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Acidosis Ph

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Anion gap usmle - anion gap metabolic acidosis normal anion gap metabolic acidosis

Acidosis

When your body fluids contain too much acid, it’s known as acidosis. Acidosis occurs when your kidneys and lungs can’t keep your body’s pH in balance. Many of the body’s processes produce acid. Your lungs and kidneys can usually compensate for slight pH imbalances, but problems with these organs can lead to excess acid accumulating in your body. The acidity of your blood is measured by determining its pH. A lower pH means that your blood is more acidic, while a higher pH means that your blood is more basic. The pH of your blood should be around 7.4. According to the American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC), acidosis is characterized by a pH of 7.35 or lower. Alkalosis is characterized by a pH level of 7.45 or higher. While seemingly slight, these numerical differences can be serious. Acidosis can lead to numerous health issues, and it can even be life-threatening. There are two types of acidosis, each with various causes. The type of acidosis is categorized as either respiratory acidosis or metabolic acidosis, depending on the primary cause of your acidosis. Respiratory acidosis Respiratory acidosis occurs when too much CO2 builds up in the body. Normally, the lun Continue reading >>

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  1. tarek

    So, for the past few nights, I've had quite a bit of trouble falling asleep. My body is very tired, but I've just been unable to sleep as soundly as I normally do. At first, I thought it might have been the dairy I was including in my diet, so I cut that out. The sleeping troubles persisted. I just realized that I've been eating fewer carbohydrates than ever (I don't really keep count, but I believe it's been around 100 grams or less each day for the past two weeks or so), so I think my body might have entered ketosis. I do have some of the other "symptoms" -- I have a funny taste in the back of my mouth, I'm thirsty more often than usual (I still drink plenty of water), I feel fatigued often, etc.
    I won't mind dealing with this as long as it eventually subsides, but I would like to know how long it will last, given that I continue to eat the same amount of carbohydrates. If you think I need to eat more or less, go for it; any advice will help. As a side note, I do some form of exercise every day, usually in the form of a light bike ride or a walk, and I do some heavy lifting two to three times per week.
    Any help is appreciated! Thanks.

  2. lmyers04

    if youre lifting you need more carbs thats why you feel tired. experiment with eating more of them.

  3. Canarygirl

    From what I gather, some people get over the sleep issues when they get fully acclimated to burning fatty acids for fuel. However, not everyone goes back to their former sleep habits...as long as they are on a low carb diet. You can try taking a tryptophan supplement before bedtime. It helps me. Also, magnesium (chelated for easy absorption).

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Acidosis Symptoms | Symptoms of Acidosis Contact Info: Rich Adams Direct Phone: 262-353-5665 Website: www.2berich.enagicweb.net Email: [email protected] To share this video, click here: http://youtu.be/A37e9tPv1kA Are you concerned about Symptoms of Acidosis? Do you want to know what the Acidosis Symptoms are? There are seven prevalent Acidosis Symptoms. You may display or experience some or all of these Acidosis Symptoms. Before we can understand Acidosis Symptoms, we must first know what acidosis is and second, we must know what causes acidosis! So what is acidosis? Acidosis is an increased acidity in the blood and other body tissue (i.e. an increased hydrogen ion concentration). If not further qualified, it usually refers to acidity of the blood plasma or metabolic acidosis. Acidosis is said to occur when arterial pH (potential hydrogen) falls below 7.35 (except in the fetus). Normal pH range is 7.35 to 7.45 for humans. The term acidemia describes the state of low blood pH, while acidosis is used to describe the processes leading to these states, i.e. the seven acidosis symptoms or stages. The kidneys and lungs maintain the balance (proper pH level) of chemicals called acids and bases in the body. Acidosis occurs when acid builds up or when bicarbonate (a base) is lost. What causes acidosis? The causes for acidosis can be many. Acidosis can be caused by physiological problems like asthma, deformed chest cavity, obesity, problems with the nervous system, kidney failure, and other such physical conditions. Typically however, acidosis is most commonly caused by drinking alcohol, drinking wine, beer or soda, having a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet, dehydration, or not drinking enough of the right water, prescription drugs and OTC drugs like aspirin, Aleave, etc. All of these are highly acidic and create and acidic environment in your body in which disease, illness, and cancer can thrive! Acidosis Symptoms. Acidosis Symptoms typically manifest themselves in 7 stages and are listed below: Acidosis Symptoms 1. Tired or lethargic Acidosis Symptoms 2. Irritation of the skin, allergies, acne, psoriasis, rashes, etc. Acidosis Symptoms 3. The formation of mucus in your throat. Acidosis Symptoms 4. Inflammation, arthritis, rheumatism, bursitis, gout, etc. Acidosis Symptoms 5. Solidification - Acid waste buildup in your arteries which results in high cholesterol. Acidosis Symptoms 6. Ulceration Acidosis Symptoms 7. Degenerative diseases, cancer, diabetes, osteoporosis, kidney stones. So what can you do about acidosis and the Symptoms of Acidosis? First of all, you can change your diet to include more alkaline food. You can eliminate soda from your diet as soda is extremely acidic! It takes 32 cups of alkaline water to neutralize the acid in 1 cup of soda!!! You can also try to eliminate many OTC medications as they create an acidic environment in your body. Once you start the conversion from acidic to alkaline in your body, your body will be better able to fight illness and disease on its own! 00:02 Acidosis Symptoms Introduction 00:11 Acidosis Symptoms Stage One 00:39 Acidosis Symptoms Stage Two 01:06 Acidosis Symptoms Stage Three 01:20 Acidosis Symptoms Stage Four 01:36 Acidosis Symptoms Stage Five 01:53 Acidosis Symptoms Stage Six 02:12 Acidosis Symptoms Stage Seven Reference: The pH Miracle by Dr. Robert Young M.D.

Acidosis

For acidosis referring to acidity of the urine, see renal tubular acidosis. "Acidemia" redirects here. It is not to be confused with Academia. Acidosis is a process causing increased acidity in the blood and other body tissues (i.e., an increased hydrogen ion concentration). If not further qualified, it usually refers to acidity of the blood plasma. The term acidemia describes the state of low blood pH, while acidosis is used to describe the processes leading to these states. Nevertheless, the terms are sometimes used interchangeably. The distinction may be relevant where a patient has factors causing both acidosis and alkalosis, wherein the relative severity of both determines whether the result is a high, low, or normal pH. Acidosis is said to occur when arterial pH falls below 7.35 (except in the fetus – see below), while its counterpart (alkalosis) occurs at a pH over 7.45. Arterial blood gas analysis and other tests are required to separate the main causes. The rate of cellular metabolic activity affects and, at the same time, is affected by the pH of the body fluids. In mammals, the normal pH of arterial blood lies between 7.35 and 7.50 depending on the species (e.g., healt Continue reading >>

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  1. llfretwell

    Yesterday morning I used ketostix and tested positive for the first time. This morning I also tested positive. I just tested again and it says I'm not in ketosis now. I haven't changed anything I've eaten so I'm confused. I'm staying under 25 grams of carbs a day. Also, I haven't had keto-breath at all and I haven't noticed a change of smell in my urine (although I haven't actively tried smelling it too hard). If this is a repetitive question on this forum, I'm sorry, but someone help me understand. Can I be in ketosis without the side effects or can the ketostix be lying to me?

  2. EddieHaskell97

    I never smelled it in urine, and could rarely detect it on my breath. Don't put all THAT much faith in the stix, and don't worry. This can sometimes happen. Since you're new to this, you won't be keto-adapted so no worries there. Try again with the stix later, you'll probably be "purple with ketones." Just keep in mind that they're more for fun, and relax, you're doing just fine.

  3. delta229

    Keto urine strips are not an accurate way to tell you are in a productive state of Ketosis. When we need to produce Ketone bodies due to lack of Carbs, our bodies produce a "Group" of Ketone acids. There are three. (AcAc, BHB and Acetone) The sticks measure AcAc, which is a "Cast off" acid and appears in the urine stream. The "work" we need done is with BHB acids, detectable only with a meter and strips. Many people, including myself, show very erratic correlations between the strips and a meter. The amount of water you consume and when you use the urine strips also affect the readings. If would like to know more, stop by and visit me.

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Respiratory acidosis #sign and symptoms of Respiratory acidosis Respiratory acidosis ABGs Analyse https://youtu.be/L5MWy1iHacI Plz share n subscribe my chanel is a condition that occurs when the lungs cant remove enough of the Suctioning https://youtu.be/hMJGkxvXTW0 carbon dioxide (CO2) produced by the body. Excess CO2 causes the pH of blood and other bodily fluids to decrease, making them too acidic. Normally, the body is able to balance the ions that control acidity. This balance is measured on a pH scale from 0 to 14. Acidosis occurs when the pH of the blood falls below 7.35 (normal blood pH is between 7.35 and 7.45).Rinku Chaudhary NSG officer AMU ALIGARH https://www.facebook.com/rinkutch/ Respiratory acidosis is typically caused by an underlying disease or condition. This is also called respiratory failure or ventilatory failure. Suctioning https://youtu.be/hMJGkxvXTW0 Normally, the lungs take in oxygen and exhale CO2. Oxygen passes from the lungs into the blood. CO2 passes from the blood into the lungs. However, sometimes the lungs cant remove enough CO2. This may be due to a decrease in respiratory rate or decrease in air movement due to an underlying condition such as: asthma COPD pneumonia sleep apnea TYPES Forms of respiratory acidosis There are two forms of respiratory acidosis: acute and chronic. Acute respiratory acidosis occurs quickly. Its a medical emergency. Left untreated, symptoms will get progressively worse. It can become life-threatening. Chronic respiratory acidosis develops over time. It doesnt cause symptoms. Instead, the body adapts to the increased acidity. For example, the kidneys produce more bicarbonate to help maintain balance. Chronic respiratory acidosis may not cause symptoms. Developing another illness may cause chronic respiratory acidosis to worsen and become acute respiratory acidosis. SYMPTOMS Symptoms of respiratory acidosis Initial signs of acute respiratory acidosis include: headache anxiety blurred vision restlessness confusion Without treatment, other symptoms may occur. These include: https://www.healthline.com/health/res... sleepiness or fatigue lethargy delirium or confusion shortness of breath coma The chronic form of respiratory acidosis doesnt typically cause any noticeable symptoms. Signs are subtle and nonspecific and may include: memory loss sleep disturbances personality changes CAUSES Common causes of respiratory acidosis The lungs and the kidneys are the major organs that help regulate your bloods pH. The lungs remove acid by exhaling CO2, and the kidneys excrete acids through the urine. The kidneys also regulate your bloods concentration of bicarbonate (a base). Respiratory acidosis is usually caused by a lung disease or condition that affects normal breathing or impairs the lungs ability to remove CO2. Some common causes of the chronic form are: asthma chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) acute pulmonary edema severe obesity (which can interfere with expansion of the lungs) neuromuscular disorders (such as multiple sclerosis or muscular dystrophy) scoliosis Some common causes of the acute form are: lung disorders (COPD, emphysema, asthma, pneumonia) conditions that affect the rate of breathing muscle weakness that affects breathing or taking a deep breath obstructed airways (due to choking or other causes) sedative overdose cardiac arrest DIAGNOSIS How is respiratory acidosis diagnosed? The goal of diagnostic tests for respiratory acidosis is to look for any pH imbalance, to determine the severity of the imbalance, and to determine the condition causing the imbalance. Several tools can help doctors diagnose respiratory acidosis. Blood gas measurement Blood gas is a series of tests used to measure oxygen and CO2 in the blood. A healthcare provider will take a sample of blood from your artery. High levels of CO2 can indicate acidosis.

Ph Control: Respiratory Acidosis

Normally, the kidneys and lungs maintain a pH between 7.35 - 7.45 in extracellular fluid. Respiratory acidosis occurs when the lungs cannot eliminate enough carbon dioxide from the body’s tissues. The typical reason is hypoventilation, or a low respiratory rate, causing the plasma pH to fall below 7.35 due to excessive carbon dioxide in the blood. When this occurs, certain chemoreceptors in the body are stimulated to increase the respiratory rate. The kidneys also help by secreting more hydrogen ions (acid) into the tubular fluid and generating more bicarbonate (base) to help stabilize the pH. Respiratory acidosis can cause many physiological problems, particularly in the nervous and cardiovascular systems which are sensitive to pH fluctuations. Continue reading >>

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  1. birdshaw

    DKA for weight loss?

    ok, here's my confession. i have gained about 20lbs in the last 8 years and it's all FAT. i hate it and i'm obsessed with getting rid of it. my doc said the better controlled i am, the more weight i'll gain. also, there's the lovely fact that insulin makes fat! i'm exercising, just can't do enough to agressively attack the problem (two young kids must come first). here's my temptation: just a few days, maybe a week of "managed" DKA to burn the fat. any thoughts? has anyone tried this? any lessons to share? am i the only person to think of this?? i'm too embarassed to ask my doc about it. i KNOW what the skinny non-diabetic would say.

  2. soso

    uhhh... ypu DO have 2 kids that come first, right?
    DKA=bad, danger possibly orphaned kids..... don't play with the bull, you will get it's horns up your arse....
    Or are you alking about a mild state of ketosis brought about by very low carbs for a while?
    check out Dr Richard Bernstein and please...don't play silly buggers with your own and your families lives......
    btw
    welcome to DD!
    support can help a lot with these battles

  3. birdshaw

    Dr Richard Bernstein ?? who is this and where can i find him?

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