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The Genetic Basis of Kidney Cancer: Targeting the Metabolic Basis of Disease Air date: Wednesday, November 20, 2013, 3:00:00 PM Runtime: 01:05:55 Description: NIH Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Annual Astute Clinican Lecture Dr. Linehan has had a long-standing interest in identification of the genetic basis of cancer of the kidney. Kidney cancer is not a single disease. It is made up of a number of different types of cancer, each of which has a different histology, a different clinical course, which respond differently to therapy and are caused by different genes. Studies of the kidney cancer gene pathways have revealed that kidney cancer is fundamentally a metabolic disease. These findings have provided the foundation for the development of targeted therapeutic approaches for patients with advanced forms of this disease. The annual Astute Clinician lecture within the NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series (WALS) highlights exciting clinical observations that have served as a focus for research. This series has been made possible through the generous gift of the late Dr. Robert W. Miller, Scientist Emeritus, National Cancer Institute and his wife, Haruko (Holly) Miller. For more information go to http://wals.od.nih.gov Author: Dr. Marston Linehan, Chief, Urologic Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, NIH Permanent link: http://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?1...

Is There Any Scientific Basis To Suggest That The Paleo Diet Is Actually Healthy?

The paleo diet is actually one of the few diets that is based on science. Few (if any) paleo adherents are preaching a literal, "live like a caveman" type of dogma. The paleo lifestyle is about living in a way that is optimal for the modern human animal, viewed through the lens of evolution. The "caveman" thing is the straw-man that haters use to throw the baby out with the bathwater. Over the past few years, there has been an increasing amount of studies. If you search for "paleo" or "ancestral" in pub-med you will find a large number of recent studies linking paleo diets with reduced inflammation, blood pressure, lipid profile and glucose tolerance, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, weight loss, etc. Gary Taubes and Dr. Peter Attia have created NuSci.org, a non-profit to conduct even more studies on the subject. Part of the caveman straw-man is that "because much of the food our ancestors ate doesn't exist anymore, its impossible to REALLY eat a paleo diet." Nobody argues that the animals and plants in existence now are the same as they were 10,000 years ago. In fact, most of the plants and animals available now aren't the same as they were 50 years ago due to factory farming an Continue reading >>

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  1. Tony Sangster

    TID 51 years: Please note the following is not to be taken as medical advice or opinion.
    In the ‘good old days’ travelling by car in the Australian summer where temperatures in a parked car might reach 50 degrees C plus , (122 F plus) my insulin was in the esky (cooling box) with some cooling blocks.
    I am pleased by all the cooling devices available these days as other writers have noted. Thank you for this.
    I must admit i still just put an small cooling brick in with my insulin kit then placed in my pack pack for walking to and fro the shops or short car trips in summer.
    I also agree with Phyllis Stewart’s answer about insulin’s stability at room temperatures.
    What is not mentioned is what about the insulin in an insulin pump ?
    At room temperatures , no problem, but wearing an insulin pump on a belt in summer could be tricky. ( maximum temperatures in Adelaide in summer is about 40 degree C ( 104 F) but even in the shade it is mighty hot). Sure the insulin in syringe is inside the pump but there is only plastic and metal surrounding it.
    Two possible strategies:

    I place my pump wrapped in thin insulation material in my pocket, with pump tubing threaded through a button hole type opening in inner side of my pocket, up under my trouser belt or elasticised waist band to my abdominal needle insertion site and wear an outer shirt with sewn in insulation over the pocket OR
    Pump on belt clip, wrap handkerchief or other linen/cotton then white insulation material around outer side of pump held on by a rubberised band ( like an exercise stretch band) wrapped around waist and tied /secured on other side. Wear over-shirt as described above. Provided the pump is rated waterproof. water the top of wrap near cotton/linen liberally.

    How do you turn off these numbers ?? Argh . ……I have no knowledge of how women protect their pumps in hot weather.

  2. Amin Zayani

    Depending on how long you travel, you need one of two coolbags:

  3. Saikiran Naik

    Yes, 3 years ago once I had to use an insulin cooling travel wallet for my Grand-Mother. As she has been living with T2 diabetes for the past 10 years. By now she is traveling still with diabetes insulin travel wallet with her. For her diabetes concern, I have found out lots of sites where many types of diabetes kit was offering, where different sizes and shapes of Cool-Ins insulin cooling wallet[1] accommodate all types and makes of insulin pumps, insulin pens, cartridges, and of course vials. But I had having difficulty keeping insulin cool without refrigeration as there are many more likely trips where you might think you need to have a refrigerator for your insulin.

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https://MamaNatural.com http://mamanatural.com/ Part 2 of this series focuses on something we deemed so precious it was literally a currency. In fact, that's where we get the word salary from. I'm talking about salt... one of mama natural's favorites. Salt is now the new villain in the eyes of mainstream medicine... being blamed for everything from high blood pressure to type II diabetes to obesity. But I'm not buying it that salt can't be part of a healthy diet. If you think of it, our body is primarily made up of salty water. We also have taste buds designed for salt so clearly we are supposed to consume some salt. But just like with sugars, the key is to consume the right kind of salt. Conventional table salt, the one found in processed foods and contributing to health problems, is a nasty substance. Mined from the earth and then scorched at high heat striping all of the trace minerals, table salt is essentially sodium chloride. It is then blended with a cocktail of chemicals including anti-caking agents, some made with aluminum, added iodine, sugar and sometimes even bleach. Wow, pass the salt? No thanks. But there are some healthy alternatives and I'm going to talk about my 3 favorites today... Celtic Sea Salt It's hand-harvested from seawater and then dried by the sun and wind, retaining the ocean's moisture and vast array of trace minerals. It's a coarse, moist salt that has a light grey hue from clay banks it's harvested from. This salt has an earthy, hearty flavor that's delicious in just about everything. Himalayan Sea Salt This salt has spent millions of years buried under extreme pressure where toxins and pollutants can't invade. Since there is no such thing as "organic" salt, this is the next best thing. Himalayan sea salts contain up to 84 minerals and has a sweet, salty taste with a cleaner finish than conventional salt. Health Benefits of Sea Salt These sea salts can be wonderful for the body when used in moderation including: Regulating the fluids in our body Promoting a healthy pH balance in the cells Aids in digestion Supports our nervous system Promotes sinus health Can help ease muscle cramps Regulates sleep Beware of salts claiming to be sea salt when they are dried and processed similar to conventional salt and simply dyed to look more natural. Also, know that Kosher Salt does not equate to sea salt. But what if you can't tolerate even sea salt? Don't despair. There is a wonderful salt substitute called kelp. This seaweed is truly a super food. High in iron, calcium, potassium and iodine, kelp is low in sodium and yet has a salty flavor. It's a delicious replacement to salt in recipes. Note, it does get a bit gelatinous when mixed with liquids so be cautious with amount used. How about you? What's your favorite kind of salt? References available at http://mamanatural.com/healthy-salt-s... Pregnant? Check out my baby registry checklist: http://www.mamanatural.com/baby-regis... Here are all my fav products for natural living: http://www.mamanatural.com/amazon/ Curious about the equipment we use to make these videos? http://www.mamanatural.com/video-equi... THANK YOU FOR WATCHING AND SUBSCRIBING! , Genevieve Howland, aka Mama Natural Bestselling author of The Mama Natural Week-by-Week Guide to Pregnancy & Childbirth https://amzn.to/2Pf6Pfe Co-Founder of https://www.mamanatural.com FB: http://fb.com/MamaNatural IG: https://www.instagram.com/mamanatural/ Pin: https://www.pinterest.com/mamanatural/

How Does A Ketogenic Diet Change Your Life?

The ketogenic diet has changed many people’s lives in different ways: from weight loss to reversing diabetes to improving multiple health factors. Eating a diet high in fat, moderate in protein, and very low in carbohydrates, such as the ketogenic diet (or commonly known as “keto”), puts your body into a state of ketosis, a natural metabolic state in which your body is no longer using glucose as its main source of fuel, and instead it begins using ketones to get its energy. Ketones are produced when your body is burning fat because no glucose is available. It is important not to confuse ketosis, a completely harmless and normal metabolic state, with ketoacidosis, a dangerous condition that occurs mostly in type 1 diabetics when they create high levels of both glucose and ketones at the same time. On the ketogenic plan, blood glucose usually drops, so this is not a danger for most people. However, if you are a type 1 diabetic, check with your doctor before switching to the ketogenic way of eating. So being in ketosis simply means that you have switched from being a sugar-burner to a fat-burner. Ketones are created when you are metabolizing fat, whether it is from the fat in th Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Tony Sangster

    TID 51 years: Please note the following is not to be taken as medical advice or opinion.
    In the ‘good old days’ travelling by car in the Australian summer where temperatures in a parked car might reach 50 degrees C plus , (122 F plus) my insulin was in the esky (cooling box) with some cooling blocks.
    I am pleased by all the cooling devices available these days as other writers have noted. Thank you for this.
    I must admit i still just put an small cooling brick in with my insulin kit then placed in my pack pack for walking to and fro the shops or short car trips in summer.
    I also agree with Phyllis Stewart’s answer about insulin’s stability at room temperatures.
    What is not mentioned is what about the insulin in an insulin pump ?
    At room temperatures , no problem, but wearing an insulin pump on a belt in summer could be tricky. ( maximum temperatures in Adelaide in summer is about 40 degree C ( 104 F) but even in the shade it is mighty hot). Sure the insulin in syringe is inside the pump but there is only plastic and metal surrounding it.
    Two possible strategies:

    I place my pump wrapped in thin insulation material in my pocket, with pump tubing threaded through a button hole type opening in inner side of my pocket, up under my trouser belt or elasticised waist band to my abdominal needle insertion site and wear an outer shirt with sewn in insulation over the pocket OR
    Pump on belt clip, wrap handkerchief or other linen/cotton then white insulation material around outer side of pump held on by a rubberised band ( like an exercise stretch band) wrapped around waist and tied /secured on other side. Wear over-shirt as described above. Provided the pump is rated waterproof. water the top of wrap near cotton/linen liberally.

    How do you turn off these numbers ?? Argh . ……I have no knowledge of how women protect their pumps in hot weather.

  2. Amin Zayani

    Depending on how long you travel, you need one of two coolbags:

  3. Saikiran Naik

    Yes, 3 years ago once I had to use an insulin cooling travel wallet for my Grand-Mother. As she has been living with T2 diabetes for the past 10 years. By now she is traveling still with diabetes insulin travel wallet with her. For her diabetes concern, I have found out lots of sites where many types of diabetes kit was offering, where different sizes and shapes of Cool-Ins insulin cooling wallet[1] accommodate all types and makes of insulin pumps, insulin pens, cartridges, and of course vials. But I had having difficulty keeping insulin cool without refrigeration as there are many more likely trips where you might think you need to have a refrigerator for your insulin.

  4. -> Continue reading
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When Lauren Bongiorno was seven, her mom began noticing that something seemed off. Lauren was constantly thirsty, going to the bathroom upwards of 10 times a night; she was cranky, a departure from her normal happy self; and she was inexplicably losing weight. A visit to the hospital left her with the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes, setting off a years-long journey of learning to manage the disease she calls a 24/7 job, and finding an unexpected career path in the process. --------------------------------------------- Please subscribe to our channel: https://goo.gl/VCchGY #getwellbe with us: Web: http://www.getwellbe.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/getwellbe Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/getwellbe Twitter: http://twitter.com/getwellbe Google+: https://plus.google.com/+getwellbe About WellBe: WellBe is a media company focused on the intersection between wellness and healthcare. We want to inform, inspire, and empower you to take control of your health and demand a system that supports you. https://getWellBe.com

Who Is Managing Type 1 Diabetes Holistically Without Medication?

When I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of 22, I asked that exact same question. The year was 2002, and no matter where I turned, all signs pointed towards eating a low-carbohydrate diet as the only solution to managing blood glucose and insulin use in type 1 diabetes. So began my journey into understanding the optimal diet for people living with type 1 diabetes, type 1.5 diabetes, pre diabetes, type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes. At the age of 22, I was the first to admit that I didn’t know anything about diabetes, only that it had something to do with old people and chocolate cake. For the first time in my life, I was faced with a series of challenging questions for which I had no answers: How do I inject insulin? How much insulin do I need? How often should I inject insulin? What is an appropriate amount of insulin? What are the dangers of too much insulin? What are the dangers of too little insulin? What should I eat to control my blood glucose? What should I NOT eat? When should I eat? Can I still exercise? How much should I exercise? What happens if I don't eat? What's going to happen to me in 5 years? 10 years? 20 years? Am I destined for a heart attack? Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Tony Sangster

    TID 51 years: Please note the following is not to be taken as medical advice or opinion.
    In the ‘good old days’ travelling by car in the Australian summer where temperatures in a parked car might reach 50 degrees C plus , (122 F plus) my insulin was in the esky (cooling box) with some cooling blocks.
    I am pleased by all the cooling devices available these days as other writers have noted. Thank you for this.
    I must admit i still just put an small cooling brick in with my insulin kit then placed in my pack pack for walking to and fro the shops or short car trips in summer.
    I also agree with Phyllis Stewart’s answer about insulin’s stability at room temperatures.
    What is not mentioned is what about the insulin in an insulin pump ?
    At room temperatures , no problem, but wearing an insulin pump on a belt in summer could be tricky. ( maximum temperatures in Adelaide in summer is about 40 degree C ( 104 F) but even in the shade it is mighty hot). Sure the insulin in syringe is inside the pump but there is only plastic and metal surrounding it.
    Two possible strategies:

    I place my pump wrapped in thin insulation material in my pocket, with pump tubing threaded through a button hole type opening in inner side of my pocket, up under my trouser belt or elasticised waist band to my abdominal needle insertion site and wear an outer shirt with sewn in insulation over the pocket OR
    Pump on belt clip, wrap handkerchief or other linen/cotton then white insulation material around outer side of pump held on by a rubberised band ( like an exercise stretch band) wrapped around waist and tied /secured on other side. Wear over-shirt as described above. Provided the pump is rated waterproof. water the top of wrap near cotton/linen liberally.

    How do you turn off these numbers ?? Argh . ……I have no knowledge of how women protect their pumps in hot weather.

  2. Amin Zayani

    Depending on how long you travel, you need one of two coolbags:

  3. Saikiran Naik

    Yes, 3 years ago once I had to use an insulin cooling travel wallet for my Grand-Mother. As she has been living with T2 diabetes for the past 10 years. By now she is traveling still with diabetes insulin travel wallet with her. For her diabetes concern, I have found out lots of sites where many types of diabetes kit was offering, where different sizes and shapes of Cool-Ins insulin cooling wallet[1] accommodate all types and makes of insulin pumps, insulin pens, cartridges, and of course vials. But I had having difficulty keeping insulin cool without refrigeration as there are many more likely trips where you might think you need to have a refrigerator for your insulin.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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