diabetestalk.net

Why Are Insulin Injections Not The Course Of Treatment For All Diabetics

What Is Insulin And Why Do Some Diabetics Need To Take It?

What Is Insulin And Why Do Some Diabetics Need To Take It?

Question: What is insulin and why do some diabetics need to take it? Answer: Insulin is a hormone. It's made by certain cells in the pancreas, which are called the beta cells of the pancreas, and the beta cells from the pancreas are part of these little islets called the Islets of Langerhans. That's where insulin normally comes from, and in type 2 diabetes there is always some insulin coming out from those beta cells; in type 1 diabetes, you tend to lose the beta cells and make no insulin. Since 1921 or so, though, insulin has been available as a pharmacologic approach, so you can take insulin by injection, and you can replace what's not being made in the pancreas. Who needs insulin? Well, it really is two situations. First of all, in type 1 diabetes, insulin is always necessary because the beta cells in the pancreas are not making any insulin. So, people with type 1 or juvenile onset diabetes always need insulin injections. In type 2 diabetes, you may also need insulin if your pancreas has sort of worn out to the point that it's not making anywhere near enough insulin, and you do need insulin injections. Type 2 diabetes often can be treated by different pills that might improve the insulin release by the pancreas or improve the response of the body to insulin, but eventually even type 2 diabetes may simply not be making, the pancreas may not be making enough insulin, and the person may need insulin by injection. Next: What Causes Diabetes? Previous: What Is Gestational Diabetes And Can It Hurt My Baby? Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Insulin

Everything You Need To Know About Insulin

Insulin is a hormone made in your pancreas, a gland located behind your stomach. It allows your body to use glucose for energy. Glucose is a type of sugar found in many carbohydrates. After a meal or snack, the digestive tract breaks down carbohydrates and changes them into glucose. Glucose is then absorbed into your bloodstream through the lining in your small intestine. Once glucose is in your bloodstream, insulin causes cells throughout your body to absorb the sugar and use it for energy. Insulin also helps balance your blood glucose levels. When there’s too much glucose in your bloodstream, insulin signals your body to store the excess in your liver. The stored glucose isn’t released until your blood glucose levels decrease, such as between meals or when your body is stressed or needs an extra boost of energy. Diabetes occurs when your body doesn't use insulin properly or doesn't make enough insulin. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes is a type of autoimmune disease. These are diseases in which the body attacks itself. If you have type 1 diabetes, your body can’t make insulin. This is because your immune system has destroyed all of the insulin-producing cells in your pancreas. This disease is more commonly diagnosed in young people, although it can develop in adulthood. In type 2 diabetes, your body has become resistant to the effects of insulin. This means your body needs more insulin to get the same effects. Therefore, your body overproduces insulin to keep blood glucose levels normal. However, after many years of overproduction, the insulin-producing cells in your pancreas burn out. Type 2 diabetes also affects people of any age, but typically develops later in life. Injections of insulin as a replacement or supplement Continue reading >>

12 Myths About Insulin And Type 2 Diabetes

12 Myths About Insulin And Type 2 Diabetes

When you hear the word “insulin,” do you picture giant needles (ouch!) or pop culture portrayals of insulin users with low blood sugar (like Julia Roberts losing it in Steel Magnolias)? Either way, most people think of insulin as a difficult, painful, or potentially scary medical treatment. The problem is that if you have type 2 diabetes, you need to know the real deal before you can make an informed choice about whether or not this potentially lifesaving therapy is right for you. Here, we take a look at the facts and fiction about insulin when it comes to treating type 2 diabetes. Diabetics always need insulin Not necessarily. People with type 1 diabetes (about 5 percent to 10 percent of diabetics) do need insulin. If you have type 2, which includes 90 percent to 95 percent of all people with diabetes, you may not need insulin. Of adults with diabetes, only 14 percent use insulin, 13 percent use insulin and oral medication, 57 percent take oral medication only, and 16 percent control blood sugar with diet and exercise alone, according to the CDC. The point is to get blood sugar—which can be a highly toxic poison in the body—into the safe zone by any means necessary. Taking insulin means you’ve ‘failed’ “This is a big myth,” says Dr. Jill Crandall, professor of clinical medicine and director of the diabetes clinical trial unit at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, in the Bronx, N.Y. “Many people who try very hard to adhere to a diet, exercise, and lose weight will still need insulin.” The fact is that type 2 diabetes is a progressive illness, meaning that over time you may need to change what you do to make sure your blood sugar is in a healthy range. Eating right and exercise will always be important, but medication needs can vary. “A larg Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Introduction Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar (glucose) level to become too high. The hormone insulin – produced by the pancreas – is responsible for controlling the amount of glucose in the blood. There are two main types of diabetes: Type 1 – where the pancreas doesn't produce any insulin Type 2 – where the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin or the body’s cells don't react to insulin This topic is about type 1 diabetes. Read more about type 2 diabetes Another type of diabetes, known as gestational diabetes, occurs in some pregnant women and tends to disappear following birth. It's very important for diabetes to be diagnosed as soon as possible, because it will get progressively worse if left untreated. You should therefore visit your GP if you have symptoms, which include feeling thirsty, passing urine more often than usual and feeling tired all the time (see the list below for more diabetes symptoms). Type 1 and type 2 diabetes Type 1 diabetes can develop at any age, but usually appears before the age of 40, particularly in childhood. Around 10% of all diabetes is type 1, but it's the most common type of childhood diabetes. This is why it's sometimes called juvenile diabetes or early-onset diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas (a small gland behind the stomach) doesn't produce any insulin – the hormone that regulates blood glucose levels. This is why it's also sometimes called insulin-dependent diabetes. If the amount of glucose in the blood is too high, it can, over time, seriously damage the body's organs. In type 2 diabetes, the body either doesn't produce enough insulin to function properly, or the body's cells don't react to insulin. Around 90% of adults with diabetes have type 2, and it tends to develop l Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Treatment Could Eliminate Need For Insulin Injections

New Diabetes Treatment Could Eliminate Need For Insulin Injections

A cell-based diabetes treatment has been developed by scientists who say it could eliminate the need for those with the condition to inject insulin. The therapy involves a capsule of genetically engineered cells implanted under the skin that automatically release insulin as required. Diabetic mice that were treated with the cells were found to have normal blood sugar levels for several weeks. Scientists said they hope to obtain a clinical trial licence to test the technology in patients within two years. If successful, the treatment would be relevant for all type 1 diabetes patients, as well as those cases of type 2 diabetes that require insulin injections. Martin Fussenegger, who led the research at the ETH university in Basel, said: “By 2040, every tenth human on the planet will suffer from some kind of diabetes, that’s dramatic. We should be able to do a lot better than people measuring their glucose.” Fussenegger said that, if confirmed as safe and effective in humans, diabetes patients could be given an implant that would need to be replaced three times a year rather than injections, which do not perfectly control blood sugar levels, leading to long-term complications including eye, nerve and heart damage. In Britain, about 400,000 people have type 1 diabetes and three million have type 2 diabetes, about 10% of whom need to inject insulin to control the condition. Type 1 diabetes normally begins in childhood and is an autoimmune disease in which the body kills off all its pancreatic beta cells. The cells respond to the body’s fluctuating glucose levels by releasing insulin, which regulates blood sugar. Without beta cells, patients need to monitor glucose and inject insulin as required – typically several times each day. Previously, scientists have attempt Continue reading >>

Lesson 2.1 Study Help

Lesson 2.1 Study Help

Describe how Glucose Tolerance Testing can be used to diagnose diabetes. You give someone a large amount of sugar when they have not eaten for awhile and then examine how their body responds to the sugar by watching the glucose levels in the blood. If they stay high majority of the time, the person most likely has diabetes. Explain why insulin injections are not the course of treatment for all diabetics. Type 2 Diabetics cannot do anything with insulin already produced; they would not be able to use the extra insulin. Whereas Type 1 Diabetics need the insulin because their body does not produce it. Also, Type 2 Diabetes can be reversed. Explain how lifestyle choices can impact a person's risk for developing diabetes. -Increase risk:Overweight, older, bad diet(high fat, sodium, carb), woman's pregnancy, genetic factors -Decrease risk: exercise, healthy diet, healthy weight. What do you think it means if doctors say that a person is "pre-diabetic"? The person may be showing symptoms of a diabetic. In the activity Patient A's glucose levels stayed high for a short amount of time, then dropped(her glucose levels are unstable). Patient A would be an example of being "pre-diabetic". The doctor would say that Patient A would need to change their eating habits and increase their activity level. Using information from this activity, explain the basic relationship between insulin and glucose. As glucose levels increase, insulin levels increase(direct relationship). As insulin levels increase, blood glucose level decreases(inverse relationship). Describe one benefit and one drawback of using models to represent scientific processes. One Benefit: enlarging so you can see it visually, making something complex and hard to understand to simplify it one drawback: not entirely accurate Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

Although diabetes cannot be cured, it can be treated successfully. If a high blood sugar level is brought down to a normal level, your symptoms will ease. You still have some risk of complications in the long term if your blood glucose level remains even mildly high - even if you have no symptoms in the short term. However, studies have shown that people who have better glucose control have fewer complications (such as heart disease or eye problems) compared with those people who have poorer control of their glucose level. Therefore, the main aims of treatment are: To keep your blood glucose level as near normal as possible. To reduce any other risk factors that may increase your risk of developing complications. In particular, to lower your blood pressure if it is high and to keep your blood lipids (cholesterol) low. To detect any complications as early as possible. Treatment can prevent or delay some complications from becoming worse. Type 2 diabetes is usually initially treated by following a healthy diet, losing weight if you are overweight, and having regular physical activity. If lifestyle advice does not control your blood sugar (glucose) levels then medicines are used to help lower your blood glucose levels. One medicine (usually metformin) is used first but two or even three medicines may be needed. Most of the medicines for type 2 diabetes are given in tablet form. However, some people with type 2 diabetes need insulin injections to help control blood glucose levels. Some people gain a great deal of benefit from insulin injections and these are sometimes used fairly soon after the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes has been made. Insulin injections can be used in combination with other medicines to further improve glucose control. Lifestyle - diet, weight control an Continue reading >>

Treatment For Type 1 Diabetes

Treatment For Type 1 Diabetes

Tweet Central to the treatment of type 1 diabetes is to keep a balance of the right amount of insulin to keep blood glucose levels from being either too high or too low. In type 1 diabetes the body’s immune system kills of the insulin producing cells leaving the pancreas unable to produce enough insulin to keep blood glucose levels at healthy levels. As a result, insulin needs to be taken by injection or another delivery means such as by infusion with an insulin pump. Insulin is a hormone in the body that helps to move glucose out of the blood and into cells for energy. Your health team Your diabetes health team are an important part of your diabetes treatment. Your GP and consultants, between them, will be able to offer you advice on controlling diabetes and refer you to any medical specialists you may need to see. Your health team will also be responsible for making sure you get all the diabetes health checks that are recommended for people with diabetes. The health checks will help you health team to spot any signs of damage caused by diabetes and ensure these are treated to prevent the damage becoming more serious. Insulin injections Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why people with diabetes are adv Continue reading >>

Diabetes Treatment: Using Insulin To Manage Blood Sugar

Diabetes Treatment: Using Insulin To Manage Blood Sugar

Understanding how insulin affects your blood sugar can help you better manage your condition. Insulin therapy is often an important part of diabetes treatment. Understand the key role insulin plays in managing your blood sugar, and the goals of insulin therapy. What you learn can help you prevent diabetes complications. The role of insulin in the body It may be easier to understand the importance of insulin therapy if you understand how insulin normally works in the body and what happens when you have diabetes. Regulate sugar in your bloodstream. The main job of insulin is to keep the level of glucose in the bloodstream within a normal range. After you eat, carbohydrates break down into glucose, a sugar that serves as a primary source of energy, and enters the bloodstream. Normally, the pancreas responds by producing insulin, which allows glucose to enter the tissues. Storage of excess glucose for energy. After you eat — when insulin levels are high — excess glucose is stored in the liver in the form of glycogen. Between meals — when insulin levels are low — the liver releases glycogen into the bloodstream in the form of glucose. This keeps blood sugar levels within a narrow range. If your pancreas secretes little or no insulin (type 1 diabetes), or your body doesn't produce enough insulin or has become resistant to insulin's action (type 2 diabetes), the level of glucose in your bloodstream increases because it's unable to enter cells. Left untreated, high blood glucose can lead to complications such as blindness, nerve damage (neuropathy) and kidney damage. The goals of insulin therapy If you have type 1 diabetes, insulin therapy replaces the insulin your body is unable to produce. Insulin therapy is sometimes needed for type 2 diabetes and gestational diabete Continue reading >>

Treatment

Treatment

There's no cure for diabetes, so treatment aims to keep your blood glucose levels as normal as possible and to control your symptoms to prevent health problems developing later in life. If you've been diagnosed with diabetes, you'll be referred for specialist treatment from a diabetes care team. They'll be able to help you understand your treatment and closely monitor your condition to identify any health problems that may occur. Type 1 diabetes occurs because your body doesn't produce any insulin. This means you'll need regular insulin treatment to keep your glucose levels normal. Insulin comes in several different preparations, each of which works slightly differently. For example, some last up to a whole day (long-acting), some last up to eight hours (short-acting) and some work quickly but don't last very long (rapid-acting). Your treatment is likely to include a combination of different insulin preparations. Insulin Insulin injections If you have type 1 diabetes, you'll probably need insulin injections. Insulin must be injected, because if it were taken as a tablet, it would be broken down in your stomach (like food) and would be unable to enter your bloodstream. When you're first diagnosed, your diabetes care team will help you with your insulin injections, before showing you how and when to do it yourself. They'll also show you how to store your insulin and dispose of your needles properly. Insulin injections are usually given by an injection pen, which is also known as an insulin pen or auto-injector. Sometimes, injections are given using a syringe. Most people need two to four injections a day. Your GP or diabetes nurse may also teach one of your close friends or relatives how to inject the insulin properly. Insulin pump therapy Insulin pump therapy is an alter Continue reading >>

2.1.1 What Is Diabetes?

2.1.1 What Is Diabetes?

2.1.1 What is Diabetes? A glucose tolerance test is a lab test to check how the person/patients body breaks down sugar. For this test the patient has to drink a liquid containing a certain amount of glucose. Then their blood will be taken again every 0, 30,60,90, and 120 minutes after they drink the solution. The purpose of the Insulin test is to monitor the amount of insulin produced by the person. The test determines if the person is producing a specific amount of insulin or not. For example, Anna didn't produce any insulin so, her insulin levels were at 0 the whole 2 hours. We are testing Patient A, Patient B, and Anna Garcia for diabetes. We are testing their insulin and glucose levels. For Patient A she was overweight and her symptoms included excessive thirst and occasional unexplained mood swings. Though she exercise 1-2 times a week because of her job and eats a lot of reheated food that is loaded in sodium. However, she claims to eat a good amount of fruits and vegetables each day and her routine urinalysis was normal. Patient B's symptoms included an increase in thirst and urination but he says he feels fine. Though , he takes medication for both elevated blood pressure and high cholesterol, he doesn't participate in any formalized exercise, and he eats a lot of heavy foods. Plus, they found ketones in his urine. Patient A and Patient B have the risk factors of being overweight and Patient B has the risk factor of diabetes in his genetics because his uncle and grandmother both had diabetes. Data Tables: Conclusion Questions: 1.) Describe how Glucose Tolerance testing can be used to diagnose diabetes. Glucose Tolerance testing can be used to diagnose diabetes by determining how much glucose is in your blood. This is used because when you have any type of diabet Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection

Insulin Injection

Insulin injection is used to control blood sugar in people who have type 1 diabetes (condition in which the body does not make insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) or in people who have type 2 diabetes (condition in which the blood sugar is too high because the body does not produce or use insulin normally) that cannot be controlled with oral medications alone. Insulin injection is in a class of medications called hormones. Insulin injection is used to take the place of insulin that is normally produced by the body. It works by helping move sugar from the blood into other body tissues where it is used for energy. It also stops the liver from producing more sugar. All of the types of insulin that are available work in this way. The types of insulin differ only in how quickly they begin to work and how long they continue to control blood sugar. Over time, people who have diabetes and high blood sugar can develop serious or life-threatening complications, including heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, nerve damage, and eye problems. Using medication(s), making lifestyle changes (e.g., diet, exercise, quitting smoking), and regularly checking your blood sugar may help to manage your diabetes and improve your health. This therapy may also decrease your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes-related complications such as kidney failure, nerve damage (numb, cold legs or feet; decreased sexual ability in men and women), eye problems, including changes or loss of vision, or gum disease. Your doctor and other healthcare providers will talk to you about the best way to manage your diabetes. Insulin comes as a solution (liquid) and a suspension (liquid with particles that will settle on standing) to be injected subcutaneousl Continue reading >>

Diabetes Treatment: It's Not Just Insulin

Diabetes Treatment: It's Not Just Insulin

Insulin usually isn’t the first line of defense for type 2 diabetes treatment. Find out about lifestyle changes and other medication options you can try to help control type 2 diabetes. If you’re newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, your first worry might be that you’ll need to begin insulin injections immediately to get your blood sugar under control. But unless your blood sugar levels are dangerously high, chances are that insulin won’t be the first step in your type 2 diabetes treatment plan. The most recent type 2 diabetes treatment guidelines, published in the January 2015 issue of the journal Diabetes Care, suggest that the best place to begin may be with a personalized, diabetes-friendly diet and increasing physical activity, along with using the common oral type 2 diabetes medication metformin (or an alternative, if there’s a reason you can’t take metformin). People who are very motivated to address type 2 diabetes through lifestyle changes may try diet and exercise alone for three to six months after diagnosis. The current type 2 diabetes treatment recommendations are: Weight loss. Losing at least 5 percent of body weight can improve type 2 diabetes control significantly, according to the guidelines. Dietary changes. Work with your doctor to create a diet that has a healthy balance of protein, carbohydrates, fats, and fruits and vegetables, according to the American Diabetes Association. Limiting the simple carbohydrates in your diet, such as crackers and bread, is a cornerstone of diabetes control. Physical activity. About 150 minutes of exercise a week, or 30 minutes five or more days a week, is recommended for type 2 diabetes control. In addition, resistance training at least two days a week is also recommended to significantly improve blood sug Continue reading >>

Diabetes Treatment

Diabetes Treatment

A Cure for Diabetes? Stem Cell & Islet Cell Transplantation Therapy Diabetes Mellitus is a chronic disorder of sugar metabolism, usually caused by insulin deficiency or insulin resistance leading to high blood sugar, also called blood glucose. Sugar is present in everyone's blood, including healthy people, but in a diabetic person the glucose in blood reaches too high, pathological levels. Although not everything is yet fully undestood about diabetes and insulin's modes of action, we know that diabetes impairs the delivery to cells of the body's main fuel, glucose. So that the single cells receive adequate nutrition, glucose is always present in the blood, and its concentration is regulated by the endocrine cells of the so-called insular apparatus. These cells are in the pancreas and produce insulin, whose deficiency causes diabetes. Insulin permits glucose to enter all cells and be used as energy source. In diabetes, in the absence of adequate insulin, the glucose builds up in the bloodstream instead of entering the cells, leading to serious health issues. Diabetes Mellitus is essentially due to absolute or relative deficiency of insulin, derived from insufficiency of beta-cells of the Islets of Langerhans in the pancreas. Their progressive exhaustion in the course of life, also due to congenital deficiency, plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes; and so does their chronic overload for excessive sugar intake. All this generates two problems: too high blood glucose levels and a deficiency of stored glucose, the body's major fuel source. Not all cases and types of diabetes are the same. The most fundamental distiction is between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. This is an important distinction in terms of treatment as well. Type 1 diabetes is also called ins Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

requires treatment to keep blood sugar levels within a target range. Treatment includes: Taking several insulin injections every day or using an insulin pump. Monitoring blood sugar levels several times a day. Eating a healthy diet that spreads carbohydrate throughout the day. Regular physical activity or exercise. Exercise helps the body to use insulin more efficiently. It may also lower your risk for heart and blood vessel disease. Regular medical checkups. You will get routine screening tests and exams to watch for signs of complications, such as eye, kidney, heart, blood vessel, and nerve diseases. Not smoking. Not drinking alcohol if you are at risk for periods of low blood sugar. Blood sugars are easier to predict and control when mealtimes, amounts of food, and exercise are similar every day. So getting into a daily routine helps a lot. Diabetic ketoacidosis Some people find out that they have type 1 diabetes when they are admitted to a hospital for diabetic ketoacidosis. If their symptoms are severe, they may need to be treated in an intensive care unit. Treatment for diabetic ketoacidosis includes fluids given through a vein (intravenous, or IV) to treat dehydration and to balance electrolytes, and insulin to lower the blood sugar level and stop the body from producing ketones. The honeymoon period If your blood sugar levels return to the normal range soon after diagnosis, you are in what is called the "honeymoon period." This is a time when the remaining insulin-producing cells in your pancreas are working harder to supply enough insulin for your body. Treatment during this time may include: Keeping in close touch with your doctor. Testing your blood sugar level often, to see if it is rising. Taking very small amounts of insulin or no insulin. Even though you Continue reading >>

More in insulin