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Will Insulin Hurt A Dog

8 Things You Should Never Feed To Dogs And Cats

8 Things You Should Never Feed To Dogs And Cats

Who knew that a few sticks of sugar-free gum could kill your dog? Evidently many people don’t, but the veterinarians who spoke to AlterNet tell us they’re seeing more animals coming in with hypoglycemia after eating as little as a stick. And even if the animal's blood sugar returns to normal, there’s quite a bit of concern that liver damage, and possibly death, may follow. “It’s not just dogs, it’s cats as well,” says Maureen Saunders, owner/director of the Spring Valley Animal Hospital and Cat Care Clinic of the Nyacks. “And it’s important to get the word out there, so people know to watch for this.” Many of us tend to think that dogs and cats can eat what humans eat. We often don’t think twice about giving them a bite of our cookie or worry too much when they scavenge for food. But dogs and cats don’t metabolize foods the same way we do, and many of the foods we eat without problems can hurt, and even kill them. Here are eight of the most harmful foods to keep away from your pets. 1. Xylitol. One of the more ubiquitous sweeteners in sugar-free products, xylitol is a naturally occurring sugar alcohol found in the fibers of many fruits, vegetables and mushrooms. It’s typically extracted from hardwoods and corn cobs for commercial use and found in sugarless gum, toothpaste and many low-calorie baked goods. While xylitol has no known toxicity in humans, just a few sticks of sugar-free gum scavenged by a 20-pound dog can cause its insulin levels to spike and send it into hypoglycemia. Ingesting higher amounts of xylitol can create serious liver problems including acute hepatic necrosis, leading to death. Cats are also susceptible to xylitol poisoning. Sometimes vomiting occurs soon after ingestion, followed by hypoglycemia within the next hour. At Continue reading >>

Will An Accidental Injection Of Insulin Into My Hand That Was Meant For My Diabetic Cat Hurt Me?

Will An Accidental Injection Of Insulin Into My Hand That Was Meant For My Diabetic Cat Hurt Me?

Ouch ! As a diabetic on insulin for 50 years I can tell you what I would do in your place but this is not to be taken as medical advice/opinion. Quickly I would note the dose ( so many units), strength ( it may be 100 units per ml or some other figure) of the insulin injected into my hand and where exactly and how deep the injection went in. Also if I had any numbness or tingling, leakage of clear fluid etc I would assume that the insulin will be absorbed and, as my hands do not contain much fat, it could have gone into muscle, or partly so. Given that insulin is absorbed quickly from muscle than fatty tissue and to forestall any possibility that the insulin might be sufficient to cause a fall in my blood sugar I would not hesitate but eat sugar of some sort, e.g. jelly beans x 6, or sweet fruit juice 2 cups of, o, glucose powder one to two dessertspoonsful mixed in water. I would then ring my doctor or ,if after hours, a locum or on-call doctor service. That doctor, once they reply ( and that is why taking sugar FIRST is best as there may be a delay) will advise me on how to proceed further. He or she can advise me also on: how long he/she thinks the insulin’s blood-sugar lowering effect may last ( some insulins last longer in effect than others) how strong the insulin’s effect may be, so about what further precautions to take any anti-infection measures and what, if any, damage may have been caused by the injection. and if I might need a tetanus injection And please, I would ensure that I or someone else gave the cat his/her insulin injection and food ! Continue reading >>

Timing Is Everything | Pet Diabetes Care

Timing Is Everything | Pet Diabetes Care

A friend recently told me that she always comes up with the perfect comeback. Her problem is that she thinks of it 20 minutes too late. Yep, sometimes timing is everything. When it comes to diabetes care of our pets, timing can make the difference between a well regulated diabetic pet and a “mostly” regulated diabetic pet. Routines may not be exciting, but routines make for a well-regulated diabetic pet! After two plus decades practicing veterinary medicine, I sometimes think I have heard it all. Then a client comes along and proves me wrong. Recently one of my own veterinary clients told me he routinely gave his cat the insulin then waited an hour before feeding his pet. I don’t know where this client got this notion as I had told him what I tell all my clients, to feed and give insulin at the same time every 12 hours. Now, whether one waits to see if Fluffy is eating before giving the injection is another story. For folks who have a pet with a hearty appetite that couldn’t imagine missing a meal, they may give the injection as the pet dives into dinner. A feeding frenzy is definitely a distraction to the quick poke of an insulin needle. For folks who have a finicky eater, they might watch to make sure the pet truly eats before giving the injection. Nonetheless, I would feed the pet essentially at the same time as the injection rather than waiting any length of time. The insulin needs something to work with. If food is not given with the insulin the pet could become hypoglycemic. How about the timing of meals? Does it matter if a pet eats in between insulin injections? Yes. Just as giving insulin without food can cause a low blood glucose reading, giving food without insulin will cause an elevated blood glucose test result. If you give a snack in the middle of Continue reading >>

Insulin

Insulin

Drug Name: Insulin Common Name: Vetsulin®, Humulin®, PZI Vet®, Novolin®, Iletin®, Velosulin® Drug Type: Synthetic hormone Used For: Diabetes mellitus Species: Dogs, Cats Administered: 40units/ml, 100units/ml, and 500units/ml Injectable How Dispensed: Prescription only FDA Approved: Yes General Description Insulin is used in the treatment of diabetes mellitus in dogs and cats. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that helps convert your pet’s food into energy by allowing the uptake of sugar by cells. By allowing this uptake and use of sugar, insulin decreases the blood glucose concentrations in the body. When you pet does not produce insulin, sugar can’t enter cells, your pet’s body cannot create fat, sugar, or protein. This also results in a dangerously high blood glucose level. How It Works Insulin replaces the insulin that your pet’s body does not produce. The type of insulin you give to your pet is a synthetic hormone derived from pigs or cows. Storage Information Some forms of insulin need to be refrigerated, pay close attention to the manufacturer’s label. DO NOT FREEZE. Protect from heat and sunlight. Do not use if past the expiration date. Insulin must be given to your pet by an injection 1 to 2 times a day. Because it is a protein, the acids in the stomach would digest it if you were to administer it orally. The proper dose of insulin is determined by your veterinarian through a series of glucose level tests. It is best to give this drug to a pet with a full stomach. It is best to give insulin right after a meal. DO NOT SHAKE THE BOTTLE OF INSULIN Proper handling of insulin: Be sure you have the appropriate size syringe for the concentration of insulin you are using. Variations include: U-40, U-100, and U-500 syringes which go to their c Continue reading >>

Do My Dog's Insulin Injections Have To Be Exactly 12 Hours Apart?

Do My Dog's Insulin Injections Have To Be Exactly 12 Hours Apart?

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) In a perfect world, a dog’s insulin injections would be given exactly 12 hours apart, but rarely can an owner do this day in and day out. It is perfectly acceptable to give a dog its insulin injections a little early or late every so often (2 hours or so in either direction). If problems with scheduling are very frequent or result in doses that are routinely given more than two hours late or early, talk to your veterinarian. He or she will probably be able to come up with alternative dosing schedule that will be easier to maintain and result in more consistent blood sugar levels for the dog throughout the day. Keep in mind that is always safer to skip an insulin injection than risk giving two doses too close apart. Related entries: Continue reading >>

Insulin Use Tips

Insulin Use Tips

Before each use, take a moment to inspect the insulin prior to drawing it into the syringe; clear insulins should appear not discolored and clear; suspended insulins should be uniform in their cloudiness. [1][2] Do not use the insulin if: The bottle looks frosted. [3][4][5][6][7][8] Clear insulin that looks discolored or has turned cloudy, contains particles or haze. [9] Cloudy insulin that appears yellowish or remains lumpy or clotted after mixing. [10][8] See Insulin problems for more information about "bad" insulin. Damaged Insulin: Insulin that is getting too old, or has been dropped or shaken or mishandled, or exposed to a lot of light or heat, will be less effective than before. Freezing [11] destroys the molecules of ANY insulin; any that has either been frozen or is suspected of having been frozen should not be used. Insulin which has been frozen will not be able to do an effective job of controlling blood glucose. [12] Check for discoloration or floating objects in the insulin -- it may also be contaminated. It's also possible that the new or newer vial from the pharmacy may be flawed. If you've recently started it and are having problems, this might be the case. Taking down the lot number and getting a new vial that has a different batch/lot number should take care of this. Frosted insulin: If insulin is subjected to temperature extremes, such as freezing or overheating, the insulin can precipitate [13] on the vial's walls, giving it a frosty or frosted appearance.[5] Another term used to describe this is flocculation. [7][14] In the photo above, the insulin vial on the right is a visual example of what a frosted vial would look like. You can see the precipitated insulin clinging to the sides of it. The problem seems to be a particular one with R-DNA/GE/GM NPH Continue reading >>

The Side Effects Of Insulin In Dogs

The Side Effects Of Insulin In Dogs

Diabetes mellitus develops when your dog's body loses its ability to produce insulin on its own. Insulin therapy, administered through injections underneath your dog's skin, is widely used to help your diabetic dog regulate its blood glucose. As essential as insulin is to a diabetic dog, it carries with it a number of side effects. These side effects are potentially life-threatening and should be reported to a veterinarian immediately. Food is broken down by your dog's body into separate organic compounds; glucose is one of these. Glucose, an energy source for movement, growth and other functions, needs the hormone insulin to transfer from the bloodstream into individual cells. The pancreas produces insulin and, in a healthy dog, produces and releases enough insulin to match the amount of glucose in the bloodstream. However, when a dog develops diabetes mellitus, his owner must administer insulin to him through subcutaneous (underneath the skin) injections to maintain the body's proper blood glucose/insulin balance. Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) is the most common side effect associated with insulin. It is an extremely serious medical condition that comes on suddenly, requiring immediate attention. Before taking your dog to your veterinarian, it is critical that you immediately feed her approximately 1 tbsp. of a fast-acting glucose, such as corn syrup or honey, first by rubbing a small amount on your dog's gums and then feeding her by mouth when she regains her swallowing functions. An insulin overdose, missed morning meal or overexertion can trigger low blood sugar. Symptoms include hunger, lethargy and sleepiness in the early stages, followed by staggering gait, then twitching, convulsions, coma and death. Certain medications, such as corticosteroids, propranolol, t Continue reading >>

What To Do If Your Diabetic Dog Won't Eat

What To Do If Your Diabetic Dog Won't Eat

A diabetic dog who will not eat is not something to ignore. Many diabetic canines are given insulin shots to control their blood sugar levels, but giving insulin to a dog who has not eaten for some time can be extremely dangerous. It is never advised to give an insulin injection to your pet if he hasn't eaten his food. To learn more about what to do if your diabetic dog won't eat, read on. Insulin Injections and Diabetic Dogs As stated previously, many canines with diabetesare given insulin injections to control blood sugar levels. Insulin injections may be important when treating diabetes in your pet, in combination with the proper diet and exercise . But when a diabetic dog hasn't eaten, however, insulin therapy can be very dangerous. Insulin is a hormone that controls glucose levels in the blood, and giving a dog insulin when he has an empty stomach can cause hypoglycemia very quickly. The dangers of the hypoglycemia would be far worse than the dangers of missing an injection of insulin. Hypoglycemia can rapidly lead to death in dogs, which is why it is advised that pet owners skip an insulin injection if their pet hasn't eaten his meal. How Do I Get My Diabetic Dog to Eat? If your pet is ignoring his food or seems uninterested in it, pet owners should try mixing a small amount of wet canned food into the dry food. They should make sure that each piece of the dry dog food is coated with the wet food. If your pet does eat, you may then give him the insulin injection. If he still does not eat, do not give the injection. Your pet may experience high blood sugar for a very short time, but it will not be enough to cause harm. If your pet continues to have a decrease in appetite and will not eat, immediately consult your veterinarian. Especially in diabetic dogs, the prope Continue reading >>

Alleged

Alleged "inhumane" Euthanasia Via Insulin Overdose - Florida Vet Jay Butan Of Lake Worth -- "marley" Of "marley And Me's" Former Vet

"Marley and Me" is all the rage, but in some circles, it's sparking debate (because bloat, the condition for which Marley's owner had him euthanized, is TREATABLE in most cases and because their dealings with Marley's supposedly bad behavior, in the view of many, leave something to be desired). In Grogan's book, he apparently calls Butan, Marley's first vet, "the doctor of our dreams." Well, it seems that for at least one cat, and for a former colleague, Butan was the vet of their NIGHTMARES. "Marley's" first vet, Jay Butan, may not be such a great guy after all, no matter what author John Grogan says. As some readers may know, my own beloved Toonces was given an insulin overdose at his vets. I saw some of the aftermath of that insulin overdose, and it was horrible and heartbreaking -- nothing you would ever want to see a pet go through. Therefore, when I read about Florida Vet Jay Butan, I became convinced that he is a MONSTER right up there with the likes of Bill Baber. Let me describe to you what happens when an animal receives an insulin overdose -- before it dies, if it dies. First, the animal would experience: ". . . headache, irregular heartbeat, increased heart rate or pulse, sweating, tremor, nausea, increased hunger and anxiety . . ." With a massive overdose, this would progress to severe effects on the central nervous system, including hypokalemia, hypophospatemia, hypomagnesia, and hypothermia. As the brain is deprived of glucose it needs to function, the animal will experience seizures and coma. Death will not come quickly, easily, or even surely. However, "massive necrosis," to quote my Toonces' neurologist, may result. That means death of brain tissue. Does this sound like a humane method of trying to kill -- or euphemistically, "euthanize" -- a pet to yo Continue reading >>

Exercise And Canine Diabetes

Exercise And Canine Diabetes

We have been asked by some of our readers about the special considerations that apply when exercising a diabetic dog. The fact is, diabetes is a serious, but often manageable disease and it is not an excuse to let your dog become a couch potato. More than anything, canine diabetes is a disease that requires consistency in daily routines, including feeding and exercise. Today we will briefly describe the disease and then discuss exercise and diet considerations for diabetic dogs. What is Canine Diabetes? Canine diabetes is a complicated, multi-symptom disease that is caused by either a deficiency in the insulin hormone or an adequate physiological response to insulin. A dog who does not produce sufficient insulin or who cannot utilize insulin properly runs the risk of elevated blood sugar (glucose) levels, which is called hyperglycaemia, which can lead to a plethora of health problems. Types of Diabetes Diabetes is classified as either Type I, caused by an inability for the body to produce insulin, or Type II, impaired insulin production along with an inadequate response to the hormone. Dogs are at risk for Type I; Type II, which is common in cats, is rarely seen in dogs. Symptoms of Canine Diabetes Below is a list of common symptoms. Excessive thirst/increase in water consumption Weight loss Increased urination Change in appetite Lethargy Dehydration Urinary tract infections Greater risk of developing slow healing wounds and infection Treatment Overview Dogs diagnosed with diabetes can often live long and active lives with proper treatment. That said, treating canine diabetes is challenging, according to Dr. Katy Nelson, a veterinarian, and host and executive producer of “The Pet Show with Dr. Katy” on Washington DC’s ABC News Channel 8. “Unlike many diseases th Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus In Dogs

Diabetes Mellitus In Dogs

What is diabetes mellitus? There are two forms of diabetes in dogs: diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus. Diabetes insipidus is a very rare disorder that results in failure to regulate body water content. Diabetes mellitus is a fairly common disorder and is most often seen in dogs five years of age or older. A congenital (existing at birth) form of this disease can occur in puppies, but this is not common. Diabetes mellitus is a disease of the pancreas. This is a small but vital organ that is located near the stomach. It has two significant populations of cells. One group of cells produces the enzymes necessary for proper digestion. The other group, called beta-cells, produces the hormone insulin. Simply put, diabetes mellitus is a failure of the pancreas to produce adequate amounts of insulin. Why is insulin so important? The role of insulin is much like that of a gatekeeper: It stands at the surface of body cells and opens the door, allowing glucose to leave the blood stream and pass inside the cells. Glucose, or blood sugar, is a vital substance that provides much of the energy needed for life and it must work inside the cells. Without an adequate amount of insulin, glucose is unable to get into the cells. It accumulates in the blood, setting in motion a series of events which can ultimately prove fatal. When insulin is deficient, the cells become starved for a source of energy. In response to this, the body starts breaking down stores of fat and protein to use as alternative energy sources. This causes the dog to eat more, but ultimately results in weight loss. The body tries to eliminate the excess glucose by excreting it in the urine. However, glucose attracts water, so the urine glucose that is excreted also contains large quantities of the body's fluids. Thi Continue reading >>

Update On Insulin Treatment For Dogs And Cats: Insulin Dosing Pens And More

Update On Insulin Treatment For Dogs And Cats: Insulin Dosing Pens And More

Authors Thompson A, Lathan P, Fleeman L Accepted for publication 19 February 2015 Checked for plagiarism Yes Peer reviewer comments 3 1School of Veterinary Science, The University of Queensland, Gatton, QLD, Australia; 2College of Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS, USA; 3Animal Diabetes Australia, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: Insulin therapy is still the primary therapy for all diabetic dogs and cats. Several insulin options are available for each species, including veterinary registered products and human insulin preparations. The insulin chosen depends on the individual patient's requirements. Intermediate-acting insulin is usually the first choice for dogs, and longer-acting insulin is the first choice for cats. Once the insulin type is chosen, the best method of insulin administration should be considered. Traditionally, insulin vials and syringes have been used, but insulin pen devices have recently entered the veterinary market. Pens have different handling requirements when compared with standard insulin vials including: storage out of the refrigerator for some insulin preparations once pen cartridges are in use; priming of the pen to ensure a full dose of insulin is administered; and holding the pen device in place for several seconds during the injection. Many different types of pen devices are available, with features such as half-unit dosing, large dials for visually impaired people, and memory that can display the last time and dose of insulin administered. Insulin pens come in both reusable and disposable options. Pens have several benefits over syringes, including improved dose accuracy, especially for low insulin doses. Keywords: diabetes, mellitus, canine, feline, NPH, glargine, porcine lente Introduction Insulin the Continue reading >>

My Dog Won’t Take His Insulin Shot

My Dog Won’t Take His Insulin Shot

I don’t have much experience with Bender not being a good boy when he gets his shot. He is rather docile and I’ve trained him well. So when he does receive his shot of insulin he doesn’t fuss about it. But I know not all dogs are like that. Some commenters have said that their dogs are any where from fussy to aggressive. They would like to know what can be done to get their dogs to be good about getting their insulin shot? The only thing Bender isn’t thrilled about is getting his nails clipped at home. At the Vet he is a perfect angel. But at home he will do everything he can to get away. After fighting with him to cut his nails I realized I’m letting him win and I’m not making the event fun for him (I’m not mean about clipping his nails, he just doesn’t enjoy it). Letting Him Win: I was letting Bender win by letting him get away/avoid the situation. If he was kicking and trying to mouth his paw/my hand I would let him to a certain extent or not correct him enough. Which after I stopped letting him win, I was able to cut a few more nails but really could only do about 2-3 nails per 5 days. I ending having to have help, I would restraint Bender while some one would cut his nails. Restraining Bender doesn’t mean I’m hurting him in any way. There are certain ways you can hold a dog which makes it difficult for them to move. Google “how to restrain a dog” or ask your Vet about safe ways to restrain your dog. By restraining Bender I was able to do about 2 paws before he really had enough and not wanting to traumatize him I would let him go. Neither technique was really affective until I started making the situation as enjoyable as possible. If I was able to cut his nail, I would reward him with praise. Then when we were done he would get a treat. This Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus In Cats And Dogs

Diabetes Mellitus In Cats And Dogs

Diabetes Mellitus is a disease that occurs when the pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin. Insulin allows glucose (a sugar) to be absorbed into the cells. When insulin production decreases, blood sugar rises. A combination of high blood sugar and glucose in the urine typically confirms the diagnosis of diabetes. Some pets (especially cats) have high blood sugar from stress alone. If there is a question about whether your pet is truly diabetic, a fructosamine test may be recommended. This measures the average blood glucose level over the previous couple of weeks and can help differentiate between a one-time elevated glucose level due to stress and persistent elevations of true diabetes mellitus. Key Symptoms of Diabetes in Dogs and Cats When the disease first develops, most diabetics don’t feel sick. The most common signs noticed by owners are: Excessive drinking, excessive urination, weight loss despite good appeite, weakness or muscle loss. Regulating the diabetes (by treating with insulin) is the only way to stop or stabilize these symptoms and their underlying cause. Other Signs of Diabetes: Cataracts: In dogs, high blood sugar levels cause rapid cataract. This is not generally seen in cats. Cataracts can form so quickly that a cloudy eye and vision loss are the first signs noticed at home. Cataract surgery to correct this problem can improve vision and quality of life in many pets. Infections: Diabetics are at increased risk for infection, particularly urinary tract infections. In many cases, diabetics don’t show normal signs of an infection (accidents in the house, blood in the urine). A urine culture is often recommended in new diabetics or unregulated diabetics. Treatment of Diabetes in Dogs and Cats Diet Diets that have a low glycemic index (meaning they Continue reading >>

How To Give A Shot Of Insulin For Dogs In 3 Steps

How To Give A Shot Of Insulin For Dogs In 3 Steps

When you have a diabetic dog, changing their diet and lifestyle can seem like the "easy" part compared to having to give your dog a daily insulin shot. Here are 3 easy steps to administering an insulin shot. Take heart, it's actually easier than it looks. If your dog has been diagnosed with canine diabetes, your vet has probably prescribed insulin injections. Insulin is a hormone that helps regulate the body’s blood sugar, or glucose, levels. Dogs with diabetes can only regulate their blood sugar with insulin injections, so you’ll have to learn to give a shot of insulin to your dog. Diabetes affects as many as 1 in 500 dogs. It’s a common health problem, and one that is manageable with consistent treatment and lifestyle changes. Many pet parents are understandably nervous about giving their dog shots, but when properly given they cause only minimal discomfort. Once you master these steps, the process will be a quick part of your—and your dog’s—routine. Your veterinarian will give you the proper dosage and the number of shots a day your dog needs –it’s important to give the injections at the same time each day. Step 1. Store the insulin carefully Insulin can be a fragile substance. It should not be exposed to direct sunlight or stored in high temperatures. Keep your unused bottles in the refrigerator, not frozen. Storing it in the fridge door is often recommended. If the insulin bottle looks frosted, was possibly exposed to heat, or the liquid seems unevenly colored, start with a new vial to be safe. Do not use insulin past the expiration date on the bottle. TIP: Although insulin is sensitive to extreme temperatures, bringing it to room temperature before use will not harm the hormone and may be more comfortable at the injection site for your pet. Step 2. Continue reading >>

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