of acetoacetic acid. It is often described as smelling like fruit or nail polish remover. Ketosis may also smell, but the odor is usually more subtle due to lower concentrations of acetone. Treatment consists most simply of correcting blood sugar and insulin levels, which will halt ketone production. If the severity of the case warrants more aggressive measures, intravenous sodium bicarbonate infusion can be given to raise blood pH back to an acceptable range. However, serious caution must be exercised with IV sodium bicarbonate to avoid the risk of equally life-threatening hypernatremia. Three common causes of ketoacidosis are alcohol, starvation, and diabetes, resulting in alcoholic ketoacidosis, starvation ketoacidosis, and diabetic ketoacidosis respectively. In diabetic ketoacidosis, a high concentration of ketone bodies is usually accompanied by insulin deficiency, hyperglycemia, and dehydration. Particularly in type 1 diabetics the lack of insulin in the bloodstream prevents glucose absorption, thereby inhibiting the production of oxaloacetate (a crucial molecule for processing Acetyl-CoA, the product of beta-oxidation of fatty acids, in the Krebs cycle) through reduced levels of pyruvate (a byproduct of glycolysis), and can cause unchecked ketone body production (through fatty acid metabolism) potentially leading to dangerous glucose and ketone levels in the blood. Hyperglycemia results in glucose overloading the kidneys and spilling into the urine (transport maximum for glucose is exceeded). Dehydration results following the osmotic movement of water into urine (Osmotic diuresis), exacerbating the acidosis. In alcoholic ketoacidosis, alcohol causes dehydration and blocks the first step of gluconeogenesis by depleting oxaloacetate. The body is unable to synthesize enough glucose to meet its needs, thus creating an energy crisis resulting in fatty acid metabolism, and ketone body formation.

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus.[1] Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness.[1] A person's breath may develop a specific smell.[1] Onset of symptoms is usually rapid.[1] In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes.[1] DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances.[1] Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids.[1] DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies.[3] DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine.[1] The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin.[1] Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin.[3] Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium.[1] Th Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. avocadozuki

    I've had tremendous success with keto, but last week I passed a few small kidney stones. OUCH. I have read that keto can lead to stones... What can I do to avoid future stones?
    Also, I am at my final goal weight, but want to go about five pounds below it so when I re-introduce lentils, beans and sushi (in moderation) I won't cry at the scale. Is a five pound water weight gain pretty normal? I feel/look my best in keto, but do want to enjoy these earthly delights maybe 2-3 times a month. Will this yank me in and out of keto flu?
    Bottom line: I want to find balance, and to avoid passing larger stones in the future. I have been out of keto twice, for trips abroad. From how I felt, I can see only wanting to increase carbs a few times a month. Being fully out of keto for more than ~5 days feels pretty unpleasant now (sluggish and hangry.)
    Thanks for any advice :)

  2. b3ar

    Speaking as someone who's passed a few stones myself (before keto) I'd suggest making sure to drink A TON of water (like, 4-6 liters a day) . Dehydration, I've been warned, is the biggest cause of stones.
    I passed a stone after buying a juicer - I was juicing spinach and beets, and like someone else said here, oxalates are bad for stones. If you're juicing, watch out.

  3. ositodose

    I passed a stone last summer and doc told me that both lifting heavy weights and dehydration contribute. I have been more conscious of keeping my hydration up and no problems since. If you are passing multiple stones you could be more genetically predisposed to their formation though. Did you take any of the stones to a urologist to be tested? They can tell you a lot from their composition...

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People always freak out when I tell them I am doing keto. I even have one friend that refers to my diet as "The Ketoacidosis Diet". I can't get him to understand the difference, but maybe this will help you! Find Me On Twitter: www.twitter.com/HeavyKevi Instagram: www.instagram.com/TheHeavyTruthTV Follow My Macros on MyFitnessPal @The HeavyTruth Facebook Group: Facebook.com/Groups/TheHeavyTruthTV Subscribe to my Essential Oils Channel: https://goo.gl/El053Q Send Questions or Testimonials By Mail: Kevin Gillem P.O.Box 291517 Phelan, CA 92329 My Favorite Low Carb Sweetener - http://amzn.to/2smCmDM I recommend Smackfat Ketone Strips - http://amzn.to/2laB9MG I use the Match DNA Milk Frother - http://amzn.to/2klHt4o I use NOW MCT Oil - http://amzn.to/2kOs48S I'm Kevin and I have used a Ketogenic diet, Intermittent Fasting and Extended Fasting to successfully lose 160 pounds and I am still shrinking. I hope to one day be half the man I was at 400 pounds. During this journey I have learned a lot about weight loss, Metabolic syndrome, Insulin Resistance, LCHF dieting and overall health in general. I am greatly interested in continuing to learn about health related topics and sharing what I learn with others so that all of our lives can be improved. Please like and subscribe to my channel so that I can share the things I learn that I think are important for all of our well being. I would also appreciate feedback from you all so I can share it with other subscribers and we can all grow as a community. I am not a doctor. I am not licensed. I do not hold any qualifications for giving medical advice. This is an account of my own experiences and does not apply to anyone else. All information, content, and material of this channel is for informational purposes only and are not intended to serve as a substitute for the consultation, diagnosis, and/or medical treatment of a qualified physician or healthcare provider. If you have questions about your own personal situation it is recommended that you discuss them with your own licensed healthcare professional. If you think you are having an emergency, dial 911 immediately.

Ketoacidosis

Ketoacidosis is a metabolic state associated with high concentrations of ketone bodies, formed by the breakdown of fatty acids and the deamination of amino acids. The two common ketones produced in humans are acetoacetic acid and β-hydroxybutyrate. Ketoacidosis is a pathological metabolic state marked by extreme and uncontrolled ketosis. In ketoacidosis, the body fails to adequately regulate ketone production causing such a severe accumulation of keto acids that the pH of the blood is substantially decreased. In extreme cases ketoacidosis can be fatal.[1] Ketoacidosis is most common in untreated type 1 diabetes mellitus, when the liver breaks down fat and proteins in response to a perceived need for respiratory substrate. Prolonged alcoholism may lead to alcoholic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis can be smelled on a person's breath. This is due to acetone, a direct by-product of the spontaneous decomposition of acetoacetic acid. It is often described as smelling like fruit or nail polish remover.[2] Ketosis may also give off an odor, but the odor is usually more subtle due to lower concentrations of acetone. Treatment consists most simply of correcting blood sugar and insulin levels, wh Continue reading >>

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  1. Alice In TX/MO

    It's my fault. I admit that. Orange is eleven years old, and she struggled a bit with her pregnancy last year. However, she recovered nicely, and she was healthy, in heat, and flirting with the bucks, and I caved in to her insistence and let her get frisky last fall. Darn it. And, what with the varieties of chaos going on at the time, I don't have an exact breeding date.
    Now, she has ketosis. Her udder and vulva are swollen with edema, and she obviously does not feel well. She has lost weight.
    I found ketosis test strips at Wal Mart and tested her yesterday to confirm the suspicions I'd had for a week or so. OFF THE CHARTS ketosis.:run:
    For the last few days, she had been taking CMPK supplements via a drench gun, and, fortunately, she thinks it is yummy. On Yarrow's advice, I started Orange on a high carbohydrate diet. She's getting Fritos, crackers, oak leaves, and (this evening) a molasses sandwich. She is also getting "Magic" which is molasses, corn syrup, and corn oil. This gives her instant usable energy, so that she doesn't continue to digest her own fat and muscle to support life and kids. I'm giving her a SMALL amount of the grain mix that the other goats get.
    She had become less and less active over the last couple of weeks. After starting treating for ketosis, she is improving. This evening, when I went to the milk house/goat yard, she was on her feet in a browse area that I have for them.
    After a good phone consult with Yarrow, I'm thinking that these old does just have trouble with their metabolisms. Hopefully, I can get her through the last few days of this pregnancy and get one last set of kids. She will be the herd queen (UNBRED) for as long as she wants to stay with us after that.
    THANK YOU, YARROW, for taking the time this afternoon to advise me. :clap:

  2. yarrow

    I have all my fingers & toes crossed that you can keep her stable until the kids are well baked.. (I just came in a hour or so ago from kidding out Eve.. whose mother was also an old lady... who I fought and fought to keep her going until time to induce her.. Eve was the sole survivor of a set of triplets.. Eve just had really nice twin DOESLINGS..-both are black & white with full white belts.. one has a few BIG moon spots.).. super easy birth.. I see their grand dam in them both!!!... I think you should get to see Orange live on via her kids & grandkids.. one more time.. so.. like we talked about.. one day at a time.. keep her eating and drinking and I think you may well be able to get her to the finish line with live kids!..
    call anytime you need to/want to talk.. brainstorming with someone else always works better for me, when it's a tricky case
    susie

  3. GoldenWood Farm

    I will be praying for her Alice! I was worried because I knew you had called Susie (I was on the phone with her as well) and I hadn't seen a posting about it.
    Susie SO glad Eve kidded with does :nanner::nanner:. Send some vibes over to poor Penny!
    Justine

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    Diabetic Ketoacidosis Definition Diabetic ketoacidosis is a dangerous complication of diabetes mellitus in which the chemical balance of the body becomes far too acidic. Description Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) always results from a severe insulin deficiency. Insulin is the hormone secreted by the body to lower the blood sugar levels when they become too high. Diabetes mellitus is the disease resulting from the inability of the body to produce or ...

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