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Why Is Insulin Injected

Insulin Injection Areas

Insulin Injection Areas

Look at the dark pink areas on these pictures to find areas of the body where insulin is injected. Inject insulin into: The abdomen, but at least 2 in. (5.1 cm) inches from the belly button. The abdomen is the best place to inject insulin, because your abdomen area can absorb insulin most consistently. The top outer area of the thighs. Insulin usually is absorbed more slowly from this site, unless you exercise soon after injecting insulin into your legs. The upper outer area of the arms. The buttocks. Rotate the location of the injection, and slightly change the injection spot each time you inject insulin. Using the same spot every time can form bumps or pits in the skin. For example, inject your insulin above your belly button, then the next time use your upper thigh, then the next time below your belly button. Continue reading >>

Injecting Insulin

Injecting Insulin

Injecting insulin at home is done subcutaneously, under the skin, but not into muscle or vein. See also Syringe and Insulin pen. It's best to pull up some loose skin into a tent[1][2], then insert the needle firmly, bevel side up[3][4] for comfort[5]. {C BD has animations with narrations to help you learn how to draw insulin properly[6]. One can select from drawing one insulin or combining two insulins in the same syringe. Selecting this and the style of syringe you use personalizes the demo for your needs. The presentation is very clear and unhurried. BD also has a slideshow which shows how to inject your dog[7] or cat[8]. Injecting any insulin at the same site repeatedly over time or blunting a needle with re-use[10] can cause a lipodystrophy: either lipoatrophy[11] or lipohypertrophy. Either makes absorption unreliable. But varying the injection site can cause variability in action profile, too. This page illustrates[12] illustrates the most common areas humans with diabetes inject insulin and explains how absorption differs in various areas of the human body. This is true for ALL insulins. The new shot area needn't be very far from where the last shot was given--the distance of the width of 2 fingers will do fine as a measure[13]. Most of us dealing with pet diabetes vary the side we give the injections in--right side mornings and left side evenings, for example. This is another help in avoiding giving shots in the same areas[14]. Many people give insulin shots in the scruff of the pet's neck, which is now considered to be a less than optimum choice. The neck area provides poor insulin Absorption, due to it not having many capillaries, veins. etc. (vascularization). Other sites suggested by Dr. Greco include the flank and armpit[15]. Intervet recommends giving injec Continue reading >>

What Is Insulin And Why Does It Need To Be Injected?

What Is Insulin And Why Does It Need To Be Injected?

Dear Diabetes Educator, My name is Lori and my doctor told me I have diabetes and need to take insulin. I don’t understand what insulin is and why I need to use a needle to inject it. I would like to take an insulin pill instead. Please explain this to me. Dear Lori, Thank you for your question. Insulin is a hormone made in the beta cells of the islets of Langerhans which is located in the pancreas. When you eat, the fats proteins and carbohydrates in our food is broken down to be used by our body. These substances are called macronutrients and are needed for growth and maintenance. The carbohydrates in our food are broken down to glucose as part of the digestion process. Glucose travels through the bloodstream to the cells in our body to be used as energy. To enter most cells, insulin is needed. Without insulin, glucose builds up in the bloodstream. When the body cannot make insulin or make enough insulin, it must be taken through injection. Pills that are used to help control diabetes are not insulin. These pills are to help the body use the insulin it already makes. The hormone insulin is made up of proteins that if taken by mouth is denatured by the digestive process. This would inactivate the insulin. Therefore, when the body can’t make insulin, it can’t be taken in pill form and at this time must be injected. *Please ask your physician and medical team for guidance in understanding the types of insulin you need and when and how much to take. You should also learn how to properly inject your insulin. Ask your doctor if you can see a diabetes educator to learn all about insulin and other aspects of taking care of your diabetes. Continue reading >>

Can I Inject Insulin Into Muscle?

Can I Inject Insulin Into Muscle?

The latest Q&A from the mailbag of Integrated Diabetes Services. Integrated Diabetes Services provides detailed advice and coaching on diabetes management from certified diabetes educators and dieticians. Each week, the team answers questions from people affected by Type 1 diabetes. Q: Is there any reason not to inject insulin directly into muscle? A: There is really no medical evidence that intramuscular injections are harmful. They hurt more than subcutaneous injections and people need to use sterile syringes to prevent infection, but otherwise this type of injection can speed up insulin action considerably. In fact, absorption occurs twice as fast in most cases. This can be a useful tool for bringing high blood glucose levels down quickly or for avoiding blood sugar spikes when consuming high glycemic meals without a pre-bolus. Have a Question? Insulin-Quiring Minds is a free service of the clinical team at Integrated Diabetes Services LLC. Submit your questions to [email protected] All questions will be answered, and yours may be chosen to appear in Insulin Nation. For more information on Integrated Diabetes Services, call 1-610-642-6055, go to integrateddiabetes.com or write to [email protected] Thanks for reading this Insulin Nation article. Want more Type 1 news? Subscribe here. Have Type 2 diabetes or know someone who does? Try Type 2 Nation, our sister publication. Continue reading >>

Facts About Insulin Treatment

Facts About Insulin Treatment

Insulin is an essential hormone. Without it, the body cannot control or properly use glucose (sugar) – one of its main energy supplying fuels. How does insulin help diabetes? People with type 1 diabetes produce inadequate amounts of insulin, so insulin replacement is their key treatment. Without adequate insulin replacement, people with type 1 diabetes will see their blood sugar levels rise and the body will start to burn up its fat stores. In a few days this leads to a condition called diabetic acidosis, which is life threatening. Too much insulin, on the other hand, leads to such low levels of blood sugar that it causes a condition called hypoglycaemia. The symptoms include paleness, shaking, shivering, perspiration, rapid heartbeat, hunger, anxiety and blurred vision. In some cases it can cause loss of consciousness (hypoglycaemic coma) and convulsions. In type 2 diabetes the problem is not a lack of insulin output, but increasing resistance of your cells to the effects of insulin. In the early years, the body compensates for this insulin resistance by increasing the output of insulin from the pancreas gland. Ultimately, the pancreas becomes unable to cope. About 30 per cent of people with type 2 diabetes eventually need treatment with insulin. The longer a person has type 2 diabetes, the more likely they will have to start insulin treatment at some point. There are four main kinds of injectable insulin. The type of insulin you use will depend on your individual needs and lifestyle. Rapid-acting insulin analogues start working within 10 or 15 minutes and last between 2 to 4 hours. Examples are insulin aspart, insulin aspart and insulin glulisine. Short-acting insulin, eg Actrapid: soluble insulin starts working within 30 to 60 minutes and lasts six to eight hours. Continue reading >>

Swallow Insulin Instead Of Inject It?

Swallow Insulin Instead Of Inject It?

BROWN (US) — With a new “bioadhesive” coating, intestines better absorb nanoparticles into the bloodstream—a necessary step toward one day swallowing drugs like insulin. For protein-based drugs such as insulin to be taken orally rather than injected, bioengineers need to find a way to shuttle them safely through the stomach to the small intestine where they can be absorbed and distributed by the bloodstream. Progress has been slow, but in a new study, researchers report an important technological advance. They show that the “bioadhesive” coating significantly increased the intestinal uptake of polymer nanoparticles in rats and that the nanoparticles were delivered to tissues around the body in a way that could potentially be controlled. [sources] “The results of these studies provide strong support for the use of bioadhesive polymers to enhance nano- and microparticle uptake from the small intestine for oral drug delivery,” write the researchers in the Journal of Controlled Release. Study leader Edith Mathiowitz, professor of medical science at Brown University, has been working for more than a decade to develop bioadhesive coatings that can get nanoparticles to stick to the mucosal lining of the intestine so that they will be taken up into its epithelial cells and transferred into the bloodstream. The idea is that protein-based medicines would be carried in the nanoparticles. In the new study, Mathiowitz put one of her most promising coatings, a chemical called PBMAD, to the test both on the lab bench and in animal models. Mathiowitz and her colleagues have applied for a patent related to the work, which would be assigned to Brown University. In prior experiments, Mathiowitz and her group have shown not only that PBMAD has bioadhesive properties, but al Continue reading >>

What Is Insulin And Why Do Some Diabetics Need To Take It?

What Is Insulin And Why Do Some Diabetics Need To Take It?

Question: What is insulin and why do some diabetics need to take it? Answer: Insulin is a hormone. It's made by certain cells in the pancreas, which are called the beta cells of the pancreas, and the beta cells from the pancreas are part of these little islets called the Islets of Langerhans. That's where insulin normally comes from, and in type 2 diabetes there is always some insulin coming out from those beta cells; in type 1 diabetes, you tend to lose the beta cells and make no insulin. Since 1921 or so, though, insulin has been available as a pharmacologic approach, so you can take insulin by injection, and you can replace what's not being made in the pancreas. Who needs insulin? Well, it really is two situations. First of all, in type 1 diabetes, insulin is always necessary because the beta cells in the pancreas are not making any insulin. So, people with type 1 or juvenile onset diabetes always need insulin injections. In type 2 diabetes, you may also need insulin if your pancreas has sort of worn out to the point that it's not making anywhere near enough insulin, and you do need insulin injections. Type 2 diabetes often can be treated by different pills that might improve the insulin release by the pancreas or improve the response of the body to insulin, but eventually even type 2 diabetes may simply not be making, the pancreas may not be making enough insulin, and the person may need insulin by injection. Next: What Causes Diabetes? Previous: What Is Gestational Diabetes And Can It Hurt My Baby? Continue reading >>

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Injecting Insulin…

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Injecting Insulin…

But Didn’t Know to Ask Just take your shot. What could be easier, right? Well, you’d be surprised how many errors are made by “veteran” insulin users. It turns out there’s nothing basic about the basics of insulin injections. However, you can improve your technique. This article takes a look at the nitty-gritty details behind successful insulin delivery, why they matter, and how to avoid common pitfalls. The gear Realistically, there are two delivery systems when it comes to injecting insulin: syringes and pens. Yes, there are pumps, but that’s a whole other subject. And yes, there are jet injectors, but they are not widely used. Syringes. The first-ever human insulin shot was delivered by syringe in 1922, and here in the United States, more than half of all insulin is still delivered via syringe. Syringes used to be made of glass, had to be sterilized between uses, and had long, thick, steel surgical needles that could be resharpened on a kitchen whetstone. (No kidding.) But syringes have come a long way since then. Syringes are now disposable, the barrels are made of plastic, and the needles are thin, high-tech, multi-beveled, and coated with lubricants to make them enter the skin smoothly. (Bevels are the slanted surfaces on a needle that create a sharp point.) In the old days, the needle and the syringe were separate components. Nowadays most insulin syringes come with the needle attached. People who use syringes almost always purchase insulin in vials. Vials are glass bottles that generally hold 1,000 units of insulin. Pens. Insulin pens date from the mid-1980s, and while syringes still predominate in the United States, much of the rest of the world has traded in syringes for insulin pens. Pens currently come in two varieties: disposable, prefilled pens Continue reading >>

Best Insulin Injection Sites: Absorption Time And Rotation

Best Insulin Injection Sites: Absorption Time And Rotation

Insulin is a hormone that helps manage diabetes when it is injected into the body. It can't be taken as a pill or oral medication. This is because the enzymes in the stomach will break down the insulin before it reaches the bloodstream. Insulin injections are one of many ways to treat and manage diabetes. Others include dietary and lifestyle changes, and oral medications. For people who require insulin injections, there are different types of insulin available. It is important to understand and follow the instructions that the doctor provides about how and where to inject insulin. Common injection sites Insulin is injected into the layer of fat directly under this skin, known as subcutaneous tissue. It is injected with a small needle or a device that looks like a pen. There are several different sites where insulin can be injected, including: Abdomen The abdomen is a common site for insulin injection that many people with diabetes choose to use. To give an injection into the abdomen, take a pinch of the fatty tissue from either side between the waist and the hipbones. It should be about 2 inches away from the belly button. This site is easy to access and some people report that it causes less discomfort than other sites. Upper Arms The upper arm is another site where insulin injections can be given. The needle should be placed into the back of the arm (tricep area), about halfway between the elbow and the shoulder. The main disadvantage of this site is that it is very difficult to use for self-administration and may require somebody else to do it. It may be more comfortable to inject into the non-dominant arm. This means injecting into the left arm of a right-handed person or the right arm of a left-handed person. Thighs The thigh is also a very easy area for self-injec Continue reading >>

Insulin: The Holy Grail Of Diabetes Treatment

Insulin: The Holy Grail Of Diabetes Treatment

Insulin is a hormone made by beta cells in the pancreas. When we eat, insulin is released into the blood stream where it helps to move glucose from the food we have eaten into cells to be used as energy. In people with type 1 diabetes, the body produces little or no insulin as the cells that produce insulin have been destroyed by an autoimmune reaction in the body. Insulin replacement by daily injections is required. In people with type 2 diabetes the body produces insulin but the insulin does not work as well as it should. This is often referred to as insulin resistance. To compensate the body makes more but eventually cannot make enough to keep the balance right. Lifestyle changes can delay the need for tablets and/or insulin to stabilise blood glucose levels. When insulin is required, it is important to understand that this is just the natural progression of the condition. RMIT University have produced a short overview of insulin, a drug that keeps in excess of one million Australians alive. Watch the video to understand why insulin is important and why so many Australians rely on it to stay alive. Copyright © 2015 RMIT University, Prepared by the School of Applied Sciences (Discipline of Chemistry). At this stage, insulin can only be injected. Insulin cannot be given in tablet form as it would be destroyed in the stomach, meaning it would not be available to convert glucose into energy. Insulin is injected through the skin into the fatty tissue known as the subcutaneous layer. You do not inject it into muscle or directly into the blood. Absorption of insulin varies depending on the part of the body into which you inject. The tummy (abdomen) absorbs insulin the fastest and is the site used by most people. The buttocks and thighs are also used by some people. While i Continue reading >>

Why A Change In Location Is Good… For Your Insulin Injections

Why A Change In Location Is Good… For Your Insulin Injections

We all know the health reasons behind changing your lancet and keeping sterile needles for insulin. But why should it matter where on your body you inject? In actuality, where you inject your insulin and how often you inject it there can have some considerable impacts on the rate of insulin absorption and changes in skin texture around the injection site. The best way to avoid complications from over-injecting in the same place is to constantly change where you inject and use a system of injection site rotation. One major motivator for alternating your insulin injection spots is to avoid lipohypertrophy – the accumulation of fat cells under the skin. When the tissue thickens, lumps of fat can form around the injection site and can slow the absorption of insulin into your blood stream by as much as 25%[1]. Another side effect is liposatrophy, where the fat beneath the skin’s surface becomes depleted and can give a dimpled appearance. While these conditions (collectively known as lypodystrophy) are not life threatening, they can result in less stable blood glucose levels since an increase of insulin resistance can occur at the injection site and may require higher doses of insulin over time. Where you inject also matters because different parts of your body intake the insulin differently. The most sensitive and fast absorbing area is your stomach and decreases in the rate of insulin uptake in the arms, then legs, and buttocks. When you are injecting for fast acting or slow release insulin you’ll want to take this into consideration. If you need an insulin dose before you hit the gym or take that evening jog, it is best to avoid injecting in the arm or thigh as the increase in blood flow to these areas can speed up the insulin absorption. Whether you are new to insul Continue reading >>

8 Ways To Take Insulin

8 Ways To Take Insulin

How to take insulin Need insulin? While the drug itself may be old—nearly 90 years to be exact—there’s lots of new things happening when it comes to ways to take it. From the old-fashioned needle and syringe to injector pens to pumps, you’ve got choices to make. There’s even a plethora of devices that can help you inject if you have poor vision or mobility issues. Check out these eight options and talk with your certified diabetes educator to determine which insulin delivery system or injection aids are right for you. Needle and syringe With this type of delivery system, you insert a needle into a vial, draw up the appropriate amount of insulin, and then inject into the subcutaneous space—the tissue just under your skin. Here are 5 types of insulin and 9 factors that affect how insulin works. Even though there are other options, needles and syringes remain the most common way to take insulin. Some of the new insulin injection methods, such as the insulin pen, carry only a preset amount of insulin. Thinner needles and other advancements, such as syringe magnifiers, have made syringes easier to use. Syringe magnifier Have poor vision? You’re not alone. According to the American Diabetes Association, diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults aged 20–74 years. Needle guides can help you keep the syringe or pen steady at the desired location and at the correct angle both for drawing up insulin out of the vial and injecting. Some needle guides also come with magnifiers, which help by enlarging the numbers and allowing you to read the fine print and dosages on the syringe. Syringe-filling device These devices are another example of innovations designed to help make insulin needles more palatable. Syringe-filling devices allow a person Continue reading >>

Injection Of Acidic Or Neutral Insulin And Pain: A Single-center, Prospective, Controlled, Noninterventional Study In Pediatric Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

Injection Of Acidic Or Neutral Insulin And Pain: A Single-center, Prospective, Controlled, Noninterventional Study In Pediatric Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

Abstract BACKGROUND: Pain resulting from injections has a potential influence on the acceptance and thus on the success of insulin treatment. Systematic investigation in humans has suggested that individuals perceive more pain during SC injection of acidic solutions than neutral solutions. Insulin glargine is a long-acting (up to 24-hour duration of effect), parenteral blood glucose-lowering agent. Unlike other insulins, it is injected as an acidic solution (pH 4). OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess whether the SC injection of insulin glargine is more painful than neutral insulin in a clinical setting. METHODS: This single-center, prospective, controlled, noninterventional study was performed in consecutively enrolled male and female pediatric patients (7-21 years) with type 1 diabetes mellitus who self-injected insulin >or=3 times per day and who had diabetes duration of >or=6 months. The study was conducted from September 1, 2005, to December 30, 2005, at the Diabetes Clinic, University Children's Hospital, Ulm, Germany. No changes to the patients' current insulin regimen were made. Based on their existing insulin treatment, patients were assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups: (1) the acidic insulin group, which injected insulin glargine, and (2) the neutral insulin group, which injected neutral protamine Hagedorn or Semilente insulin. All patients also injected shortacting regular insulin or insulin analogs. Pain during SC insulin injection and during self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) (the internal control) was assessed using a standardized, noninterventional protocol and optimized combined 10-cm visual analog scale and 5-point verbal rating scale (minimum = I cannot feel it at all; maximum = it hurts me). Patients were instructed to document pain imm Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medication Misconceptions

Diabetes Medication Misconceptions

If you or a loved one has recently been diagnosed with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, you may have some questions about how the diseases are treated. There are many misconceptions about diabetes medications, mainly because the treatment for type 1 and type 2 diabetes can be very different. One of the most pervasive myths about diabetes--both forms of it--is that the disease can be treated by simply refining your diet or exercising more. While this is certainly an option for some people with type 2 diabetes, it is absolutely untrue for people with type 1. Type 1 diabetes is an auto-immune disease that occurs when the body’s disease fighting system, the immune system, destroys all your body's insulin-producing cells. Insulin is a vital agent that your body needs to convert food into energy. If your body is not producing insulin, you must take it by injection or a pump to live. Insulin currently cannot be taken by mouth because the digestive juices in your stomach and intestine will break down the insulin before it has a chance to get into your bloodstream to do its job. If you have type 2 diabetes, you may or may not have to take insulin injections, depending on a variety of factors. Contrary to popular belief, insulin injections are not for people with diabetes who have been "bad"—instead, taking insulin is a reflection of insulin production by the pancreas. People diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in general are still producing some insulin, although the amount they produce is not enough for their needs. Their cells may also be resistant to the effects of insulin, which makes them require more insulin than a person who does not have diabetes. Frequently when type 2 diabetes is diagnosed, weight loss, exercise, and changes in how much you eat can bring blood glucose levels Continue reading >>

Should I Inject Insulin Into A Vein?

Should I Inject Insulin Into A Vein?

I am 20 years old and have type 1 diabetes. When I am off the insulin pump, my blood sugar gets unstable and can take more than 48 hours to go down. Two friends told me that to handle this, they just inject a very small amount of insulin directly into the bloodstream. I know it sounds crazy, but this would save me time and money. Is it safe? Continue reading >>

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