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Why Insulin Injection

Everything You Need To Know About Insulin

Everything You Need To Know About Insulin

Insulin is a hormone made in your pancreas, a gland located behind your stomach. It allows your body to use glucose for energy. Glucose is a type of sugar found in many carbohydrates. After a meal or snack, the digestive tract breaks down carbohydrates and changes them into glucose. Glucose is then absorbed into your bloodstream through the lining in your small intestine. Once glucose is in your bloodstream, insulin causes cells throughout your body to absorb the sugar and use it for energy. Insulin also helps balance your blood glucose levels. When there’s too much glucose in your bloodstream, insulin signals your body to store the excess in your liver. The stored glucose isn’t released until your blood glucose levels decrease, such as between meals or when your body is stressed or needs an extra boost of energy. Diabetes occurs when your body doesn't use insulin properly or doesn't make enough insulin. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes is a type of autoimmune disease. These are diseases in which the body attacks itself. If you have type 1 diabetes, your body can’t make insulin. This is because your immune system has destroyed all of the insulin-producing cells in your pancreas. This disease is more commonly diagnosed in young people, although it can develop in adulthood. In type 2 diabetes, your body has become resistant to the effects of insulin. This means your body needs more insulin to get the same effects. Therefore, your body overproduces insulin to keep blood glucose levels normal. However, after many years of overproduction, the insulin-producing cells in your pancreas burn out. Type 2 diabetes also affects people of any age, but typically develops later in life. Injections of insulin as a replacement or supplement Continue reading >>

How To Give An Insulin Injection

How To Give An Insulin Injection

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: What do I need to know about insulin syringes? Insulin syringes come in different sizes depending on the dose of insulin you need. Your healthcare provider or pharmacist will help you find the right size syringe. Use the correct size insulin syringe to make sure you get the right dose of insulin. Where do I inject insulin? You can inject insulin into your abdomen, upper arm, buttocks, hip, and the front or side of the thigh. Insulin works fastest when it is injected into the abdomen. Do not inject insulin into areas where you have a wound or bruising. Insulin injected into wounds or bruises may not get into your body correctly. Use a different area within the site each time you inject insulin. For example, inject insulin into different areas in your abdomen. Insulin injected into the same area can cause lumps, swelling, or thickened skin. How do I inject the insulin with a syringe? Clean the skin where you will inject the insulin. You can use an alcohol pad or a cotton swab dipped in alcohol. Grab a fold of your skin. Gently pinch the skin and fat between your thumb and first finger. Insert the needle straight into your skin. Do not hold the syringe at an angle. Make sure the needle is all the way into the skin. Let go of the pinched tissue. Push down on the plunger to inject the insulin. Press on the plunger until the insulin is gone. Keep the needle in place for 5 seconds after you inject the insulin. Pull out the needle. Press on your injection site for 5 to 10 seconds. Do not rub. This will keep insulin from leaking out. Throw away your used insulin syringe as directed. Do not recap the syringe before you throw it away. How can I decrease pain when I inject insulin? Inject insulin at room temperature. If the insulin has been stored in the refr Continue reading >>

Insulin Administration

Insulin Administration

Insulin is necessary for normal carbohydrate, protein, and fat metabolism. People with type 1 diabetes mellitus do not produce enough of this hormone to sustain life and therefore depend on exogenous insulin for survival. In contrast, individuals with type 2 diabetes are not dependent on exogenous insulin for survival. However, over time, many of these individuals will show decreased insulin production, therefore requiring supplemental insulin for adequate blood glucose control, especially during times of stress or illness. An insulin regimen is often required in the treatment of gestational diabetes and diabetes associated with certain conditions or syndromes (e.g., pancreatic diseases, drug- or chemical-induced diabetes, endocrinopathies, insulin-receptor disorders, certain genetic syndromes). In all instances of insulin use, the insulin dosage must be individualized and balanced with medical nutrition therapy and exercise. This position statement addresses issues regarding the use of conventional insulin administration (i.e., via syringe or pen with needle and cartridge) in the self-care of the individual with diabetes. It does not address the use of insulin pumps. (See the American Diabetes Association’s position statement “Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion” for further discussion on this subject.) INSULIN Insulin is obtained from pork pancreas or is made chemically identical to human insulin by recombinant DNA technology or chemical modification of pork insulin. Insulin analogs have been developed by modifying the amino acid sequence of the insulin molecule. Insulin is available in rapid-, short-, intermediate-, and long-acting types that may be injected separately or mixed in the same syringe. Rapid-acting insulin analogs (insulin lispro and insulin a Continue reading >>

8 Ways To Take Insulin

8 Ways To Take Insulin

How to take insulin Need insulin? While the drug itself may be old—nearly 90 years to be exact—there’s lots of new things happening when it comes to ways to take it. From the old-fashioned needle and syringe to injector pens to pumps, you’ve got choices to make. There’s even a plethora of devices that can help you inject if you have poor vision or mobility issues. Check out these eight options and talk with your certified diabetes educator to determine which insulin delivery system or injection aids are right for you. Needle and syringe With this type of delivery system, you insert a needle into a vial, draw up the appropriate amount of insulin, and then inject into the subcutaneous space—the tissue just under your skin. Here are 5 types of insulin and 9 factors that affect how insulin works. Even though there are other options, needles and syringes remain the most common way to take insulin. Some of the new insulin injection methods, such as the insulin pen, carry only a preset amount of insulin. Thinner needles and other advancements, such as syringe magnifiers, have made syringes easier to use. Syringe magnifier Have poor vision? You’re not alone. According to the American Diabetes Association, diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults aged 20–74 years. Needle guides can help you keep the syringe or pen steady at the desired location and at the correct angle both for drawing up insulin out of the vial and injecting. Some needle guides also come with magnifiers, which help by enlarging the numbers and allowing you to read the fine print and dosages on the syringe. Syringe-filling device These devices are another example of innovations designed to help make insulin needles more palatable. Syringe-filling devices allow a person Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection: Cutaneous Adverse Effects

Insulin Injection: Cutaneous Adverse Effects

Sir, We read with great interest the article published in May–June 2015 issue by Tandon et al. titled “The Indian recommendations 2.0, for best practice in insulin injection technique 2015.”[1] Authors have nicely highlighted the correct insulin injection techniques and its importance. Proper insulin administration is equally important as the correct type and dosage of insulin. In routine practice this vital aspect of demonstrating the technique of insulin injection and counseling of the patients if often overlooked. The inappropriately administered insulin not only leads to deranged blood glucose but can lead to many cutaneous adverse effects. Local dermal reactions at the site of insulin therapy occur at some point of time in about half of all diabetes patients.[2] Apart from the mentioned adverse effects, some other cutaneous adverse effects needs to be highlighted. Acanthosis nigricans localized at the site of insulin injection is one of the commonly observed adverse effect over sites such as abdomen and arms.[3] Acanthosis nigricans co-localizing with amyloidosis have also been reported following insulin injections.[4] Postinflammatory hyperpigmentation is also one of the common cutaneous adverse effects following insulin injections, which can have at times a very bizarre presentation. We observed a young female having a whorled pattern postinflammatory hyperpigmentation over abdomen and buttocks, the site of insulin injections [Figure 1a and b]. The patient used to get insulin injections (premixed insulin [human mixtard 30:70]) through her father, reutilizing the needles several times. Multiple use of needles makes the needlepoint blunt. This blunt tipped needle produces more micro-trauma leading to postinflammatory hyperpigmentation. This strange pattern of Continue reading >>

The Dos And Don'ts Of Insulin Injections

The Dos And Don'ts Of Insulin Injections

When diet, exercise, and oral medications aren’t enough to manage type 2 diabetes, it may be time for insulin. The most important aspect of insulin therapy is using it exactly as prescribed. Still, remembering all the little details can be tricky, and certain mistakes are common. By following these dos and don’ts, you can avoid medication mishaps and keep insulin working as it should. DO: Rotate the insertion site (while keeping the body part consistent). “Insulin is absorbed at different speeds depending on where you inject it, so it’s best to consistently use the same part of the body for each of your daily injections,” says Doreen Riccelli, BSN, director of education at Lake Pointe Medical Center in Rowlett, Texas. “For example, don’t inject yourself in the abdomen on Saturday and in the thigh on Sunday,” she says. “If you choose the thigh for your evening injection, then use the thigh for all of your evening injections.” That said, within the specific body area, it’s important to move each injection site at least one finger’s width from the previous injection site to avoid the creation of hard lumps or extra fat deposits, which could change the way insulin is absorbed. DON’T: Store insulin incorrectly. Insulin can generally be stored at room temperature (59 to 86° F), either opened or unopened, for one month. When kept in the refrigerator, unopened bottles last until the expiration date printed on the bottle. Opened bottles stored in the refrigerator should be used or discarded after a month. Never store insulin in direct sunlight, in the freezer, or near heating or air conditioning vents, ovens, or radiators. It should also not be left in a very warm or cold car. Store it in an insulated case if needed. DO: Work closely with your doctor. Continue reading >>

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Injecting Insulin…

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Injecting Insulin…

But Didn’t Know to Ask Just take your shot. What could be easier, right? Well, you’d be surprised how many errors are made by “veteran” insulin users. It turns out there’s nothing basic about the basics of insulin injections. However, you can improve your technique. This article takes a look at the nitty-gritty details behind successful insulin delivery, why they matter, and how to avoid common pitfalls. The gear Realistically, there are two delivery systems when it comes to injecting insulin: syringes and pens. Yes, there are pumps, but that’s a whole other subject. And yes, there are jet injectors, but they are not widely used. Syringes. The first-ever human insulin shot was delivered by syringe in 1922, and here in the United States, more than half of all insulin is still delivered via syringe. Syringes used to be made of glass, had to be sterilized between uses, and had long, thick, steel surgical needles that could be resharpened on a kitchen whetstone. (No kidding.) But syringes have come a long way since then. Syringes are now disposable, the barrels are made of plastic, and the needles are thin, high-tech, multi-beveled, and coated with lubricants to make them enter the skin smoothly. (Bevels are the slanted surfaces on a needle that create a sharp point.) In the old days, the needle and the syringe were separate components. Nowadays most insulin syringes come with the needle attached. People who use syringes almost always purchase insulin in vials. Vials are glass bottles that generally hold 1,000 units of insulin. Pens. Insulin pens date from the mid-1980s, and while syringes still predominate in the United States, much of the rest of the world has traded in syringes for insulin pens. Pens currently come in two varieties: disposable, prefilled pens Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection: Two Bottle Injection Instructions

Insulin Injection: Two Bottle Injection Instructions

Wash your hands. Pick up the CLOUDY bottle and turn it upside down. Roll the bottle gently between your hands to mix the insulin. Wipe the top of both (clear and cloudy) bottles with alcohol. Remove the caps from the top and bottom of the syringe. Pull the plunger down to the correct unit mark for your CLOUDY insulin dose as ordered. Insert the needle into the CLOUDY bottle. Push the plunger down to inject air into the CLOUDY bottle. Withdraw the empty syringe from the bottle. Set the bottle aside. Pull the plunger down to the correct unit mark for the CLEAR insulin dose as ordered. Insert the needle into the CLEAR bottle. Push the plunger down to inject air into the CLEAR bottle. Leave the needle in the bottle. Turn the bottle upside down with the needle in it. Pull the plunger down to the correct unit mark for the CLEAR insulin dose. Look for air bubbles in the syringe. If you see air bubbles in the syringe, push the insulin back into the bottle, and repeat steps 17 and 18. Pull the bottle away from the needle, and set aside the CLEAR bottle. Pick up the CLOUDY bottle of insulin. Turn the CLOUDY bottle upside down and push the needle into the bottle. Be very careful not to move the plunger. Pull the plunger down and withdraw the correct number of units for the CLOUDY insulin. The plunger should now be on the unit mark showing the total units of both the CLEAR and CLOUDY types of insulin. For example, 6 units of CLEAR insulin are already in the syringe. Add 14 units of CLOUDY insulin for a total of 20 units in the syringe. Pull the bottle away from the needle. Set both bottles on the table. Look for air bubbles in the syringe. If you see air bubbles, discard the dose and begin again. Set the syringe down. Do not let the needle touch anything. Pinch or spread the skin a Continue reading >>

Injecting Insulin

Injecting Insulin

Tweet Injecting insulin is an essential part of the daily regime for many diabetics. Although insulin that can be inhaled is now available and approved, the reality is that most type 1 diabetics (and type 2 diabetics who require insulin) will have to continue injecting insulin until it is more common. Does injecting insulin hurt? Needle technology for insulin injection has become much better in recent years, meaning that the injection process, although not pain-free, does not hurt as much as it used to. Many patients still find injecting insulin to manage their diabetes an unpleasant process, however. Is injecting insulin and having diabetes going to change my life? Unfortunately, having diabetes does lead to lifestyle complications. For insulin therapy to be effective, it is necessary to make certain lifestyle changes. These should include: eating healthily exercising regularly testing blood glucose regularly and following a strict insulin regimen Although adhering to all these changes does influence your daily routine, the benefits for diabetics are enormous. Into what part of my body should I inject insulin to best help my diabetes? The abdomen is the most common site for injecting insulin. For some people, this site is not suitable, and other sites must be used. These include the upper arms, the upper buttocks and the outside of the thigh. All of these sites are most effective because they have a layer of fat to absorb the insulin better. This process directly injects insulin into the subcutaneous tissue. These areas also have fewer nerve endings, meaning that they are the least painful areas in which to inject. Should I switch the site where I inject insulin? Your healthcare team should be able to help you to decided the best places to inject insulin, when you shou Continue reading >>

Insulin-injection, Humulin, Iletin I Nph, Novolin

Insulin-injection, Humulin, Iletin I Nph, Novolin

The display and use of drug information on this site is subject to express terms of use. By continuing to view the drug information, you agree to abide by such terms of use. INSULIN-INJECTION, Humulin, Iletin I NPH, Novolin GENERIC NAME: INSULIN - INJECTION (IN-sue-lin) BRAND NAME(S): Humulin, Iletin I NPH, Novolin HOW TO USE: Insulin must be injected. Learn the proper way to inject insulin. Check the dose carefully. Clean the injection site with rubbing alcohol. Change the injection site daily to prevent skin bulges or pockets. Do not inject cold insulin. The insulin container you are currently using can be kept at room temperature. The length of time you can store it at room temp. depends on the product. Consult your pharmacist. Insulin is frequently injected 30 minutes before a meal. Some inject at bedtime. Ask your pharmacist or nurse for details of injecting insulin as it varies depending on your insulin treatment plan. Monitor your urine or blood sugar as prescribed. Keep track of your results. This is very important in order to determine the correct insulin dose. Follow all of your doctor's directions carefully. Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis, Treatment, Medication SIDE EFFECTS: Insulin may cause minor and usually temporary side effects such as rash, irritation or redness at the injection site. To help prevent hypoglycemia, eat meals on a regular schedule. Too much insulin can cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). The symptoms include cold sweat, shaking, rapid heart rate, weakness, headache and fainting which, if untreated, may lead to slurred speech and other behaviors that resemble drunkenness. If you experience these symptoms, eat a quick source of sugar such as glucose (glutose, etc.) table sugar, orange juice, honey or non-diet soda. Tell your doctor about the r Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection

Insulin Injection

Insulin injection is used to control blood sugar in people who have type 1 diabetes (condition in which the body does not make insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) or in people who have type 2 diabetes (condition in which the blood sugar is too high because the body does not produce or use insulin normally) that cannot be controlled with oral medications alone. Insulin injection is in a class of medications called hormones. Insulin injection is used to take the place of insulin that is normally produced by the body. It works by helping move sugar from the blood into other body tissues where it is used for energy. It also stops the liver from producing more sugar. All of the types of insulin that are available work in this way. The types of insulin differ only in how quickly they begin to work and how long they continue to control blood sugar. Over time, people who have diabetes and high blood sugar can develop serious or life-threatening complications, including heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, nerve damage, and eye problems. Using medication(s), making lifestyle changes (e.g., diet, exercise, quitting smoking), and regularly checking your blood sugar may help to manage your diabetes and improve your health. This therapy may also decrease your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes-related complications such as kidney failure, nerve damage (numb, cold legs or feet; decreased sexual ability in men and women), eye problems, including changes or loss of vision, or gum disease. Your doctor and other healthcare providers will talk to you about the best way to manage your diabetes. Insulin comes as a solution (liquid) and a suspension (liquid with particles that will settle on standing) to be injected subcutaneousl Continue reading >>

What Is Insulin And Why Do Some Diabetics Need To Take It?

What Is Insulin And Why Do Some Diabetics Need To Take It?

Question: What is insulin and why do some diabetics need to take it? Answer: Insulin is a hormone. It's made by certain cells in the pancreas, which are called the beta cells of the pancreas, and the beta cells from the pancreas are part of these little islets called the Islets of Langerhans. That's where insulin normally comes from, and in type 2 diabetes there is always some insulin coming out from those beta cells; in type 1 diabetes, you tend to lose the beta cells and make no insulin. Since 1921 or so, though, insulin has been available as a pharmacologic approach, so you can take insulin by injection, and you can replace what's not being made in the pancreas. Who needs insulin? Well, it really is two situations. First of all, in type 1 diabetes, insulin is always necessary because the beta cells in the pancreas are not making any insulin. So, people with type 1 or juvenile onset diabetes always need insulin injections. In type 2 diabetes, you may also need insulin if your pancreas has sort of worn out to the point that it's not making anywhere near enough insulin, and you do need insulin injections. Type 2 diabetes often can be treated by different pills that might improve the insulin release by the pancreas or improve the response of the body to insulin, but eventually even type 2 diabetes may simply not be making, the pancreas may not be making enough insulin, and the person may need insulin by injection. Next: What Causes Diabetes? Previous: What Is Gestational Diabetes And Can It Hurt My Baby? Continue reading >>

Why Insulin Can Become Necessary For A Person With Type 2 Diabetes

Why Insulin Can Become Necessary For A Person With Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes may require insulin when their meal plan, weight loss, exercise and antidiabetic drugs do not achieve targeted blood glucose (sugar) levels. Diabetes is a progressive disease and the body may require insulin injections to compensate for declining insulin production by the pancreas. That is why starting insulin treatment should never be seen as a failure. Starting insulin treatment should never be seen as a failure. Treatment with insulin may be added to an antidiabetic medication or completely replace it. Regardless of the treatment, lifestyle habits (diet, exercise, stress management) are essential to managing diabetes. Many people are reluctant to inject insulin for various reasons: Fear of pain or needles Guilt Impression that this is the “last resort” Fear of hypoglycemic attacks Fear of weight gain Memories of loved one who had to take insulin If this is the case, do not hesitate to discuss your concerns with a health care professional. Some of your fears may be due to false beliefs. Learning more about today’s insulin treatment will probably allay your fears. For many people, insulin is an effective way to achieve good blood-sugar control, which can prevent or delay certain diabetes complications over the long term. Every person with diabetes being treated with insulin should be trained by a health care professional. This training should include the different injection steps, as well as the treatment and prevention of hypoglycemia, which can occur in anyone on insulin. Research and text: Cynthia Chaput, Dietitian Scientific review: Louise Tremblay, Nurse. M. Ed. June 2014 - Revised May 2016 Continue reading >>

Best Insulin Injection Sites: Absorption Time And Rotation

Best Insulin Injection Sites: Absorption Time And Rotation

Insulin is a hormone that helps manage diabetes when it is injected into the body. It can't be taken as a pill or oral medication. This is because the enzymes in the stomach will break down the insulin before it reaches the bloodstream. Insulin injections are one of many ways to treat and manage diabetes. Others include dietary and lifestyle changes, and oral medications. For people who require insulin injections, there are different types of insulin available. It is important to understand and follow the instructions that the doctor provides about how and where to inject insulin. Common injection sites Insulin is injected into the layer of fat directly under this skin, known as subcutaneous tissue. It is injected with a small needle or a device that looks like a pen. There are several different sites where insulin can be injected, including: Abdomen The abdomen is a common site for insulin injection that many people with diabetes choose to use. To give an injection into the abdomen, take a pinch of the fatty tissue from either side between the waist and the hipbones. It should be about 2 inches away from the belly button. This site is easy to access and some people report that it causes less discomfort than other sites. Upper Arms The upper arm is another site where insulin injections can be given. The needle should be placed into the back of the arm (tricep area), about halfway between the elbow and the shoulder. The main disadvantage of this site is that it is very difficult to use for self-administration and may require somebody else to do it. It may be more comfortable to inject into the non-dominant arm. This means injecting into the left arm of a right-handed person or the right arm of a left-handed person. Thighs The thigh is also a very easy area for self-injec Continue reading >>

The Importance Of Good Insulin Injection Practices In Diabetes Management

The Importance Of Good Insulin Injection Practices In Diabetes Management

Abstract: Abstract Time constraints are often significant when treating patients with diabetes with insulin. In such settings, focus is often placed on the type of insulin the patient is taking, with an even greater emphasis placed on the amount. However, how much emphasis is placed on the practical aspects of insulin use? Is the patient using proper injection techniques? Are the insulin syringes or pens being cared for correctly? Are needles being quietly re-used without the medical staff’s knowledge? Are sharps being disposed of safely? Diabetes education regarding the proper use of insulin takes much time and effort. Without it, however, the appropriate type of insulin at the correct dose might not necessarily give the intended outcome. Instead, marked glycemic excursions could occur, leaving the goal of good diabetes control unachievable and the medical staff baffled. Keywords Diabetes, insulin, injection technique, insulin pens, insulin syringes, insulin needle re-use, patient education Disclosure: Richard Dolinar, MD, is a member of the speakers’ bureaus of Amylin, Eli Lilly, and Takeda and a consultant for BD Medical and Pfizer. Received: October 22, 2009 Accepted: December 2, 2009 Correspondence: Richard Dolinar, MD, Arizona Endocrinology Center, 5130 W. Thunderbird Road, Suite 1, Phoenix, AZ 85306. E: [email protected] When insulin-requiring patients with diabetes are seen in the clinic,there is usually a great emphasis placed on the type of insulin the patient is taking and an even greater emphasis on the amount. However, how much emphasis is placed on the practical aspects of insulin use? Which technique is the patient using to inject the insulin? Is he or she injecting it correctly? What sites are being used? Are the insulin syringes or pens being ca Continue reading >>

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