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Why Insulin Spike Is Bad

The Inside Scoop On Insulin- Why Spikes Cause Acne

The Inside Scoop On Insulin- Why Spikes Cause Acne

Insulin… a necessary evil in life, and one where the scales can be tipped with the slightest breeze. Too much, or too little, blood sugar can cause some serious issues in your body, but did you know it’s also linked to acne? THAT’S RIGHT! Blood sugar, particularly when it’s spiked can cause breakouts, even the super sore cystic kind. Here’s how: Spikes in your blood sugar can occur when you eat something sugary, skip a meal, drink a cup of coffee and even experience a cold or flu. When your system becomes overloaded with sugar, your pancreas has to go into “hare mode” to produce enough insulin and insulin like growth factor (IGF-1) to restore balance to your blood sugar levels When your system is burdened by an abundance of insulin (or IGF-1), it begins to produce androgen hormones BUT WHY IS THIS A BAD THING??? When we have an excess of androgen hormones in our body, it reacts by producing excess sebum (oil), leading to clogged pores, congestion AND breakouts (both in the forms of black and white heads). When congestion and oil are present, it can increase the inflammation in the skin, and even lead to cystic acne when left untreated. Basically – it’s a VICIOUS cycle! One wrong move can lead to a bad reaction, which leads to another bad reaction, and another…. well you get the point. If left unattended, the long term results can lead to insulin resistance (basically meaning, it takes way more insulin to restore balance than it did before, and the pancreas is required to produce at much higher levels). This also means the production of androgen hormones (and oil) is put into overdrive, eventually leading to acne chaos! SOME OTHER TID-BITS TO NOTE: When we exacerbate the levels of inflammation it only propels our acne into a downward spiral further (i Continue reading >>

If White Rice Is Linked To Diabetes, What About China?

If White Rice Is Linked To Diabetes, What About China?

“The fact the cohorts used to determine this study’s conclusions (BMJ published meta analysis) failed to consider incredibly relevant diabetes confounders like family history of diabetes, socioeconomic status, and dietary consumption patterns, including the dietary consumption of other categories of refined grains, makes quantifying the effect on diabetes development due to white rice consumption from this data set impossible. And yet it was published in the BMJ?” At the end of the press release it says this: “In an accompanying editorial, Dr Bruce Neal from the University of Sydney suggests that more, bigger studies are needed to substantiate the research hypothesis that white rice increases the chances of getting type 2 diabetes.” But then the title says: “White Rice Increases Risk of Type 2 Diabetes” Im understandably upset at this. Continue reading >>

Reactive Hypoglycemia

Reactive Hypoglycemia

Reactive hypoglycemia, postprandial hypoglycemia, or sugar crash is a term describing recurrent episodes of symptomatic hypoglycemia occurring within 4 hours[1] after a high carbohydrate meal in people who do not have diabetes.[2] The condition is related to homeostatic systems utilised by the body to control blood sugar levels. It is variously described as a sense of tiredness, lethargy, irritation, or hangover, although the effects can be less if one has undertaken a lot of physical activity within the next few hours after consumption. The alleged mechanism for the feeling of a crash is correlated with an abnormally rapid rise in blood glucose after eating. This normally leads to insulin secretion (known as an insulin spike), which in turn initiates rapid glucose uptake by tissues either accumulating it as glycogen or utilizing it for energy production. The consequent fall in blood glucose is indicated as the reason for the "sugar crash".[3]. A deeper cause might be hysteresis effect of insulin action, i.e., the effect of insulin is still prominent even if both plasma glucose and insulin levels were already low, causing a plasma glucose level eventually much lower than the baseline level[4]. Sugar crashes are not to be confused with the after-effects of consuming large amounts of protein, which produces fatigue akin to a sugar crash, but are instead the result of the body prioritising the digestion of ingested food.[5] The prevalence of this condition is difficult to ascertain because a number of stricter or looser definitions have been used. It is recommended that the term reactive hypoglycemia be reserved for the pattern of postprandial hypoglycemia which meets the Whipple criteria (symptoms correspond to measurably low glucose and are relieved by raising the glucos Continue reading >>

On Whey Protein, Insulin Spikes And Losing Fat

On Whey Protein, Insulin Spikes And Losing Fat

Some argue against the use of whey protein when you’re trying to lose fat, mainly on the basis that it raises insulin levels. “Whey is a fast protein that spikes insulin,” they say. “Every time you chug down a whey protein shake, there’s a big insulin response, and fat burning is stopped dead in its tracks. If you want to lose fat, stop using whey.” It’s true that whey is a highly insulinogenic food, which means that it triggers a large release of insulin after you eat it. In fact, whey has a much bigger impact on insulin levels than even pure glucose. But this has little to do with changes in blood sugar levels. Rather, the amino acids in whey trigger insulin secretion directly in pancreatic beta cells. The branched-chain amino acids, leucine in particular, appear to be the most potent insulin secretagogues. Whey also stimulates the release of a couple of gastrointestinal hormones known as GIP and GLP-1, both of which have the effect of raising insulin levels. Should you stop using whey if you want to lose fat? Whey comes from milk. Around 20 percent of milk protein is whey, with the remaining 80 percent coming from casein. So if the “whey prevents fat loss” claim was true, you’d expect to see a slower rate of fat loss in people eating large amounts of dairy produce like milk and yogurt. In one study, researchers compared low (0–1 serving of dairy per day), medium (3–4 servings of dairy per day) and high (6–7 servings of dairy per day) dairy diets. All three diets were set up so that the women taking part consumed around 500 calories less than they needed to maintain their weight. After 16 weeks of diet and exercise, all three groups lost weight. If whey or dairy had a negative impact on weight loss, then you’d expect it to show up in this s Continue reading >>

If Fructose Is Bad, What About Fruit?

If Fructose Is Bad, What About Fruit?

Alcohol without the buzz? That was in reference to my video How Much Added Sugar Is Too Much?—make sure to check it out for background. I have lots more fructose videos on the way. Before, I would have these long series on single topics, like a dozen videos in a row on vitamin D or something. The advantage of that is you aren’t left hanging; the downside is that for those uninterested in the topic there can be no new videos of interest for weeks. So I’ve tried breaking topics up. So every few weeks there’s a new turmeric or diabetes video instead of grouping them altogether. Let me know what you think… Surprised about the juice results? Me too! More on juice: A few videos I have on industrial sugars: How else can we blunt the glycemic spike? If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here. Continue reading >>

Insulin Spikes, Fat Storage, And The Bad Cycle

Insulin Spikes, Fat Storage, And The Bad Cycle

Insulin is a chemical your body uses to transport sugar to the places it’s needed as energy. Your body extracts sugar from most foods, which is what carbohydrates become as they break down. The process takes a long time for complex forms but no time at all with refined foods. If you read labels and see carbs noted, this number is usually broken down to reflect how much of those are sugars. Sugar and Fat Carbs are good sources of energy, right? That is true but consumers must be discerning. Carbs should be derived from complex sources such as grains (rice, oats, and quinoa) and vegetables. They tend to lose their value if they are refined into flour or altered considerably. Many vegetables aren’t as good for you if they are baked or cooked and certainly less healthy when fried or smothered in fatty sauces. Thick or steel cut oats are better than those you can cook just by adding hot water. Your body only needs a certain number of calories daily depending on your lifestyle too. Unused carbs will turn into sugar if you are providing excess fuel. Insulin Spikes A slow process of over-eating healthy foods produces stores of fat for energy. There’s an even worse problem caused by consuming refined or junk foods such as potato chips, cheese puffs, candy, and baked items: insulin spikes. This is what happens when you eat simple carbohydrates and your pancreas releases insulin to deal with it. As the body determines its needs for energy are minimal, the rest of that sugar is stored as fat in case you need energy later. Fat storage is a body’s natural means of preventing starvation, something that was a real possibility for most people around the world, even in developed countries up to a century ago. It is only a relatively modern problem that consumers don’t need that Continue reading >>

Carbohydrates And Blood Sugar

Carbohydrates And Blood Sugar

When people eat a food containing carbohydrates, the digestive system breaks down the digestible ones into sugar, which enters the blood. As blood sugar levels rise, the pancreas produces insulin, a hormone that prompts cells to absorb blood sugar for energy or storage. As cells absorb blood sugar, levels in the bloodstream begin to fall. When this happens, the pancreas start making glucagon, a hormone that signals the liver to start releasing stored sugar. This interplay of insulin and glucagon ensure that cells throughout the body, and especially in the brain, have a steady supply of blood sugar. Carbohydrate metabolism is important in the development of type 2 diabetes, which occurs when the body can’t make enough insulin or can’t properly use the insulin it makes. Type 2 diabetes usually develops gradually over a number of years, beginning when muscle and other cells stop responding to insulin. This condition, known as insulin resistance, causes blood sugar and insulin levels to stay high long after eating. Over time, the heavy demands made on the insulin-making cells wears them out, and insulin production eventually stops. Glycemic index In the past, carbohydrates were commonly classified as being either “simple” or “complex,” and described as follows: Simple carbohydrates: These carbohydrates are composed of sugars (such as fructose and glucose) which have simple chemical structures composed of only one sugar (monosaccharides) or two sugars (disaccharides). Simple carbohydrates are easily and quickly utilized for energy by the body because of their simple chemical structure, often leading to a faster rise in blood sugar and insulin secretion from the pancreas – which can have negative health effects. Complex carbohydrates: These carbohydrates have mo Continue reading >>

Here's Why You Don't Need To Spike Your Insulin After A Workout

Here's Why You Don't Need To Spike Your Insulin After A Workout

“What should I eat after a workout to get the best insulin spike?” — PRADEEP R., LANTANA, FLORIDA It’s time to clear up one of the biggest misconceptions about post-workout nutrition. It’s been (correctly) reported that your body needs a rise in insulin to drive protein and carbohydrates into the muscles to help them recover and grow. Starchy foods accomplish this, which is why rice and potatoes are staples in any bodybuilder’s diet. But here’s the funny thing: The one time of day you definitely don’t need to boost insulin is immediately after a weight workout. Research from the Journal of Applied Physiology has shown that muscle contractions facilitate glucose transport into muscle cells, essentially mimicking the work insulin does. In other words, lifting primes the pump for you, so you don’t need a sharp rise in insulin to get nutrition into the muscles. Play Video Play Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Remaining Time -0:00 This is a modal window. Foreground --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Opaque Background --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Window --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Font Size 50% 75% 100% 125% 150% 175% 200% 300% 400% Text Edge Style None Raised Depressed Uniform Dropshadow Font Family Default Monospace Serif Proportional Serif Monospace Sans-Serif Proportional Sans-Serif Casual Script Small Caps Defaults Done So, rather than spend money on fancy post-workout supps that spike insulin, eat a piece of whole fruit. Fast-digesting carbs are still important after a workout because they halt muscle breakdown, so a mere banana will get the job done. Sean Hyson, C.S.C.S., is the Men’s Fitness training di Continue reading >>

Why Insulin Is The Most Important Acne Hormone

Why Insulin Is The Most Important Acne Hormone

If you don’t get your insulin levels under control, then you will never cure your acne. It is as simple as that. When most people think about acne and hormones, they usually believe that testosterone and DHT are important, and they are. However they are nothing compared to the acne-causing monstrosity that is insulin. High levels of insulin will both massively increase your sebum production, and enhance the ability of DHT to do the same. Insulin is not an evil hormone; it is vital for human health. However it can destroy your health when you have chronically elevated levels of it. The majority of Western citizens have high insulin levels and it’s extremely likely that you do too. That therefore means that elevated insulin is almost certain to be a huge cause of your acne. Read on and find out why insulin is so bad for acne and how you can deal with the problem… How elevated insulin begins Insulin’s basic role in the human body is to shuttle nutrients into cells, and by far the most important nutrient it controls is the carbohydrate. You’ll have been told at a young age that the human body needs carbohydrates for energy, but it also needs insulin to extract that energy and allow it be used. Here’s how it works: Every single carbohydrate you eat will eventually get converted into glucose – the form of sugar in your blood. A plate of potatoes breaks down into glucose, and a slice of sugary cake will become glucose as well. Read Annihilate Your Acne – learn to prevent acne and stop just treating it! Therefore, eating any carbohydrate causes an increase in blood sugar and this is what gets insulin involved. Insulin is required for converting this excess glucose into energy and it does just that; it first converts the blood sugar into glycogen, an easily usabl Continue reading >>

Insulin Insight: The All-important Hormone Insulin Can Be Your Best Friend Or Worst Nightmare

Insulin Insight: The All-important Hormone Insulin Can Be Your Best Friend Or Worst Nightmare

What’s one of the most written and talked-about hormones in the body, yet one that utterly confuses the average person? Insulin. As the hormone that drives glucose into cells (including muscles), it used to be discussed only in regard to diabetes. But insulin is so much more than a mechanism for controlling glucose; because it’s highly anabolic, it’s critical for bodybuilders. Insulin Factor Yet insulin has a dark side, too: It increases the storage of bodyfat. Fact is, you need to spike insulin to grow but also blunt it to stay lean. It can all get a bit confusing, and it’s high time we set the record straight. Make sure you know all the facts about insulin specifically, how and when to use it and avoid it to build a lean, muscular physique. Our insider’s guide will give you all the must-know details. Getting To Know Insulin Insulin is actually a functional protein very similar to growth hormone. Like all other proteins, it’s a chain of amino acids, but the way insulin’s chains are folded makes it act as a signaling mechanism. Here’s how it works: When you eat carbs and/or protein, insulin is produced by and released from the pancreas, enters the bloodstream and travels to various tissues, including muscle. Muscle fibers (or cells) are lined with insulin receptors, which resemble a docking station. Once an insulin molecule “docks” onto the receptor, it signals the muscle cell to open “gates” that allow glucose, amino acids and creatine to enter the muscle. It also instigates biochemical reactions in the muscle that increase protein synthesis the building of muscle tissue from the amino acids that are entering the cells. But wait, there’s more: Insulin also reduces muscle breakdown, further promoting growth. So if insulin is so important for bu Continue reading >>

Wtf Is Insulin And How Does It Affect Our Health And Fat Loss?

Wtf Is Insulin And How Does It Affect Our Health And Fat Loss?

With so much written about diet versus exercise and exercise versus diet, it’s easy to overlook the role hormones play in our health and wellbeing, but they can make all the difference. That's why we’ve decided to take a closer look at the hormone insulin: What is it, and how does it relate to diabetes? Can we manipulate insulin to help us lose fat and live longer? As it turns out, we can—and pretty easily, too. What Is Insulin and How Does It Relate to Diabetes? Insulin is a super important hormone that helps us absorb nutrients from our food. Whenever we eat carbs (and a little bit when we eat protein), the amount of sugar in our blood increases, and the pancreas releases insulin to help take the sugar out of the bloodstream and into our organs (mostly the liver and muscle cells) where it can be used for energy . Diabetes is a disease that occurs when that insulin response doesn’t work properly and sugar piles up in the blood with nowhere to go. This can result in a whole lot of problems, including vision loss, hearing loss, high blood pressure, and gum disease. There are two main kinds of diabetes: Type 1 occurs when the pancreas produces little or no insulin. Type 2 occurs when insulin is produced, but the body doesn’t respond to it the right way. What causes Type 1 is often hard to pinpoint. Type 2 diabetes is increasingly common—some have estimated that a third of Americans born in 2000 will develop the disease—and a lot of the time, it can be prevented. How? Let’s talk insulin sensitivity. What Is Insulin Sensitivity? Doing a lot of something can make you less sensitive to its effects, right? Drinking coffee all the time can dull the caffeine, regular drinkers find they need more beers to get drunk than they used to, and so on. In kind of the same Continue reading >>

Insulin And Keto: What You Need To Know

Insulin And Keto: What You Need To Know

If you want to make keto really work for you, it helps to understand a little bit about how the diet does its magic – and one of the big players here is the hormone insulin. Insulin does a whole lot of different things, but it’s best-known as the hormone that you make to metabolize carbs. Insulin gets a really bad rap in low-carb circles, to the point where it can get really oversimplified. There’s more to weight gain than insulin! For general health, insulin isn’t necessarily bad, and it’s actually necessary for some health-related goals (for example, if you want to gain muscle, insulin is definitely your friend). But keto isn’t just about general health. Keto is about a specific metabolic shift. If your goal is ketosis specifically, insulin is bad news – here’s what you need to know. Insulin: Keto Enemy #1 The whole point of the ketogenic diet is that you’re forcing your body to use ketone bodies for energy, instead of fat and carbohydrate. That’s what makes the diet work. Insulin suppresses ketone production. So if you want to get into ketosis and stay there, you want to minimize insulin as much as possible. Unless you’re taking outside insulin, the easiest way to do this is by changing what you eat. Insulin is produced in response to different foods, so by changing your diet, you can minimize insulin production. That’s the point of a ketogenic diet. Eating for Low Insulin Production The ketogenic diet minimizes insulin production by restricting both carbs and protein – the diet keeps carbs as low as possible and supplies just enough protein to meet your needs, but not more. To reduce insulin production, lower carbs Carbs raise insulin levels because you need insulin to metabolize carbs (use them for energy). The more carbs you eat, the more Continue reading >>

High Insulin Levels Stop Fat Loss And Cause Weight Gain

High Insulin Levels Stop Fat Loss And Cause Weight Gain

It is impossible to have high levels of insulin in your system while burning fat at the same time. Think about that. If you eat a meal that has too high of a Glycemic Index, your blood sugar will spike, causing a large release in insulin. During this period of time your body cannot use fat for fuel (even if you are operating under a calorie deficit and even if you workout like crazy). You can get everything else right and not make good progress if you allow your insulin levels to get out of whack. [I would highly recommend you avoid anything made with white flower while dieting down. It is okay once you hit your target weight, but try to avoid it to make quick progress.] I Used to Think a Calorie Deficit Was Enough A while back I used to think that as long as you burned more calories than what you ingested, you would lose weight. This is true to a point…you should lose weight under a calorie deficit. The problem lies in the fact that if you eat a high G.I. carb, you may shut down the body’s ability to burn fat for several hours. Even if you do wind up losing weight, you aren’t following the quickest route to your goal. A Quick Overview of Insulin You probably know what insulin is, but if you don’t here is a quick summary: Insulin is a hormone that causes most of the body’s cells to take up glucose from the blood (including liver, muscle, and fat tissue cells), storing it as glycogen in the liver and muscle, and stops use of fat as an energy source. When insulin is absent (or low), glucose is not taken up by most body cells and the body begins to use fat as an energy source. Insulin and Carbs With a High (GI) Glycemic Index The “Glycemic Index” ranks carbohydrates according to their effect on our blood glucose levels. The rating used to go from 0 to 100…s Continue reading >>

Why Refined Carbs Are Bad For You

Why Refined Carbs Are Bad For You

Not all carbs are the same. Many whole foods that are high in carbs are incredibly healthy and nutritious. On the other hand, refined or simple carbs have had most of the nutrients and fiber removed. Eating refined carbs is linked to drastically increased risk of many diseases, including obesity, heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Almost every nutrition expert agrees that refined carbs should be limited. However, they are still the main source of dietary carbs in many countries. This article explains what refined carbs are, and why they are bad for your health. Refined carbs are also known as simple carbs or processed carbs. There are two main types: Sugars: Refined and processed sugars, such as sucrose (table sugar), high fructose corn syrup and agave syrup. Refined grains: These are grains that have had the fibrous and nutritious parts removed. The biggest source is white flour made from refined wheat. Refined carbs have been stripped of almost all fiber, vitamins and minerals. For this reason, they can be considered as "empty" calories. They are also digested quickly, and have a high glycemic index. This means that they lead to rapid spikes in blood sugar and insulin levels after meals. Eating foods high on the glycemic index has been linked to overeating and increased risk of many diseases (1, 2). Sadly, sugars and refined grains are a very large part of the total carbohydrate intake in many countries (3, 4, 5). The main dietary sources of refined carbs are white flour, white bread, white rice, pastries, sodas, snacks, pasta, sweets, breakfast cereals and added sugars. They are also added to all sorts of processed foods. Refined carbs include mostly sugars and processed grains. They are empty calories and lead to rapid spikes in blood sugar and insulin levels. Whole Continue reading >>

Human Growth Hormone And Insulin Are Friends

Human Growth Hormone And Insulin Are Friends

Hormone balance, and the cycle by which our hormones are regulated, is very complicated. That’s why we have doctors who specialize in endocrinology. This article is intended as a basic explanation of the function of a few hormones and their interactions within the human body, as well as how nutrition/exercise affect their production and utilization. That said, hormone manipulation through diet and exercise does NOT account for a great deal of your results – you should focus on getting better at exercise, eating enough, and recovering properly before you lose sleep over whether or not you have optimal HGH or insulin levels. Insulin vs. HGH I’ll get down to brass tacks and make myself clear: insulin and growth hormone play antagonist roles against one another. When one is elevated, the other will be low. That does not, however, mean that their functions are all that dissimilar; they’re both responsible for growth in different ways and looking at them as synergists is much more productive. We want to find a way to make the best of insulin’s ability to pull nutrients into cells, but we also want to elicit the muscular, skeletal and neurological growth that (as the name implies) growth hormone is responsible for. Intraday nutrient cycling is the best way to do this. Understanding why is complicated as all heck, but we’ve tried to make it easy to digest (Get it? Digest? Haha?) Before we continue, I am going to ask that you take a look at our articles on insulin and leptin, as well as the sleep tutorial. They’ll help you understand some of the terms in this section and get a better idea of what’s really going on behind the scenes. Growth Hormone and IGF-1 Growth Hormone (GH) is a hormone responsible for cellular growth in the human body. Throughout the day, GH Continue reading >>

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