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Why Insulin Injection

Insulin Injection: Cutaneous Adverse Effects

Insulin Injection: Cutaneous Adverse Effects

Sir, We read with great interest the article published in May–June 2015 issue by Tandon et al. titled “The Indian recommendations 2.0, for best practice in insulin injection technique 2015.”[1] Authors have nicely highlighted the correct insulin injection techniques and its importance. Proper insulin administration is equally important as the correct type and dosage of insulin. In routine practice this vital aspect of demonstrating the technique of insulin injection and counseling of the patients if often overlooked. The inappropriately administered insulin not only leads to deranged blood glucose but can lead to many cutaneous adverse effects. Local dermal reactions at the site of insulin therapy occur at some point of time in about half of all diabetes patients.[2] Apart from the mentioned adverse effects, some other cutaneous adverse effects needs to be highlighted. Acanthosis nigricans localized at the site of insulin injection is one of the commonly observed adverse effect over sites such as abdomen and arms.[3] Acanthosis nigricans co-localizing with amyloidosis have also been reported following insulin injections.[4] Postinflammatory hyperpigmentation is also one of the common cutaneous adverse effects following insulin injections, which can have at times a very bizarre presentation. We observed a young female having a whorled pattern postinflammatory hyperpigmentation over abdomen and buttocks, the site of insulin injections [Figure 1a and b]. The patient used to get insulin injections (premixed insulin [human mixtard 30:70]) through her father, reutilizing the needles several times. Multiple use of needles makes the needlepoint blunt. This blunt tipped needle produces more micro-trauma leading to postinflammatory hyperpigmentation. This strange pattern of Continue reading >>

Why Is Insulin Injected Instead Of Taken By Mouth?

Why Is Insulin Injected Instead Of Taken By Mouth?

Insulin cannot be taken orally because it would break down in the digestive process. Insulin is a poly-peptide protein, which can be broken down by enzymes in the digestive system. By the time it reaches the small intestine, where it is absorbed, it is only a single peptide and can no longer function as insulin. Besides the chemical reasons for not ingesting insulin, there are other reasons that have more to do with the management of diabetes. Why Injection Is Better Blood sugar levels are subject to great change throughout the day. What foods were consumed, exercise, stress, illness, even time of day – all of these impact glucose levels. If this were not so, there would be no need to monitor levels with a finger prick multiple times each day. Insulin is needed to ensure that glucose is properly utilized and that levels of glucose remain stable. In order to work properly, insulin must enter the bloodstream intact. By injecting it into the subcutaneous tissue in our bodies, it is designed to be absorbed into the bloodstream without changing its properties and within a proscribed amount of time. Insulin should not be injected directly into muscle or into the bloodstream, as both will increase the speed of absorption. How fast absorption happens is also a function of what type of insulin is being used: rapid-acting, short-acting, intermediate-acting, long-acting or a mix of some of these. Each is designed to be absorbed and active over certain time frames, in order to cope with different glucose control needs, like consuming a meal or sleeping all night. Possible New Alternatives There is active research to develop alternatives to injections. One of the most promising is inhaled insulin. There was an inhaled insulin product, Exubera, on the market for about a year betwee Continue reading >>

Intermittent Insulin Injections Insulin Overview

Intermittent Insulin Injections Insulin Overview

Insulin is the cornerstone of therapy in the management of type 1 diabetes. Insulin therapy also has a clear role in type 2 diabetes mellitus in patients with long-standing or poorly controlled disease. Since the discovery of insulin approximately 80 years ago, insulin therapy has undergone various changes in formulations with different pharmacokinetics. In the 1930s, protamine zinc insulin, the first long-acting preparation, was introduced. In the 1950s, the neutral protamine hagedorn (NPH) and insulin zinc (lente) were introduced. [1] Newer formulations have since been developed, allowing insulin to be provided in more physiologically appropriate ways. These provide more flexibility in dosing, mimic endogenous production of insulin, and lower the incidence of nocturnal hypoglycemia. [2, 3, 4] When used as monotherapy, oral hypoglycemic drugs generally lower glycated hemoglobin (HgbA1C) by only 0.5%-1.5%. Most patients with type 2 diabetes eventually require multidrug therapy or insulin. Some guidelines encourage early use of insulin if HgbA1C remains poorly controlled on maximal-dose, single-drug therapy. Insulins have varying pharmacokinetics that allow for specific products from which to choose. Table 1 provides a comparison between insulins for onset of action and duration of action. Table 2 provides a list of combination insulin products. Insulin Category Onset of Action Duration of Action Insulin aspart (NovoLog) Rapid-acting 5-15 minutes 3-5 hours Insulin aspart (Fiasp) Rapid-acting 16-20 minutes 5-7 hours Insulin lispro (Humalog) Rapid-acting 5-15 minutes 4-5 hours Insulin glulisine (Apidra) Rapid-acting 5-15 minutes 3-4 hours insulin regular (Humulin R, Novolin R) Short-acting 30-60 minutes 8-10 hours Insulin NPH (Humulin N, Novolin N) Intermediate-acting 2-4 Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection

Insulin Injection

Insulin injection is used to control blood sugar in people who have type 1 diabetes (condition in which the body does not make insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) or in people who have type 2 diabetes (condition in which the blood sugar is too high because the body does not produce or use insulin normally) that cannot be controlled with oral medications alone. Insulin injection is in a class of medications called hormones. Insulin injection is used to take the place of insulin that is normally produced by the body. It works by helping move sugar from the blood into other body tissues where it is used for energy. It also stops the liver from producing more sugar. All of the types of insulin that are available work in this way. The types of insulin differ only in how quickly they begin to work and how long they continue to control blood sugar. Over time, people who have diabetes and high blood sugar can develop serious or life-threatening complications, including heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, nerve damage, and eye problems. Using medication(s), making lifestyle changes (e.g., diet, exercise, quitting smoking), and regularly checking your blood sugar may help to manage your diabetes and improve your health. This therapy may also decrease your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes-related complications such as kidney failure, nerve damage (numb, cold legs or feet; decreased sexual ability in men and women), eye problems, including changes or loss of vision, or gum disease. Your doctor and other healthcare providers will talk to you about the best way to manage your diabetes. Insulin comes as a solution (liquid) and a suspension (liquid with particles that will settle on standing) to be injected subcutaneousl Continue reading >>

8 Ways To Take Insulin

8 Ways To Take Insulin

How to take insulin Need insulin? While the drug itself may be old—nearly 90 years to be exact—there’s lots of new things happening when it comes to ways to take it. From the old-fashioned needle and syringe to injector pens to pumps, you’ve got choices to make. There’s even a plethora of devices that can help you inject if you have poor vision or mobility issues. Check out these eight options and talk with your certified diabetes educator to determine which insulin delivery system or injection aids are right for you. Needle and syringe With this type of delivery system, you insert a needle into a vial, draw up the appropriate amount of insulin, and then inject into the subcutaneous space—the tissue just under your skin. Here are 5 types of insulin and 9 factors that affect how insulin works. Even though there are other options, needles and syringes remain the most common way to take insulin. Some of the new insulin injection methods, such as the insulin pen, carry only a preset amount of insulin. Thinner needles and other advancements, such as syringe magnifiers, have made syringes easier to use. Syringe magnifier Have poor vision? You’re not alone. According to the American Diabetes Association, diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults aged 20–74 years. Needle guides can help you keep the syringe or pen steady at the desired location and at the correct angle both for drawing up insulin out of the vial and injecting. Some needle guides also come with magnifiers, which help by enlarging the numbers and allowing you to read the fine print and dosages on the syringe. Syringe-filling device These devices are another example of innovations designed to help make insulin needles more palatable. Syringe-filling devices allow a person Continue reading >>

Insulin: The Holy Grail Of Diabetes Treatment

Insulin: The Holy Grail Of Diabetes Treatment

Insulin is a hormone made by beta cells in the pancreas. When we eat, insulin is released into the blood stream where it helps to move glucose from the food we have eaten into cells to be used as energy. In people with type 1 diabetes, the body produces little or no insulin as the cells that produce insulin have been destroyed by an autoimmune reaction in the body. Insulin replacement by daily injections is required. In people with type 2 diabetes the body produces insulin but the insulin does not work as well as it should. This is often referred to as insulin resistance. To compensate the body makes more but eventually cannot make enough to keep the balance right. Lifestyle changes can delay the need for tablets and/or insulin to stabilise blood glucose levels. When insulin is required, it is important to understand that this is just the natural progression of the condition. RMIT University have produced a short overview of insulin, a drug that keeps in excess of one million Australians alive. Watch the video to understand why insulin is important and why so many Australians rely on it to stay alive. Copyright © 2015 RMIT University, Prepared by the School of Applied Sciences (Discipline of Chemistry). At this stage, insulin can only be injected. Insulin cannot be given in tablet form as it would be destroyed in the stomach, meaning it would not be available to convert glucose into energy. Insulin is injected through the skin into the fatty tissue known as the subcutaneous layer. You do not inject it into muscle or directly into the blood. Absorption of insulin varies depending on the part of the body into which you inject. The tummy (abdomen) absorbs insulin the fastest and is the site used by most people. The buttocks and thighs are also used by some people. While i Continue reading >>

Insulin Treatment

Insulin Treatment

Insulin is a hormone made in your pancreas, which lies just behind your stomach. It helps our bodies use glucose for energy. Everyone with Type 1 diabetes and some people with Type 2 diabetes need to take insulin – either by injection or a pump – to control their blood glucose levels (also called blood sugar levels). Injecting insulin Insulin is injected using a syringe and needle, or an insulin pen or needle. The needles used are very small as the insulin only needs to be injected under the skin (subcutaneously) – not into a muscle or vein. Once it's been injected, it soaks into small blood vessels and is taken into the bloodstream. As your confidence grows and you become more relaxed, injections will get easier and soon become second nature. The most frequently used injection sites are the thighs, buttocks and abdomen. You may be able to inject into your upper arms, but check with your diabetes team first as this isn't always suitable. As all these areas cover a wide skin area, you should inject at different sites within each of them. It is important to rotate injection sites, as injecting into the same place can cause a build up of lumps under the skin (also known as lipohypertrophy), which make it harder for your body to absorb and use the insulin properly. The three groups of insulin There are three groups of insulin – animal, human (not from humans but produced synthetically to match human insulin) and analogues (the insulin molecule is like a string of beads; scientists have managed to alter the position of some of these beads to create 'analogues' of insulin). Nowadays, most people use human insulin and insulin analogues, although a small number of people still use animal insulin because they have some evidence that they otherwise lose their awareness of Continue reading >>

What Are The Side Effects Of Insulin Shots?

What Are The Side Effects Of Insulin Shots?

Insulin is at the center of the diabetes problem. In people with type 2 diabetes, the body does not use insulin effectively. The pancreas compensates by overproducing insulin, and in time, it simply cannot keep up with the demands of the body to keep glucose levels down. To provide enough insulin to the body to manage blood glucose levels, many diabetics are advised to take insulin shots. The insulin in these injections is a chemical that is produced artificially to resemble the insulin made in our pancreas. This insulin works just like natural insulin by escorting sugar from our blood into our cells. Type 2 diabetics deal with a condition known as insulin resistance. It is a phenomenon where cells aren’t sensitive to the action of insulin (escorting blood glucose into cells) and hence, do not respond to it. This leads to the accumulation of glucose in the blood and is called hyperglycemia. Supplemental insulin given to Type 2 diabetics helps the body ‘muscle’ sugar out of the bloodstream and into cells. Insulin injections are used to regulate blood sugar differently for the different diabetes-types: For people who have type 1 diabetes – Their bodies cannot make insulin and therefore they aren’t able to regulate the amount of glucose in their bloodstream. For people who have type 2 diabetes – Their bodies aren’t able to produce enough insulin, or use it effectively. The insulin shots are used because the blood sugar cannot be regulated with oral medications alone. They also stop the liver from producing more sugar. Every type of insulin available in a drug store works in this way. They, mainly, differ in two ways – How quickly they begin to work For how long they can regulate blood sugar levels Mechanism of Action Regulating the process in which glucose Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection Sites: Where And How To Inject

Insulin Injection Sites: Where And How To Inject

Insulin is a hormone that helps cells use glucose (sugar) for energy. It works as a “key,” allowing the sugar to go from the blood and into the cell. In type 1 diabetes, the body doesn’t make insulin. In type 2 diabetes, the body doesn’t use insulin correctly, which can lead to the pancreas not being able to produce enough — or any, depending on the progression of the disease —insulin to meet your body’s needs. Diabetes is normally managed with diet and exercise, with medications, including insulin, added as needed. If you have type 1 diabetes, insulin is required for life. This may seem difficult at first, but you can learn to successfully administer insulin with the support of your healthcare team, determination, and a little practice. There are different ways to take insulin, including syringes, insulin pens, insulin pumps, and jet injectors. Your doctor will help you decide which technique is best for you. Syringes remain a common method of insulin delivery. They’re the least expensive option, and most insurance companies cover them. Syringes Syringes vary by the amount of insulin they hold and the size of the needle. They’re made of plastic and should be discarded after one use. Traditionally, needles used in insulin therapy were 12.7 millimeters (mm) in length. Recent research shows that smaller 8 mm, 6 mm, and 4 mm needles are just as effective, regardless of body mass. This means insulin injection is less painful than it was in the past. Insulin is injected subcutaneously, which means into the fat layer under the skin. In this type of injection, a short needle is used to inject insulin into the fatty layer between the skin and the muscle. Insulin should be injected into the fatty tissue just below your skin. If you inject the insulin deeper int Continue reading >>

Insulin-injection, Humulin, Iletin I Nph, Novolin

Insulin-injection, Humulin, Iletin I Nph, Novolin

The display and use of drug information on this site is subject to express terms of use. By continuing to view the drug information, you agree to abide by such terms of use. INSULIN-INJECTION, Humulin, Iletin I NPH, Novolin GENERIC NAME: INSULIN - INJECTION (IN-sue-lin) BRAND NAME(S): Humulin, Iletin I NPH, Novolin HOW TO USE: Insulin must be injected. Learn the proper way to inject insulin. Check the dose carefully. Clean the injection site with rubbing alcohol. Change the injection site daily to prevent skin bulges or pockets. Do not inject cold insulin. The insulin container you are currently using can be kept at room temperature. The length of time you can store it at room temp. depends on the product. Consult your pharmacist. Insulin is frequently injected 30 minutes before a meal. Some inject at bedtime. Ask your pharmacist or nurse for details of injecting insulin as it varies depending on your insulin treatment plan. Monitor your urine or blood sugar as prescribed. Keep track of your results. This is very important in order to determine the correct insulin dose. Follow all of your doctor's directions carefully. Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis, Treatment, Medication SIDE EFFECTS: Insulin may cause minor and usually temporary side effects such as rash, irritation or redness at the injection site. To help prevent hypoglycemia, eat meals on a regular schedule. Too much insulin can cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). The symptoms include cold sweat, shaking, rapid heart rate, weakness, headache and fainting which, if untreated, may lead to slurred speech and other behaviors that resemble drunkenness. If you experience these symptoms, eat a quick source of sugar such as glucose (glutose, etc.) table sugar, orange juice, honey or non-diet soda. Tell your doctor about the r Continue reading >>

Best Insulin Injection Sites: Absorption Time And Rotation

Best Insulin Injection Sites: Absorption Time And Rotation

Insulin is a hormone that helps manage diabetes when it is injected into the body. It can't be taken as a pill or oral medication. This is because the enzymes in the stomach will break down the insulin before it reaches the bloodstream. Insulin injections are one of many ways to treat and manage diabetes. Others include dietary and lifestyle changes, and oral medications. For people who require insulin injections, there are different types of insulin available. It is important to understand and follow the instructions that the doctor provides about how and where to inject insulin. Common injection sites Insulin is injected into the layer of fat directly under this skin, known as subcutaneous tissue. It is injected with a small needle or a device that looks like a pen. There are several different sites where insulin can be injected, including: Abdomen The abdomen is a common site for insulin injection that many people with diabetes choose to use. To give an injection into the abdomen, take a pinch of the fatty tissue from either side between the waist and the hipbones. It should be about 2 inches away from the belly button. This site is easy to access and some people report that it causes less discomfort than other sites. Upper Arms The upper arm is another site where insulin injections can be given. The needle should be placed into the back of the arm (tricep area), about halfway between the elbow and the shoulder. The main disadvantage of this site is that it is very difficult to use for self-administration and may require somebody else to do it. It may be more comfortable to inject into the non-dominant arm. This means injecting into the left arm of a right-handed person or the right arm of a left-handed person. Thighs The thigh is also a very easy area for self-injec Continue reading >>

What Is Insulin And Why Does It Need To Be Injected?

What Is Insulin And Why Does It Need To Be Injected?

Dear Diabetes Educator, My name is Lori and my doctor told me I have diabetes and need to take insulin. I don’t understand what insulin is and why I need to use a needle to inject it. I would like to take an insulin pill instead. Please explain this to me. Dear Lori, Thank you for your question. Insulin is a hormone made in the beta cells of the islets of Langerhans which is located in the pancreas. When you eat, the fats proteins and carbohydrates in our food is broken down to be used by our body. These substances are called macronutrients and are needed for growth and maintenance. The carbohydrates in our food are broken down to glucose as part of the digestion process. Glucose travels through the bloodstream to the cells in our body to be used as energy. To enter most cells, insulin is needed. Without insulin, glucose builds up in the bloodstream. When the body cannot make insulin or make enough insulin, it must be taken through injection. Pills that are used to help control diabetes are not insulin. These pills are to help the body use the insulin it already makes. The hormone insulin is made up of proteins that if taken by mouth is denatured by the digestive process. This would inactivate the insulin. Therefore, when the body can’t make insulin, it can’t be taken in pill form and at this time must be injected. *Please ask your physician and medical team for guidance in understanding the types of insulin you need and when and how much to take. You should also learn how to properly inject your insulin. Ask your doctor if you can see a diabetes educator to learn all about insulin and other aspects of taking care of your diabetes. Continue reading >>

What Is Insulin?

What Is Insulin?

Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas that allows your body to use sugar (glucose) from carbohydrates in the food that you eat for energy or to store glucose for future use. Insulin helps keeps your blood sugar level from getting too high (hyperglycemia) or too low (hypoglycemia). The cells in your body need sugar for energy. However, sugar cannot go into most of your cells directly. After you eat food and your blood sugar level rises, cells in your pancreas (known as beta cells) are signaled to release insulin into your bloodstream. Insulin then attaches to and signals cells to absorb sugar from the bloodstream. Insulin is often described as a “key,” which unlocks the cell to allow sugar to enter the cell and be used for energy. If you have more sugar in your body than it needs, insulin helps store the sugar in your liver and releases it when your blood sugar level is low or if you need more sugar, such as in between meals or during physical activity. Therefore, insulin helps balance out blood sugar levels and keeps them in a normal range. As blood sugar levels rise, the pancreas secretes more insulin. If your body does not produce enough insulin or your cells are resistant to the effects of insulin, you may develop hyperglycemia (high blood sugar), which can cause long-term complications if the blood sugar levels stay elevated for long periods of time. Insulin Treatment for Diabetes People with type 1 diabetes cannot make insulin because the beta cells in their pancreas are damaged or destroyed. Therefore, these people will need insulin injections to allow their body to process glucose and avoid complications from hyperglycemia. People with type 2 diabetes do not respond well or are resistant to insulin. They may need insulin shots to help them better process Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 1

Diabetes Type 1

The young people we talked to tell us what it is like to inject insulin every day, the problems they've had and how they've coped with them. Where and how to inject Young people are taught by specialist diabetes nurses and doctors how and where to inject. Arms, legs and the stomach are all parts of the body recommended for injection. Most people said that their preferred place was the stomach. But they also said that it's important to vary the place where they inject, over a wide area. They said that injecting in the same place can cause lumps or other changes, called hyperlipotrophy, to develop under the skin. Your healthcare team can teach you how to recognise these changes. Injecting into the areas that have developed this problem is usually completely painless but the insulin may then be absorbed unevenly, which makes blood sugar much harder to control. Some young people who were small children when diagnosed said that they have grown up with doing daily injections and thought it was normal. Other children were scared of needles at first and their parents had to inject them, to begin with. Young people have different opinions as to whether insulin injections hurt or not. Some said that the needles they use are so thin that they don't feel it, but others said it depends on how relaxed and comfortable they are at the time of the injection. Several young people commented that it's much easier and painless to do the injections themselves because they know their own body. Most young people said that it is down to practice and that 'practice makes it perfect'. The people we talked to said that doing their own injections made them feel in control and gave them a feeling of independence. Getting used to injecting everyday It could take a long time to get used to injecting e Continue reading >>

Tips For Injecting Insulin

Tips For Injecting Insulin

Stomach: Stay at least two inches away from the bellybutton or any scars you may already have when using the abdomen for injections. Thigh: Inject at least 4 inches or about one hand’s width above the knee and at least 4 inches down from the top of the leg. The best area on the leg is the top and outer area of the thigh. Do not inject insulin into your inner thigh because of the number of blood vessels and nerves in this area. Arm: Inject into fatty tissue in the back of the arm between the shoulder and the elbow. Buttock: Inject into the hip or “wallet area” and not into the lower buttock area. When rotating sites within one injection area, keep injections about an inch (or two finger widths) apart. Do not inject into scar tissue or areas with broken vessels or varicose veins. Scar tissue may interfere with absorption. Massage or exercise that occurs immediately after the injection may speed up absorption because of the increased circulation to the injection site. If you plan on strenuous physical activity shortly after injecting insulin, don’t inject in an area affected by the exercise. For example, if you plan to play tennis, don’t inject into your racquet arm. If you plan to jog or run, don’t inject into your thighs. When injecting with an insulin pen, inject straight in and be sure to hold the pen in place for a few seconds after the insulin is delivered to ensure that no insulin leaks out. Continue reading >>

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