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Why Is Frozen Shoulder More Common In Diabetics?

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Frozen Shoulder Exercises: https://www.growyoungfitness.com In this video Deron Buboltz takes you through his fun, step by step Frozen Shoulder Exercises. these exercises for shoulder pain are designed specifically for anyone with frozen shoulder and shoulder pain in general. Deron's goal is to bring Senior Fitness to a place it has never been before. To learn how you can join the club and start living a better more mobile lifestyle just click the link ABOVE. ______________________________________________ Don't forget to SUBSCRIBE for the latest videos! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPG8... _______________________________________________ Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/growyoungfit... ______________________________________________________ Follow me on Twitter https://twitter.com/GrowYoungFit Follow Me On Instagram https://instagram.com/growyoungfitness ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- To learn how you can Grow Young, click the link Below! https://www.growyoungfitness.com ________________________________________________________ Keep it Movin! - Deron Buboltz

Best Home Remedies To Treat Frozen Shoulder Pain

For many, frozen shoulder isn’t a condition they know about or have even experienced. Frozen shoulder treatment can be painful and risky, making it a difficult condition to live with. This shoulder issue typically occurs in people aged between 40 and 60 years. It’s most common in women and patients suffering from diabetes. Roughly 3% of Americans experience it (1). What is Frozen Shoulder? Like its name suggests, frozen shoulder is characterized by stiffness, pain, and limited range of movement in your shoulder. (2) Ortho Info explains: “Your shoulder is a ball-and-socket joint made up of three bones: your upper arm bone (humerus), your shoulder blade (scapula), and your collarbone (clavicle). The head of the upper arm bone fits into a shallow socket in your shoulder blade. Strong connective tissue, called the shoulder capsule, surrounds the joint. To help your shoulder move more easily, synovial fluid lubricates the shoulder capsule and the joint. In frozen shoulder, the shoulder capsule thickens and becomes tight. Stiff bands of tissue — called adhesions — develop. In many cases, there is less synovial fluid in the joint.”(3) See also: Reversing diabetes Type-2 Frozen Continue reading >>

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  1. KarenLeigh

    Diabetes and frozen shoulder

    The posts I've found on this subject are quite old. I've had a frozen right shoulder since September 2010. I am right handed, and things have been hard. Just getting dressed has been traumatic, the inability to use my arm, and the pain was unbearable. My doctor recommended I see a bone doctor, and wrote a referral to the local hospital.
    After about 15 months, the pain lessened and is now tolerable. It is there from aggravation now but no longer constant. The shoulder itself is still frozen solid. I lift my arm and half my back and shoulder lifts with it.
    This week, I finally got to see the specialist. He said that only surgery could help now, but they can't do it because of a heart condition. He said outright that diabetics and frozen shoulders seem to go together. He couldn't explain why. Has anyone heard of the reason that diabetes could cause a frozen shoulder? There is no warning for this condition. It just there one morning when you wake up.
    He says I am in the middle stage of it now, and anywhere from 6 to 18 months from now, I should wake up and the shoulder will suddenly be free. I pray he is right.

  2. Nicoletti

    Yes, I've heard it's more likely to happen to diabetics, though I don't know why.
    I would see your cardiologist as to why you can't have surgery and what can be done so you can have it.

  3. mizmac

    I had a frozen shoulder and my chiropractor worked it out. It took several months of treatments, but at least I avoided surgery on it.

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Check Our [email protected]://orthobangalore.com There are various issues related to the shoulder joint for people in diabetes, and frozen shoulder is the most common one. Frozen shoulder restricts in movements, difficulty in reaching their back, difficulty in lifting the arm, difficulty in carrying out day to day activities. Basic pathology here is the capsule, which covers the structure of the shoulder joint, it will become hard, loses its elastic property, called frozen shoulder. Dr Banarji B.H is a renowned Orthopaedic Surgeon specialised in the field of Shoulder and Upper limb disorders and Arthroscopy & Sports medicine. He is one of the most renowned surgeons in the shoulder & Upper limb sector. A specialist in the field of Shoulder Arthoscopy and Upperlimb Reconstructive surgeries, Dr Banarji B is known to be the best shoulder surgeon in Bangalore. Contact Us @ http://orthobangalore.com/contact-us Like Our Facebook Page @ https://www.facebook.com/orthooneorth... Follow Us On Google+ @ https://plus.google.com/u/0/100235118... Follow Us On Twitter @ https://twitter.com/DrBanarji Subscribe Our Youtube Channel @ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyza... Follow Us On Linkedin @https://

Patient Education: Frozen Shoulder (beyond The Basics)

FROZEN SHOULDER OVERVIEW Frozen shoulder is a condition that causes shoulder pain and limits the shoulder’s range of motion. The limitation in movement affects both active and passive range of motion. That means that your movement is restricted at the shoulder joint both when you try to move your own arm and when someone else (such as your doctor) tries to move your arm for you. Frozen shoulder is also called “adhesive capsulitis”, “painful stiff shoulder”, and “periarthritis”. We will use the term “frozen shoulder” throughout this article. EPIDEMIOLOGY Frozen shoulder is a fairly common condition in the general population. The condition is most common in people in their 50s and 60s, and rarely affects anyone younger than 40. Women are more often affected than men. Frozen shoulder usually affects only one shoulder (left or right) and gets better on its own, but it can last two to three years or even longer. People who get frozen shoulder on one side can go on to develop it on the other. FROZEN SHOULDER CAUSES Frozen shoulder often happens as a result of a shoulder injury, such as a rotator cuff tear, a bone fracture affecting the shoulder, or shoulder surgery. It Continue reading >>

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  1. hardaker

    Sometime last November my right shoulder started acting up and being irritated. It eventually got bad enough that I got a cortisone shot for it in Februrary (boy did that mess up my numbers!!! Geeze; I was warned, but spent 3 days over 200 no matter what I did....). The shot did, fortunately, work quite well until one day when I reached for something quickly and nearly collapsed in pain.
    I've since been to PT 7 times, and it's helped but mobility is still significantly impaired. Supposedly diabetics aged 40-60 are somewhat likely to get it.
    My primary questions are:
    How long did it last for you if you had it? Online research shows 2 years or so of frustration.
    Did you regain full mobility at some point?
    Any suggestions that seemed to help you more than others for regaining mobility?
    Thanks!
    [Back to stretching and icing....]

  2. [deleted]

    Yeah I've been dealing with that for the last year/year and a half. Best thing so far for it has been stretching. Granted, they can REALLY hurt, it's slowly improved mobility and the last few months it's starting to not hurt as bad.
    My doctors have all told me it's common with T1's and there's not much else to do besides stretches and it will get better, albeit very slowly.

  3. hardaker

    Thanks for the info!

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http://www.frozenshoulderclinic.com/f... NB: Go to part 2 of this video to see MOST OF DR. O's ACTUAL FROZEN SHOULDER EXERCISES which only start AT ABOUT THE 9 MIN MARK of this video.) In the video you see here, Dr. Oolo-Austin, developer of the Trigenics OAT Procedure, first takes you into his clinic with a patient about to undergo the revolutionary procedure. The Trigenics OAT Procedure is non-surgical capsular dissection operation which restores full or near-full range of motion to an adhesive capsulitis frozen shoulder in ONE VISIT! See the actual before and immediately after ranges of motion in this patients shoulder! Dr. Oolo-Austin also explains the Trigenics OAT Procedure in this video. Also, discover one of the most common predisposing factors of Frozen Shoulder. Hear the accounts of Lisa Fung on her experience with Dr. Oolo-Austin's procedure. Learn the actual neurologically facilitated Trigenics myoneural exercises which retrain your brain to enable you to quickly regain shoulder movement in part 2 of this video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aNDA-... For everything you need to know to have your frozen shoulder fixed in one treatment, watch this video about treatment o

Shockwave Therapy Improves Frozen Shoulder In Diabetes Patients

Diabetic patients who received non-invasive shockwave therapy for frozen shoulder had improved range of motion and diminished pain. A group of diabetic patients who received non-invasive shockwave therapy for a condition commonly known as frozen shoulder had improved range of motion and diminished pain, according to results of a small pilot study in Italy. The study evaluated the effect of extracorporeal shock therapy as treatment for adhesive capsulitis on 50 patients with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, according to an article in Diabetes Care, a journal of the American Diabetes Association. The therapy is delivered by sound waves as non-invasive shocks applied to the shoulder area. Extracorporeal shock therapy has previously been used on patients who are not diabetic to treat adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder (ACS), a condition marked by intense shoulder pain with progressive limitation of joint mobility, states the article. Researchers of this study believe that it is the first to assess the therapy on functional outcomes in patients with diabetes and ACS. Other treatment options for the condition include oral or intra -articular steroid injections, which may not be ideal f Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. hardaker

    Sometime last November my right shoulder started acting up and being irritated. It eventually got bad enough that I got a cortisone shot for it in Februrary (boy did that mess up my numbers!!! Geeze; I was warned, but spent 3 days over 200 no matter what I did....). The shot did, fortunately, work quite well until one day when I reached for something quickly and nearly collapsed in pain.
    I've since been to PT 7 times, and it's helped but mobility is still significantly impaired. Supposedly diabetics aged 40-60 are somewhat likely to get it.
    My primary questions are:
    How long did it last for you if you had it? Online research shows 2 years or so of frustration.
    Did you regain full mobility at some point?
    Any suggestions that seemed to help you more than others for regaining mobility?
    Thanks!
    [Back to stretching and icing....]

  2. [deleted]

    Yeah I've been dealing with that for the last year/year and a half. Best thing so far for it has been stretching. Granted, they can REALLY hurt, it's slowly improved mobility and the last few months it's starting to not hurt as bad.
    My doctors have all told me it's common with T1's and there's not much else to do besides stretches and it will get better, albeit very slowly.

  3. hardaker

    Thanks for the info!

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