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Wireless Insulin Pumps For Diabetes

Hybrid Closed Loop System.

Hybrid Closed Loop System.

NEW! The Suspend before low§ option avoids lows and rebound highs proactively by automatically stopping insulin 30 minutes before you reach your pre-selected low limits, then automatically restarts insulin when your levels recover, all without bothersome alerts. NEW! The Auto Mode‡ option automatically adjusts your basal insulin delivery every 5 minutes based on your sugar levels to keep you in target range, all day and night. Watch Video View Brochure Get Started NEW! Guardian® Sensor 3 continuous glucose monitoring sensor. Introducing the most accurate sensor from Medtronic, now with up to 7 day wear and easy insertion. It is the FIRST and ONLY continuous glucose monitoring sensor FDA approved and trusted to control insulin dosing. Exclusive CONTOUR®NEXT LINK 2.4 meter1 Get easy and accurate CGM calibration, insulin dosing and remote bolusing with our exclusive meter. “This device will mean peace of mind, in knowing a person will be in normal blood sugar range a great majority of the time,” “It’s a medical device with the potential to change the lives of more than 1 million Americans who suffer from Type 1 diabetes.” KEEP YOUR GLUCOSE IN RANGE SMARTGUARD® HCL TECHNOLOGY. Quick and easy access to your glucose and insulin information, all from the home screen. Bright color screen for easy readability - day or night. Waterproof - so you can enjoy underwater activities. Quick and easy bolus from your meter. Fewer shots than multiple daily injections. The only sensor FDA approved and trusted to control insulin dosing. Easy to insert. Know at all times where your glucose levels are trending. Click here for assistance if your insurance does not currently cover the MiniMed 670G system. * Mean Absolute Relative Difference. ** 3-4 calibrations per day required. Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Reviews From Diabetesmine

Insulin Pump Reviews From Diabetesmine

For anyone taking long-acting and short-acting (pre-meal) insulin, an insulin pump offers freedom from all of the hassle of injections. If you decide to eat a little more, or do some unexpected exercise, you can just push a button to administer more or less insulin. And the pump’s continuous background drip of insulin mimics the action of a healthy pancreas, so your blood sugar levels can remain much steadier. Note that an insulin pump is NOT an artificial pancreas or a fully automated cure for diabetes. The person wearing it still has to decide how much insulin they need and when they need it. This makes the user the most important part of the pump. But no worries – modern pumps are very intuitive and easy to use. And there’s no age limit on using a pump; they are used by infants, all the way up to senior citizens. Here are our reviews of some of the existing insulin pumps available here in the United States (in alphabetical order): Animas OneTouch Ping Insulin Pump (combo with glucose meter) A combination of the Animas 2020 insulin pump and OneTouch glucose (fingerstick) meter that talk to each other wirelessly. This means you can actually control the pump right from the glucose meter — setting basal rates and bolus insulin doses — without ever having to "pull the pump off your hip." Animas Vibe Insulin Pump (combo with continuous glucose monitor) New! Just approved by the FDA in November 2014 and available to customers in early 2015, this is a combination of the Animas insulin pump and the popular Dexcom G4 continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system. The CGM data is displayed directly on the insulin pump’s screen, so there's no need to carry a separate receiver. Asante Snap Insulin Pump (no longer available) This was a unique full-featured insulin pump th Continue reading >>

Continuous Glucose Monitoring

Continuous Glucose Monitoring

With Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM), you get a more complete picture of your glucose levels, which can lead to better treatment decisions and better glucose control. Without diabetes, your body tracks glucose levels all day and night to ensure the right amount of insulin is released at the right time. To successfully manage diabetes, a monitoring system is needed to consistently check your glucose levels. The most common glucose monitoring solutions are blood glucose meters and continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems. Sensor overtape not shown in depiction How Does CGM Work? CGM is a way to measure glucose levels in real-time throughout the day and night. A tiny electrode called a glucose sensor is inserted under the skin to measure glucose levels in tissue fluid. It is connected to a transmitter that sends the information via wireless radio frequency to a monitoring and display device. The device can detect and notify you if your glucose is reaching a high or low limit. The latest Medtronic CGM systems can actually alert you before you reach your glucose limits. CGM systems usually consist of a glucose sensor, a transmitter, and a small external monitor to view your glucose levels. MiniMed insulin pumps have built-in CGM so the information can be conveniently seen on your pump screen. The CGM monitor or insulin pump is small, discreet, and easy-to-wear. It can be attached to your belt, hidden in your pocket, or placed under your clothing. This component will show your current glucose levels and your historical glucose trends. It also notifies you before you reach your low or high glucose limits and if your glucose level rises or falls too quickly. The CGM transmitter is a small, lightweight device that attaches to the glucose sensor, gathers your glucose data, Continue reading >>

2016 Insulin Pump Comparisons

2016 Insulin Pump Comparisons

Click to go to comparison page: Tandem t-Slim/t-Flex/t-slim G4Roche Accu-Chek Combo Insulet Insulet OmniPod Medtronic 530G With Enlite Animas Vibe Pump System Features in Common: 24-hour toll-free helpline Internal safety checks Child button lock-out Full Training Included Simplified programming Extended bolus options Temporary basal rate options Programmable reminders Downloadable Low battery warning Low insulin warning User-set active insulin time Tandem t:slim, t:slim G4 & t:flex Unique Advantages Potential Drawbacks Bright, full-color touch screen Modern, high-tech appearance Compact, thin dimensions Rapid numeric entry, fastest bolus entry Cartridges hold 300u (t:slim); 480u (t:flex) Can calculate boluses up to 50 units (60 on t:flex) Site-change reminder w/customizable day & time Graphic on-screen history display Carb counting calculator Temp basal up to 250%, 72 hrs Can set duration of insulin action in 1-minute increments IOB & time remaining displayed on home screen Missed bolus reminders customizable by day of week Alert for high temperatures which may spoil insulin Secondary basal programs linked with secondary bolus calculation parameters Web-based download software Compatible w/leur-lock infusion sets Minimal insulin movement with changes in altitude Small buttons can be difficult to activate; screen goes blank if buttons missed 3x Unlock procedure required to perform any programming No integrated clip (must put in a case that has a clip) Tubing connector looks “medical,” can snag on clothing Basal & bolus settings in same time slots; may take several steps to edit Extra confirmation steps with all programming Weak vibrate mechanism No meter link Manufacturer relatively new in pump industry Requires charging 1-2x/week No formal in-warranty upgrade polic Continue reading >>

Sneak Peeks At Upcoming Diabetes Devices

Sneak Peeks At Upcoming Diabetes Devices

These diabetes devices in development weren't available in the United States by Oct. 10, 2012, our cutoff date for being included in the 2013 Consumer Guide. The 2-ounce device plugs into an iPhone, iPad, or iPod Touch, turning it into a blood glucose meter . Open the related (and free) app, insert a test strip into the GMate Smart, and automatically upload readings to the app. The device plugs into the headphone jack, so unlike the very similar iBGStar, the GMate Smart will work with the iPhone 5 without an adapter. The meter has been approved in Europe and is awaiting FDA approval. The next generation of this tubeless pump will have a 33 percent smaller pod, which is worn on the body, with the same 200-unit reservoir. It has been approved by the FDA. The small tubeless insulin pump (it's 2.4 inches long, 1.5 inches wide, and 0.5 inches thick) lets you deliver insulin via a handheld remote or by pressing buttons on the pump. The device hasn't been submitted to the FDA for approval. This system's remote-handset meter is glitzya thin color touch screen that also runs apps to help pumpers track blood glucose, food, and insulin. The rechargeable, buttonless pump with tubing is as bare-bones as they come. Users complete all pump functions from the handset. The device is approved in Europe but has not yet been submitted to the FDA. Echo Therapeutics' novel device uses a sensor above the skin to track glucose. The needle-free technology includes a gadget that removes dead skin cells and prepares the body for a skin-patch biosensor that relays results to a remote monitor. The company plans to file for European approval early in 2013. (Learn more: " Innovator: Patrick Mooney ") Take key features from the Animas insulin pump (color display, teensy basal rate increments), add a Continue reading >>

The One And Only Tube-free, Wireless, Insulin Pump – The Omnipod

The One And Only Tube-free, Wireless, Insulin Pump – The Omnipod

If you have diabetes and are injecting multiple times each day you may want to consider switching to an insulin pump. The Omnipod insulin pump, also known as “the pod”, is a tiny white “egg-looking” device that is very simple to use, has no wires, is very discreet and allows you the luxury of having the best control over your diabetes. The pod has many features to be aware of: It can be worn in any area that you typically inject. It is 1.6″ x 2.4″ x 0.7″ (so small and in 2012 will be even smaller!) – making it very discreet. It’s PDM (Personal Diabetes Manager) has multi-uses: With a press of a button the pod will insert itself. Simply remove the adhesive from the small device and attach to your skin. Press a button on the PDM and it’s done! Does not have to be with you to work. Basal rate is provided without the PDM and pod communicating. You will need the PDM to give bolus rates, hear alarms and make changes. It’s waterproof up to 25 feet for 60 minutes. This allows you to bathe, swim and partake in sports without removing the pod. The PDM and pod communicate within an area of 2 feet Contains a food library for carbohydrate counting It is recommend that the pod be changed every 3 days. It holds a maximum of 200 units of rapid-acting insulin such as Humalog, Novolog or Apidra. Glucose readings can be downloaded CGM (continuous glucose monitoring) device such as the Dexcom Seven Plus may be used to enhance your diabetes control. OmniPod – Talk to your friends who may be already wearing an insulin pump, attend pump support groups, ask your endocrinologist or diabetes educator about the advantages of the pump and then decide if it’s for you. Most pump wearers feel that it makes their lives easier! Continue reading >>

Tubed Vs. Tubeless: Insulin Pump Comparison

Tubed Vs. Tubeless: Insulin Pump Comparison

It’s been more than ten years since Caleb began pumping. That’s more than 1,500 pods, roughly estimating. Caleb was four when we decided to use Omnipod. He didn’t have much say in the matter. Over the years, we’ve talked about other pumps. I thought he might be intrigued by the t:slim because of its slick touch screen. Not so. “Does it have a tube? Yes? No, thanks.” Simple as that. Traveling on his own and wanting the benefit of closed loop technology that was only available with a tubed pump changed his perspective. Now that we have first-hand experience with a tubed pump, I can provide a user comparison of it to a tubeless one. The process of changing a site and reservoir is much more involved than filling a pod and inserting it. There are so many more steps. It’s not difficult – Caleb took over immediately and I don’t even remember what to do – but it’s definitely simpler with Omnipod. Being tethered takes some getting used to. Caleb adjusted quickly. Figuring out what to do with the tube with certain clothing, in particular a dress shirt and khakis, was a little perplexing. I sympathize with the ladies wearing dresses. This is probably no longer relevant with newer tubed pumps, but the screens and menus of the older model Medtronic pumps – just ugh. I now appreciate all the comments about failed pods. This was never a problem for us. Yes, we had the occasional pod error, but we didn’t know any differently. It’s what we experienced from the very beginning and we learned to be prepared for it – always carrying extra pods, insulin and alcohol. No biggie. After using a tubed pump, which almost never errors (we did have a pump go kaput – not fun), I understand how someone switching to Omnipod would find these errors completely unacceptable Continue reading >>

The Advantages And Disadvantages Of An Insulin Pump

The Advantages And Disadvantages Of An Insulin Pump

What is an insulin pump? An insulin pump is a small, computerized device that delivers insulin continuously throughout the day. It attempts to mimic the normal pancreas's release of insulin, but you must tell the pump how much insulin to inject. It delivers insulin in two ways: a basal rate which is a continuous, small trickle of insulin that keeps blood glucose stable between meals and overnight; and a bolus rate, which is a much higher rate of insulin taken before eating to "cover" the food you plan to eat. Effective, safe use of the pump requires: Commitment to checking blood glucose at least 4 times a day, every day. Adjusting insulin doses based on blood glucose levels, carbohydrate intake, and physical activity. The main advantages of pump therapy are: Increased flexibility in lifestyle. Predictable insulin delivery. Precise insulin delivery. Ability to accurately deliver 1/10th of a unit of insulin. Tighter blood glucose control, while reducing the risk of low blood glucose. Reducing episodes of severe hypoglycemia. Reducing wide fluctuations in blood glucose. Helping manage the "dawn phenomenon." The main disadvantages of pump therapy are: Risk of skin infections at the catheter site. Risk of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) from pump malfunction or absorption problems. Cost: pumps are expensive, plus the continuing cost of supplies. Checking blood glucose at least 4 times per day. Letting others know that you have diabetes. Is pump therapy for you? Ask yourself these questions: Are you ready to be attached to a device that lets people know you have diabetes? Do you have realistic expectations? It is not the "magic bullet" that will solve all your blood glucose problems. Are you comfortable with the technology and mechanics of operating a pump? Are you committed to c Continue reading >>

Minimed® 530g System

Minimed® 530g System

Diabetes shouldn't prevent you from living the life you want. Playing in the majors. Taking the stage. Falling in love. MiniMed 530G system with SmartGuard™ technology helps you better control your glucose levels and even takes action for you when you need it – so you can be free to experience life's exceptional moments. Worn on your body, the pump delivers tiny drops of rapid-acting insulin to match your needs. Change your pump tubing only once every two to three days. Bolus Wizard® calculator makes it easier to calculate mealtime insulin and may avoid insulin stacking.1 Set temporary basal rates and patterns around your activities. Get readings every five minutes, right on your pump. Track your glucose levels throughout the day, including the effects of food or exercise. Get alerted when you’re trending high or low, so you can make adjustments – ahead of time. MiniMed 530G system is an insulin pump that’s fully integrated with a glucose sensor to give you advanced diabetes control. It’s the only diabetes management system with SmartGuard™ technology that takes action for you and is proven to reduce your risk of lows*. And by helping you keep your glucose levels stable long-term, MiniMed system can help lower both your A1C and your risk of nerve, eye and kidney problems.2,3,4 A good night’s sleep can mean starting your day refreshed, ready to live the life you want. But when you’re living with diabetes, a restful sleep can sometimes feel out of reach. In fact, up to 75 percent of severe hypoglycemia happens at night.5 SmartGuard technology users experience about half as many nighttime lows* than those using a pump and sensor alone 6. Our exclusive SmartGuard technology mimics some of the functions of a healthy pancreas to provide you with advanced pr Continue reading >>

2018 New Insulin Pump Comparisons And Reviews

2018 New Insulin Pump Comparisons And Reviews

Insulin pumps are NOT commodities. There are differences between systems (some subtle, some obvious) that make certain pumps better options for certain individuals. It is astounding that so many people are given little to no choice when it comes to selecting an insulin pump. Given that pump warranties last longer than the average marriage, it makes sense to invest some time in comparing the various devices before making a selection. Every member of our clinical team has personal and professional experience with every make and model of insulin pump. We are not employed by any pump company, and we are not easily pressured (although really good chocolate has been known to sway our opinion a bit), so we can offer you fair and impartial information/insight. Please use our pump comparisons to help make an educated decision. We have listed the positive and negative features that are unique to each pump. Features that are common to all pumps, such as allowing for multiple basal patterns, are not included. At the end of the day, the choice is yours. If you would like some expert input, feel free to contact our office and schedule some time to meet or speak with one of our clinicians. And for assistance applying your pump to achieve the best possible glucose management, please reach out. Continue reading >>

How The Omnipod System Works | Omnipod Insulin Management System

How The Omnipod System Works | Omnipod Insulin Management System

An Innovative Approach to Continuous Insulin Delivery The Omnipod System provides all the benefits of insulin pump therapy while providing more flexibility and freedom than other traditional tubed pumps. Customizable insulin delivery settings to give you what you need, when you need it. Insulin pumps work by continuously delivering insulin at set and variable rates,mimicking the insulin release of a healthy pancreas. The Omnipod System delivers insulin in two ways: Basal rate: A small, constant supply of insulin is delivered automatically at a personalized, preset rate around the clock. Bolus: Additional doses of insulin can be delivered when you need them, either around mealtime or to correct high blood glucose. The Omnipod System communicates wirelessly2 to program insulin delivery, eliminating the need for cumbersome tubes. You can wear the Pod comfortably and discreetly under your clothes while carrying the Personal Diabetes Manager separately in a backpack or purse. The Personal Diabetes Manager needs to be within 5 feet of the Pod to deliver a bolus, but does not need to be kept in proximity for basal insulin delivery2 after activation. 3 days of truly continuous insulin delivery3 thanks to its waterproof1 design. Theres no need to take the Pod off to shower, exercise, or sleep. Plus, youll never have to worry about finding a place to hang your insulin pump in the shower or accidentally disconnecting the pump in your sleep. The cannula inserts automatically with the push of a button, with no needles in sight. Simply press a button on the Personal Diabetes Manager, and the Pod automatically inserts the cannula beneath the skin, virtually pain-free. Continuous Innovation for the Diabetes Community The Omnipod System has changed the lives of over 100,000 individuals Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Tech On The Horizon: What’s Coming By Mid-2017 In The Us?

New Diabetes Tech On The Horizon: What’s Coming By Mid-2017 In The Us?

By Lynn Kennedy, Ava Runge, and Adam Brown What Abbott, Dexcom, LifeScan, Medtronic, Tandem, and others are bringing to make diabetes easier and less burdensome Want more news just like this? We’re living in the most exciting time ever in diabetes technology, and a slew of soon-to-launch products are going to subtract hassle from living with diabetes – fewer injections and fingersticks, less math, less data overload, less pain, and less worry. Equally important, most emerging technology shows excellent potential to improve glucose outcomes that matter, among them hypoglycemia, time-in-range, hyperglycemia, and A1c. Curious what’s coming? Read on for a summary of the insulin delivery and glucose monitoring devices expected to launch in the US by mid-2017 or earlier, based on the most recent company timelines (listed chronologically). This list is not fully comprehensive, but does cover the major device launches expected. A more detailed description of each device follows further below. New Insulin Delivery Devices Tandem’s t:slim X2 Insulin Pump – October-December 2016. The latest Tandem pump will add a new Bluetooth radio and enable software updates to add future Dexcom G5 connectivity and automated insulin delivery algorithms. Medtronic MiniMed Pro Infusion Set with BD FlowSmart technology – around late 2016. The long-awaited infusion set has several key improvements, most notably a new catheter that allows insulin to flow out of two holes (less occlusions). LifeScan’s OneTouch Via – early 2017. The bolus-only, super slim wearable device holds 200 units of insulin and can be worn for three days. Squeezing two buttons (including through clothes) – will discreetly deliver a two-unit bolus. Medtronic’s MiniMed 670G/Enlite 3 Hybrid Closed Loop – by Ap Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Overview

Insulin Pump Overview

As people with diabetes know, keeping blood sugar levels in a safe range is extremely important. Good blood sugar control not only makes you feel well, but also helps prevent long-term diabetes complications, such as blindness, kidney failure and heart disease. People with type 1 diabetes don’t produce insulin, a hormone that helps the body use sugar (glucose), a key source of energy that comes from carbohydrates. If you have type 1 diabetes you must make up for the lack of insulin with insulin therapy. Meanwhile, people with type 2 diabetes produce insulin, but their bodies don’t use insulin properly, or they don’t produce enough insulin. Diet, exercise and medication can often work to control glucose levels. However, in certain cases, these measures aren’t enough, and insulin therapy is needed to better control blood sugar levels. While insulin can be given by self-injection, people who take multiple daily injections of insulinmay also consider using an insulin pump. An insulin pump provides continuous delivery of short acting insulin all day long. The insulin pump substitutes the need for long acting insulin. A pump also replaces the need for multiple daily injections with a continuous insulin infusion, and also helps to improve your blood sugar levels. How Do Insulin Pumps Work? Insulin pumps are small, computerized devices that mimic the way the human pancreas works by delivering small doses of short acting insulin continuously (basal rate). The device also is used to deliver variable amounts of insulin when a meal is eaten (bolus). The basal insulin rates are usually set up in your pump with your doctor, and you can have one or multiple basal settings programmed in your pump, based on your needs. You program the amount of insulin for your mealtime bolus di Continue reading >>

The Future For Insulin Pump Companies: Who Will Survive?

The Future For Insulin Pump Companies: Who Will Survive?

www.diabeticinvestor.com As problems for Tandem continue, and with Johnson & Johnson abandoning the insulin pump market, it’s beginning to dawn on some people that we soon could live in a world with just two insulin pump companies – Medtronic and Insulet. [Editor’s Note: Johnson & Johnson reached out to us with the following information: “Animas continues to manufacture, deliver and support its products and provide the service our patients expect. We remain committed to our patients, and we intend to honor our warranty and do not anticipate any interruptions to patients’ pump therapy. If patients or potential patients have any concerns, they can contact Animas online or at 1-877-YES-PUMP.”] Ok, to be fair, Roche also has a pump, but their market presence is lacking. Also, to be fair, Bigfoot is working on a system, but it isn’t here yet. Plus, there is growing belief that patients can achieve optimum control using a CGM smart insulin pen system. Given where things stand today, the real possibility exists that when it comes to insulin pumps, patient choice will be very limited. This was a fear expressed by many when Medtronic signed an exclusive deal with UnitedHealthcare. Yet this agreement is not the cause of limited patient choice. Poor strategy is the real reason, as both Tandem and J&J have made mistakes that have put them in their current positions. Now, I will not list these mistakes as it serves no useful purpose; there is no need to go backward. What I will do, however, is offer a path forward for any company that is bold enough to take on Medtronic. Keep in mind that Diabetic Investor has been covering Medtronic since it was known as MiniMed and no one, and I mean no one, has come close to giving them a run for their money – EVER. The insulin pu Continue reading >>

6 New Diabetes Products To Look For In 2017

6 New Diabetes Products To Look For In 2017

If we learned anything about diabetes products in 2016, it’s that progress can happen faster than we anticipate. The diabetes community was stunned in September when the FDA announced that it had approved Medtronic Diabetes’ MiniMed 670G system, the world’s first pump/sensor system to be able to dose insulin on its own. (Advocacy works!) One of the most exciting things about the approval of Medtronic’s 670G is not only access to the groundbreaking device itself, but the path it paves for similar products – by many companies – to win approval as well. (We’re keeping an eye on Bigfoot Biomedical, Inc, the company that back in July of this year enrolled its first patients in a clinical trial for the Bigfoot smartloop automated insulin delivery system.) Now, as this year comes to a close, we’re listening to the buzz that continues to build around the new diabetes technology coming our way in 2017. The new year will bring a slate of highly anticipated products, including milestone devices like the OneTouch Via (a bolus-only delivery patch) and the above-mentioned Medtronic MiniMed 670G system (widely regarded as a rudimentary artificial pancreas). We’ve rounded up descriptions of some of the most exciting diabetes products expected to hit the market in 2017, followed by an approximate timeframe of when they’ll become available to the public. Sure, what we really want is a cure in 2017, but we’ll take improved quality of life, thanks to new devices and tech, with tremendous gratitude. Animas G5 Integrated Vibe Insulin Pump and CGM System What it is: This pump integrates Dexcom G5 technology with the Animas Vibe system. It’s especially exciting because it’s the only pump of its kind that is available to patients with type one diabetes as young as 2 ye Continue reading >>

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