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Acidosis Symptoms

Acidosis

Acidosis

What is acidosis? Acidosis is a serious metabolic imbalance in which there is an excess of acidic molecules in the body. This can occur as a result of acid overproduction, impaired acid transport, acid underexcretion, or any combination. With overproduction, the body makes too much acid. This can occur in sepsis, a life-threatening widespread infection in which the body makes too much lactic acid. With underexcretion, the body is unable to rid itself of excess acid. This can occur in renal failure and various lung diseases. In renal failure, the kidneys are unable to cleanse the blood of acid. In pulmonary diseases, the lungs are unable to exhale sufficient carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide is a gaseous form of acid that builds up in the bloodstream. Both conditions may coexst in a number of serious diseases, such as pneumonia and pulmonary edema (fluid in the lungs), which is seen in a particularly severe form of heart failure. Doctors diagnose acidosis with blood tests, the most common of which is known as a pH test. The normal pH of the body is 7.4 (a lower pH value is more acidic, higher pH is more alkaline). Acidosis is defined as a pH less than 7.4. Specific blood tests may be used to identify particular acids, such as lactic acid. The treatment of acidosis depends on its cause. Therapy may range from simple interventions, such as oral medications and intravenous fluids, to invasive measures, such as dialysis and surgery. The outcome of acidosis depends on its severity. Seek immediate medical care (call 911) for serious symptoms, such as rapid breathing, confusion, shortness of breath, and lethargy, especially in the setting of lung disease, kidney disease, or other diseases that can cause acidosis. Seek prompt medical care if you are being treated for chronic acidos Continue reading >>

Too Much Acid In The Body In Dogs

Too Much Acid In The Body In Dogs

Metabolic Acidosis in Dogs The lungs and kidneys help to maintain a delicate balance of acid and alkali in the blood, both normal components of a healthy blood supply. A condition of metabolic acidosis occurs when there is an increase in the levels of acid in the blood, which ultimately accumulates to abnormal levels in the body, causing various problems. This can occur due to loss of bicarbonate (alkali); acid production by increased metabolism; excess acid introduction into the body through an external source like ethylene glycol (resulting in ethylene toxicity); or by the kidney’s inability to excrete acid, which it normally does to maintain its level. Metabolic acidosis can occur in dogs of any age, size, gender, or breed. Symptoms and Types Symptoms can vary considerably, especially if your dog is concurrently suffering from other health problems like diabetes or kidney disease. The most common symptoms that you may notice in a dog that is suffering from metabolic acidosis include: Depression (especially if acidosis is severe) Confusion Causes Diagnosis You will need to give a thorough history of your dog's health, including a background history of symptoms, and possible incidents that might have precipitated this condition (such as suspected antifreeze ingestion, or use of aspirin to treat your dog). The history you provide may give your veterinarian clues as to which organs are causing secondary symptoms. Your veterinarian will then perform a thorough physical examination on your dog. For the diagnosis of metabolic acidosis, a compete blood chemical profile will be performed to check the levels of acid and alkali in the body. The next step is to find the underlying cause of the metabolic acidosis in order to treat that problem along with correcting the acid lev Continue reading >>

Congenital Lactic Acidosis

Congenital Lactic Acidosis

Causes Most cases of congenital lactic acidosis are caused by one or more inherited mutations of genes within the DNA located within the nucleus (nDNA) or within the mitochondria (mtDNA) of cells. Genes carry the genetic instructions for cells. A mutation is a change in a gene located in nuclear or mitochondrial DNA that may cause disease. Mutations of nDNA, which occur in cellular chromosomes, can be inherited through different forms of transmission of the mutation, including autosomal recessive, autosomal dominant or X-linked recessive inheritance. Mutations affecting the genes for mitochondria (mtDNA) are inherited from the mother. MtDNA that is found in sperm cells is typically lost during fertilization. As a result, all human mtDNA comes from the mother. An affected mother will pass on the mutation to all her children, but only her daughters will pass on the mutation to their children. Mitochondria, which are found by the hundreds or thousands in the cells of the body, particularly in muscle and nerve tissue, carry the blueprints for regulating energy production. As cells divide, the number of normal mtDNA and mutated mtDNA are distributed in an unpredictable fashion among different tissues. Consequently, mutated mtDNA accumulates at different rates among different tissues in the same individual. Thus, family members who have the identical mutation in mtDNA may exhibit a variety of different symptoms and signs at different times and to varying degrees of severity. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) deficiency is a genetic mitochondrial disease of carbohydrate metabolism that is due to a mutation in nDNA. It is generally considered to be the most common cause of biochemically proven cases of congenital lactic acidosis. PDC deficiency can be inherited as an autosom Continue reading >>

Newsletter: D-lactic Acidosis

Newsletter: D-lactic Acidosis

AddthisShare | Facebook Twitter Pinterest Gmail var addthis_exclude = 'print, email'; D-Lactic Acidosis Craig Petersen RD, CNSC D-lactic acidosis, also referred to as D-lactate encephalopathy, is a rare neurological syndrome that can occur in individuals with short bowel syndrome (SBS) or following jejuno-ileal bypass surgery. A home parenteral or enteral nutrition (HPEN) consumer may develop the neurological symptoms—which can be quite striking—several months to years after the initial diagnosis of a malabsorption disorder. Misdiagnosis of D-lactic acidosis is common, as the neurologic symptoms are sometimes attributed to other causes. With proper diagnosis, D-lactic acidosis can be treated promptly and the symptoms will usually resolve within several hours to a few days. Symptoms Neurological symptoms associated with this syndrome typically present after the ingestion of enteral formula or food high in carbohydrates (either simple or complex) and include altered mental status, slurred speech, confusion, disorientation, difficulty concentrating, memory deficits, excessive sleepiness, weakness, abnormal gait, problems with muscle coordination, and even coma. Individuals with D-lactic acidosis often appear to be inebriated, or drunk, though they may not have consumed alcohol and alcohol is not detected in the blood. Behavior during episodes of D-lactic acidosis can be aggressive, hostile, or abusive. Neurological symptoms are episodic and may last from hours to days. They are accompanied by metabolic acidosis and elevation of plasma D-lactic acid (also referred to as D-lactate) concentration. Cause In D-lactic acidosis, carbohydrate that is not properly absorbed is fermented by an abnormal bacterial flora in the colon. This fermentation produces excessive amounts of Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis Clinical Presentation

Metabolic Acidosis Clinical Presentation

Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. These changes should be made cautiously under close medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin, including Fiasp®, and may be life-threatening. Increase glucose monitoring with changes to: insulin dosage, co-administered glucose lowering medications, meal pattern, physical activity; and in patients with renal impairment or hepatic impairment or hypoglycemia unawareness. As with all insulins, Fiasp® use can lead to life-threatening hypokalemia, which then may cause respiratory paralysis, ventricular arrhythmia, and death. Monitor potassium levels in patients at risk for hypokalemia and treat if indicated. Fluid retention and heart failure can occur with concomitant use of thiazolidinediones (TZDs), which are PPAR-gamma agonists, and insulin, including Fiasp®. Patients should be observed for signs and symptoms of heart failure. If heart failure occurs, dosage reduction or discontinuation of the TZD must be considered. Continue reading >>

Respiratory Acidosis: Causes, Symptoms, And Treatment

Respiratory Acidosis: Causes, Symptoms, And Treatment

Respiratory acidosis develops when air exhaled out of the lungs does not adequately exchange the carbon dioxide formed in the body for the inhaled oxygen in air. There are many conditions or situations that may lead to this. One of the conditions that can reduce the ability to adequately exhale carbon dioxide (CO2) is chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or COPD. CO2 that is not exhaled can shift the normal balance of acids and bases in the body toward acidic. The CO2 mixes with water in the body to form carbonic acid. With chronic respiratory acidosis, the body partially makes up for the retained CO2 and maintains acid-base balance near normal. The body's main response is an increase in excretion of carbonic acid and retention of bicarbonate base in the kidneys. Medical treatment for chronic respiratory acidosis is mainly treatment of the underlying illness which has hindered breathing. Treatment may also be applied to improve breathing directly. Respiratory acidosis can also be acute rather than chronic, developing suddenly from respiratory failure. Emergency medical treatment is required for acute respiratory acidosis to: Regain healthful respiration Restore acid-base balance Treat the causes of the respiratory failure Here are some key points about respiratory acidosis. More detail and supporting information is in the main article. Respiratory acidosis develops when decreased breathing fails to get rid of CO2 formed in the body adequately The pH of blood, as a measure of acid-base balance, is maintained near normal in chronic respiratory acidosis by compensating responses in the body mainly in the kidney Acute respiratory acidosis requires emergency treatment Tipping acid-base balance to acidosis When acid levels in the body are in balance with the base levels in t Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis Symptoms And Treatment

Metabolic Acidosis Symptoms And Treatment

Do you often feel tired and out of breath? Find yourself breathing rapidly after light exercise, but still feel like you’re suffocating? These are symptoms of metabolic acidosis, a potentially dangerous condition you should not ignore. Metabolic acidosis is a temporary condition where your blood pH drops to dangerously low levels. A healthy body can compensate, but If you are older, or have health challenges, your body may not be able to compensate for the acidity. If this happens to you frequently, you need to take action. To fight metabolic acidosis, you need to raise the pH of your blood back to a safe level. A recent clinical study reveals that one of the best ways to do this is to drink a glass of alkaline water. Four Types of Metabolic Acidosis Respiratory Acidosis: happens when your blood has high levels of CO2 in it. CO2 acidifies your blood, and your body responds by breathing rapidly and deeply in an effort to expel the CO2 from your lungs. A normally healthy person will experience respiratory acidosis when they exercise. But if you’re health is poor, or you don’t get much exercise, even regular daily activities can leave you feeling out of breath. Hyperchloremic acidosis: happens when your body’s supply of sodium bicarbonate gets too low. It is caused by dehydration and severe diarrhea, which drains your body of electrolytes. Diabetic acidosis: Also called diabetic ketoacidosis or DKA occurs with type 1 diabetes. It happens when substances known as ketones build up in your body. Lactic acidosis: Is caused by a buildup of lactic acid in the body. It is most commonly caused by vigorous exercise, but lactic acidosis can be caused by any of these conditions: Alcohol Tumors Vigorous exercise Liver failure Low blood sugar Salicylates (some medications) Lack Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis Nclex Review Notes

Metabolic Acidosis Nclex Review Notes

Are you studying metabolic acidosis and need to know a mnemonic on how to remember the causes? This article will give you a clever mnemonic and simplify the signs and symptoms and nursing interventions on how to remember metabolic acidosis for nursing lecture exams and NCLEX. In addition, you will learn how to differentiate metabolic acidosis from metabolic alkalosis. Don’t forget to take the metabolic acidosis and metabolic alkalosis quiz. This article will cover: Metabolic acidosis simplified Lab values expected with metabolic acidosis Causes of metabolic acidosis Signs and symptoms of metabolic acidosis Nursing interventions for metabolic acidosis Lecture on Metabolic Acidosis Metabolic Acidosis Metabolic Acidosis in Simple Terms: a metabolic problem due to the buildup of acid in the body fluids which affects the bicarbonate (HCO3 levels) either from: increased acid production (ex: DKA where ketones (acids) increase in the body which decreases bicarbonate) decreased acid excretion (ex: renal failure where there is high amount of waste left in the body which causes the acids to increase and bicarb can’t control imbalance) loss of too much bicarb (diarrhea) When this acidic phenomena is taking place in the body other systems will try to compensate to increase the bicarb back to normal. One system that tries to compensate is the respiratory system. In order to compensate, the respiratory system will cause the body to hyperventilate by increasing breathing through Kussmaul’s respirations. Kussmaul respirations are deep, rapid breathes. The body hopes this will help expel CO2 (an acid) which will “hopefully” increase the pH back to normal. Lab values expected in Metabolic Acidosis: HCO3: decreased <22 Blood pH: decreased <7.35 CO2: <35 or normal (may be normal b Continue reading >>

> Renal Tubular Acidosis

> Renal Tubular Acidosis

Each time our internal organs do something, such as digesting food or healing damaged tissue, chemical reactions take place in the body's cells. These reactions cause acid to go into the bloodstream. Normally, the kidneys remove excess acid from blood, but certain diseases, genetic defects, or drugs can damage a kidney's ability to do this important job. This can allow too much acid to build up in the blood and cause problems. When this happens, it's called renal tubular acidosis (RTA). Without treatment, RTA can affect a child's growth and cause kidney stones, fatigue, muscle weakness, and other symptoms. Over time, untreated acidosis can lead to long-term problems like bone disease, kidney disease, and kidney failure. Fortunately, such complications are rare, since most cases of RTA can be effectively treated with medicines or by treating the condition that's causing the acid to build up. The kidneys are a pair of bean-shaped organs located toward the back of the abdominal cavity, just above the waist. The kidneys remove waste products and extra water from the food a person eats, returning chemicals the body needs (such as sodium, phosphorus, and potassium) back into the bloodstream. The extra water combines with other waste to become urine (pee). The main functional units of the kidneys, where the blood filtering happens, are tiny structures called nephrons. Each kidney has about a million nephrons, and each nephron has a renal tubule, a tube where the acid and waste products filtered from the blood are secreted into urine. Having a disease or defect can interfere with how the renal tubules function, which can lead to RTA. There are a few different kinds of RTA. The first two types are named for the part of the renal tubule in which the damage or defect is found. Typ Continue reading >>

Acidosis

Acidosis

When your body fluids contain too much acid, it’s known as acidosis. Acidosis occurs when your kidneys and lungs can’t keep your body’s pH in balance. Many of the body’s processes produce acid. Your lungs and kidneys can usually compensate for slight pH imbalances, but problems with these organs can lead to excess acid accumulating in your body. The acidity of your blood is measured by determining its pH. A lower pH means that your blood is more acidic, while a higher pH means that your blood is more basic. The pH of your blood should be around 7.4. According to the American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC), acidosis is characterized by a pH of 7.35 or lower. Alkalosis is characterized by a pH level of 7.45 or higher. While seemingly slight, these numerical differences can be serious. Acidosis can lead to numerous health issues, and it can even be life-threatening. There are two types of acidosis, each with various causes. The type of acidosis is categorized as either respiratory acidosis or metabolic acidosis, depending on the primary cause of your acidosis. Respiratory acidosis Respiratory acidosis occurs when too much CO2 builds up in the body. Normally, the lungs remove CO2 while you breathe. However, sometimes your body can’t get rid of enough CO2. This may happen due to: chronic airway conditions, like asthma injury to the chest obesity, which can make breathing difficult sedative misuse deformed chest structure Metabolic acidosis Metabolic acidosis starts in the kidneys instead of the lungs. It occurs when they can’t eliminate enough acid or when they get rid of too much base. There are three major forms of metabolic acidosis: Diabetic acidosis occurs in people with diabetes that’s poorly controlled. If your body lacks enough insulin, keton Continue reading >>

Rumen Acidosis

Rumen Acidosis

Managing disease can be a frustrating proposition. This Guide can help you identify which disease is damaging your cattle. Rumen acidosis is a metabolic disease of cattle. Like most metabolic diseases it is important to remember that for every cow that shows clinical signs, there will be several more which are affected sub-clinically. Acidosis is said to occur when the pH of the rumen falls to less than 5.5 (normal is 6.5 to 7.0). In many cases the pH can fall even lower. The fall in pH has two effects. Firstly, the rumen stops moving, becoming atonic. This depresses appetite and production. Secondly, the change in acidity changes the rumen flora, with acid-producing bacteria taking over. They produce more acid, making the acidosis worse. The increased acid is then absorbed through the rumen wall, causing metabolic acidosis, which in severe cases can lead to shock and death. Cause The primary cause of acidosis is feeding a high level of rapidly digestible carbohydrate, such as barley and other cereals. Acute acidosis, often resulting in death, is most commonly seen in ‘barley beef’ animals where cattle have obtained access to excess feed. In dairy cattle, a milder form, sub-acute acidosis, is seen as a result of feeding increased concentrates compared to forage. Symptoms Acute acidosis often results in death, although illness and liver abscesses may be seen before hand. Cattle may become depressed, go off feed, have an elevated heart rate or diarrhea. Sub-acute: Reduced feed intake Poor body condition and weight loss Unexplained diarrhoea Temperature Pulse rate and respiratory rate may rise Lethargy Treatment Because subacute ruminal acidosis is not detected at the time of depressed ruminal pH, there is no specific treatment for it. Secondary conditions may be treat Continue reading >>

Causes For Acidosis, Metabolic, Lactic, Respiratory, Renal Acidosis And Diabetic Ketoacidosis Symptoms

Causes For Acidosis, Metabolic, Lactic, Respiratory, Renal Acidosis And Diabetic Ketoacidosis Symptoms

Acidosis simply means your body’s fluids have an unhealthy excess of acid. This either occurs from a buildup of acid or a loss of bicarbonate (base). Your lungs and kidneys are the maintenance organs for a healthy “acid to base” ph balance. Primary categories causing symptoms of acidosis: Metabolic acidosis is excessive acidity of your blood. It can be caused by many conditions or situations, notably: Primary symptom for metabolic acidosis is rapid breathing. Confusion or lethargy may also occur. Severe metabolic acidosis can cause death. Lactic acidosis is a build up of lactic acid in your bloodstream, generally produced when oxygen levels drop. It’s most common cause is intensive or prolonged exercise. Yet, it can also be caused by: cancer alcohol hypoglycemia respiratory failure medications ~ salicylates, metformin Symptoms of lactic acidosis are: Diabetic acidosis, also termed diabetic ketoacidosis, is usually a diabetes complication occurring when glucose (sugar) is unavailable due to insufficient insulin. So instead, fat is used as your energy source, producing a ketone build up. This is rarely a complication of type 2 diabetes. Diabetic ketoacidosis might as well be caused by: Symptoms of diabetic acidosis: mental stupor rapid breathing muscle stiffness, aching Left untreated, it can be fatal. Respiratory acidosis happens when your lungs can’t remove all of your body’s carbon dioxide (an acid) production. It is also referred to as hypercapnic acidosis or carbon dioxide acidosis. Causes of respiratory acidosis include: scoliosis ~ makes lungs less efficient nerve & muscle diseases affecting inflation, deflation of lungs Chronic respiratory acidosis leads to a stabilized ph, because your kidneys adjusts to help restore a healthy balance. But, in the cas Continue reading >>

For Patients And Visitors

For Patients And Visitors

Definition Metabolic acidosis is a condition in which there is too much acid in the body fluids. Alternative Names Acidosis - metabolic Causes Metabolic acidosis occurs when the body produces too much acid. It can also occur when the kidneys are not removing enough acid from the body. There are several types of metabolic acidosis. Diabetic acidosis develops when acidic substances, known as ketone bodies, build up in the body. This most often occurs with uncontrolled type 1 diabetes. It is also called diabetic ketoacidosis and DKA. Hyperchloremic acidosis results from excessive loss of sodium bicarbonate from the body. This can occur with severe diarrhea. Lactic acidosis results from a buildup of lactic acid. It can be caused by: Alcohol Cancer Exercising intensely Liver failure Medicines, such as salicylates Prolonged lack of oxygen from shock, heart failure, or severe anemia Seizures Other causes of metabolic acidosis include: Kidney disease (distal renal tubular acidosis and proximal renal tubular acidosis) Poisoning by aspirin, ethylene glycol (found in antifreeze), or methanol Severe dehydration Symptoms Most symptoms are caused by the underlying disease or condition that is causing the metabolic acidosis. Metabolic acidosis itself most often causes rapid breathing. Acting confused or very tired may also occur. Severe metabolic acidosis can lead to shock or death. In some situations, metabolic acidosis can be a mild, ongoing (chronic) condition. Exams and Tests These tests can help diagnose acidosis. They can also determine whether the cause is a breathing problem or a metabolic problem. Tests may include: Arterial blood gas Basic metabolic panel, (a group of blood tests that measure your sodium and potassium levels, kidney function, and other chemicals and function Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Print Overview Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious complication of diabetes that occurs when your body produces high levels of blood acids called ketones. The condition develops when your body can't produce enough insulin. Insulin normally plays a key role in helping sugar (glucose) — a major source of energy for your muscles and other tissues — enter your cells. Without enough insulin, your body begins to break down fat as fuel. This process produces a buildup of acids in the bloodstream called ketones, eventually leading to diabetic ketoacidosis if untreated. If you have diabetes or you're at risk of diabetes, learn the warning signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — and know when to seek emergency care. Symptoms Diabetic ketoacidosis signs and symptoms often develop quickly, sometimes within 24 hours. For some, these signs and symptoms may be the first indication of having diabetes. You may notice: Excessive thirst Frequent urination Nausea and vomiting Abdominal pain Weakness or fatigue Shortness of breath Fruity-scented breath Confusion More-specific signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — which can be detected through home blood and urine testing kits — include: High blood sugar level (hyperglycemia) High ketone levels in your urine When to see a doctor If you feel ill or stressed or you've had a recent illness or injury, check your blood sugar level often. You might also try an over-the-counter urine ketones testing kit. Contact your doctor immediately if: You're vomiting and unable to tolerate food or liquid Your blood sugar level is higher than your target range and doesn't respond to home treatment Your urine ketone level is moderate or high Seek emergency care if: Your blood sugar level is consistently higher than 300 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 16.7 mill Continue reading >>

What Is Lactic Acidosis?: Signs, Symptoms, Causes And Treatment

What Is Lactic Acidosis?: Signs, Symptoms, Causes And Treatment

What is lactic acidosis? It is a condition where lactate builds up in the body which leads to extremely low pH levels in the blood. Normally, your blood is alkaline or slightly basic. Lactic acidosis occurs when your blood is much more acidic than usual. Changes in blood pH levels can adversely affect your body’s organs. Lactic acidosis is a form of metabolic acidosis characterized by excessive accumulation of acid as a result of the body failing to metabolize lactic acidosis. Metabolic acidosis is a medical state that occurs when there is reduced systemic pH because of a decrease in bicarbonate or an increase in hydrogen ion concentration. Accumulation of lactic acids happens when there is inadequate oxygen in the muscles that is required to break down the glycogen and glucose for energy. In a normal body, lactate will exit muscle cells and travel to the liver, where it will be oxidized to pyruvate, and later converted to glucose. Glucose refers to a form of sugar which is one of the main sources of energy for the body. When there is reduced oxygen in the tissue, there will be a build up of lactic acid. This medical condition usually starts in the kidneys. Lactic acidosis normally occurs when the kidneys fail to excrete excess acids from the body. As a result, lactic acid accumulates in the body faster than it is removed. This build up of lactic acid leads to a pH imbalance in the body. There are two forms of lactic acid, that is D-lactate and L-lactate. D-lactate is a form produced in bacterial metabolism and may build up in patients who have had a gastric bypass or have short gut syndrome. On the other hand, L-lactic is produced from human metabolism. Both L-lactic and D-lactic are produced from pyruvate and metabolized to pyruvate by an enzyme known as lactate deh Continue reading >>

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