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Alcoholic Ketoacidosis Prognosis

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Alcoholism is disease, heres some resources to help you fight back: Responsible Drinking: A Moderation Management Approach http://amzn.to/1ZdgP9f I Need to Stop Drinking!: How to get back your self-respect. http://amzn.to/1VEqbeU Why You Drink and How to Stop: A Journey to Freedom: http://amzn.to/1Q8pAv2 Alcoholics Anonymous: The Big Book: http://amzn.to/1N0rttl Alcoholics: Dealing With an Alcoholic Family Member, Friend or Someone You Love: http://amzn.to/1j9cvH4 Watch more How to Understand Alcoholism videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/517398-... The question that has been asked of me is if alcoholism can lead to diabetes. And if so, how? The answer is chronic alcohol use can lead to diabetes. The way it leads to diabetes is that chronic alcohol use can cause inflammation of the pancreas, and chronic inflammation of the pancreas can affect the production of insulin in the body. And that's what causes diabetes. So that is why alcohol can be an actual primary determinate of diabetes. The other way that heavy alcohol use can lead to diabetes or exacerbate diabetes is that alcohol has a high content of sugar. So if one is already diabetic, alcohol is really not indicated because o

Alcoholism: Facts On Alcoholic Symptoms & Treatment

For More Information About Alcoholism and Alcohol Use Disorder Alcohol problems vary in severity from mild to life threatening and affect the individual, the person's family, and society in numerous adverse ways. Despite the focus on illegal drugs of abuse such as cocaine , alcohol remains the number-one drug problem in the United States. Nearly 17 million adults in the U.S. are dependent on alcohol or have other alcohol-related problems, and about 88,000 people die from preventable alcohol-related causes. In teenagers, alcohol is the most commonly abused drug. Thirty-five percent of teens have had at least one drink by age 15. Even though it is illegal, about 8.7 million people 12 to 20 years of age have had a drink in the past month, and this age group accounted for 11% of all alcohol consumed in the U.S. Among underaged youth, alcohol is responsible for about 189,000 emergency-room visits and 4,300 deaths annually. Withdrawal, for those physically dependent on alcohol, is much more dangerous than withdrawal from heroin or other narcotic drugs. Alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence are now grouped together under the diagnosis of alcohol use disorder. What was formerly called alco Continue reading >>

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  1. Saraleesaralee

    Is it possible to stay on ketogenic diet for life-long?

    I have been on ketogenic diet for 2 weeks. It controls my blood sugar level really well. However I am not over weight. And I am worried about potential long term side effects of the diet. For example, high LDL level, steoporosis, auto immune disease, too much weight loss, vesicular stiffness. I was wondering if there is anyone in this forum has been on ketogenic diet for years? And do you experience any side effects from the diet?

  2. Aaron1963

    I've been on a strict ketogenic diet for 6 months, and was doing LCHF for much of the 5 months prior to that but didn't make any attempts at it being ketogenic so I may have been in and out of ketosis some during that period. I now have a blood ketone meter and remain in ketosis according to it.
    I did suffer excessive weight loss initially. I lost about 40kg (about 90 lbs.), and it ended up sending me from being very obese to being underweight. But I've always eaten very little protein, which I continued to do, plus I was doing intermittent fasting, sometimes not eating anything for days at a time. Once I stopped the intermittent fasting and concentrated on getting adequate protein, my weight went back up to my ideal weight and stabilized there. I've heard from several people that you really need to watch your protein when doing a ketogenic diet being it's easy for excess to hinder weight loss and/or increase your BG.
    I have had a few issues while doing a ketogenic diet, but not 100% sure which if any can be attributed to ketosis vs. some other factor. First off, as winter was approaching I got extremely cold all the time, especially my fingers and toes, but even my whole body was cold. I thought it might have been the caffeine I was getting as part of my ketogenic diet involves drinking lots of coffee with HWC, coconut oil, and butter. I switched to decaf and the problem pretty much went away, but I don't know if it was the caffeine, the ketosis, the massive weight loss (lack of body fat), something else, or a combination of factors.
    I've also had excessive itching and a rash. That's normal for me during the winter months, but this year it started a bit early, went longer, and was much worse than normal. I think it may very well have been my usual sensitivity to the cold dry weather, aggravated by toxins released during my rapid weight loss, and perhaps ketones being emitted through the skin. It's just recently started to clear up and the rash is gone and most of the itching.
    I got keto-breath for a week or two when I first concentrated on going keto. It was very noticeable, but disappeared after that and no issues anymore with my breath.
    This diet is very sustainable for me. I tried my whole adult life to diet to lose weight and was never successful. This time I wanted to lose weight, but my primary focus was controlling my BG, meaning reducing carbs down to a low-carb level, which caused me to gravitate naturally to a LCHF diet. For the first time I have no desire to go back to my old way of eating. I love this diet and it's completely satisfying. So I killed two birds with one stone - got my BG under control, down to non-diabetic levels, and got my weight down to ideal. Plus with the huge benefits (IMHO) of having my body use ketones rather than glucose, I'm totally sold on this way of eating for the rest of my life and have absolutely no worries about not being able to stick to my diet. I really have no strong urges for carbs anymore, and only end up going off the plan rarely due to social pressures or inadvertently eating hidden/unknown carbs.
    My LDL has gone up, but I've heard from others that usually it's benign large fluffy LDL that typically goes up when on a ketogenic diet. And my body is still adjusting. Also I've heard that LDL by itself is not a good measure of risk. So I'm not worried about it, but will keep an eye on things. I also have taken my ketogenic diet to an extreme, hitting a KR of 3.0 or higher almost everyday, and sometimes up to 4.0 or more. Not sure if eating much more fat than necessary for ketosis affected my LDL any or not. Initially my LDL dropped significantly as well as my trigs, but both increased at my last doctor's visit. I may try a more normal KR in the future while monitoring my blood ketones to verify I stay in ketosis and see if there's any difference in my BG, cholesterol, or other tests.
    I did also suffer from other typical symptoms during my keto adaptation phase. Most went away within about two weeks. But it's just been here at the 6-month mark where my BG numbers suddenly stabilized with very little change, and quite low, and overall I just feel absolutely fantastic. I feel like I'm bursting with energy and joined a gym and suddenly love running and working out whereas I hated them all my life.
    Well, I don't have years of experience with ketosis to report anything to you about that. Other than I've heard lots of other people with years of experience and not heard of anyone having any real side effects other than the things I've mentioned. However some people do find ketosis isn't for them and give up very soon. For those that feel it is working for them and stick with it, seems there's no significant side effects. But I'll let the others who've been in ketosis for longer than me speak for themselves.

  3. furball64801

    Hi and welcome to DD I know of a guy called no more carbs that was on it over 2 yrs. It is possible he is still on it, that chat site closed down but he was going strong on it.

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high b

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic ketoacidosis is a metabolic complication of alcohol use and starvation characterized by hyperketonemia and anion gap metabolic acidosis without significant hyperglycemia. Alcoholic ketoacidosis causes nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Diagnosis is by history and findings of ketoacidosis without hyperglycemia. Treatment is IV saline solution and dextrose infusion. Alcoholic ketoacidosis is attributed to the combined effects of alcohol and starvation on glucose metabolism. Alcohol diminishes hepatic gluconeogenesis and leads to decreased insulin secretion, increased lipolysis, impaired fatty acid oxidation, and subsequent ketogenesis, causing an elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis. Counter-regulatory hormones are increased and may further inhibit insulin secretion. Plasma glucose levels are usually low or normal, but mild hyperglycemia sometimes occurs. Diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion; similar symptoms in an alcoholic patient may result from acute pancreatitis, methanol or ethylene glycol poisoning, or diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). In patients suspected of having alcoholic ketoacidosis, serum electrolytes (including magnesium), BUN and creatinine, glucose, Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. HollywoodSwole

    I ask because the flax oil/chocolate protein shake is getting old. I have a huge tub of unflavored protein that I used p/w with dextrose and kool-aid. I wanna try my unflavored stuff with a little sweetener and kool-aid just for variety. .

  2. fresh

    Aspartame kicks you out of ketosis?
    -fresh

  3. s2000

    Use sucralose (Splenda), Ace-K, saccharin, or stevia, preferably in that order. Splenda is not metabolised for the most part and is very close to eating air. The only one to avoid is Aspartame, as many people get kicked out of ketosis on it. Be careful not to overload on sweeteners however as your body expects sugar to enter the blood stream, and even though it doesn't with fake sugar your body releases some insulin anyhow in expectation. It shouldn't be an issue unless you pour it on.
    Also, kool aid is a BAD idea. it has citric acid in it which can be worse than aspartame, and then amount of sweetener used with kool aid is large (may cause insulin spike). Aspartame is very easy to avoid, but citric acid is almost impossible to avoid in beverages. even flavored water usually has it in it. Some people are more sensative than others. Diet Dr. Pepper is about the only pop that doesnt have any (but it does have aspartame).
    Hope this helps...

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Anion gap usmle - anion gap metabolic acidosis normal anion gap metabolic acidosis

Severe Metabolic Acidosis In The Alcoholic: Differential Diagnosis And Management

1 A chronic alcoholic with severe metabolic acidosis presents a difficult diagnostic problem. The most common cause is alcoholic ketoacidosis, a syndrome with a typical history but often misleading laboratory findings. This paper will focus on this important and probably underdiagnosed syndrome. 2 The disorder occurs in alcoholics who have had a heavy drinking-bout culminating in severe vomiting, with resulting dehydration, starvation, and then a β- hydroxybutyrate dominated ketoacidosis. 3 Awareness of this syndrome, thorough history-taking, physical examination and routine laboratory analyses will usually lead to a correct diagnosis. 4 The treatment is simply replacement of fluid, glucose, electrolytes and thiamine. Insulin or alkali should be avoided. 5 The most important differential diagnoses are diabetic ketoacidosis, lactic acidosis and salicylate, methanol or ethylene glycol poisoning, conditions which require quite different treatment. 6 The diagnostic management of unclear cases should always include toxicological tests, urine microscopy for calcium oxalate crystals and calculation of the serum anion and osmolal gaps. 7 It is suggested here, however, that the value of th Continue reading >>

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  1. eatresponsibly

    I just started the keto diet and I realized I should have some way to track progress, so i bought the recommended Precision Xtra meter. It arrived, without an strips (my fault for not thinking of it) and I looked them up to get them and its $88 for 50!!!!!! Please tell me there is a cheaper alternative I can use with this device!

  2. [deleted]

    Nope. Why are you testing? Testing is not necassary if just looking to do keto

  3. eatresponsibly

    comment score below threshold

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