diabetestalk.net

Acidosis In Dairy Cows

Is Milk Protein (casein) Is Harmful For Diabetics? Should They Avoid Dairy Products?

Is Milk Protein (casein) Is Harmful For Diabetics? Should They Avoid Dairy Products?

When it comes to health, I tend to rely on factual evidence as opposed to popular opinion, hyperbole, unsubstantiated hypothesis, or conjecture. To avoid the confusion and distraction caused by meritless debate, I look for a preponderance of evidence... well established correlations having a long history of independently reproducible peer-reviewed clinical studies published in medical journals. As far as the deleterious effects of casein on diabetics, it is the same as with non-diabetics; the science is clear about it, and has been clear for several decades. Recent limited studies which tend to indicate otherwise have yet to be vetted, perfected, independently reproduced, and peer-reviewed. When it comes to my health, I do not rely on outliers - I rely on what the propensity of data indicates, and govern myself accordingly. Casein and animal proteins promote cancer; plant-based proteins do not. Period. Barnard RJ, Gonzalez JH, Liva ME, Ngo TH. Effects of a low-fat, high-fiber diet and exercise program on breast cancer risk factors in vivo and tumor cell growth and apoptosis in vitro. Nutr Cancer. 2006;55(1):28-34. Ornish D, Weidner G, Fair WR, Marlin R, Pettengill EB, Raisin CJ, Dunn-Emke S, Crutchfield L, Jacobs FN, Barnard RJ, Aronson WJ, McCormac P, McKnight DJ, Fein JD, Dnistrian AM, Weinstein J, Ngo TH, Mendell NR, Carroll PR. Intensive lifestyle changes may affect the progression of prostate cancer. J Urol. 2005 Sep;174(3):1065-9; discussion 1069-70. Hart AR, Kennedy H, Harvey I. Pancreatic cancer: a review of the evidence on causation. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2008 Mar;6(3):275-82. Population Health, School of Medicine, Health Policy and Practice, University of East Anglia, Norwich, Norfolk, United Kingdom. [email protected] Thiébaut AC, Jiao L, Silverman DT, Continue reading >>

Rumen Acidosis

Rumen Acidosis

Managing disease can be a frustrating proposition. This Guide can help you identify which disease is damaging your cattle. Rumen acidosis is a metabolic disease of cattle. Like most metabolic diseases it is important to remember that for every cow that shows clinical signs, there will be several more which are affected sub-clinically. Acidosis is said to occur when the pH of the rumen falls to less than 5.5 (normal is 6.5 to 7.0). In many cases the pH can fall even lower. The fall in pH has two effects. Firstly, the rumen stops moving, becoming atonic. This depresses appetite and production. Secondly, the change in acidity changes the rumen flora, with acid-producing bacteria taking over. They produce more acid, making the acidosis worse. The increased acid is then absorbed through the rumen wall, causing metabolic acidosis, which in severe cases can lead to shock and death. Cause The primary cause of acidosis is feeding a high level of rapidly digestible carbohydrate, such as barley and other cereals. Acute acidosis, often resulting in death, is most commonly seen in ‘barley beef’ animals where cattle have obtained access to excess feed. In dairy cattle, a milder form, sub-acute acidosis, is seen as a result of feeding increased concentrates compared to forage. Symptoms Acute acidosis often results in death, although illness and liver abscesses may be seen before hand. Cattle may become depressed, go off feed, have an elevated heart rate or diarrhea. Sub-acute: Reduced feed intake Poor body condition and weight loss Unexplained diarrhoea Temperature Pulse rate and respiratory rate may rise Lethargy Treatment Because subacute ruminal acidosis is not detected at the time of depressed ruminal pH, there is no specific treatment for it. Secondary conditions may be treat Continue reading >>

When Does Acidosis Occur?

When Does Acidosis Occur?

Subclinical, or chronic, ruminal acidosis in broad terms is a fermentative disorder in the rumen. Acidosis can occur when cows are not properly transitioned onto high/sugar starch feeds, commonly brassicas or fodder beet. Or when large quantities of high starch/sugar feeds are included in the diet (e.g. greater than 6 kilograms of barley). The rumen in the cow is a huge “fermentation vat” where rumen microbes ferment feed, ready for further digestion in the rest of the intestinal tract or for direct use by the cows for things like milk production. What are the symptoms of acidosis? Cows with mild clinical acidosis will exhibit scouring, will be off their feed and hanging back from the rest of the herd. Subclinical acidosis In lactating animals, sub-clinical acidosis is usually of greater economic importance than the clinical disease and can often affect a significant proportion of the herd. How to treat acidosis? Treatment of acidosis depends on the severity of the case. Seek veterinary attention if cows are down. If a few cows get mild acidosis, ensure the time and space allocations are being achieved and reduce the allocation back to 2-3 kg DM until all cows are eating it. Any cows with clinical acidosis (walking but wobbly or looking drunk) should be removed from the crop, orally dosed with magnesium oxide as above and alternative feed provided. Seek veterinary attention if cows are down. Continue reading >>

Farming: Why Are Most Cows Fed Corn Instead Of Grass?

Farming: Why Are Most Cows Fed Corn Instead Of Grass?

Most cows are not fed corn. As a matter of fact most cattle aren't even on a high-grain diet for most, if not all, of their lives. Most cattle are actually grass-fed. Just not grass-finished. There's around 89 million beef cattle in the US, 9.3 million dairy cattle and 12.1 million cattle currently in the feedlot being finished (that according to USDA statistics from July 1, 2015). The 89 million beef cattle are breeding cattle: Beef cows, replacement heifers, and bulls. The 9.3 million dairy cattle are primarily dairy cows used in milk production. And the 12.1 million cattle and calves in the feedlot are both beef and dairy of various ages. Now, look at the 89 million number again. That's 95% of the total cattle herd inventory of the United States (which is currently sitting at 93.4 million cattle). That equates to "most cows/cattle." And what most people don't know (nor have most acknowledged here, except for one) is that those 89 million cattle are grass or forage-fed. That means that those cattle are on pasture or range from spring until fall and fed hay in the winter. They are being fed and eating grass and forbs on either an extensive or intensive (all depending on grazing management, most operations choose an extensive to a happy medium between extensive and intensive) grazing system. Corn or other grains are optional, and only fed when and if the animals need it if feed supplies are low and straw is only to be fed (cattle can do quite well on straw if supplemented with grain for added carbohydrate and protein) but never as a main constituent of their diet. Certainly not like finisher or dairy cattle. The other interesting thing most people miss is that cattle in the feedlot have not been raised in the feedlot. Most cattle, which are largely beef with only maybe Continue reading >>

New Developments In Understanding Ruminal Acidosis In Dairy Cows

New Developments In Understanding Ruminal Acidosis In Dairy Cows

Summary Maximizing milk production without incurring ruminal acidosis is a challenge for most dairy producers. Feeding a highly fermentable diet provides energy precursors needed for high milk production, but the risk of subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) increases. Ruminal acidosis is characterized by periodic episodes of suboptimal rumen pH, which depresses fiber digestion and possibly milk production. Preventing SARA requires careful management of rumen fermentation. Key strategies that help reduce the risk of acidosis are adaptation of the rumen environment to changes in diet composition, formulation of diets with slow rate of ruminal carbohydrate digestion, and increased intake of physically effective fiber. New research developments are improving our understanding of the factors that put cows at risk of developing SARA and how this risk can be managed. Please check this link first if you are interested in organic or specialty dairy production. Introduction There is increasing concern about the prevalence of SARA in dairy cows, and several excellent reviews have been published (e.g., Krause and Oetzel, 2006; Enemark, 2008). Subacute ruminal acidosis is an increasing problem for the dairy industry, even in well-managed, high-yielding dairy herds. The reality is that some occurrence of SARA is inevitable in most high-producing dairy cows, given their high level of dry matter intake (DMI) and the high proportion of grain included in lactation diets. It is crucial to develop an understanding of the factors that put cows at risk of developing SARA and how feeding and management practices can help minimize this risk. Defining Ruminal Acidosis Ruminal acidosis in cattle can be defined as acute or subacute. During acute ruminal acidosis, the pH in the rumen drastically drops Continue reading >>

More in ketosis