diabetestalk.net

Why Insulin Spike Is Bad

Insulin…an Undeserved Bad Reputation

Insulin…an Undeserved Bad Reputation

I feel sorry for insulin. Insulin has been bullied and beaten up. It has been cast as an evil hormone that should be shunned. However, insulin doesn't deserve the treatment it has received. Insulin: A Primer Insulin is a hormone that regulates the levels of sugar in your blood. When you eat a meal, the carbohydrate in the meal is broken down into glucose (a sugar used as energy by your cells). The glucose enters your blood. Your pancreas senses the rising glucose and releases insulin. Insulin allows the glucose to enter your liver, muscle, and fat cells. Once your blood glucose starts to come back down, insulin levels come back down too. This cycle happens throughout the day. You eat a meal, glucose goes up, insulin goes up, glucose goes down, and insulin goes down. Insulin levels are typically lowest in the early morning since it's usually been at least 8 hours after your last meal. Insulin doesn't just regulate blood sugar. It has other effects as well. For example, it stimulates your muscles to build new protein (a process called protein synthesis). It also inhibits lipolysis (the breakdown of fat) and stimulates lipogenesis (the creation of fat). It is the latter effect by which insulin has gotten its bad reputation. Because carbohydrate stimulates your body to release insulin, it has caused some people to argue that a diet high in carbohydrate will cause you to gain fat. Their reasoning, in a nutshell, goes like this: High Carbohydrate Diet -> High Insulin -> Increased Lipogenesis/Decreased Lipolysis -> Increased Body Fat -> Obesity Using this same logic, they argue that a low carbohydrate diet is best for fat loss, because insulin levels are kept low. Their logic chain goes something like this: Low Carbohydrate Diet -> Low Insulin -> Decreased Lipogenesis/Increase Continue reading >>

The Inside Scoop On Insulin- Why Spikes Cause Acne

The Inside Scoop On Insulin- Why Spikes Cause Acne

Insulin… a necessary evil in life, and one where the scales can be tipped with the slightest breeze. Too much, or too little, blood sugar can cause some serious issues in your body, but did you know it’s also linked to acne? THAT’S RIGHT! Blood sugar, particularly when it’s spiked can cause breakouts, even the super sore cystic kind. Here’s how: Spikes in your blood sugar can occur when you eat something sugary, skip a meal, drink a cup of coffee and even experience a cold or flu. When your system becomes overloaded with sugar, your pancreas has to go into “hare mode” to produce enough insulin and insulin like growth factor (IGF-1) to restore balance to your blood sugar levels When your system is burdened by an abundance of insulin (or IGF-1), it begins to produce androgen hormones BUT WHY IS THIS A BAD THING??? When we have an excess of androgen hormones in our body, it reacts by producing excess sebum (oil), leading to clogged pores, congestion AND breakouts (both in the forms of black and white heads). When congestion and oil are present, it can increase the inflammation in the skin, and even lead to cystic acne when left untreated. Basically – it’s a VICIOUS cycle! One wrong move can lead to a bad reaction, which leads to another bad reaction, and another…. well you get the point. If left unattended, the long term results can lead to insulin resistance (basically meaning, it takes way more insulin to restore balance than it did before, and the pancreas is required to produce at much higher levels). This also means the production of androgen hormones (and oil) is put into overdrive, eventually leading to acne chaos! SOME OTHER TID-BITS TO NOTE: When we exacerbate the levels of inflammation it only propels our acne into a downward spiral further (i Continue reading >>

7 Foods That Spike Blood Sugar

7 Foods That Spike Blood Sugar

1 / 8 7 Foods That Spike Blood Sugar If you have type 2 diabetes, you know about the importance of making healthy mealtime choices. But just as important is staying away from the wrong foods — those that can spike your blood sugar. That's because simple carbohydrates, like white bread and sugary soda, are broken down by the body into sugar, which then enters the bloodstream. Even if you don't have diabetes, these foods can lead to insulin resistance, which means your body's cells don't respond normally to the insulin produced by the pancreas. Here are seven foods you should avoid for better blood sugar control. Continue reading >>

High Insulin Levels Stop Fat Loss And Cause Weight Gain

High Insulin Levels Stop Fat Loss And Cause Weight Gain

It is impossible to have high levels of insulin in your system while burning fat at the same time. Think about that. If you eat a meal that has too high of a Glycemic Index, your blood sugar will spike, causing a large release in insulin. During this period of time your body cannot use fat for fuel (even if you are operating under a calorie deficit and even if you workout like crazy). You can get everything else right and not make good progress if you allow your insulin levels to get out of whack. [I would highly recommend you avoid anything made with white flower while dieting down. It is okay once you hit your target weight, but try to avoid it to make quick progress.] I Used to Think a Calorie Deficit Was Enough A while back I used to think that as long as you burned more calories than what you ingested, you would lose weight. This is true to a point…you should lose weight under a calorie deficit. The problem lies in the fact that if you eat a high G.I. carb, you may shut down the body’s ability to burn fat for several hours. Even if you do wind up losing weight, you aren’t following the quickest route to your goal. A Quick Overview of Insulin You probably know what insulin is, but if you don’t here is a quick summary: Insulin is a hormone that causes most of the body’s cells to take up glucose from the blood (including liver, muscle, and fat tissue cells), storing it as glycogen in the liver and muscle, and stops use of fat as an energy source. When insulin is absent (or low), glucose is not taken up by most body cells and the body begins to use fat as an energy source. Insulin and Carbs With a High (GI) Glycemic Index The “Glycemic Index” ranks carbohydrates according to their effect on our blood glucose levels. The rating used to go from 0 to 100…s Continue reading >>

Do Whole Wheat Carbohydrates Cause Insulin Spikes?

Do Whole Wheat Carbohydrates Cause Insulin Spikes?

Insulin spikes are usually caused by a high carbohydrate intake. Insulin is produced by your pancreas whenever your blood sugar levels start rising, which mainly occurs after consuming carbohydrates from breads, potatoes or sugar. A healthy diet can help you keep insulin levels lower to help you stay healthier and reduce your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, polycystic ovarian syndrome, obesity, acne and heart diseases, according to a 2003 article in "Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology." Although whole wheat grain products are higher in fiber, many of them can still induce spikes in your insulin levels. Carbohydrate Content The carbohydrate content of food is one of the main factors influencing how much insulin will be released into your bloodstream after eating it. Whole wheat products contain slightly less carbohydrates, which can help to reduce their impact, to a small extent, on your insulin levels. For example, an average slice of whole wheat bread contains 11.5 grams of carbohydrates and 1.9 grams of dietary fiber per slice, while white bread has 13.7 grams of carbohydrates and 0.8 grams of fiber. A cup of cooked regular spaghetti has 43.2 grams of carbohydrates and 2.5 grams of fiber, while the same serving of whole wheat spaghetti has 37.2 grams of carbohydrates and 6.3 grams of fiber. Glycemic and Insulin Index The glycemic index is another useful tool to predict how much or how little your blood sugar levels will rise after eating carbohydrate foods. The glycemic index ranges between zero and 100. The higher the value, the higher you can expect your blood sugar to spike. The glycemic index of a food is correlated to its insulin index, according to a 2002 paper published in the "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition." In other words, foods with a high Continue reading >>

Carbohydrates And Blood Sugar

Carbohydrates And Blood Sugar

When people eat a food containing carbohydrates, the digestive system breaks down the digestible ones into sugar, which enters the blood. As blood sugar levels rise, the pancreas produces insulin, a hormone that prompts cells to absorb blood sugar for energy or storage. As cells absorb blood sugar, levels in the bloodstream begin to fall. When this happens, the pancreas start making glucagon, a hormone that signals the liver to start releasing stored sugar. This interplay of insulin and glucagon ensure that cells throughout the body, and especially in the brain, have a steady supply of blood sugar. Carbohydrate metabolism is important in the development of type 2 diabetes, which occurs when the body can’t make enough insulin or can’t properly use the insulin it makes. Type 2 diabetes usually develops gradually over a number of years, beginning when muscle and other cells stop responding to insulin. This condition, known as insulin resistance, causes blood sugar and insulin levels to stay high long after eating. Over time, the heavy demands made on the insulin-making cells wears them out, and insulin production eventually stops. Glycemic index In the past, carbohydrates were commonly classified as being either “simple” or “complex,” and described as follows: Simple carbohydrates: These carbohydrates are composed of sugars (such as fructose and glucose) which have simple chemical structures composed of only one sugar (monosaccharides) or two sugars (disaccharides). Simple carbohydrates are easily and quickly utilized for energy by the body because of their simple chemical structure, often leading to a faster rise in blood sugar and insulin secretion from the pancreas – which can have negative health effects. Complex carbohydrates: These carbohydrates have mo Continue reading >>

Insulin – Everything You Need To Know

Insulin – Everything You Need To Know

Insulin – What is it, and HOW is it effecting YOUR health and body weight? When people hear the word ‘insulin’ they mostly associate it with diabetes and don’t pay much attention to what it means to their own body. Insulin gets a ‘bad rap’ because of its direct association with diabetes, but insulin plays a BIG role in EVERY body! Insulin is responsible for determining whether you are storing or burning fat, your energy levels, your mental awareness, athletic performance, and even the possibility of chronic disease! Soooooo…understanding insulin is VERY important to your health! What is insulin anyway? Insulin is a hormone secreted by the pancreas when you have eaten carbohydrates. Have you ever eaten a big pasta meal, and wanted to take a nap a few hours later? Have you ever started eating chips or crackers and you just couldn’t stop? If you have experienced one or both of these situations, you have EXPERIENCED what an insulin spike can do to you. More on this later… What does insulin do?– In simple terms, when you eat carbohydrates, they are absorbed into the blood stream (as glucose) which in turn elevates your blood sugar levels. The pancreas secretes insulin to help your body process the increased blood sugar (glucose) and store it as glycogen in your muscles and liver. If the glycogen stores in your muscles and liver are full, then the ‘excess’ blood sugar is stored as body fat! If your body is secreting insulin, it is in a ‘storing’ process, and NO body fat will be burned. Back to our big pasta meal. When we ate that meal, we had a large flood of carbohydrates which led to a big spike in insulin secretion. Since insulin’s job is to ‘lower’ blood sugar, it does just that. But because of the huge insulin spike, it can lower blood s Continue reading >>

Insulin Spike Bad For Weight Loss

Insulin Spike Bad For Weight Loss

I found the hypnisos info in threads there. Try using it in your coffee or tea instead of sugar. Can we manipulate insulin to help us lose fat and live longer?. If its really bad for a long time, the pancreas needs to make more and more insulin. blood sugar spike is a good thing post-workout, because the insulin helps to quickly send. Why Snacking Can Stall Fat Loss and Fast Metabolism. Insulin then stores those triglycerides as, you guessed it, fat. Every time. Ive got bad news to add to your guilt Studies indicate that nighttime snacking stores more fat. The drawback of insulin is that when insulin levels are high, it promotes fat storage as opposed to fat breakdown. If too much carbs converts to PA, does that make sat fat a bad thing?. I found a page called How can I lose weight?. The premise is that insulin spikes as much or more in response to protein as it does in. Im sorry youve gotten such bad information. If you stay at a calorie deficit you will continue to. If there is excess sugar that is not needed by the body, insulin will help store the excess sugar as fat. So essentially, your body switches its source of fuel from fat to glucose (sugar) whenever you spike your insulin levels. Part of. Im referring to the vicious cycle of spikes and drops in blood sugar levels that. even having a handle on weight maintenance and loss comes down to blood sugar. When insulin takes that sugar to your cell, the sugar is turned into fat and. Dietary protein its role in satiety, energetics, weight loss and health. combinations of food (usually but not always, carbsfat) are bad for me. That insulin spike signals insulin doing its job of getting amino acids and. Heres the problem, these kinds of food create a massive spike of insulin. And youre not even hungry. Most of all, youre Continue reading >>

Why Is Insulin The Bad Guy?

Why Is Insulin The Bad Guy?

Insulin is a vitally important hormone in your body. I know because as a type 1 diabetic, I frequently know what it's like to have too much or not enough. It is the hormone that pushes fuel into the cells and makes you grow. Do you consider insulin evil? Instead of talking about insulin spikes, should we be talking about glucose spikes? Continue reading >>

The Insulin Response (video)

The Insulin Response (video)

(YouTube link: This video is part of the interview I did for Open Water Source, but most of what I talk about will interest non-swimmers and non-athletes. (See the rest of the videos in this series.) Transcript Open Water Source: In simple terms, can you describe the insulin response? Peter Attia, MD: Sure. Insulin is a hormone secreted by an organ in our body called the pancreas. It’s the only organ that can secrete this hormone. The pancreas sits in an area called our retroperitoneum. It’s behind our stomach. This is probably the most important hormone when it comes to how we digest food, take food into ourselves, and how we regulate fat. When you eat something, it will stimulate insulin to varying degrees, depending on what’s in it. Carbohydrates stimulate insulin more than any other food. And even within carbohydrates, there are different amounts of insulin stimulus that result form it, depending on the simplicity of them. Proteins also stimulate insulin, but to a much lesser degree. And fat doesn’t stimulate insulin at all. So, here’s how it works. Let’s say you take a bite of your Corn Flakes. Those Corn Flakes get into your stomach. As it exits your stomach, it enters the first part of your bowel called the duodenum. And all of a sudden, it starts to get translocated and it starts to get absorbed into your bloodstream. So now, we have to get it into the cells of your body. That’s where you need that glucose. How does it get there? Well, that’s how insulin enters the equation. As sugar levels in your blood… And I’m going to use the word “sugar” and “glucose” interchangeably. I apologize for that. Glucose is a very specific type of sugar, and most people, when they hear the term “sugar” they think about table sugar. If I’m ever ref Continue reading >>

Diet Soda And Insulin Spikes

Diet Soda And Insulin Spikes

Dear Alice, I have heard that the main reason why diet drinks, like a diet soda, can be bad on a diet, is that it can spike insulin levels and then your body expects sugar that it does not get. I have taken to the habit of only occasionally having diet drinks with meals, so that any increase in insulin is actually met with food in my system. My question is whether or not this is a good/workable strategy, or whether a diet soda is a diet soda no matter when you drink it and is therefore always a bad idea. Thank you for your time. Dear Reader, It doesn’t seem like there’s a short and sweet answer to your inquiry. Unfortunately, scientists still don’t fully understand the influence of artificial sweeteners on the body’s blood sugar and insulin responses. But, here’s the skinny on pairing a meal with your diet soda: the evidence that connects artificial sweeteners to “insulin spiking” is limited. In vitro studies (a.k.a., test-tube studies of cells living outside the body) have shown that cells release more insulin when exposed to some artificial sweeteners. Increased insulin signals a cell to store more energy as fat (rather than use it as fuel), so this might partially explain the correlation between weight gain and artificial sweeteners. However, much more research on this is still needed, so it’s difficult to say if eating a meal with your diet soda makes a difference either way. Reader, you also mention you’ve heard that drinking diet soda might make your body expect sugar when it’s really getting a calorie-free substitute. Although studies on humans show mixed results, researchers think that it could be a possibility because this is generally true in rats — animals predict the calorie content of a food based on how sweet it tastes (and fun fact: Continue reading >>

Why Refined Carbs Are Bad For You

Why Refined Carbs Are Bad For You

Not all carbs are the same. Many whole foods that are high in carbs are incredibly healthy and nutritious. On the other hand, refined or simple carbs have had most of the nutrients and fiber removed. Eating refined carbs is linked to drastically increased risk of many diseases, including obesity, heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Almost every nutrition expert agrees that refined carbs should be limited. However, they are still the main source of dietary carbs in many countries. This article explains what refined carbs are, and why they are bad for your health. Refined carbs are also known as simple carbs or processed carbs. There are two main types: Sugars: Refined and processed sugars, such as sucrose (table sugar), high fructose corn syrup and agave syrup. Refined grains: These are grains that have had the fibrous and nutritious parts removed. The biggest source is white flour made from refined wheat. Refined carbs have been stripped of almost all fiber, vitamins and minerals. For this reason, they can be considered as "empty" calories. They are also digested quickly, and have a high glycemic index. This means that they lead to rapid spikes in blood sugar and insulin levels after meals. Eating foods high on the glycemic index has been linked to overeating and increased risk of many diseases (1, 2). Sadly, sugars and refined grains are a very large part of the total carbohydrate intake in many countries (3, 4, 5). The main dietary sources of refined carbs are white flour, white bread, white rice, pastries, sodas, snacks, pasta, sweets, breakfast cereals and added sugars. They are also added to all sorts of processed foods. Refined carbs include mostly sugars and processed grains. They are empty calories and lead to rapid spikes in blood sugar and insulin levels. Whole Continue reading >>

Is Milk Bad For You? Diabetes And Milk

Is Milk Bad For You? Diabetes And Milk

Is cow’s milk good food for people, especially people with diabetes? The American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) say yes. Given how I feel about ADA and USDA’s record on nutrition advice, I think we should check for ourselves. ADA recommends two to three servings of low-fat milk (or other low-fat dairy food such as cheese and yogurt) each day. “Including sources of dairy products in your diet is an easy way to get calcium and high-quality protein,” according to their nutrition page. USDA says three cups a day for people age nine and up. But what do independent experts say? And what does the data say? Many disagree about milk’s being healthy. Dr. Mark Hyman, author of The Blood Sugar Solution, wrote, “I typically advise most of my patients to avoid dairy products completely… From an evolutionary point of view, milk is a strange food for humans. Until 10,000 years ago we didn’t domesticate animals and weren’t able to drink milk… The majority of humans naturally stop producing significant amounts of lactase — the enzyme needed to [deal with] lactose, the sugar in milk — sometime between the ages of two and five.” OK. So some experts disagree with the government. But we have to start at the beginning. What is milk anyway? What milk is made of Milk is food produced by mammal mothers to feed their young. Mammal milks are all similar, but they have important differences in the specific proteins. It may be that cow’s milk is not a good match for most human populations. Milk has significant amounts of fat, protein, and carbohydrate in one package. Normal cow’s milk contains 30–35 grams of protein per liter, mostly in the form of casein. It also contains dozens of other proteins in small amounts, various mi Continue reading >>

How Insulin Really Works: It Causes Fat Storage…but Doesn’t Make You Fat

How Insulin Really Works: It Causes Fat Storage…but Doesn’t Make You Fat

Many people believe that insulin is to blame for the obesity epidemic. When you understand how it actually works, you’ll know why this is a lie. Insulin has been taking quite a beating these days. If we’re to listen to some “experts,” it’s an evil hormone whose sole goal is making us fat, type 2 diabetics. Furthermore, we’re told that carbohydrates also are in on the conspiracy. By eating carbs, we open the insulin floodgates and wreak havoc in our bodies. How true are these claims, though? Does it really make sense that our bodies would come with an insidious mechanism to punish carbohydrate intake? Let’s find out. What is Insulin, Anyway? Insulin is a hormone, which means it’s a substance the body produces to affect the functions of organs or tissues, and it’s made and released into the blood by the pancreas. Insulin’s job is a very important one: when you eat food, it’s broken down into basic nutrients (protein breaks down into amino acids; dietary fats into fatty acids; and carbohydrates into glucose), which make their way into the bloodstream. These nutrients must then be moved from the blood into muscle and fat cells for use or storage, and that’s where insulin comes into play: it helps shuttle the nutrients into cells by “telling” the cells to open up and absorb them. So, whenever you eat food, your pancreas releases insulin into the blood. As the nutrients are slowly absorbed into cells, insulin levels drop, until finally all the nutrients are absorbed, and insulin levels then remain steady at a low, “baseline” level. This cycle occurs every time you eat food: amino acids, fatty acids, and/or glucose find their way into your blood, and they’re joined by additional insulin, which ushers them into cells. Once the job is done, insu Continue reading >>

Human Growth Hormone And Insulin Are Friends

Human Growth Hormone And Insulin Are Friends

Hormone balance, and the cycle by which our hormones are regulated, is very complicated. That’s why we have doctors who specialize in endocrinology. This article is intended as a basic explanation of the function of a few hormones and their interactions within the human body, as well as how nutrition/exercise affect their production and utilization. That said, hormone manipulation through diet and exercise does NOT account for a great deal of your results – you should focus on getting better at exercise, eating enough, and recovering properly before you lose sleep over whether or not you have optimal HGH or insulin levels. Insulin vs. HGH I’ll get down to brass tacks and make myself clear: insulin and growth hormone play antagonist roles against one another. When one is elevated, the other will be low. That does not, however, mean that their functions are all that dissimilar; they’re both responsible for growth in different ways and looking at them as synergists is much more productive. We want to find a way to make the best of insulin’s ability to pull nutrients into cells, but we also want to elicit the muscular, skeletal and neurological growth that (as the name implies) growth hormone is responsible for. Intraday nutrient cycling is the best way to do this. Understanding why is complicated as all heck, but we’ve tried to make it easy to digest (Get it? Digest? Haha?) Before we continue, I am going to ask that you take a look at our articles on insulin and leptin, as well as the sleep tutorial. They’ll help you understand some of the terms in this section and get a better idea of what’s really going on behind the scenes. Growth Hormone and IGF-1 Growth Hormone (GH) is a hormone responsible for cellular growth in the human body. Throughout the day, GH Continue reading >>

More in insulin