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Alcohol Lactic Acidosis Mechanism

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Alcoholism is disease, heres some resources to help you fight back: Responsible Drinking: A Moderation Management Approach http://amzn.to/1ZdgP9f I Need to Stop Drinking!: How to get back your self-respect. http://amzn.to/1VEqbeU Why You Drink and How to Stop: A Journey to Freedom: http://amzn.to/1Q8pAv2 Alcoholics Anonymous: The Big Book: http://amzn.to/1N0rttl Alcoholics: Dealing With an Alcoholic Family Member, Friend or Someone You Love: http://amzn.to/1j9cvH4 Watch more How to Understand Alcoholism videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/517398-... The question that has been asked of me is if alcoholism can lead to diabetes. And if so, how? The answer is chronic alcohol use can lead to diabetes. The way it leads to diabetes is that chronic alcohol use can cause inflammation of the pancreas, and chronic inflammation of the pancreas can affect the production of insulin in the body. And that's what causes diabetes. So that is why alcohol can be an actual primary determinate of diabetes. The other way that heavy alcohol use can lead to diabetes or exacerbate diabetes is that alcohol has a high content of sugar. So if one is already diabetic, alcohol is really not indicated because of its sugar content. So, again, alcohol can actually be a primary cause of diabetes by chronically inflaming the pancreas, or it can actually make diabetes worse and interfere with the diabetes treatment because of the high sugar content in alcohol.

Alcoholism And Lactic Acidosis

Learn more about the SDN Exhibition Forums for exclusive discounts and contests. So the way I understood this is that both alcohol metabolism and latcate to pyrvuate conversion require NAD, and with too much alcohol consumption the body uses up all the NAD for alcohol metabolism right? The part that I'm a bit troubled with this mechanism is that unless we are doing extreme exercise, we don't really generate lactic acid. In most cases, the body uses oxidative phosphorylation, right? So lactic acidosis will most likely occur when you drink alcohol and then do extreme exercise, correct? SDN Members don't see this ad. About the ads. My understanding is that high NADH levels from EtOH metab drives the pyruvate -> lactate conversion. So you don't need to be exercising +drinking, either will do it on their own. I actually enjoy your questions, though some things are really easily looked up. The several different causes of lactic acidosis: I actually enjoy your questions, though some things are really easily looked up. The several different causes of lactic acidosis: But the reasons behind why lactic acidosis occurs for these is significantly different.... For example, in exercise- lactic Continue reading >>

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  1. @BriMcS

    Has anyone experienced any of the following since doing the BP diet?
    1. An increased sensitivity to cold temperature
    2. A drop in body temperature when at rest; or at least the feeling of.
    3. Apparent deterioration in blood circulation
    Manifestations:
    Cold hands & feet at night & morning when resting
    Dry skin at fingertips
    The above applies to when at rest. The symptoms improve when exercising.
    It's odd - my brain feels rested, clean & active, while the rest of my body seems to slow down at rest.

  2. Reka

    This sounds like underactive thyroid to me.

  3. @BriMcS

    Is there a component in the BP diet that might reduce thyroid activity?
    Note no unusual fatigue, low mood or any other symptom of hypothyroidism (I just looked it up ).
    Anything to do with lack of carbs or fructose, or withdrawal from, I wonder..

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What is BASAL METABOLIC RATE? What does BASAL METABOLIC RATE mean? BASAL METABOLIC RATE meaning - BASAL METABOLIC RATE definition - BASAL METABOLIC RATE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. Basal metabolic rate (BMR) is the minimal rate of energy expenditure per unit time by endothermic animals at rest. It is reported in energy units per unit time ranging from watt (joule/second) to ml O2/min or joule per hour per kg body mass J/(hkg)). Proper measurement requires a strict set of criteria be met. These criteria include being in a physically and psychologically undisturbed state, in a thermally neutral environment, while in the post-absorptive state (i.e., not actively digesting food). In bradymetabolic animals, such as fish and reptiles, the equivalent term standard metabolic rate (SMR) is used. It follows the same criteria as BMR, but requires the documentation of the temperature at which the metabolic rate was measured. This makes BMR a variant of standard metabolic rate measurement that excludes the temperature data, a practice that has led to problems in defining "standard" rates of metabolism for many mammals. Metabolism comprises the processes that the body needs to function. Basal metabolic rate is the amount of energy expressed in calories that a person needs to keep the body functioning at rest. Some of those processes are breathing, blood circulation, controlling body temperature, cell growth, brain and nerve function, and contraction of muscles. Basal metabolic rate (BMR) affects the rate that a person burns calories and ultimately whether that individual maintains, gains, or loses weight. The basal metabolic rate accounts for about 60 to 75% of the daily calorie expenditure by individuals. It is influenced by several factors. BMR typically declines by 12% per decade after age 20, mostly due to loss of fat-free mass, although the variability between individuals is high. The body's generation of heat is known as thermogenesis and it can be measured to determine the amount of energy expended. BMR generally decreases with age and with the decrease in lean body mass (as may happen with aging). Increasing muscle mass has the effect of increasing BMR. Aerobic (resistance) fitness level, a product of cardiovascular exercise, while previously thought to have effect on BMR, has been shown in the 1990s not to correlate with BMR when adjusted for fat-free body mass. But anaerobic exercise does increase resting energy consumption (see "aerobic vs. anaerobic exercise"). Illness, previously consumed food and beverages, environmental temperature, and stress levels can affect one's overall energy expenditure as well as one's BMR. BMR is measured under very restrictive circumstances when a person is awake. An accurate BMR measurement requires that the person's sympathetic nervous system not be stimulated, a condition which requires complete rest. A more common measurement, which uses less strict criteria, is resting metabolic rate (RMR).

Metabolic Acidosis

Patient professional reference Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find one of our health articles more useful. See also separate Lactic Acidosis and Arterial Blood Gases - Indications and Interpretations articles. Description Metabolic acidosis is defined as an arterial blood pH <7.35 with plasma bicarbonate <22 mmol/L. Respiratory compensation occurs normally immediately, unless there is respiratory pathology. Pure metabolic acidosis is a term used to describe when there is not another primary acid-base derangement - ie there is not a mixed acid-base disorder. Compensation may be partial (very early in time course, limited by other acid-base derangements, or the acidosis exceeds the maximum compensation possible) or full. The Winter formula can be helpful here - the formula allows calculation of the expected compensating pCO2: If the measured pCO2 is >expected pCO2 then additional respiratory acidosis may also be present. It is important to remember that metabolic acidosis is not a diagnosis; rather, it is a metabolic derangement that in Continue reading >>

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  1. Oni1jz

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    You know when you are in full blow ketosis when: (self.keto)
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  2. Oni1jz

    effyourbeautystandards lol.

  3. kymandu

    Someone once told me to choose between a cup of butter and a bag of chips. I chose the former and was shunned.

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Chapter 221. Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Woods WA, Perina DG. Woods W.A., Perina D.G. Woods, William A., and Debra G. Perina.Chapter 221. Alcoholic Ketoacidosis. In: Tintinalli JE, Stapczynski J, Ma O, Cline DM, Cydulka RK, Meckler GD, T. Tintinalli J.E., Stapczynski J, Ma O, Cline D.M., Cydulka R.K., Meckler G.D., T Eds. Judith E. Tintinalli, et al.eds. Tintinalli's Emergency Medicine: A Comprehensive Study Guide, 7e New York, NY: McGraw-Hill; 2011. Accessed March 27, 2018. Woods WA, Perina DG. Woods W.A., Perina D.G. Woods, William A., and Debra G. Perina.. "Chapter 221. Alcoholic Ketoacidosis." Tintinalli's Emergency Medicine: A Comprehensive Study Guide, 7e Tintinalli JE, Stapczynski J, Ma O, Cline DM, Cydulka RK, Meckler GD, T. Tintinalli J.E., Stapczynski J, Ma O, Cline D.M., Cydulka R.K., Meckler G.D., T Eds. Judith E. Tintinalli, et al. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill, 2011, Alcoholic ketoacidosis is a wide anion gap metabolic acidosis most often associated with acute cessation of alcohol consumption after chronic alcohol abuse and is typically associated with nausea, vomiting, and vague GI complaints. 1 Alcohol metabolism combined with little or no glycogen reserves results in elevated ketoacid levels. Although alcoho Continue reading >>

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  1. Melissa_Carver

    Hi all! I’m new here and to ketosis, 10 days in and feeling great!
    So I was listening to the 2 Keto Dudes episode on sweeteners and they were talking about how one sweetener or the other would “knock them out of ketosis.” How do you know when you’ve been knocked out of ketosis? Is it a blood sugar thing? Or are you using a ketone tester (blood/breath/urine strip) to verify?
    (Note: I’m T1D, 25 years now, diagnosed as a kid. I just started wearing my CGM again today to try to level off the blood sugars and adjust my basal rate in my insulin pump as needed. If I can tell by blood sugar if I’m knocked out of ketosis that would perfect and so easy for me!)

    Thanks in advance everyone!

  2. Ernest

    Most likely from experimentation to test tolerance.
    I did a protein tolerance experiment and I’d test my ketone readings, using the Precision Xtra, a few times after eating a large amount of protein .
    I bet one could do the same experiment with sweeteners.

  3. Rian

    There are a few sure ways to know if you are in ketosis. In my opinion the most reliable and easiest way is to acquire a blood ketone test meter. Many people here like the Abbott Precision Xtra. The strips to test ketones are a few bucks each but if you try eBay you can usually get them a little cheaper. You will have to do a fair amount of testing in the beginning to see what foods do what to your ketone levels but after awhile you’ll become familiar with the do’s and don’t and will only need to test or occasion.

    Testing for ketones isn’t a requirement but it is nice to know what’s going on without resorting to guessing.

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