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Alcoholic Ketoacidosis Symptoms

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Glucose or sugar is the preferred source of fuel for the body. If the body’s cells get insufficient glucose, fat is used as the alternative source of energy. When fat is used as a source of energy, it produces ketones, which are acidic chemicals. A buildup of ketones causes the blood to become too acidic. This leads to chemical derangements called ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis comes in two different forms - diabetic ketoacidosis and alcoholic ketoacidosis. Here is more information about alcoholic ketoacidosis. What Is Alcoholic Ketoacidosis? Alcoholic Ketoacidosis (AKA) is a condition that develops in people who drink too much alcohol. This condition results in the increase of Ketones. AKA is common in adults who have a history with alcoholism. Any person showing signs of AKA needs to seek immediate medical attention because it is a potentially fatal condition. If you consume alcoholic beverages excessively without eating a balanced diet, the acidic levels of your blood might rise, causing health complications. Drinking alcoholic beverages in moderation or drinking as you eat can help reduce the likelihood of getting AKA. When the body’s fat cells breakdown after they have been consumed, ketones are formed. Consequently, the amount of acid in the blood dramatically increases and the blood’s pH (potenz Hydrogen) balance drops. While people who drink lots of alcoholic drinks and do not eat sufficient nutrients, or a balanced diet are likely to develop AKA, they are not the only ones. Inexperienced drinkers who binge drink can also develop this condition. What Are the Symptoms of Alcoholic Ketoacidosis? AKA symptoms vary based on the amount of alcohol you consume. Symptoms also depend on the amount of ketones you have in the bloodstream. If any of the following symptoms Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

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Chapter 221. Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Chapter 221. Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Woods WA, Perina DG. Woods W.A., Perina D.G. Woods, William A., and Debra G. Perina.Chapter 221. Alcoholic Ketoacidosis. In: Tintinalli JE, Stapczynski J, Ma O, Cline DM, Cydulka RK, Meckler GD, T. Tintinalli J.E., Stapczynski J, Ma O, Cline D.M., Cydulka R.K., Meckler G.D., T Eds. Judith E. Tintinalli, et al.eds. Tintinalli's Emergency Medicine: A Comprehensive Study Guide, 7e New York, NY: McGraw-Hill; 2011. Accessed March 27, 2018. Woods WA, Perina DG. Woods W.A., Perina D.G. Woods, William A., and Debra G. Perina.. "Chapter 221. Alcoholic Ketoacidosis." Tintinalli's Emergency Medicine: A Comprehensive Study Guide, 7e Tintinalli JE, Stapczynski J, Ma O, Cline DM, Cydulka RK, Meckler GD, T. Tintinalli J.E., Stapczynski J, Ma O, Cline D.M., Cydulka R.K., Meckler G.D., T Eds. Judith E. Tintinalli, et al. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill, 2011, Alcoholic ketoacidosis is a wide anion gap metabolic acidosis most often associated with acute cessation of alcohol consumption after chronic alcohol abuse and is typically associated with nausea, vomiting, and vague GI complaints. 1 Alcohol metabolism combined with little or no glycogen reserves results in elevated ketoacid levels. Although alcoholic ketoacidosis is usually seen in chronic alcoholics, it has been described in first-time binge drinkers. Repeated episodes can occur. 2 Although with proper treatment this illness is self limited, death has been reported from presumed excessive ketonemia. 24 Ethanol metabolism requires nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and the enzymes alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase to convert ethanol to acetyl coenzyme A. Acetyl coenzyme A may be metabolized directly, resulting in ketoacid production, used as substrate for the Krebs cycle, or used for free fatty acid synthesis ( Figu Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

What is alcoholic ketoacidosis? Cells need glucose (sugar) and insulin to function properly. Glucose comes from the food you eat, and insulin is produced by the pancreas. When you drink alcohol, your pancreas may stop producing insulin for a short time. Without insulin, your cells won’t be able to use the glucose you consume for energy. To get the energy you need, your body will start to burn fat. When your body burns fat for energy, byproducts known as ketone bodies are produced. If your body is not producing insulin, ketone bodies will begin to build up in your bloodstream. This buildup of ketones can produce a life-threatening condition known as ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis, or metabolic acidosis, occurs when you ingest something that is metabolized or turned into an acid. This condition has a number of causes, including: shock kidney disease abnormal metabolism In addition to general ketoacidosis, there are several specific types. These types include: alcoholic ketoacidosis, which is caused by excessive consumption of alcohol diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), which mostly develops in people with type 1 diabetes starvation ketoacidosis, which occurs most often in women who are pregnant, in their third trimester, and experiencing excessive vomiting Each of these situations increases the amount of acid in the system. They can also reduce the amount of insulin your body produces, leading to the breakdown of fat cells and the production of ketones. Alcoholic ketoacidosis can develop when you drink excessive amounts of alcohol for a long period of time. Excessive alcohol consumption often causes malnourishment (not enough nutrients for the body to function well). People who drink large quantities of alcohol may not eat regularly. They may also vomit as a result of drinking too Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Workup When a chronic alcoholic presents with signs of AKA, the clinician should carefully evaluate the patient, obtain a history, perform a physical exam, and order the appropriate laboratory tests. Laboratory tests and results A comprehensive metabolic profile will allow the medical team to determine the overall clinical picture of the patient. This includes measurement of serum electrolytes, glucose, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, lipase, amylase, and plasma osmolality. Also, urinalysis is helpful to detect ketones. Another useful tool is the blood alcohol level [8]. Finally, critically ill patients with positive ketones must have an analysis of their arterial blood gas (ABG) and serum lactate levels. With regards to expected findings, all patients demonstrate ketonuria and a majority display ketonemia. Also common are electrolyte imbalances such as hypokalemia, hyponatremia, hypophosphatemia, and hypomagnesemia. Additionally, the serum glucose may range from low to modest elevation while another abnormality is an increased osmolar gap (secondary to increased acetone and possibly ethanol). Most importantly, AKA is typically characterized by a high anion gap metabolic acidosis, which may be complicated by metabolic alkalosis secondary to concurrent vomiting. In cases where the pH is normal, the increased anion gap is an indicator of ketoacidosis. If there is a normal gap, this is the result of the excretion of ketoacid ions. Additionally, lactic acidosis is observed in more than 50% of cases due to hypoperfusion [9]. Differential diagnoses Differentials include diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA),however, the absence of hyperglycemia excludes this. Pancreatitis may also present similar to AKA and should be ruled out. If alcohol intoxication is not conclusive, serum me Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis

Ketoacidosis

Ketoacidosis is a metabolic state associated with high concentrations of ketone bodies, formed by the breakdown of fatty acids and the deamination of amino acids. The two common ketones produced in humans are acetoacetic acid and β-hydroxybutyrate. Ketoacidosis is a pathological metabolic state marked by extreme and uncontrolled ketosis. In ketoacidosis, the body fails to adequately regulate ketone production causing such a severe accumulation of keto acids that the pH of the blood is substantially decreased. In extreme cases ketoacidosis can be fatal.[1] Ketoacidosis is most common in untreated type 1 diabetes mellitus, when the liver breaks down fat and proteins in response to a perceived need for respiratory substrate. Prolonged alcoholism may lead to alcoholic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis can be smelled on a person's breath. This is due to acetone, a direct by-product of the spontaneous decomposition of acetoacetic acid. It is often described as smelling like fruit or nail polish remover.[2] Ketosis may also give off an odor, but the odor is usually more subtle due to lower concentrations of acetone. Treatment consists most simply of correcting blood sugar and insulin levels, which will halt ketone production. If the severity of the case warrants more aggressive measures, intravenous sodium bicarbonate infusion can be given to raise blood pH back to an acceptable range. However, serious caution must be exercised with IV sodium bicarbonate to avoid the risk of equally life-threatening hypernatremia. Cause[edit] Three common causes of ketoacidosis are alcohol, starvation, and diabetes, resulting in alcoholic ketoacidosis, starvation ketoacidosis, and diabetic ketoacidosis respectively.[3] In diabetic ketoacidosis, a high concentration of ketone bodies is usually accomp Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Go to: CHARACTERISATION In 1940, Dillon et al1 described a series of nine patients who had episodes of severe ketoacidosis in the absence of diabetes mellitus, all of whom had evidence of prolonged excessive alcohol consumption. It was not until 1970 that Jenkins et al2 described a further three non‐diabetic patients with a history of chronic heavy alcohol misuse and recurrent episodes of ketoacidosis. This group also proposed a possible underlying mechanism for this metabolic disturbance, naming it alcoholic ketoacidosis. Further case series by Levy et al, Cooperman et al, and Fulop et al were subsequently reported, with remarkably consistent features.3,4,5 All patients presented with a history of prolonged heavy alcohol misuse, preceding a bout of particularly excessive intake, which had been terminated several days earlier by nausea, severe vomiting, and abdominal pain. Clinical signs included tachypnoea, tachycardia, and hypotension. In 1974, Cooperman's series of seven ketoacidotic alcoholic patients all displayed diffuse epigastric tenderness on palpation.4 In contrast to patients with diabetic ketoacidosis, the patients were usually alert and lucid despite the severity of the acidosis and marked ketonaemia. When altered mental status occurred, this was clearly attributable to other causes. Laboratory results included absent blood alcohol with normal or low blood glucose level, no glycosuria, and a variably severe metabolic acidosis with a raised anion gap. This acidosis appeared to result from the accumulation in plasma of lactate and ketone bodies including beta‐hydroxybutyrate (BOHB) and acetoacetate (AcAc).3 Cooperman et al found that near patient testing for ketone bodies using nitroprusside test (Acetest, Ketostix) produced a low to moderate result in th Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis: Causes, Symptoms, Treatment, Prognosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis: Causes, Symptoms, Treatment, Prognosis

Ketoacidosis is a medical condition in which the food that is ingested by an individual is either metabolized or converted into acid. Alcoholic Ketoacidosis is a condition in which there is development of Ketoacidosis as a result of excessive alcohol intake for a long period of time and less ingestion of food resulting in malnutrition. Drinking excessive alcohol causes the individual to be able to eat less food. Additionally, if excess alcohol is ingested then it may lead to vomiting which further worsens the nutritional status of the individual which results in formation of excess acids resulting in Alcoholic Ketoacidosis. The symptoms caused by Alcoholic Ketoacidosis include abdominal pain, excessive fatigue, persistent vomiting, and the individual getting dehydrated due to frequent vomiting episodes and less fluid intake. If an individual has a history of alcohol abuse and experiences the above mentioned symptoms then it is advised that the individual goes to the nearest emergency room to get evaluated and if diagnosed treated for Alcoholic Ketoacidosis. As stated above, the root cause of Alcoholic Ketoacidosis is drinking excessive amounts of alcohol for a prolonged period of time. When an individual indulges in binge drinking he or she is not able to take in enough food that is required by the body to function. This eventually results in malnourishment. Additionally, vomiting caused by excessive drinking also results in loss of vital nutrients and electrolytes from the body such that the body is not able to function normally. This results in the insulin that is being produced by the body becoming less and less. All of these ultimately results in the development of Alcoholic Ketoacidosis. An individual may develop symptoms within a day after binge drinking, dependin Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Increased production of ketone bodies due to: Dehydration (nausea/vomiting, ADH inhibition) leads to increased stress hormone production leading to ketone formation Depleted glycogen stores in the liver (malnutrition/decrease carbohydrate intake) Elevated ratio of NADH/NAD due to ethanol metabolism Increased free fatty acid production Elevated NADH/NAD ratio leads to the predominate production of β–hydroxybutyrate (BHB) over acetoacetate (AcAc) Dehydration Fever absent unless there is an underlying infection Tachycardia (common) due to: Dehydration with associated orthostatic changes Concurrent alcohol withdrawal Tachypnea: Common Deep, rapid, Kussmaul respirations frequently present Nausea and vomiting Abdominal pain (nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain are the most common symptoms): Usually diffuse with nonspecific tenderness Epigastric pain common Rebound tenderness, abdominal distension, hypoactive bowel sounds uncommon Mandates a search for an alternative, coexistent illness Decreased urinary output from hypovolemia Mental status: Minimally altered as a result of hypovolemia and possibly intoxication Altered mental status mandates a search for other associated conditions such as: Head injury, cerebrovascular accident (CVA), or intracranial hemorrhage Hypoglycemia Alcohol withdrawal Encephalopathy Toxins Visual disturbances: Reports of isolated visual disturbances with AKA common History Chronic alcohol use: Recent binge Abrupt cessation Physical Exam Findings of dehydration most common May have ketotic odor Kussmaul respirations Palmar erythema (alcoholism) Lab Acid–base disturbance: Increased anion gap metabolic acidosis hallmark Mixed acid–base disturbance common: Respiratory alkalosis Metabolic alkalosis secondary to vomiting and dehydration Hyperchlorem Continue reading >>

Emergent Treatment Of Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Emergent Treatment Of Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Exenatide extended-release causes an increased incidence in thyroid C-cell tumors at clinically relevant exposures in rats compared to controls. It is unknown whether BYDUREON BCise causes thyroid C-cell tumors, including medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), in humans, as the human relevance of exenatide extended-release-induced rodent thyroid C-cell tumors has not been determined BYDUREON BCise is contraindicated in patients with a personal or family history of MTC or in patients with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndrome type 2 (MEN 2). Counsel patients regarding the potential risk of MTC with the use of BYDUREON BCise and inform them of symptoms of thyroid tumors (eg, mass in the neck, dysphagia, dyspnea, persistent hoarseness). Routine monitoring of serum calcitonin or using thyroid ultrasound is of uncertain value for detection of MTC in patients treated with BYDUREON BCise Acute Pancreatitis including fatal and non-fatal hemorrhagic or necrotizing pancreatitis has been reported. After initiation, observe patients carefully for symptoms of pancreatitis. If suspected, discontinue promptly and do not restart if confirmed. Consider other antidiabetic therapies in patients with a history of pancreatitis Acute Kidney Injury and Impairment of Renal Function Altered renal function, including increased serum creatinine, renal impairment, worsened chronic renal failure, and acute renal failure, sometimes requiring hemodialysis and kidney transplantation have been reported. Not recommended in patients with severe renal impairment or end-stage renal disease. Use caution in patients with renal transplantation or moderate renal impairment Gastrointestinal Disease Because exenatide is commonly associated with gastrointestinal adverse reactions, not recommended in patients with sev Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic ketoacidosis is a metabolic complication of alcohol use and starvation characterized by hyperketonemia and anion gap metabolic acidosis without significant hyperglycemia. Alcoholic ketoacidosis causes nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Diagnosis is by history and findings of ketoacidosis without hyperglycemia. Treatment is IV saline solution and dextrose infusion. Alcoholic ketoacidosis is attributed to the combined effects of alcohol and starvation on glucose metabolism. Alcohol diminishes hepatic gluconeogenesis and leads to decreased insulin secretion, increased lipolysis, impaired fatty acid oxidation, and subsequent ketogenesis, causing an elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis. Counter-regulatory hormones are increased and may further inhibit insulin secretion. Plasma glucose levels are usually low or normal, but mild hyperglycemia sometimes occurs. Diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion; similar symptoms in an alcoholic patient may result from acute pancreatitis, methanol or ethylene glycol poisoning, or diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). In patients suspected of having alcoholic ketoacidosis, serum electrolytes (including magnesium), BUN and creatinine, glucose, ketones, amylase, lipase, and plasma osmolality should be measured. Urine should be tested for ketones. Patients who appear significantly ill and those with positive ketones should have arterial blood gas and serum lactate measurement. The absence of hyperglycemia makes DKA improbable. Those with mild hyperglycemia may have underlying diabetes mellitus, which may be recognized by elevated levels of glycosylated Hb (HbA1c). Typical laboratory findings include a high anion gap metabolic acidosis, ketonemia, and low levels of potassium, magnesium, and phosphorus. Detection of acidosis may be com Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alternative Names: Ketoacidosis - alcoholic Causes, incidence, and risk factors: Alcoholic ketoacidosis is caused by excessive alcohol use. It is most often seen in a malnourished person who drinks large amounts of alcohol every day. Symptoms: Abdominal pain Changed level of alertness, which may lead to coma Fatigue Slow, sluggish, lethargic movement Irregular deep, rapid breathing (Kussmaul's sign) Loss of appetite Nausea and vomiting Symptoms of dehydration , such as dizziness, light-headedness, and thirst Treatment: Treatment may involve fluids (salt and sugar solution) given through a vein. You may need to have your blood taken often. You may get vitamin supplements to treat nutritional deficiencies caused by excess alcohol use. People with this condition are admitted to the hospital, often to the intensive care unit (ICU). Expectations (prognosis): Prompt medical attention improves the overall outlook. How severe the alcoholism is, and the presence of liver disease or other complications also affect the outlook. Calling your health care provider: If you or someone else has symptoms of alcoholic ketoacidosis, seek emergency medical help. Prevention: Limiting the amount of alcohol you drink may help prevent this condition. References: Cho KC, Fukagawa M, Kurokawa K. Fluid and electrolyte disorders. In: McPhee SJ, Papadakis MA, eds. Current Medical Diagnosis and Treatment. 48th ed. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill; 2009:chap 21. DuBose TD Jr. Acidosis and alkalosis. In: Fauci A , Kasper D, Longo DL, et al, eds. Harrison's Principals of Internal Medicine. 17th ed. New York, NY: McGraw Hill; 2008:chap 48. Wiener SW, Hoffman RS. Alcoholic ketoacidosis. In: Wolfson Ab, Hendey GW, Ling LJ, et al, eds. Harwood-Nuss' Clinical Practice of Emergency Medicine. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis: Another Risk Of Chronic Alcohol Abuse

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis: Another Risk Of Chronic Alcohol Abuse

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis: Another Risk ofChronic Alcohol acts like poison within the human body. It enters the bloodstream and affects every part of the body, making the drinker vulnerable to serious health consequences. Chronic alcohol abuse exposes the central nervous, digestive, circulatory, immune, skeletal, and muscle systems to severe and long-lasting damage. Alcoholic ketoacidosis (AKA) is a disease that develops from drinking too much alcohol. Learn about this harmful condition and what you can do to prevent it. Alcoholic ketoacidosis occurs when there is an unhealthy buildup of ketones in the body. Ketones are a byproduct of the body burning fat instead of glucose for energy. Cells need glucose and insulin to function properly. The pancreas produces insulin, and glucose comes from the foods you eat. Consuming too much alcohol regularly, combined with a poor diet, can lead to the pancreas failing to produce insulin for a short time. This leads to your body burning fat for energy instead of using the glucose you consume. Without the production of insulin, ketones build up in the bloodstream, causing the life-threatening condition of AKA. Ketoacidosis occurs when the body digests something that gets turned into acid. Alcoholic ketoacidosis happens when excessive amounts of alcohol cause digestive problems. Failure to follow a holistic approach , such as eating a balanced diet, combined with excessive drinking and/or vomiting, leads to blood that is too acidic. Alcoholic ketoacidosis can be fatal, and requires treatment right away. Knowing how to identify AKA will help you recognize this condition in yourself or loved ones early on, giving you the best chance of recovery. This condition is treatable, but only with swift action to stop excessive alcohol consumption, Continue reading >>

Alcoholism: Facts On Alcoholic Symptoms & Treatment

Alcoholism: Facts On Alcoholic Symptoms & Treatment

For More Information About Alcoholism and Alcohol Use Disorder Alcohol problems vary in severity from mild to life threatening and affect the individual, the person's family, and society in numerous adverse ways. Despite the focus on illegal drugs of abuse such as cocaine , alcohol remains the number-one drug problem in the United States. Nearly 17 million adults in the U.S. are dependent on alcohol or have other alcohol-related problems, and about 88,000 people die from preventable alcohol-related causes. In teenagers, alcohol is the most commonly abused drug. Thirty-five percent of teens have had at least one drink by age 15. Even though it is illegal, about 8.7 million people 12 to 20 years of age have had a drink in the past month, and this age group accounted for 11% of all alcohol consumed in the U.S. Among underaged youth, alcohol is responsible for about 189,000 emergency-room visits and 4,300 deaths annually. Withdrawal, for those physically dependent on alcohol, is much more dangerous than withdrawal from heroin or other narcotic drugs. Alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence are now grouped together under the diagnosis of alcohol use disorder. What was formerly called alcohol abuse refers to excessive or problematic use with one or more of the following: Failure to fulfill major obligations at work, school, or home Recurrent use in situations where it is hazardous (such as driving a car or operating machinery) Continued use of alcohol despite having medical, social, family, or interpersonal problems caused by or worsened by drinking Despite negative outcomes resulting from drinking, the alcoholic continues to drink to try to attain the feeling of euphoria they first experienced when they started drinking. Previously called alcohol dependence, this aspect of alc Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis Damian Baalmann, 2nd year EM resident A 45-year-old male presents to your emergency department with abdominal pain. He is conscious, lucid and as the nurses are hooking up the monitors, he explains to you that he began experiencing abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting about 2 days ago. Exam reveals a poorly groomed male with dry mucous membranes, diffusely tender abdomen with voluntary guarding. He is tachycardic, tachypneic but normotensive. A quick review of the chart reveals a prolonged history of alcohol abuse and after some questioning, the patient admits to a recent binge. Pertinent labs reveal slightly elevated anion-gap metabolic acidosis, normal glucose, ethanol level of 0, normal lipase and no ketones in the urine. What are your next steps in management? Alcoholic Ketoacidosis (AKA): What is it? Ketones are a form of energy made by the liver by free fatty acids released by adipose tissues. Normally, ketones are in small quantity (<0.1 mmol/L), but sometimes the body is forced to increase its production of these ketones. Ketones are strong acids and when they accumulate in large numbers, their presence leads to an acidosis. In alcoholics, a combination or reduced nutrient intake, hepatic oxidation of ethanol, and dehydration can lead to ketoacidosis. Alcoholics tend to rely on ethanol for their nutrient intake and when the liver metabolizes ethanol it generates NADH. This NADH further promotes ketone formation in the liver. Furthermore, ethanol promotes diuresis which leads to dehydration and subsequently impairs ketone excretion in the urine. Alcoholic Ketoacidosis: How do I recognize it? Typical history involves a chronic alcohol abuser who went on a recent binge that was terminated by severe nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. These folk Continue reading >>

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