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Yams And Diabetes

Are Sweet Potatoes Or Yams Good For Blood Sugar?

Are Sweet Potatoes Or Yams Good For Blood Sugar?

Although most of the calories in both sweet potatoes and yams come from carbs, they're still good food choices, even if you’re working hard at maintaining normal blood sugars. These starchy root vegetables are rich in fiber, which helps with blood sugar control. They're also low-glycemic carbs, so can be enjoyed on a diabetic diet, as long as you watch your portion size. Sweet Potato vs. Yams In the United States, most consumers consider sweet potatoes and yams the same food. But sweet potatoes and yams are two totally different root vegetables from different families. In fact, when you think you’re getting "yams" at the grocery store, you’re actually buying sweet potatoes. A true yam has a dark brown skin that looks like tree bark and flesh that’s either white, purple or red, not orange. Nutrition in Sweet Potatoes and Yams Nutritionally, both sweet potatoes and yams are low in calories, fat-free and high in carbs. A 1/2-cup serving of baked sweet potato has 90 calories, 20 grams of carbs, and 3 grams of fiber. The same serving of yams has 80 calories, 19 grams of carbs, and 3 grams of fiber. But the sweet potato is a slightly better source of most vitamins and minerals, including vitamin C, potassium and magnesium. Plus, the sweet potato is way higher in beta-carotene. Glycemic Index of the Root Vegetables Both sweet potatoes and yams have a low glycemic index, or GI. The glycemic index ranks carbohydrates on a scale of 0 to 100 on how they affect blood sugar. Foods with a low GI digest more slowly and release sugar gradually into the bloodstream, keeping blood sugar steady. In addition to helping maintain even blood sugar levels, eating more low-GI foods like these root vegetables may help lower your risk of type 2 diabetes, improve heart health and make it e Continue reading >>

Dietary Recommendations For Gestational Diabetes

Dietary Recommendations For Gestational Diabetes

Diabetes diagnosed during pregnancy is called gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs in about 7 percent of all pregnancies. It usually arises in the second half of pregnancy and goes away as soon as the baby is born. However, if gestational diabetes is not treated, you may experience complications. The first step in treating gestational diabetes is to modify your diet to help keep your blood sugar level in the normal range, while still eating a healthy diet. Most women with well-controlled blood sugar deliver healthy babies without any complications. One way of keeping your blood sugar levels in normal range is by monitoring the amount of carbohydrates in your diet. Carbohydrate foods digest and turn into blood glucose (a type of sugar). Glucose in the blood is necessary because it is the fuel for your body and nourishment your baby receives from you. However, it's important that glucose levels stay within target. Carbohydrates in Food Carbohydrates are found in the following foods: Milk and yogurt Fruits and juices Rice, grains, cereals and pasta Breads, tortillas, crackers, bagels and rolls Dried beans, split peas and lentils Potatoes, corn, yams, peas and winter squash Sweets and desserts, such as sugar, honey, syrups, pastries, cookies, soda and candy also typically have large amounts of carbohydrate. Carbohydrates in foods are measured in units called grams. You can count how many carbohydrates are in foods by reading food labels and learning the exchange lists. The two most important pieces of information on food labels for a carbohydrate-controlled diet is the serving size and grams of total carbohydrate in each serving. Dietary Recommendations It is important to be meet with a registered dietitian to have your diet assessed. The dietitian will calcula Continue reading >>

Should I Be Eating Yams Or Sweet Potatoes, Which One Is Better For Me?

Should I Be Eating Yams Or Sweet Potatoes, Which One Is Better For Me?

Q: I have been reading articles from several "reputable" sources about yams & sweet potatoes. The problem is they contradict each other as to how to tell them apart. Folk wisdom says orange flesh is yam, white or cream flesh is sweet potato. Can you please define what the actual tubers look like so I know what I am buying? Which has the more acceptable nutrition for diabetics? - Multnomah County, Oregon A: Yams and sweet potatoes are commonly confused with each other in the United States; this is because most grocery stores label orange variety of sweet potatoes as yams to distinguish them from the white variety. I believe that in most stores we are purchasing sweet potatoes even if they are labeled as yams. Yams are harder to find and you may have to go to an international grocery store to purchase them. Botanically yams are in a different group than sweet potatoes. Compared to sweet potatoes, yams are starchier and drier. Assuming that you are probably eating sweet potatoes, if cooked without added ingredients, nutritionally they are high in carbohydrate, fat and cholesterol free, low sodium, very rich in Vitamin A and high in Vitamin C and contain fiber. Estimated nutrient content for one cup cooked is approximately 40 grams Carbohydrate and provides over 700% of daily Vit A. I didn't find specific nutritional data on white versus orange sweet potatoes varieties but based on color I would assume that the deeper colored varieties would have more vitamins/antioxidants as this holds true for other foods. For diabetes you will need to consider the carbohydrate content and how that fits with your individual meal plan and goals for diabetes. Ask an Expert is a way for you to get answers from the OSU Extension Service. We have experts in family and health, community develop Continue reading >>

Antidiabetic Effects Of Yam (dioscorea Batatas) And Its Active Constituent, Allantoin, In A Rat Model Of Streptozotocin-induced Diabetes

Antidiabetic Effects Of Yam (dioscorea Batatas) And Its Active Constituent, Allantoin, In A Rat Model Of Streptozotocin-induced Diabetes

Go to: The objective of this study was to investigate the therapeutic efficacies of crude yam (Dioscorea batatas) powder (PY), water extract of yam (EY), and allantoin (the active constituent of yam) in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats with respect to glucose, insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), C-peptide, glycated hemoglobin (HbAlc), lipid metabolism, and oxidative stress. For this purpose, 50 rats were divided into five groups: normal control (NC), diabetic control (STZ), and STZ plus treatment groups (STZ + PY, STZ + EY, and STZ + allantoin). After treatment for one-month, there was a decrease in blood glucose: 385 ± 7 in STZ, 231 ± 3 in STZ + PY, 214 ± 11 in STZ + EY, and 243 ± 6 mg/dL in STZ + allantoin, respectively. There were significant statistical differences (p < 0.001) compared to STZ (100%): 60% in STZ + PY, 55% in STZ + EY, and 63% in STZ + allantoin. With groups in the same order, there were significant decreases (p < 0.001) in HbAlc (100% as 24.4 ± 0.6 ng/mL, 78%, 75%, and 77%), total cholesterol (100% as 122 ± 3 mg/dL, 70%, 67%, and 69%), and low-density lipoprotein (100% as 29 ± 1 mg/dL, 45%, 48%, and 38%). There were also significant increases (p < 0.001) in insulin (100% as 0.22 ± 0.00 ng/mL, 173%, 209%, and 177%), GLP-1 (100% as 18.4 ± 0.7 pmol/mL, 160%, 166%, and 162%), and C-peptide (100% as 2.56 ± 0.10 ng/mL, 129%, 132%, and 130%). The treatment effectively ameliorated antioxidant stress as shown by a significant decrease (p < 0.001) in malondialdehyde (100% as 7.25 ± 0.11 nmol/mL, 87%, 86%, and 85%) together with increases (p < 0.01) in superoxide dismutase (100% as 167 ± 6 IU/mL, 147%, 159%, and 145%) and reduced glutathione (100% as 167 ± 6 nmol/mL, 123%, 141%, and 140%). The results indicate that yam and allantoin Continue reading >>

Yams Vs. Sweet Potatoes: Yes, There Is A Difference

Yams Vs. Sweet Potatoes: Yes, There Is A Difference

(Yams) If you’re like me, at first glance you can’t tell the difference between a yam and a sweet potato. They both are orange on the inside and both taste great in a pie or mashed or in a casserole. Even though they may look the same, technically, they’re two different vegetables–especially how your body digests them. Yams sold in the United States are actually a type of sweet potato. Sweet potatoes originated in South America and are grown in the United States. True yams are native to Africa and are seldom sold in your local grocery store. The two potatoes also do not share similar carbohydrate profiles. As a result, sweet potatoes boost blood sugar, while yams help keep it balanced. After you eat sweet potatoes and yams, their carbohydrates are Join the conversation and share this story digested into simple sugars that enter your bloodstream, causing a post-meal boost in blood sugar. For most people, this isn’t a problem because insulin escorts sugar into cells, which returns blood levels to normal. However, if you have health conditions that interfere with normal secretion or use of insulin — insulin resistance, prediabetes or diabetes — your body struggles to … …remove the extra sugar and blood levels remain high. Over time, high blood sugar may cause kidney disease and heart attacks, according to the American Diabetes Association. If you only look at total carbohydrates you might think the glycemic scores are wrong. You’ll get 26.58 grams of total carbohydrates from a 150-gram serving of sweet potatoes. The same portion of yams has 41.22 grams of total carbohydrates–nearly double the amount! In spite of their higher carb content, yams have a smaller impact on blood sugar thanks to containing more fiber and less sugar. Sweet potatoes have 12 t Continue reading >>

Sweet Potatoes: Health Benefits, Risks & Nutrition Facts

Sweet Potatoes: Health Benefits, Risks & Nutrition Facts

MORE Although they're soft and creamy enough to be put in pies and called dessert, sweet potatoes are also a surprisingly nutritious vegetable. "Sweet potatoes are high in vitamin A, vitamin B5, B6, thiamin, niacin, riboflavin, and, due to their orange color, are high in carotenoids," said San Diego-based nutritionist Laura Flores. Plus, they're fat-free, relatively low in sodium and have fewer calories than white potatoes — although they do have more sugar. Sweet potatoes are one of the best sources of vitamin A; a large one contains more than 100 percent of the daily recommended intake, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Vitamin A is an antioxidant powerhouse, and is linked to anti-aging benefits, cancer prevention and the maintenance of good eyesight, according to the National Institutes of Health. Although the orange variety is the most common in the United States, sweet potatoes also come in white, yellow, pink and purple varieties, according to the Library of Congress. While the orange and yellow types contain the most vitamin A, the purple sort is an excellent way to get antioxidants, the Cleveland Clinic reports. Here are the nutrition facts for sweet potatoes, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which regulates food labeling through the National Labeling and Education Act: Nutrition Facts Serving size: 1 medium (4.6 oz / 130 g) Calories 100 Calories from Fat 0 *Percent Daily Values (%DV) are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Amt per Serving %DV* Amt per Serving %DV* Total Fat 0g 0% Total Carbohydrate 23g 8% Cholesterol 0mg 0% Dietary Fiber 4g 16% Sodium 70mg 3% Sugars 7g Potassium 440mg 13% Protein 2g Vitamin A 120% Calcium 4% Vitamin C 30% Iron 4% So it's clear that while sweet potato pie might be soul food, sweet potatoes thems Continue reading >>

Why The Sweet Potato Is King

Why The Sweet Potato Is King

If you don't eat sweet potatoes very often, or only at holiday time when they're smothered in melted marshmallow goo and baked until they're unrecognizable, you're missing out on one of nature's truly perfect foods. They're low in calories, high in fiber, great for diabetics and people who are carbohydrate sensitive, and packed with vitamins and minerals. So good for you is the humble sweet potato that Nutrition Action Health Letter once rated it the number one healthiest vegetable. Because it's so delectable and versatile, the sweet potato is one of my favorite foods. [sidebar]Yam or Sweet Potato—The Final Answer This could very well be the winning answer on Jeopardy! some day, so pay close attention. Most people really don't know the difference between yams and sweet potatoes. Well, here's the story. All of the roots that are labeled yams in American supermarkets are actually sweet potatoes, cousins of morning glories. They come in different colors and textures. True yams are gigantic tropical roots not related to sweet potatoes, and they are seldom seen in our grocery stores. They can occasionally be found in the exotic veggie area of large supermarkets, particularly in neighborhoods with Hispanic populations. Despite this, many people insist on calling moist, orange-fleshed sweet potatoes yams, reserving the name sweet potatoes for the drier, yellow-fleshed varieties. Both are unrelated to regular white potatoes and are much, much better for you. When I visited Okinawa, Japan, I was delighted to discover purple sweet potatoes. Their flesh is actually bright purple, and Okinawans make them into everything from chips to ice cream. Undoubtedly, their pigments offer protection from cancer and other diseases. I hope we will be able to get them in the US one day soon. [ Continue reading >>

Is Yam Good For Diabetes

Is Yam Good For Diabetes

Basically, no yams are grown in the United States. What is referred to as yams in the United States is basically a type of sweet potato. Real yams originated from Africa and are sold. On the other hand, sweet potatoes were natively grown in South America with some of it being grown in the USA. Yams help maintain controlled blood sugar levels whereas sweet potatoes increase the blood sugar levels. Effects of sweet potatoes and yams on blood sugar levels Yams and sweet potatoes contain carbohydrates. After consuming these carbohydrates they are broken down into sugar that is then absorbed into the bloodstream with a potential to cause a post mean a spike in the blood sugar levels. Generally, this should not be a problem since the body should be in a position to produce insulin to counter this effect. There is a problem when your body cells are resistant to the effects of insulin resistance. A continued spike in the blood sugar levels can eventually lead to a heart attack and kidney problems. Rating on the glycemic index Glycemic index is a scale rated from 0-100 and is used to show how a certain food substance causes a rise in the blood sugar levels. Pure glucose is rated 100. Sweet potatoes have a glycemic index of 70 which is considered high. On the other hand, yams have a glycemic index of 54 which is relatively low. The carbs count Basically, if what you consider is the total carbohydrates in a meal as a diabetic, then you might get everything wrong. Sweet potatoes have 26.58 grams of carbohydrates whereas the same serving of yams has 41.22 grams of carbohydrates. Given that yams have a glycemic index of 54 and sweet potatoes a glycemic index of 70, it would be expected that yams will have a higher glycemic index but this is not the case. Yams have 5.8 grams of solubl Continue reading >>

Should Yams Be A Banned Substance?

Should Yams Be A Banned Substance?

When Usain Bolt won the Beijing Olympics 100 meter race his father was interviewed shortly after saying, “It is definitely the Trelawny Yam.” If he was asked about his wins in London and in Rio he would probably say the exact same thing. The president of Jamaica’s University Of Technology added this, “Eating yams from a young age and running extensively will develop muscles. Yams include nutrients that have such effects.” This article elaborates on potential steroidal effects that Yams may have. Luckily for Usain Bolt, it isn’t a banned substance so he can eat his heart out and break all the records he wants. The Yams we know of in North America aren’t the Yams Usain Bolt or any of his Jamaican compatriots are eating. Regardless, sweet potatoes/yams are part of the morning-glories family. Despite being a “starchy” food, yams and sweet potatoes are high in fiber (about 4 grams per medium sweet potatoe) and are full of nutritents, including: Potassium Copper Manganese Vitamin B1, B6, C Beta Carotene (mostly in the orange sweet potatoes) On top of being a nutritional powerhouse eating sweet potatoes makes you feel fuller faster which is great if you’re trying to loose weight. Yes it’s a carb, but don’t get all crazy – it won’t make you fat. In fact, it’s a slow release carbohydrate with a low glycemic index providing little impact on insulin, even for those who are pre-diabetic or diabetic. Living in the Caribbean for the last 5 years I’ve come across the Trelawny (Usain Bolt) Yam and have eaten quite a bit of it. I love it. I don’t time my runs everyday but I do feel pretty speedy :). If there’s a store selling Caribbean food in your area I recommend you give it a try. Find out how to cook it here. In the meantime, don’t fear the “s Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Sweet Potatoes If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Eat Sweet Potatoes If I Have Diabetes?

Many cases of diabetes, especially type 1 diabetes, come from problems with the ability of the pancreas to regulate insulin, which is important in controlling blood sugar. The pancreas-shaped sweet potato helps to balance blood sugar in diabetics. Research shows that sweet potatoes contain adiponectin, the same hormones that are released from fat cells. Adiponectin tends to improve metabolism and insulin regulation. Unlike other starchy vegetables, sweet potatoes are considered to be an “anti-diabetic food.” This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com Yes diabetics can eat sweet potatoes. Sweet potatoes contain carbohydrates which can raise blood sugar levels. However if you eat the right serving size of a sweet potato you can control the amount of sugar you take in. Also what you put on the potato is important. Avoid added sugars or sweeteners. Absolutely! Sweet potatoes are perfect for any plate but especially for people with diabetes. Compared to white potatoes, sweet potatoes are lower on the glycemic index and deliver chart topping vitamin A for eye health. The fiber helps with blood glucose control and weight management and the potassium helps control blood pressure. One important note... Take care to prepare your sweet potatoes without all of the added sugar, butter or marshmallows that many recipes call for. Go beyond the norm and try sweet potatoes roasted, mashed or even pureed into soup. One sweet potato contains 26 grams of carbs, but that’s partially offset by the 4 grams of fiber. Sweet potatoes contain healthy phytochemicals, too. One idea is to eat just half a sweet potato (topped with butter rather than sugar) and pair it with a protein food. Continue reading >>

Yams Vs. Sweet Potatoes: Nutrition And Recipes

Yams Vs. Sweet Potatoes: Nutrition And Recipes

One’s kind of orange. The other is more of a light yellow. They both have thick peels, taste sweet, and are sold in the potato section of the market. And one is better for that Thanksgiving dish with the marshmallows on top, but you can never remember — is that for sweet potatoes or yams? Though the names are often used interchangeably in America, there is a difference between sweet potatoes and yams. It’s not a huge difference, but when it comes to counting carbs to manage your diabetes, or packing nutrition into your diet if you have a malabsorption condition like celiac disease, making informed choices matters. So, once and for all, what’s the difference between sweet potatoes and yams? Perfect Strangers First of all, the tubers are not related to each other, nor to potatoes. Sweet potatoes are from sub-tropical American climes and are actually related to morning glories. Yams, meanwhile, are originally from Africa and Asia and are related to lilies. The Library of Congress suggests that yams could have been brought to the Americas by African slaves. But how do sweet potatoes and yams compare, nutritionally? This analysis is of 100-gram (about 1/2 cup) servings of each food, peeled and boiled. Calories Sweet potato: 76, Yam: 116 Winner? Sweet potatoes. Just don’t add butter, sugar, and marshmallows! Nutritional analysis often starts off with calories, but you should consider that measurement in terms of the rest of the food’s nutritional offering. Yams have more calories per serving, but they are much lower in natural sugars, for example. Carbohydrates Sweet potato: 17.72 grams, Yam: 27.48 grams Winner? Sweet potatoes. If you’re counting carbs, count on sweet potatoes. The Mayo Clinic advises that carbohydrates should make up between 45 and 65 percent o Continue reading >>

11 Superfoods For Your Diabetes Diet

11 Superfoods For Your Diabetes Diet

Getty Images What to Eat to Beat Type 2 Diabetes What makes a food “super”? When it comes to type 2 diabetes, it’s not just about foods that pack lots of nutrients. For a diabetes-friendly diet, you also need foods that will help keep your blood sugar levels in check. “Look for items that contain healthy fats and are high in vitamins, minerals, and fiber,” says Sue McLaughlin, RD, a certified diabetes educator at Burgess Health Center in Onawa, Iowa. It’s also crucial to eat a wide variety of foods to make sure you’re getting a healthy mix of phytochemicals and essential fatty acids. Add these 11 superfoods to your grocery cart to keep your diet diabetes-friendly. Continue reading >>

Are Sweet Potatoes Or Yams Good For Blood Sugar?

Are Sweet Potatoes Or Yams Good For Blood Sugar?

You may be surprised to find out there is no relationship between sweet potatoes and yams. Although often confused, yams relate closer to lilies and grass than to sweet potatoes, and sweet potatoes are more like the morning glory flower. It is no wonder then that these two veggies can affect your blood sugar differently. Video of the Day When you try to determine how a certain food will affect your blood sugar, consider its glycemic index value. The glycemic index is a method to determine how a food will raise your blood glucose. Foods receive a score that compares their effect to pure glucose. Scores range from zero to 100, the higher the score, the larger and more rapid the effect. The Glycemic Index rates the impact of starches on your blood sugar levels. Raw food contains starch stored in compact granules, which makes it difficult to digest. Cooking releases the starch and makes it easier to digest -- and to elevate your blood sugar levels. Foods with a low GI rating, from zero to 55, contain slowly digested starches. A moderate GI index rating is 56 to 69. A high GI rating, between 70 and 100, indicates foods containing quickly digested starches, the ones that cause blood sugar spikes and crashes. According to the University of Sydney, depending on preparation, the GI ratings for sweet potatoes are 44 to 94, while yams rank 35 to 77. The lower ratings apply to one-cup servings of boiled sweet potatoes, which rate 44, and one-cup servings of boiled yams, which rank 35. The highest GI rating of 94 applies to sweet potatoes peeled and baked for 45 minutes. Yams peeled and roasted on preheated charcoal get a high rating of 77. Eating With Diabetes All of this information should lead you to believe that both yams and sweet potatoes are good for your blood sugar. Althoug Continue reading >>

Bitter Yam

Bitter Yam

Learn about User Reviews and read IMPORTANT information about user generated content Conditions of Use and Important Information: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you. This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. © Therapeutic Research Faculty 2009. Continue reading >>

I Have Diabetes…what Can I Eat?

I Have Diabetes…what Can I Eat?

From the day you are diagnosed with diabetes, type 1 or type 2, everyone around you is going start telling you what you can and cannot eat. Your doctor, friends, brother, mother, father, uncle, children, spouse, and even the television and every magazine and newspaper! (Be wary of the all the diet fads that will not be directed right at you!) By the time you’ve heard it all, you might feel like there’s nothing you’re allowed to eat except for steamed chicken and spinach. Here are three secrets for your life with diabetes around food: Despite what everyone is saying you “can’t” and “shouldn’t” eat, you are the one who puts the food in your mouth…which means you actually can eat anything, in a sense. It is your choice, and while we all would be better if we always chose the healthiest foods, try reminding yourself of this statement: “I can choose to eat whatever I want.” Thinking this way around your choices versus feeling like you aren’t allowed to eat practically anything can be a very helpful tool for feeling more empowered around food. No one can control what you eat except for you. It’s your choice. As people with diabetes, we do want to aim for 70 to 90 percent of the day’s choices to be very healthy, moderate to low in carbohydrates, and whole food choices, but you do not have to be perfect! Enjoying a treat (whether it’s potato chips or chocolate) in moderation is possible, but the key is moderation. Sometimes, putting too many rules around those treats can make us want more and more of them, which is why the way you think about food is going to very important for how you behave around food. Think about the treats you love the most and how to incorporate them carefully and in sensible portions in your week’s nutrition. Never stop Continue reading >>

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