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Alcoholic Ketoacidosis Symptoms

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine. The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin. Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin. Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium. Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked. Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection. In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended. Rates of DKA vary around the world. About 4% of people with type 1 diabetes in United Kingdom develop DKA a year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year. DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost universally fatal. The risk of death with adequate and timely treatment is currently around 1–4%. Up to 1% of children with DKA develop a complication known as cerebral edema. The symptoms of an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a period of about 24 hours. Predominant symptoms are nausea and vomiting, pronounced thirst, excessive urine production and abdominal pain that may be severe. Those who measure their glucose levels themselves may notice hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels). In severe DKA, breathing becomes labored and of a deep, gasping character (a state referred to as "Kussmaul respiration"). The abdomen may be tender to the point that an acute abdomen may be suspected, such as acute pancreatitis, appendicitis or gastrointestinal perforation. Coffee ground vomiting (vomiting of altered blood) occurs in a minority of people; this tends to originate from erosion of the esophagus. In severe DKA, there may be confusion, lethargy, stupor or even coma (a marked decrease in the level of consciousness). On physical examination there is usually clinical evidence of dehydration, such as a dry mouth and decreased skin turgor. If the dehydration is profound enough to cause a decrease in the circulating blood volume, tachycardia (a fast heart rate) and low blood pressure may be observed. Often, a "ketotic" odor is present, which is often described as "fruity", often compared to the smell of pear drops whose scent is a ketone. If Kussmaul respiration is present, this is reflected in an increased respiratory rate.....

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alternative Names: Ketoacidosis - alcoholic Causes, incidence, and risk factors: Alcoholic ketoacidosis is caused by excessive alcohol use. It is most often seen in a malnourished person who drinks large amounts of alcohol every day. Symptoms: Abdominal pain Changed level of alertness, which may lead to coma Fatigue Slow, sluggish, lethargic movement Irregular deep, rapid breathing (Kussmaul's sign) Loss of appetite Nausea and vomiting Symptoms of dehydration , such as dizziness, light-headedness, and thirst Treatment: Treatment may involve fluids (salt and sugar solution) given through a vein. You may need to have your blood taken often. You may get vitamin supplements to treat nutritional deficiencies caused by excess alcohol use. People with this condition are admitted to the hospital, often to the intensive care unit (ICU). Expectations (prognosis): Prompt medical attention improves the overall outlook. How severe the alcoholism is, and the presence of liver disease or other complications also affect the outlook. Calling your health care provider: If you or someone else has symptoms of alcoholic ketoacidosis, seek emergency medical help. Prevention: Limiting the amount of alcoh Continue reading >>

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  1. Kevin Gormley

    I have been in nutritional Ketosis for 4 months now. I GET that I am not as hungry as before due to being "fat adapted". Some days I do not feel like eating much at all. But, my question for the group is there science around "Does you body have the ability to store extra calories from fat into adipose tissue when insulin is low?" That is... when someone is Keto adapted (protein is appropriate and carbs are very low) if I DO eat too much cream cheese and whipped cream one night- what happens to that energy? I have done this a couple of times (binged on whipped cream) and it has not seemed to ruin anything. Are there alternative mechanisms other then insulin for your body to store excess calories from "fat bombs" when you are fully Keto- adapted? BTW, I am not looking for permission to gorge myself- just the science how how our bodies deal with too much fat calories! I have been curious since the second month on Keto.

  2. Fiorella

    I believe that yes it is possible to eat too much. However, the fat typically allows you to have satiety signals that naturally stop you from over eating.

  3. carolT

    1Secondactcpa:


    "Does you body have the ability to store extra calories from fat into adipose tissue when insulin is low?"
    I think the key to this is the definition of "low". I take that to mean normal basal insulin plus whatever insulin response you get from stomach signaling upon ingestion. Then yes, it is sufficient to store fat in adipose tissue. Take, for example, a type-1 diabetic. They do not store fat well at all. Also, a severely insulin resistant person has damaged fat cells in adipose tissue that can no longer absorb fat. This is when visceral fat accumulates and leads to NAFLD. Most of us with normal to elevated basal insulin are quite adept at fat storage. It's getting the fat back out again [and using it for fuel] bit that's the problem.

    @richard and @erdoke can get more technical and sciencey than I can.

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What is KETOACIDOSIS? What does KETOACIDOSIS mean? KETOACIDOSIS meaning - KETOACIDOSIS definition - KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Ketoacidosis is a metabolic state associated with high concentrations of ketone bodies, formed by the breakdown of fatty acids and the deamination of amino acids. The two common ketones produced in humans are acetoacetic acid and ß-hydroxybutyrate. Ketoacidosis is a pathological metabolic state marked by extreme and uncontrolled ketosis. In ketoacidosis, the body fails to adequately regulate ketone production causing such a severe accumulation of keto acids that the pH of the blood is substantially decreased. In extreme cases ketoacidosis can be fatal. Ketoacidosis is most common in untreated type 1 diabetes mellitus, when the liver breaks down fat and proteins in response to a perceived need for respiratory substrate. Prolonged alcoholism may lead to alcoholic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis can be smelled on a person's breath. This is due to acetone, a direct by-product of the spontaneous decomposition of acetoacetic acid. It is often described as smelling like fruit or nail polish remover. Ketosis may also smell, but the odor is usually more subtle due to lower concentrations of acetone. Treatment consists most simply of correcting blood sugar and insulin levels, which will halt ketone production. If the severity of the case warrants more aggressive measures, intravenous sodium bicarbonate infusion can be given to raise blood pH back to an acceptable range. However, serious caution must be exercised with IV sodium bicarbonate to avoid the risk of equally life-threatening hypernatremia. Three common causes of ketoacidosis are alcohol, starvation, and diabetes, resulting in alcoholic ketoacidosis, starvation ketoacidosis, and diabetic ketoacidosis respectively. In diabetic ketoacidosis, a high concentration of ketone bodies is usually accompanied by insulin deficiency, hyperglycemia, and dehydration. Particularly in type 1 diabetics the lack of insulin in the bloodstream prevents glucose absorption, thereby inhibiting the production of oxaloacetate (a crucial molecule for processing Acetyl-CoA, the product of beta-oxidation of fatty acids, in the Krebs cycle) through reduced levels of pyruvate (a byproduct of glycolysis), and can cause unchecked ketone body production (through fatty acid metabolism) potentially leading to dangerous glucose and ketone levels in the blood. Hyperglycemia results in glucose overloading the kidneys and spilling into the urine (transport maximum for glucose is exceeded). Dehydration results following the osmotic movement of water into urine (Osmotic diuresis), exacerbating the acidosis. In alcoholic ketoacidosis, alcohol causes dehydration and blocks the first step of gluconeogenesis by depleting oxaloacetate. The body is unable to synthesize enough glucose to meet its needs, thus creating an energy crisis resulting in fatty acid metabolism, and ketone body formation.

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

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  1. rstrauser

    quick question..
    each mid morning, after my BP coffee , Brain Octane, Butter concoction i notice a strong ammonia smell from my urine..
    Is that a marker for ketosis ?

  2. Michelle My Bell

    When urine begins to smell like ammonia, it usually means one of two things. First, it could be that you are a bit dehydrated and therefore your urine is more concentrated. All urine has ammonia which is a normal product of the metabolism of protein. Your urine should smell a little bit like ammonia, and this smell is enhanced by the urine being more concentrated. Sometimes urine smells stronger when there has been a change in your diet. Another possibility is that your urine is infected with a bacteria. Some bacteria can feed on different compounds in the urine making it smell quite bad. Usually if you are in ketosis acetone is released in sweat and your breath smells of acetone or a "fruity" smell. Only way to know for certain is a blood ketone meter, which is what I use. The urine strips are not a good indicator of ketosis. Hope this helps some!

  3. rstrauser

    Greatly appreciate the response..
    Confused a bit if dehydrated..
    I start w/ about 4-6 oz of lemon water every morning - followed by BP Coffee - followed by a couple glasses of my Tea Stack (green tea / herbal tea).
    I drink water at home -2-3 glasses a night..
    Infection ??? Well didn't think so but guess it's possible somehow..
    thanks again .

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Case 714 * Alcoholic Ketoacidosis * Dr. Mohammad Akram Babury, MD . Send us your feedback/suggestions. Naser Oria https://www.facebook.com/doctorsforaf... / . Visit us at / :www.doctorsforafghanistan.com Kabul # health # Acidosis # Diabetic #

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis: A Case Report And Review Of The Literature

Go to: CASE REPORT We present a 64-year-old female who presented with generalized abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and shortness of breath. Arterial blood gas analysis showed significant acidaemia with a pH of 7.10, bicarbonate of 2.9 mmol/l and lactate of 11.7 mmol/l. Serum ketones were raised at 5.5 mmol/l. Capillary blood glucose was noted to 5.8 mmol/l. The anion gap was calculated and was elevated at 25 mmol/l. The diagnosis of DKA was queried after initial triage. However, following senior medical review, given a recent history of drinking alcohol to excess, the diagnosis of AKA was felt more likely. Whilst a decreased conscious level may have been expected, our patient was lucid enough to report drinking one to two bottles of wine per day for the past 30 years, with a recent binge the day prior to admission. Subsequent fluid resuscitation and monitoring were instituted. Further biochemical investigation after treatment showed a rapid decline in the level of ketones and normalization of pH. Our patient had a multidisciplinary team (MDT) looking after her care, whilst she was an inpatient, including acute medical and gastroenterology doctors and nurses, dietitians, alcohol spe Continue reading >>

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  1. Patrick*

    Like others here, I switched to a low carb diet, and it seems to help my ME. My Candida antibodies were very high when last tested. I'm not excessive about the diet -- I probably get about 35-45% of my macronutrients from protein -- up from maybe 10% before the diet.
    But now my urine is foamy every time I urinate. According to Google, this means that there is protein in my urine. But it's difficult to get a sense of whether this is harming me (especially my kidneys) or not. Sources are conflicting. It doesn't foam excessively, like beer, but a single layer of noticeable bubbles forms. It could almost go unnoticed, but I'm certain I've never seen it before.
    Can anyone shed any light on this? Should I be concerned? I don't want to have to choose between Candida and kidney damage. (I would choose Candida, BTW).
    P.S. To anyone who may remember that I posted in another thread about having kidney-area pain, this pain predated the foam by about 6 months, so it's not clear that there's any connection.

  2. alex3619

    Hi PWCalvin, I have no hard evidence about this as I have not reseached the literature. However I have heard stories of bodybuilders who developed kidney problems from too much protein. The point of low carb is not to eat massive amounts of protein. Maybe someone with more knowledge of paleo diets and low carb diets would like to comment? Bye, Alex

  3. Tony Mach

    PWCalvin said: ↑
    But now my urine is foamy every time I urinate. According to Google, this means that there is protein in my urine. But it's difficult to get a sense of whether this is harming me (especially my kidneys) or not. Sources are conflicting. It doesn't foam excessively, like beer, but a single layer of noticeable bubbles forms. It could almost go unnoticed, but I'm certain I've never seen it before.
    Can anyone shed any light on this? Should I be concerned? I don't want to have to choose between Candida and kidney damage. (I would choose Candida, BTW).
    P.S. To anyone who may remember that I posted in another thread about having kidney-area pain, this pain predated the foam by about 6 months, so it's not clear that there's any connection. If you suspect protein in your urine, you could get urine sticks to test for it. In that case a visit to the doctor would be well advised.
    But if you changed you diet, your body is probably adapting and this might go away.
    I had kidney-area pain that was similiar to what you describe, plus I had a high urinating frequency. After I went on a Atkins diet (carb-free), these problems went away.
    I am now on a Paleo/Primal type of diet and I think it is not the carbs, that are the problem, but usually carbs are either grain-products, milk-products or potatoes. All three contain substances that can be bad (gluten, wga, alkaloids, etc.). There are some sources of carb that should be safe, like plantains and sweet potatoes/african yam. Other sources like rice are OK for some, but I try to minimize it. Search for "safe starches".
    If you are healthy going very low carb (VLC) for some time can be OK, but in the long term one should find out what ones personal "safe starches" are.
    One more thought: I try to get my protein from animal products (meat, fish, eggs) and try to avoid plant-products rich in protein like soybean. Soybean contains substances that can mess up the hormone system

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