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Acidosis Definition

Acidosis

Acidosis

The kidneys and lungs maintain the balance (proper pH level) of chemicals called acids and bases in the body. Acidosis occurs when acid builds up or when bicarbonate (a base) is lost. Acidosis is classified as either respiratory or metabolic acidosis. Respiratory acidosis develops when there is too much carbon dioxide (an acid) in the body. This type of acidosis is usually caused when the body is unable to remove enough carbon dioxide through breathing. Other names for respiratory acidosis are hypercapnic acidosis and carbon dioxide acidosis. Causes of respiratory acidosis include: Chest deformities, such as kyphosis Chest injuries Chest muscle weakness Chronic lung disease Overuse of sedative drugs Metabolic acidosis develops when too much acid is produced in the body. It can also occur when the kidneys cannot remove enough acid from the body. There are several types of metabolic acidosis: Diabetic acidosis (also called diabetic ketoacidosis and DKA) develops when substances called ketone bodies (which are acidic) build up during uncontrolled diabetes. Hyperchloremic acidosis is caused by the loss of too much sodium bicarbonate from the body, which can happen with severe diarrhea. Poisoning by aspirin, ethylene glycol (found in antifreeze), or methanol Lactic acidosis is a buildup of lactic acid. Lactic acid is mainly produced in muscle cells and red blood cells. It forms when the body breaks down carbohydrates to use for energy when oxygen levels are low. This can be caused by: Cancer Drinking too much alcohol Exercising vigorously for a very long time Liver failure Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) Medications, such as salicylates MELAS (a very rare genetic mitochondrial disorder that affects energy production) Prolonged lack of oxygen from shock, heart failure, or seve Continue reading >>

Acidosis

Acidosis

acidosis [as″ĭ-do´sis] 1. the accumulation of acid and hydrogen ions or depletion of the alkaline reserve (bicarbonate content) in the blood and body tissues, resulting in a decrease in pH. 2. a pathologic condition resulting from this process, characterized by increase in hydrogen ion concentration (decrease in pH). The optimal acid-base balance is maintained by chemical buffers, biologic activities of the cells, and effective functioning of the lungs and kidneys. The opposite of acidosis is alkalosis. adj., adj acidot´ic. Acidosis usually occurs secondary to some underlying disease process; the two major types, distinguished according to cause, are metabolic acidosis and respiratory acidosis (see accompanying table). In mild cases the symptoms may be overlooked; in severe cases symptoms are more obvious and may include muscle twitching, involuntary movement, cardiac arrhythmias, disorientation, and coma. In general, treatment consists of intravenous or oral administration of sodium bicarbonate or sodium lactate solutions and correction of the underlying cause of the imbalance. Many cases of severe acidosis can be prevented by careful monitoring of patients whose primary illness predisposes them to respiratory problems or metabolic derangements that can cause increased levels of acidity or decreased bicarbonate levels. Such care includes effective teaching of self-care to the diabetic so that the disease remains under control. Patients receiving intravenous therapy, especially those having a fluid deficit, and those with biliary or intestinal intubation should be watched closely for early signs of acidosis. Others predisposed to acidosis are patients with shock, hyperthyroidism, advanced circulatory failure, renal failure, respiratory disorders, or liver disease. Continue reading >>

5.1 - Metabolic Acidosis : Definition

5.1 - Metabolic Acidosis : Definition

Acid-Base Physiology A metabolic acidosis is an abnormal primary process or condition leading to an increase in fixed acids in the blood. This causes the arterial plasma bicarbonate to fall to a level lower than expected. The fall in plasma bicarbonate is due to titration of HCO3- by H+. Secondary or compensatory processes which cause a fall in plasma bicarbonate should not be confused with primary processes. A fall in bicarbonate occurring in response to a chronic respiratory alkalosis should be referred to as a compensatory response and never as a �secondary metabolic acidosis�. This distinction between a primary process and a secondary one has been discussed previously in section 3.1.2 when discussing terminology of acid-base disorders. It is of course possible for a patient to have a mixed acid-base disorder with both a metabolic acidosis and a respiratory alkalosis. An example would be an adult presenting following a salicylate overdose. In this situation, direct stimulation of the respiratory centre occurs resulting in a respiratory alkalosis as well as the salicylate-related metabolic acidosis. 'Acid-base pHysiology' by Kerry Brandis -from Acid-Base Physiology 5.2.1 Classification by Patho-physiological Mechanism A decrease in plasma bicarbonate can be caused by two mechanisms: A gain of strong acid A loss of base All causes of a metabolic acidosis must work by these mechanisms. The gain of strong acid may be endogenous (eg ketoacids from lipid metabolism) or exogenous (NH4Cl infusion). Bicarbonate loss may occur via the bowel (diarrhoea, small bowel fistulas) or via the kidneys (carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, renal tubular acidosis). An alternative to the above, is to classify the causes of metabolic acidosis into two groups depending on whether the anion ga Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic Acidosis

What is metabolic acidosis? The buildup of acid in the body due to kidney disease or kidney failure is called metabolic acidosis. When your body fluids contain too much acid, it means that your body is either not getting rid of enough acid, is making too much acid, or cannot balance the acid in your body. What causes metabolic acidosis? Healthy kidneys have many jobs. One of these jobs is to keep the right balance of acids in the body. The kidneys do this by removing acid from the body through urine. Metabolic acidosis is caused by a build-up of too many acids in the blood. This happens when your kidneys are unable to adequately remove the acid from your blood. What are the signs and symptoms? Not everyone will have signs or symptoms. However, you may experience: Long and deep breaths Fast heartbeat Headache and/or confusion Weakness Feeling very tired Vomiting and/or feeling sick to your stomach (nausea) Loss of appetite If you experience any of these, it is important to let your healthcare provider know immediately. What are the complications of metabolic acidosis if I have kidney disease or kidney failure? Increased bone loss (osteoporosis): Metabolic acidosis can lead to a loss of bone in your body. This can lead to a higher chance of fractures in important bones like your hips or backbone. Progression of kidney disease: Metabolic acidosis can make your kidney disease worse. Exactly how this happens is not clear. As acid builds up, kidney function lowers; and as kidney function lowers, acid builds up. This can lead to the progression of kidney disease. Muscle loss: Albumin is an important protein in your body that helps build and keep muscles healthy. Metabolic acidosis lowers the amount of albumin created in your body, and leads to muscle loss, or what is called Continue reading >>

Acidosis

Acidosis

When your body fluids contain too much acid, it’s known as acidosis. Acidosis occurs when your kidneys and lungs can’t keep your body’s pH in balance. Many of the body’s processes produce acid. Your lungs and kidneys can usually compensate for slight pH imbalances, but problems with these organs can lead to excess acid accumulating in your body. The acidity of your blood is measured by determining its pH. A lower pH means that your blood is more acidic, while a higher pH means that your blood is more basic. The pH of your blood should be around 7.4. According to the American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC), acidosis is characterized by a pH of 7.35 or lower. Alkalosis is characterized by a pH level of 7.45 or higher. While seemingly slight, these numerical differences can be serious. Acidosis can lead to numerous health issues, and it can even be life-threatening. There are two types of acidosis, each with various causes. The type of acidosis is categorized as either respiratory acidosis or metabolic acidosis, depending on the primary cause of your acidosis. Respiratory acidosis Respiratory acidosis occurs when too much CO2 builds up in the body. Normally, the lungs remove CO2 while you breathe. However, sometimes your body can’t get rid of enough CO2. This may happen due to: chronic airway conditions, like asthma injury to the chest obesity, which can make breathing difficult sedative misuse deformed chest structure Metabolic acidosis Metabolic acidosis starts in the kidneys instead of the lungs. It occurs when they can’t eliminate enough acid or when they get rid of too much base. There are three major forms of metabolic acidosis: Diabetic acidosis occurs in people with diabetes that’s poorly controlled. If your body lacks enough insulin, keton Continue reading >>

Rumen Acidosis

Rumen Acidosis

Managing disease can be a frustrating proposition. This Guide can help you identify which disease is damaging your cattle. Rumen acidosis is a metabolic disease of cattle. Like most metabolic diseases it is important to remember that for every cow that shows clinical signs, there will be several more which are affected sub-clinically. Acidosis is said to occur when the pH of the rumen falls to less than 5.5 (normal is 6.5 to 7.0). In many cases the pH can fall even lower. The fall in pH has two effects. Firstly, the rumen stops moving, becoming atonic. This depresses appetite and production. Secondly, the change in acidity changes the rumen flora, with acid-producing bacteria taking over. They produce more acid, making the acidosis worse. The increased acid is then absorbed through the rumen wall, causing metabolic acidosis, which in severe cases can lead to shock and death. Cause The primary cause of acidosis is feeding a high level of rapidly digestible carbohydrate, such as barley and other cereals. Acute acidosis, often resulting in death, is most commonly seen in ‘barley beef’ animals where cattle have obtained access to excess feed. In dairy cattle, a milder form, sub-acute acidosis, is seen as a result of feeding increased concentrates compared to forage. Symptoms Acute acidosis often results in death, although illness and liver abscesses may be seen before hand. Cattle may become depressed, go off feed, have an elevated heart rate or diarrhea. Sub-acute: Reduced feed intake Poor body condition and weight loss Unexplained diarrhoea Temperature Pulse rate and respiratory rate may rise Lethargy Treatment Because subacute ruminal acidosis is not detected at the time of depressed ruminal pH, there is no specific treatment for it. Secondary conditions may be treat Continue reading >>

The Definition Of Acidosis In Dairy Herds Predominantly Fed On Pasture And Concentrates.

The Definition Of Acidosis In Dairy Herds Predominantly Fed On Pasture And Concentrates.

Abstract This cross-sectional survey examined the prevalence of ruminal acidosis and the effects of acidosis on the production of dairy cattle. Eight fresh cows, 3 primiparous and 5 multiparous (< 100 d in milk), were selected randomly from each of 100 dairy herds in 5 regions of Australia. Rumen fluid was obtained from each cow by rumenocentesis and a stomach tube, and samples were tested for pH. Stomach tube rumen fluid samples were analyzed for volatile fatty acid, ammonia, and D-lactate concentrations. On the basis of the results of all assays, cows were categorized into 3 distinct categories (categories 1, 2, and 3) by cluster analysis. The percentages of cattle in categories 1, 2, and 3 were 10.2, 29.9, and 59.9%, respectively. Mean rumen pH for categories 1, 2, and 3 were 5.74 +/- 0.47, 6.18 +/- 0.44, and 6.33 +/- 0.43, respectively. Biochemically, categories 1, 2, and 3 were characterized, respectively, as follows: mean total VFA concentration (mM), 100.74 +/- 23.22, 94.79 +/- 18.13, and 62.81 +/- 15.65; mean ammonia concentration (mM), 2.46 +/- 2.02, 7.79 +/- 3.75, and 3.64 +/- 2.03; and mean D-lactate concentration (mM), 0.34 +/- 0.86, 0.28 +/- 0.97, and 0.12 +/- 0.51. Category 1 cows had higher propionate, valerate, isovalerate, and caproate concentrations and were of lower parity than cows in other categories. Cows in category 1 had higher milk production but lower milk fat content than category 2 cows. Herds were assigned to 1 of 3 groups according to the numbers of cows assigned to each category. Herds with > or = 3 of the 8 cows in category 1 were classified as acidotic. Herds with > or = 3 of the 8 cows in category 2 were classified as having suboptimal rumen function, and herds with > or = 3 of the 8 cows in category 3 were classified as normal. Herds t Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis - Definition

Metabolic Acidosis - Definition

Definition Metabolic acidosis is an excessive accumulation of acids in the blood (its pH drops below 7.38, the norm being between 7.38 and 7.42). It is due either to an excessive production of acids by the body, or by an insufficient elimination of these acids by the kidneys. It occurs principally in the case of an insulin-dependent diabetic imbalance, a major kidney problem, fasting, or medicinal intoxication. Metabolic acidosis causes an increase in respiratory activity (which is supposed to lower the blood's acidity). Research into the cause at the origin of this excess of acids and the treatment of this cause allows for the correction of metabolic acidosis. This document, titled "Metabolic acidosis - Definition," is available under the Creative Commons license. Any copy, reuse, or modification of the content should be sufficiently credited to CCM Health (health.ccm.net). Continue reading >>

Definitions

Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition n. An abnormal increase in the acidity of the body's fluids, caused either by accumulation of acids or by depletion of bicarbonates. from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License n. An abnormally increased acidity of the blood. from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English n. abnormally high acidity of the blood and other body fluids. from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia n. Poisoning by certain acids, such as uric acid or the fatty acids, formed within the body under various morbid conditions, such as cancer, diabetes, or fever. Also called acid intoxication. from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved. n. abnormally high acidity (excess hydrogen-ion concentration) of the blood and other body tissues Continue reading >>

Acidosis

Acidosis

ac·i·do·sis pl. -·ses· an abnormal condition in the body, often due to faulty metabolism in which excessive acid, or a loss of alkali, lowers the pH of the blood and tissue Origin of acidosis ModL: see acid and -osis acidosis noun Abnormally high acidity of the blood and body tissues caused by a deficiency of bicarbonates or an excess of acids other than carbonic acid. It can result from any of various acute or chronic disorders or from the ingestion of certain drugs and toxins. Also called metabolic acidosis . Abnormally high acidity of the blood and body tissues caused by an excess of carbon dioxide due to hypoventilation. Also called respiratory acidosis . Related Forms: ac′i·dot′ic THE AMERICAN HERITAGE® DICTIONARY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE, FIFTH EDITION by the Editors of the American Heritage Dictionaries. Copyright © 2016, 2011 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved. acidosis Continue reading >>

Medical Definition Of Lactic Acidosis

Medical Definition Of Lactic Acidosis

font size A A A Lactic acidosis: Acidosis (too much acid in the body) due to the buildup of lactic acid in the body. Lactic acidosis occurs when cells make lactic acid (from glucose) faster than it can be metabolized. The key signs of lactic acidosis include unusually deep and rapid breathing, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Lactic acidosis is a feature of different disorders, usually indicating a metabolic derangement in the acid-base system of the body. Sometimes associated with severe infection, and can be a rare side effect of some medications such as metformin (Glucophage). Source: MedTerms™ Medical Dictionary Continue reading >>

Uncompensated, Partially Compensated, Or Combined Abg Problems

Uncompensated, Partially Compensated, Or Combined Abg Problems

Arterial Blood Gas (ABG) analysis requires in-depth expertise. If the results are not understood right, or are wrongly interpreted, it can result in wrong diagnosis and end up in an inappropriate management of the patient. ABG analysis is carried out when the patient is dealing with the following conditions: • Breathing problems • Lung diseases (asthma, cystic fibrosis, COPD) • Heart failure • Kidney failure ABG reports help in answering the following questions: 1. Is there acidosis or alkalosis? 2. If acidosis is present, whether it is in an uncompensated state, partially compensated state, or in fully compensated state? 3. Whether acidosis is respiratory or metabolic? ABG reports provide the following descriptions: PaCO2 (partial pressure of dissolved CO2 in the blood) and PaO2 (partial pressure of dissolved O2 in the blood) describe the efficiency of exchange of gas in the alveolar level into the blood. Any change in these levels causes changes in the pH. HCO3 (bicarbonate in the blood) maintains the pH of the blood within normal range by compensatory mechanisms, which is either by retaining or increasing HCO3 excretion by the kidney. When PaCO2 increases, HCO3 decreases to compensate the pH. The following table summarizes the changes: ABG can be interpreted using the following analysis points: Finding acidosis or alkalosis: • If pH is more it is acidosis, if pH is less it is alkalosis. Finding compensated, partially compensated, or uncompensated ABG problems: • When PaCO2 is high, but pH is normal instead of being acidic, and if HCO3 levels are also increased, then it means that the compensatory mechanism has retained more HCO3 to maintain the pH. • When PaCO2 and HCO3 values are high but pH is acidic, then it indicates partial compensation. It means t Continue reading >>

For Patients And Visitors

For Patients And Visitors

Definition Metabolic acidosis is a condition in which there is too much acid in the body fluids. Alternative Names Acidosis - metabolic Causes Metabolic acidosis occurs when the body produces too much acid. It can also occur when the kidneys are not removing enough acid from the body. There are several types of metabolic acidosis. Diabetic acidosis develops when acidic substances, known as ketone bodies, build up in the body. This most often occurs with uncontrolled type 1 diabetes. It is also called diabetic ketoacidosis and DKA. Hyperchloremic acidosis results from excessive loss of sodium bicarbonate from the body. This can occur with severe diarrhea. Lactic acidosis results from a buildup of lactic acid. It can be caused by: Alcohol Cancer Exercising intensely Liver failure Medicines, such as salicylates Prolonged lack of oxygen from shock, heart failure, or severe anemia Seizures Other causes of metabolic acidosis include: Kidney disease (distal renal tubular acidosis and proximal renal tubular acidosis) Poisoning by aspirin, ethylene glycol (found in antifreeze), or methanol Severe dehydration Symptoms Most symptoms are caused by the underlying disease or condition that is causing the metabolic acidosis. Metabolic acidosis itself most often causes rapid breathing. Acting confused or very tired may also occur. Severe metabolic acidosis can lead to shock or death. In some situations, metabolic acidosis can be a mild, ongoing (chronic) condition. Exams and Tests These tests can help diagnose acidosis. They can also determine whether the cause is a breathing problem or a metabolic problem. Tests may include: Arterial blood gas Basic metabolic panel, (a group of blood tests that measure your sodium and potassium levels, kidney function, and other chemicals and function Continue reading >>

Acidosis: The Kiss Of Death!

Acidosis: The Kiss Of Death!

WHAT CAUSES A CONDITION CALLED "ACIDOSIS"? WHAT IS ACIDOSIS? Acidosis Definition: Acidosis is an increased acidity in the blood and other body tissue. Acidosis is said to occur when arterial pH falls below 7.35. The pH level of our blood affects every cell in our body. Chronic acidosis corrodes body tissue, and if left unchecked, will interrupt all cellular activities and functions. WHAT CAUSES ACIDOSIS? HIGH ACID-FORMING FOODS and DIETS all lead to ACIDOSIS. Living a fast-paced daily lifestyle, such as eating on the run and excessive over stimulation, will lead people to face a constant symptoms of indigestion and growing endangerment of over-acidification (Acidosis) of the body cells, which will interrupt cellular activities and functions. It is a major root of sickness and disease. Having our cells constantly exposed to an acidic environment leads to acidosis and then chronic acidosis and finally various forms of disease such as cancer and many more! Studies have shown that an acidic, anaerobic (which is also the lack of oxygen) body environment encourages the breeding of fungus, mold, bacteria, and viruses. As a result, our inner biological terrain shifts from a healthy oxygenated, alkaline environment to an unhealthy acidic one (acidic pH scale). This forces the body to constantly deplete its cellular energy to neutralize and detoxify these acids before they can act as poisons in and around the cells, ultimately changing the environment of each cell and finally compromising its immune system leaving it vulnerable to the ravages of disease to take a foothold in the body. When our body pH becomes overly acidic, it starts to set up defense mechanisms to keep the damaging acids from entering the vital organs. Modern Day Athletes and Acid-Forming Foods Unfortunately, Mo Continue reading >>

Acidosis

Acidosis

If the blood pH falls below 7.35, the condition is defined as acidosis which may have serious consequences. The causes of acidosis are quite severe and are not caused by food or diet. Some of the most common causes of metabolic acidosis include: poisoning with carbon monoxide, cyanide, methanol, heart failure, in-born error of metabolism, poor lung function not allowing the exhaling of sufficient carbon dioxide, kidney failure, use of certain drugs (large doses of aspirin, alcohol, iron, acetazolamide), lactic acidosis (as a result of shock) and complications of poorly controlled diabetes type 1. (1) (2) Continue reading >>

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