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Ada Easd Type 2 Diabetes

Selected Important Safety Information

Selected Important Safety Information

WARNING: RISK OF THYROID C-CELL TUMORS Liraglutide causes dose-dependent and treatment-duration-dependent thyroid C-cell tumors at clinically relevant exposures in both genders of rats and mice. It is unknown whether Victoza® causes thyroid C-cell tumors, including medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), in humans, as the human relevance of liraglutide-induced rodent thyroid C-cell tumors has not been determined. Victoza® is contraindicated in patients with a personal or family history of MTC and in patients with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndrome type 2 (MEN 2). Counsel patients regarding the potential risk for MTC with the use of Victoza® and inform them of symptoms of thyroid tumors (eg, a mass in the neck, dysphagia, dyspnea, persistent hoarseness). Routine monitoring of serum calcitonin or using thyroid ultrasound is of uncertain value for early detection of MTC in patients treated with Victoza®. Victoza® (liraglutide) injection 1.2 mg or 1.8 mg is indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and to reduce the risk of major adverse cardiovascular (CV) events (CV death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, or non-fatal stroke) in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus and established CV disease. Victoza® is not a substitute for insulin and should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus or diabetic ketoacidosis. Concurrent use with prandial insulin has not been studied. WARNING: RISK OF THYROID C-CELL TUMORS Liraglutide causes dose-dependent and treatment-duration-dependent thyroid C-cell tumors at clinically relevant exposures in both genders of rats and mice. It is unknown whether Victoza® causes thyroid C-cell tumors, including medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), in humans, as the hum Continue reading >>

Management Of Hyperglycemia In Type 2 Diabetes: A Patient-centered Approach

Management Of Hyperglycemia In Type 2 Diabetes: A Patient-centered Approach

Glycemic management in type 2 diabetes mellitus has become increasingly complex and, to some extent, controversial, with a widening array of pharmacological agents now available (1–5), mounting concerns about their potential adverse effects and new uncertainties regarding the benefits of intensive glycemic control on macrovascular complications (6–9). Many clinicians are therefore perplexed as to the optimal strategies for their patients. As a consequence, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) convened a joint task force to examine the evidence and develop recommendations for antihyperglycemic therapy in nonpregnant adults with type 2 diabetes. Several guideline documents have been developed by members of these two organizations (10) and by other societies and federations (2,11–15). However, an update was deemed necessary because of contemporary information on the benefits/risks of glycemic control, recent evidence concerning efficacy and safety of several new drug classes (16,17), the withdrawal/restriction of others, and increasing calls for a move toward more patient-centered care (18,19). This statement has been written incorporating the best available evidence and, where solid support does not exist, using the experience and insight of the writing group, incorporating an extensive review by additional experts (acknowledged below). The document refers to glycemic control; yet this clearly needs to be pursued within a multifactorial risk reduction framework. This stems from the fact that patients with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality; the aggressive management of cardiovascular risk factors (blood pressure and lipid therapy, antiplatelet treatment, and Continue reading >>

Ada, Easd Joint Statement On Hypoglycemia

Ada, Easd Joint Statement On Hypoglycemia

Home / Resources / Articles / ADA, EASD Joint Statement on Hypoglycemia ADA, EASD Joint Statement on Hypoglycemia Organizations publish recommendations for identifying and reporting hypoglycemia in clinical studies. Current research on hypoglycemia was examined by the International Hypoglycemia Study group to create proposed hypoglycemia levels. The study group also formed recommendations for which levels of hypoglycemia should be reported. Simon R. Heller, MD, professor of clinical diabetes, University of Sheffield, and director of research and development and honorary consultant physician at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust in the United Kingdom, said in a press release that, We formed our multi-disciplinary group 3 years ago with a goal to increase awareness of hypoglycemia as a major side effect of current treatment in diabetes by educational activities among the diabetes community including patients, their families and professionals to benefit patient care.We developed the idea that a reclassification of hypoglycemia would be useful and are delighted that both the ADA and European Association for the Study of Diabetes have agreed. A Joint Position Statement of the American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes agreed that a glucose concentration of less than 54 mg/dL. or 3.0 mmol/L should be reported in clinical trials of glucose-lowering drugs evaluated for the treatment of diabetes. The glycemic thresholds for symptoms of hypoglycemia and for glucose counterregulatory (including sympathoadrenal) responses to hypoglycemia, as plasma glucose concentrations fall, are not fixed in patients with insulin, sulfonylurea, or meglitinide (glinide)-treated diabetes. They are at higher glucose concentrations in those wi Continue reading >>

Management Of Hyperglycemia In Type 2 Diabetes, 2015: A Patient-centeredapproach: Update To A Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association Andthe European Association For The Study Of Diabetes.

Management Of Hyperglycemia In Type 2 Diabetes, 2015: A Patient-centeredapproach: Update To A Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association Andthe European Association For The Study Of Diabetes.

1. Diabetes Care. 2015 Jan;38(1):140-9. doi: 10.2337/dc14-2441. Management of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes, 2015: a patient-centeredapproach: update to a position statement of the American Diabetes Association andthe European Association for the Study of Diabetes. Inzucchi SE(1), Bergenstal RM(2), Buse JB(3), Diamant M(4), Ferrannini E(5),Nauck M(6), Peters AL(7), Tsapas A(8), Wender R(9), Matthews DR(10). (1)Section of Endocrinology, Yale University School of Medicine, Yale-New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT [email protected] (2)International Diabetes Center at Park Nicollet, Minneapolis, MN. (3)Division of Endocrinology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC. (4)Diabetes Center/Department of Internal Medicine, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. (5)Department of Medicine, University of Pisa School of Medicine, Pisa, Italy. (6)Diabeteszentrum Bad Lauterberg, Bad Lauterberg im Harz, Germany. (7)Division of Endocrinology, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA. (8)Second Medical Department, Aristotle University Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece. (9)American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA Department of Family and Community Medicine, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA. (10)Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Churchill Hospital, Oxford, U.K. National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), Oxford Biomedical Research Centre, Oxford, U.K. Harris Manchester College, University of Oxford, Oxford, U.K. Comment in Diabetes Care. 2015 Aug;38(8):e125-6. Diabetes Care. 2015 Aug;38(8):e127. Diabetes Care. 2015 Sep;38(9):e143. Diabetes Care. 2015 Sep;38(9):e141-2. Diabetes Care. 2015 Aug;38(8):e128-9. Dipeptidyl-Peptidase IV In Continue reading >>

Comparison Of The Diabetes Guidelines From The Ada/easd And The Aace/ace.

Comparison Of The Diabetes Guidelines From The Ada/easd And The Aace/ace.

1. J Am Pharm Assoc (2003). 2017 Mar - Apr;57(2):261-265. doi:10.1016/j.japh.2016.11.005. Epub 2017 Jan 5. Comparison of the diabetes guidelines from the ADA/EASD and the AACE/ACE. OBJECTIVE: To compare recent diabetes guideline updates from the AmericanDiabetes Association-European Association for the Study of Diabetes (ADA/EASD)and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists-American College ofEndocrinology (AACE/ACE).SUMMARY: The ADA/EASD guideline continues to advocate a stepwise approach toglycemic control that initiates with metformin and intensifies treatmentincrementally to dual and triple therapy at 3-month intervals until the patientis at their individualized goal. The AACE/ACE guideline provides a broader choiceof first-line medications, with a suggested hierarchy of use, and it encouragesinitial dual and triple therapy if the glycated hemoglobin (A1C) level is highenough at diagnosis (7.5%-9.0% and >9.0%, respectively). Target A1C levels arehigher in the ADA/EASD guideline (7.0%) compared with the AACE/ACE guideline(6.5%), although both statements indicate that targets should be adjusted tospecific clinical scenarios based on safety. Both guidelines now include the new sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors among their choices of acceptableglucose-lowering medications and endorse the overall cardiovascular andpancreatic safety of incretin therapies, and the safety of pioglitazone vis-a-visbladder cancer.CONCLUSION: In practice, the ADA/EASD guidelines tend to be more user-friendlyfor general practitioners because of the simple stepwise intensification regimen,whereas the AACE/ACE guidelines are more commonly followed by specialists(endocrinologists) because of the more aggressive A1C targets.Copyright 2017 American Pharmacists Association. Publ Continue reading >>

Management Of Hyperglycaemia In Type 2 Diabetes, 2015: A Patient-centred Approach. Update To A Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association And The European Association For The Study Of Diabetes

Management Of Hyperglycaemia In Type 2 Diabetes, 2015: A Patient-centred Approach. Update To A Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association And The European Association For The Study Of Diabetes

, Volume 58, Issue3 , pp 429442 | Cite as Management of hyperglycaemia in type 2 diabetes, 2015: a patient-centred approach. Update to a Position Statement of the American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes GuidelinesInsulinOral agentsTherapyType 2 diabetes Michaela Diamant is credited posthumously. Her experience, wisdom and wit were key factors in the creation of the original 2012 position statement; they continued to resonate with us during the writing of this update. S. E. Inzucchi and D. R. Matthews were co-chairs for the Position Statement Writing Group. R. M. Bergenstal, J. B. Buse, A. L. Peters and R. Wender were the Writing Group for the American Diabetes Association. M. Diamant, E. Ferrannini, M. Nauck and A. Tsapas were the Writing Group for the European Association for the Study of Diabetes. Simultaneous publication: This article is being simultaneously published in Diabetes Care and Diabetologia by the American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes. Copyright 2014 by the American Diabetes Association and Springer-Verlag. Copying with attribution allowed for any non-commercial use of the work. The online version of this article (doi: 10.1007/s00125-014-3460-0 ) contains an ESM slide set for this paper and an abridged version, which is available to authorised users. In 2012, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) published a position statement on the management of hyperglycaemia in patients with type 2 diabetes [ 1 , 2 ]. This was needed because of an increasing array of anti-hyperglycaemic drugs and growing uncertainty regarding their proper selection and sequence. Because of a paucity of comparative effectiveness res Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Management: Applying The Ada/easd Position Statement On Patient-centered Management

Type 2 Diabetes Management: Applying The Ada/easd Position Statement On Patient-centered Management

Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape.If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. Log out Cancel Inzucchi SE, Bergenstal RM, Buse JB, et al. Management of hyperglycaemia in type 2 diabetes: a patient-centered approach. Position statement of the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD). Diabetologia. 2012;55:1577-1596. Abstract Inzucchi SE, Bergenstal RM, Buse JB, et al; American Diabetes Association (ADA); European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD). Management of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes: a patient-centered approach: position statement of the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD). Diabetes Care. 2012;35:1364-1379. Abstract Institute of Medicine (IOM). Committee on Quality of Health Care in America: Institute of Medicine. Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press; 2001. Accessed May 3, 2013. Ismail-Beigi F, Moghissi E, Tiktin M, Hirsch IB, Inzucchi SE, Genuth S. Individualizing glycemic targets in type 2 diabetes mellitus: implications of recent clinical trials. Ann Intern Med. 2011;154:554-549. Abstract ClinicalTrials.gov. A Comparative Effectiveness Study of Major Glycemia-lowering Medications for Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes (GRADE). NCT01794143. Accessed May 3, 2013. Sasali A, Leahy JL. Insulin therapy for type 2 diabetes. Curr Diab Rep. 2003;3:378-385. Abstract Yki-Jrvinen H, Ryysy L, Nikkil K, Tulokas T, Vanamo R, Heikkil M. Comparison of bedtime insulin regimens in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A randomized, controlled trial. Ann Intern Med. 1999;130:389-396. Abstract Avils-S Continue reading >>

Aace Algorithm Offers New Guidance On Managing T2dm

Aace Algorithm Offers New Guidance On Managing T2dm

AACE Algorithm Offers New Guidance on Managing T2DM How Does It Compare With ADA/EASD Guidelines? In creating the ADA/EASD position statement,[ 2 ] each organization selected 5 members. There were 5 members from the United States and 5 from Europe. We met over 2 years to do our best to create an evidence-based position statement. We reviewed the world literature on the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The available data are not definitive, and although we know how individual drugs work, it is very hard to come up with best practices for the pathways to use those drugs. For many of us, our practice situations vary, and that may dictate how and when we can use different drugs. The starting premise of the ADA/EASD position statement is that we should provide patient-focused care, and that inherent in providing patient-focused care, algorithms are impossible. Clinicians need to determine the patient's needs and preferences and then treat them appropriately. In the position statement, we review the literature, provide the background information, and then come up with our position on the various treatments for hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes. We discuss 5 domains of treatment: efficacy, hypoglycemia, weight gain, cost, and side effects. We provide a basic algorithm for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and discuss different patient situations, such as an elderly patient, a patient in whom the risk for hypoglycemia is high, a patient for whom financial factors are very significant, etc. We discuss different clinical scenarios and try to help practitioners look at their own patients and decide what to do. After writing the statement, it was reviewed by approximately 50 external reviewers and also by the steering committees and executive committees of ADA and the EASD. We incorpor Continue reading >>

Ada/easd Guidelines Hyperglycemia Management In Type 2 Diabetes | Ndei

Ada/easd Guidelines Hyperglycemia Management In Type 2 Diabetes | Ndei

If A1C target is not achieved after 3 months of dual therapy, proceed to Triple Therapy If A1C target is not achieved after 3 months of triple therapy and patient (1) is on oral combination, move to injectable; (2) on GLP-1, add basal insulin; or (3) on optimally titrated basal insulin, add GLP-1 or mealtime insulin. Refractory patients: consider adding TZD or SGLT2. Basal insulin + mealtime insulin or GLP-1 If not controlled after FBG target is reached or if dose >0.5 U/kg/d Add 1 rapid insulin injection before largest meal 4 U, 0.1 U/kg, or 10% basal dose. If A1C <8%, consider decreasing basal dose by same amount Increase dose by 1-2U or 10-15% once to twice weekly until SMBG target is reached Decrease corresponding dose by 2-4U or 10-20% for hypoglycemia Divide current basal dose into 2/3 AM, 1/3 PM, or 1/2 AM, 1/2 PM Increase dose by 1-2U or 10-15% once to twice weekly to reach SMBG target Decrease corresponding dose by 2-4U or 10-20% for hypoglycemia Add 2 rapid insulin injections before meals: basal-bolus 4 U, 0.1 U/kg, or 10% basal dose/meal. If A1C <8%, consider decreasing basal by same amount Increase dose by 1-2U or 10-15% once to twice weekly until SMBG target is reached Decrease corresponding dose by 2-4U or 10-20% for hypoglycemia Continue reading >>

Easd, Ada Recommendations Aimed At Improving Safety, Efficacy Of Cgm

Easd, Ada Recommendations Aimed At Improving Safety, Efficacy Of Cgm

EASD, ADA Recommendations Aimed at Improving Safety, Efficacy of CGM EASD, ADA Recommendations Aimed at Improving Safety, Efficacy of CGM As the use of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) devices becomes more prevalent worldwide, several professional medical organizations have banded together to examine barriers to use, including cost, reliability, and lack of standardization. Two organizations the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) Diabetes Technology Working Group have penned a joint statement, published in Diabetologia, examining the most efficacious ways to create systemic improvement, increase clinical use, and standardize device regulations. Growing evidence supports the benefits of using CGM , noted John R. Petrie, MD, of the Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences at the University of Glasgow in the United Kingdom, and colleagues. [T]he studies and clinical trials reviewed suggest that adults with type 1 diabetes who wear a CGM device can improve glycemic control. Dr Petrie and colleagues continued, Our goal was to assess current clinical and regulatory aspects of CGM within this rapidly evolving landscape in order to encourage cycles of improvement in device performance, clinical outcomes, and utilization. Following a meta-analysis of current studies examining CGM use in diabetes, the researchers were able to organize their recommendations according to the following themes: Continue reading >>

Silvio E Inzucchi, Md

Silvio E Inzucchi, Md

Furie KL, Viscoli CM, Gorman M, Ford GA, Young LH, Inzucchi SE, Guarino PD, Lovejoy AM, Conwit R, Tanne D, Kernan WN, IRIS Trial Investigators.: Effects of pioglitazone on cognitive function in patients with a recent ischaemic stroke or TIA: a report from the IRIS trial. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2018 Jan; 2017 Sep 22. PMID: 28939682 Kohler S, Lee J, George JT, Inzucchi SE, Zinman B: Bladder cancer in the EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial. Diabetologia. 2017 Dec; 2017 Sep 14. PMID: 28913551 Kernan WN, Viscoli CM, Dearborn JL, Kent DM, Conwit R, Fayad P, Furie KL, Gorman M, Guarino PD, Inzucchi SE, Stuart A, Young LH, Insulin Resistance Intervention After Stroke (IRIS) Trial Investigators.: Targeting Pioglitazone Hydrochloride Therapy After Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack According to Pretreatment Risk for Stroke or Myocardial Infarction. JAMA Neurol. 2017 Nov 1. PMID: 28975241 Young LH, Viscoli CM, Inzucchi SE, Kernan WN: Response by Young et al to Letters Regarding Article, "Cardiac Outcomes After Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack: Effects of Pioglitazone in Patients With Insulin Resistance Without Diabetes Mellitus". Circulation. 2017 Oct 17. PMID: 29038213 Epstein KA, Viscoli CM, Spence JD, Young LH, Inzucchi SE, Gorman M, Gerstenhaber B, Guarino PD, Dixit A, Furie KL, Kernan WN, IRIS Trial Investigators.: Smoking cessation and outcome after ischemic stroke or TIA. Neurology. 2017 Oct 17; 2017 Sep 8. PMID: 28887378 Erfe JM, Perry A, McClaskey J, Inzucchi SE, James WS, Eid T, Bronen RA, Mahajan A, Huttner A, Santos F, Spencer D: Long-term outcomes of tissue-based ACTH-antibody assay-guided transsphenoidal resection of pituitary adenomas in Cushing disease. J Neurosurg. 2017 Oct 13; 2017 Oct 13. PMID: 29027854 Inzucchi SE, Kosiborod M: Oral Pharmacologic Trea Continue reading >>

New Easd Ada Diabetes Treatment Goals

New Easd Ada Diabetes Treatment Goals

New EASD ADA Diabetes Treatment Goals A new position statement for treatment of type 2 diabetes treatment focuses on the individual patient rather than a one number fits all HbA1c target. The new recommendations from the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA), announced in a news conference at the EASDs 48th Annual Meeting, put the patients condition, desires, abilities, and tolerances at the center of the decision-making process about the goals and methods of treatment. Our recommendations are less prescriptive than and not as algorithmic as prior guidelines, the authors write. What were trying to do is encourage people to really engage in a complex world with the patient, given the variety of choices, said David Matthews, MD, DPhil, from the Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism at Churchill Hospital and the National Institute for Health Research, And the algorithmic approach, in our view, has finally had its day. We cant do that anymore. Dr. Matthews said the EASD and ADA writing group decided not to issue guidelines but rather to take positions and issue recommendations. Published guidelines tend to be algorithmic, yet few clinicians prescribe by algorithmsand so theres a lot of lip service to explicit guidelines, he said. Furthermore, theres a danger in guidelines in that some payers and regulatory bodies focus on them as an absolute measure of success or failure and pay accordingly, or not. So for this reason, the authors did not put a specific HbA1c number in their position statement, and in addition, they did not want to give the impression that it is all right for the number to drift upward if it is below a certain level. On the other hand, a lower HbA1c value may not be best for som Continue reading >>

Home - Ada Daily News

Home - Ada Daily News

Major trial results to be released at 78th Scientific Sessions Maureen Gannon, PhD, Chair of the Scientific Sessions Meeting Planning Committee, provides a preview of the American Diabetes Associations 78th Scientific Sessions, which will be held June 22-26 in Orlando, Florida. The meeting will feature results from more major diabetes trials than any year in recent memory. Read more Symposium will highlight real-world diabetes evidence While randomized controlled clinical trials (RCT) are the gold standard for establishing the safety and efficacy of new diabetes treatments, real-world observations can add important information that RCTs may not provide. Lawrence Blonde, MD, is one of five experts who will review the latest real-world diabetes findings and discuss the advantages and limitations of real-world evidence during a Scientific Sessions symposium on Friday, June 22. Read more New TEDDY results promise to change the conversation about type 1 diabetes in youth Early findings from the Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) study, the largest and most comprehensive study of events leading up to diabetes in children, have already changed our understanding of type 1 diabetes in youth. The next analysis of genetic and environmental factors affecting the etiology and pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes will likely shift clinical paradigms once again, according to Jeffrey Krischer, PhD, a TEDDY study coordinator. Read more Researchers to present final follow-up data from VADT Final observational follow-up data from the Veterans Administration Diabetes Trial (VADT) will be reported on Sunday, June 24, at the Scientific Sessions. There will almost certainly be more subanalyses of the VADT findings published in the next few years, but this is the final pre Continue reading >>

Pharmacologic Therapy For Type 2 Diabetes: Synopsis Of The 2017 American Diabetes Association Standards Of Medical Care In Diabetes Free

Pharmacologic Therapy For Type 2 Diabetes: Synopsis Of The 2017 American Diabetes Association Standards Of Medical Care In Diabetes Free

Abstract Description: The American Diabetes Association (ADA) annually updates the Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes to provide clinicians, patients, researchers, payers, and other interested parties with evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and management of patients with diabetes. Methods: For the 2017 Standards, the ADA Professional Practice Committee updated previous MEDLINE searches performed from 1 January 2016 to November 2016 to add, clarify, or revise recommendations based on new evidence. The committee rates the recommendations as A, B, or C, depending on the quality of evidence, or E for expert consensus or clinical experience. The Standards were reviewed and approved by the Executive Committee of the ADA Board of Directors, which includes health care professionals, scientists, and laypersons. Feedback from the larger clinical community informed revisions. Recommendations: This synopsis focuses on recommendations from the 2017 Standards about pharmacologic approaches to glycemic treatment of type 2 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) first released its Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes for health professionals in 1989. These practice guidelines provide an extensive set of evidence-based recommendations that are updated annually for the diagnosis and management of patients with diabetes. The 2017 Standards cover all aspects of patient care (1); this guideline synopsis focuses on pharmacologic approaches for patients with type 2 diabetes. Pharmacologic Therapy for Type 2 Diabetes: Recommendations Initial Treatment Approach: Metformin Assessing Response and Deciding to Intensify Therapy Recent Evidence From Cardiovascular Outcomes Trials Recent Warnings About Pharmacotherapies Insulin Therapy Continue reading >>

Initiation And Adjustment Of Therapy In Type 2 Diabetes

Initiation And Adjustment Of Therapy In Type 2 Diabetes

Initiation and Adjustment of Therapy in Type 2 Diabetes US Endocrinology, 2007;(1):15-9 DOI: This article is a synopsis of a consensus statement published in 2006 by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD). The original article, Management of Hyperglycemia in Type 2 Diabetes: a Consensus Algorithm for the Initiation and Adjustment of Therapy, can be accessed in its entirety at www.diabetes.org or www.easd.org . The consensus statement was authored on behalf of the ADA and the EASD by David M Nathan, MD, John B Buse, MD, PhD, Mayer B Davidson, MD, Robert J Heine, MD, Rury R Holman, FRCP, Robert Sherwin, MD, and Bernard Zinman, MD. The epidemic of type 2 diabetes in the late 20th/early 21st centuries, and the recognition that achieving specific glycemic goals can substantially reduce morbidity, have made the effective treatment of hyperglycemia a top priority.13 Maintaining glycemic levels as close to the non-diabetic range as possible has been demonstrated to have a powerful beneficial impact on diabetes-specific complications in the setting of type 1 diabetes4,5 and type 2 diabetes.68 Intensive glycemic management resulting in lower hemoglobin (A1c) levels has also been shown to have a beneficial effect on cardiovascular disease (CVD) in type 1 diabetes;9,10 however, the role of intensive diabetes therapy on CVD in type 2 diabetes remains under active investigation.11,12 The development of new classes of blood glucose-lowering medications to supplement older therapies has provided an increased number of choices for practitioners and patients, but perhaps heightened uncertainty regarding the most appropriate means of treating this widespread disease. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the European As Continue reading >>

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