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Alcoholic Ketoacidosis Home Treatment

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Fasting Ketosis And Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

INTRODUCTION Ketoacidosis is the term used for metabolic acidoses associated with an accumulation of ketone bodies. The most common cause of ketoacidosis is diabetic ketoacidosis. Two other causes are fasting ketosis and alcoholic ketoacidosis. Fasting ketosis and alcoholic ketoacidosis will be reviewed here. Issues related to diabetic ketoacidosis are discussed in detail elsewhere. (See "Diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state in adults: Epidemiology and pathogenesis" and "Diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state in adults: Clinical features, evaluation, and diagnosis" and "Diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state in adults: Treatment".) PHYSIOLOGY OF KETONE BODIES There are three major ketone bodies, with the interrelationships shown in the figure (figure 1): Acetoacetic acid is the only true ketoacid. The more dominant acid in patients with ketoacidosis is beta-hydroxybutyric acid, which results from the reduction of acetoacetic acid by NADH. Beta-hydroxybutyric acid is a hydroxyacid, not a true ketoacid. Continue reading >>

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  1. Kenshosan

    I have been eating ketogenic for about 9 months and I am regularly between 0.2 and 0.8 on my ketone meter with my average being about 0.5. I have noticed the last two times I have consumed red wine, (about 24 ounces or 3-8 ounce glasses) the next day my ketone reading is as low as 1.1 and as high as 3.5. I would think that drinking three glasses of wine would kick me out of ketosis. Anyone have ideas as to why I would get more into ketosis? It kind of makes me want to drink more often.

  2. AshSimmonds

    It might technically "help" ketosis, but the downsides make it a wash.

    http://ashsimmonds.com/2014/08/09/carbohydrates-in-wine-its-not-starch-only-residual-sugar-and-why-listings-are-wrong/
    73

    Wine is great, but imbibe to enjoy, not for ketones.

  3. howdy242

    So I noticed something similar with my ketones today. I drank quite a bit last night (rum & coconut bai)& my ketones are significantly higher today. I did not check ketones upon waking, but proceeded to have 2 BPC's and don't eat anything until later tonight. I checked ketones about 5 hrs after the BPC's and had a reading of 2.8. 2 hrs later it was up to 3.8. I mentioned this oddity to my hubby and he thought it might have something to do with the breakdown products of the alcohol- acetylaldehyde..sort of along the breathalyzer that will test for alcohol but will also pick up ketones..
    So in essence it's not that we're making more ketones but perhaps still breaking down the alcohol?

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Alcoholism is disease, heres some resources to help you fight back: Responsible Drinking: A Moderation Management Approach http://amzn.to/1ZdgP9f I Need to Stop Drinking!: How to get back your self-respect. http://amzn.to/1VEqbeU Why You Drink and How to Stop: A Journey to Freedom: http://amzn.to/1Q8pAv2 Alcoholics Anonymous: The Big Book: http://amzn.to/1N0rttl Alcoholics: Dealing With an Alcoholic Family Member, Friend or Someone You Love: http://amzn.to/1j9cvH4 Watch more How to Understand Alcoholism videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/517398-... The question that has been asked of me is if alcoholism can lead to diabetes. And if so, how? The answer is chronic alcohol use can lead to diabetes. The way it leads to diabetes is that chronic alcohol use can cause inflammation of the pancreas, and chronic inflammation of the pancreas can affect the production of insulin in the body. And that's what causes diabetes. So that is why alcohol can be an actual primary determinate of diabetes. The other way that heavy alcohol use can lead to diabetes or exacerbate diabetes is that alcohol has a high content of sugar. So if one is already diabetic, alcohol is really not indicated because of its sugar content. So, again, alcohol can actually be a primary cause of diabetes by chronically inflaming the pancreas, or it can actually make diabetes worse and interfere with the diabetes treatment because of the high sugar content in alcohol.

The Physical Effects Of Alcoholism | The Canyon

Alcohol is a potent substance that can cause damage to some of the most sensitive organs in the body. While there are many therapies that can help people who are dealing with alcohol-based symptoms, the best long-term solution for alcoholism is rehab and abstinence. Taking the important first step towards treatment, means the body and mind can begin to heal. When a person takes in alcohol, the liver has a significant amount of work to do. This organ quickly and efficiently processes the alcohol and removes the potent chemicals through the kidneys and out with the urine. Over time and with regular use, alcohol damages tissues that make up the liver. In the early stages of alcohol-related liver disease, the liver becomes swollen and inflamed. If a person continues to drink, the liver can develop scar tissue as it attempts to heal. This can lead to severe scarring and cirrhosis of the liver. According to the U.D National Library of Medicine [i] , cirrhosis is irreversible and cannot be adequately treated. The damage is permanent, and the only way to return the body to a normal state is to undergo a liver transplant. Not everyone who drinks will develop liver damage, but those who dri Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Momto3

    I just called Walgreens to get DD's Rx for individually wrapped ketostix refilled and the tech told me she didn't think they were being manufactured anymore. She is double checking and will be calling me back. I prefer to leave these at school because DD doesn't need to use them often.
    Does anyone know for certain if these have been discontinued?
    Thanks so much for your help!

  2. dzirbel

    Yes, I was told that last fall. I hate it because we used to use those too. What a waste the 50 ct is. Someone else needs to mfg these or they just need to make the blood ketone strips cheaper and more accessible.

  3. sooz

    Is this what you are looking for?
    The second link has a better price. I love Amazon!
    http://www.amazon.com/Ketostix-Reag...sr=8-1&keywords=Individually+wrapped+ketostix
    http://www.amazon.com/Bayer-Ketostix-Reagent-Strips-Wrapped/dp/B003WQ9LEA/ref=pd_sim_sbs_hpc_1

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine. The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin. Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin. Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium. Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked. Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection. In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended. Rates of DKA vary around the world. About 4% of people with type 1 diabetes in United Kingdom develop DKA a year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year. DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost universally fatal. The risk of death with adequate and timely treatment is currently around 1–4%. Up to 1% of children with DKA develop a complication known as cerebral edema. The symptoms of an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a period of about 24 hours. Predominant symptoms are nausea and vomiting, pronounced thirst, excessive urine production and abdominal pain that may be severe. Those who measure their glucose levels themselves may notice hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels). In severe DKA, breathing becomes labored and of a deep, gasping character (a state referred to as "Kussmaul respiration"). The abdomen may be tender to the point that an acute abdomen may be suspected, such as acute pancreatitis, appendicitis or gastrointestinal perforation. Coffee ground vomiting (vomiting of altered blood) occurs in a minority of people; this tends to originate from erosion of the esophagus. In severe DKA, there may be confusion, lethargy, stupor or even coma (a marked decrease in the level of consciousness). On physical examination there is usually clinical evidence of dehydration, such as a dry mouth and decreased skin turgor. If the dehydration is profound enough to cause a decrease in the circulating blood volume, tachycardia (a fast heart rate) and low blood pressure may be observed. Often, a "ketotic" odor is present, which is often described as "fruity", often compared to the smell of pear drops whose scent is a ketone. If Kussmaul respiration is present, this is reflected in an increased respiratory rate.....

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

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  1. holymolysoly

    I am on day 21 and my husband has remarked on several occasions that my breath is absolutely horrific and offensive. After some searching in this forum and online, it seems the most likely culprits are ketosis and acetone breath from the over-consumption of protein? I dont think either of these are possible culprits, but over the last few days, I have increased my starchy veggie consumption to two per day and my husband said it hasn't helped. I am a nursing mamma to an almost 2 year old, so I figured I could use the extra starchy veggie because he still nurses 4 to 6 times in a 24 hour period. I follow the meal template fairly strictly so I don't think I am lacking or overdoing it in terms of protein or plant based starches/carbs. I feel great and want to continue with a very slow reintroduction of just a few things but my husband said he can barely tolerate the next 9 days and he is looking forward to me eating "normally" and my bad breath issue resolving ASAP. Any suggestions ? I really would like to make this way of eating a lifestyle and the breath issue is the only impediment for me.

  2. ladyshanny

    On July 25, 2016 at 10:12 PM, holymolysoly said:



    I am on day 21 and my husband has remarked on several occasions that my breath is absolutely horrific and offensive. After some searching in this forum and online, it seems the most likely culprits are ketosis and acetone breath from the over-consumption of protein? I dont think either of these are possible culprits, but over the last few days, I have increased my starchy veggie consumption to two per day and my husband said it hasn't helped. I am a nursing mamma to an almost 2 year old, so I figured I could use the extra starchy veggie because he still nurses 4 to 6 times in a 24 hour period. I follow the meal template fairly strictly so I don't think I am lacking or overdoing it in terms of protein or plant based starches/carbs. I feel great and want to continue with a very slow reintroduction of just a few things but my husband said he can barely tolerate the next 9 days and he is looking forward to me eating "normally" and my bad breath issue resolving ASAP. Any suggestions ? I really would like to make this way of eating a lifestyle and the breath issue is the only impediment for me.
    Hi,
    The most common culprits is ketosis but could also be from dehydration causing dry mouth which allows bacteria to breed.
    If would be most helpful if you would outline your last few days of food including portion sizes, specific vegetables/fat types and quantities, fluids, exercise etc. We can take a look and see if anything stands out.

  3. holymolysoly

    Thanks so much for the response. I generally walk between 5-7 miles a day and sleep is disrupted with several night time wake-ups since my son does not sleep through the night yet.
    Here's what my days have looked like:
    M1 - 3 scrambled eggs cooked in ghee
    1/3 of a 6 inch in diameter acorn squash drizzled with some EVOO
    1 trader joe's bag of organic spinach, steamed to yield about a cup
    1/2 cup coconut milk in coffee
    M2 - 3 turkey meatballs (each a bit smaller than a tennis ball),
    1 cup home made complaint marinara
    2 cups green beans (steamed)
    2 tbsp ghee mixed into marinara after cooking
    M3 - 1 and a half boneless skinless chicken thighs cooked into a curry with
    1 cup broccoli, 1/2 cup red peppers
    Served atop cauli rice with 1-2 tbsp of ghee mixed in after cooking
    Yesterday
    M1 - Fritatta made with 2 eggs, 1/4 cup ground chicken, asparagus, zucchini, onions, spinach
    roasted potatoes with herbs
    1/2 cup coconut milk with coffee
    M2 - Buffalo chicken spaghetti squash bake (PaleoOMG recipe)
    Mixed greens with tomato and cucumber, EVOO and balsamic
    M3 - ground turkey with 2 cups of veggies (same as in morning fritatta) with 1-2 tbsp of ghee mixed in after cooking
    I practice good oral hygeine and brush and floss twice a day. I have been carrying around mouth wash and using that several times a day as well. I can't tell that my breath smells bad. Also, I never had this issue before W30, and do not have any underlying medical conditions that could be causing this. My husband mentioned bad breath to me the last time I did a W30 in October of 2013, but he doesn't recall it being as severe as it is now. About a week ago, I ate squash or potato at every meal for 2 or 3 days and my husband said it wasn't as rancid but that he could still smell it.

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