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Who Buys Diabetic Needles

Where To Buy Insulin Syringes?

Where To Buy Insulin Syringes?

There is a question frequently searched online by individuals who are in need for diabetic insulin syringes. The question is “where can I buy insulin syringes?” The purpose of this blog is to address such a question and its variations including: Where can I buy insulin syringes? Where can I buy EasyTouch insulin syringes? Where to buy insulin syringes? Where can I buy diabetic syringes? Where can I buy a syringe? Where to buy medical syringes? Where to buy syringes for diabetes? Where can I order Easy Touch insulin syringes? Where can I order EasyTouch insulin syringes online? Which online store sells EasyTouch insulin syringes? You can buy insulin syringes at discounted price with free shipping at Diabetic Outlet. Moreover, you can subscribe to the Automatic Shipment program and save time and money on your future purchases of insulin syringes. Simply order once and set to automatically receive your insulin syringes at the frequency you need. You will save 5% on all subsequent orders. Diabetic Outlet carries a full line of EasyTouch insulin syringes at a variety of sizes and lengths. Easy Touch Insulin Syringes are available in: 27g, 1/2″ (12.7mm), .5cc & 1cc 28g, 1/2″ (12.7mm), .5cc & 1cc 29g, 1/2″ (12.7mm), .5cc & 1cc 30g, 5/16″ (8mm), .3cc, .5cc, 1cc 30g, 1/2″ (12.7mm), .3cc, .5cc, 1cc 31g, 5/16″ (8mm), .3cc, .5cc, 1cc Almost all online diabetic supply stores that sell cheap insulin syringes have shipping costs. The only place you can buy discounted insulin syringes with Free Shipping is Diabetic Outlet. At Diabetic Outlet, you will find affordable EasyTouch insulin syringes at almost 30% below the market. Are Insulin syringes an over the counter item? This is the second most common question customers often ask us. The answer to this questions depends Continue reading >>

What Can I Do With 1000 Unused Insulin Needles? [archive] - Straight Dope Message Board

What Can I Do With 1000 Unused Insulin Needles? [archive] - Straight Dope Message Board

Seriously, I have been buying insulin and syringes for 25 years. They will sell the insulin without a prescription but not the syringes. Selling them might run you afoul of the law. In some jurisdictions, the sale or possession of hypodermic syringes may be controlled or prohibited without a prescription,[18] due to its potential use with illegal intravenous drugs.[19] Don't even try to give them away (to any reputable organization, anyway). One of those needles could be infected with HIV for all your potential donatees know. I suggest trying the /diy/ board on 4chan. They'll probably come up with some neat ideas. If they're still packaged, as told in the OP, they aren't used and therefore do not have HIV or any other infectious agent in them. Check your local laws before you attempt to sell them. I use bevels for a weekly injection and depending in the pharmacy they can be very tough to get sometimes. If the pharmacist doesn't know you they always seem to treat you with suspicion. Even with my script for the medication they will only sell me 5 needless at one time, requiring a prescription to purchase more. I'm really not sure if they are regulated, but I would hate to hear you got busted for selling them. Damn, the base hospital tosses me a 2 100 count boxes per quarter year [2 shots per day x 90, and the boxes have 10 10 packs] with my scrip - I think I have around 200 stockpiled under the sink. [I also get the tips for the pens, my victoza is in a pen. I really wish I could get it in vial form instead.] If you went to your doc and asked for a scrip specifically for the syringes, would he/she give you one? Seems that a scrip for a box of 100 syringes would make sense if you also get your insulin in 90 day supplies. Many states have needle exchange programs to reduce Continue reading >>

Purchase Diabetic Supplies| Bulk Syringes

Purchase Diabetic Supplies| Bulk Syringes

Buy Needles and Diabetic Supplies That Are Safe and Affordable! Buy Needles and Diabetic Supplies That Are Safe and Affordable! It can be financially challenging, tiring and draining for diabetics to keep up with their insulin shots each day, which is why we allow them buy needles and syringes at discounted prices or in bulk. Our goal is to make life easier for those individuals who need to use syringes on a regular basis. Some people have to buy blood glucose meters and other products in order to maintain the right insulin supplies. These expenses can add up. Some diabetics spend tons of money on test strips alone each year because they need to be replaced often. Other necessary expenses could include foot care products and doctors visits. If you buy your insulin supplies online, you can save more money in multiple ways. There are many online vendors that offer diabetic products are more affordable prices. While some online vendors mark up their prices disproportionately, we take great pride in offering incredible bulk discounts to all our customers. We offer guaranteed shipping and same day processing, which means you can count on receiving your supplies when you need them without worrying about running out. We make it easy to order your syringes and needles in bulk. Our wholesale supplies are designed to make the treatment of your disease more affordable. Theres no reason to buy needles from anyone else. We make sure your order is fulfilled on a timely basis. When doing business online, you have to select the right supplier for your diabetic products. We are a reputable online vendor that can promise you the lowest prices for the products you need. We understand it is a hassle to inject insulin, but it is a necessary task that ensures your health and wellbeing. When Continue reading >>

Tips For Buying An Insulin Pen

Tips For Buying An Insulin Pen

Using an insulin pen can take the hassle out of injecting. Heres what you should keep in mind. For kids and very insulin-sensitive adults: Look for a pen that allows for 0.5-unit insulin doses. Most pens dose in 1-unit increments. For those with dexterity issues: Consider the placement of a pens dosing buttonsome may make dosing easier than others. For the ouch averse: Some pens use spring-loaded mechanisms that make injecting less painful, says Kellie Antinori-Lent, MSN, RN, ACNS-BC, BC-ADM, CDE, a diabetes clinical nurse specialist at the University of Pittsburgh Medical CenterShadyside Hospital. Needles vary in length and thickness. Needle length can range from 4 to 12.7millimeters, though most are 4 or 5millimeters long. The thickness of the needle is measured by gauge (most are between 29 and 33). The lower the gauge, the thicker the needle. Shorter, thinner needles may feel more comfortable, but thicker needles make it possible to deliver a larger dose of insulin more quickly. If you find insulin leaks out after an injection, a longer needle may be best for youit will inject deeper into the tissue and reduce leakage. Technique can also affect what you feel upon injection, says Antinori-Lent. Prepare the skin. Clean the area with alcohol, if possible, then wait for it to dry. Prime the pen. To ensure accurate dosing, place a new needle onto the pen and hold the pen with the needle pointing up. Dial 2 units, then push the button until the dose indicator hits zero. Repeat (if necessary) until you see insulin at the needle tip. If no insulin appears, replace the needle and repeat. Check the pen for air bubbles (air displaces the insulin, which could cause a dosing error). Hold the pen with the needle pointing upward and gently tap the cartridge a few times. Inject at Continue reading >>

Sell Diabetic Lancets For Cash

Sell Diabetic Lancets For Cash

If you have unused diabetic lancets, don’t let them go to waste. Lancets are important diabetic testing supplies, and Cash Now Offer is dedicated to helping people with diabetes get the supplies they need. It’s a win-win for you: You get cash for diabetic lancets, and Cash Now Offer provides the supplies to those who need them most. How Can I Sell My Diabetic Lancets? Selling your extra diabetic lancets couldn’t be easier with Cash Now Offer. Read on to learn how to get cash for your diabetic lancets and other diabetic testing supplies. Cash Now Offer provides cash for diabetic lancets that are unused and in their original packaging. It is very important that you not open or tamper with the packaging, as this limits our ability to provide discounted supplies to diabetics in need. Follow these guidelines to sell unused diabetic lancets to Cash Now Offer: Cash Now Offer accepts most name-brand diabetic lancets. You can check whether your lancets qualify with our handy online calculator. Some of the brands we accept include One Touch, Bayer, Accu-Chek and Freestyle. Check to make sure your lancets are unopened and unexpired. Unfortunately, we cannot accept diabetic lancets that are not in their original packaging. Get your quote from Cash Now Offer! Once you’ve tallied your supplies, get an accurate quote to learn how much cash you can receive for your diabetic testing supplies (remember that we buy test strips and other supplies in addition to diabetic lancets). Ship your supplies. At checkout, choose your desired shipping method. We can email you a shipping label, provide a shipping kit or reimburse your postage. Select the shipping method that is most convenient to you and send your supplies. Get cash! Once we verify the contents of your shipment, you get paid! Continue reading >>

When A Diabetic Is Denied Syringes, There’s A Big Problem

When A Diabetic Is Denied Syringes, There’s A Big Problem

I ask a lot of questions. It’s what I do for a living. So when a routine visit to my local pharmacy to buy syringes and insulin for my diabetic dog took an unexpected turn this week, questions came to mind: “Is it still legal to buy syringes over the counter?” “Yes,” the pharmacist answered. “Then why do I need to give you my name?” Because, the pharmacist said, “I need to keep track” of who’s buying syringes. “Why?” I persisted. “Do I need a prescription?” “No,” he said. “I just need to know what you’re using them for.” The syringes and insulin, neither of which requires a prescription, were for Moxie, our Lab mix who’s been battling diabetes for three years. Until this week, I’d never had a problem easing in and out of the pharmacy without anyone’s nose getting out of joint. But this little dance with the pharmacist is a common problem, one that some medical and criminal law experts find perplexing, if not disturbing. “The bottom line of the story is that no one has been able to point to a good reason we should make it hard to buy syringes in pharmacies, and all the evidence points to good reasons we should” allow syringes to be sold without a prescription, said Scott Burris, a professor of law at Temple University. Only one state, Delaware, now requires adults to have prescriptions for syringes, Burris said. There also are government-sanctioned needle exchange programs in dozens of states across the nation — which makes the reluctance to sell them legally even more baffling. There are no needle exchange programs in Texas, however. A San Antonio lawmaker managed to get a pilot needle exchange program approved for Bexar County seven years ago by attaching it to a Medicaid bill. But the Bexar County district attorney der Continue reading >>

What Size Insulin Syringe Should I Buy?

What Size Insulin Syringe Should I Buy?

Insulin syringes come in several sizes. When buying syringes, keep these things in mind: Needle gauge: The gauge of the needle means its width, or thickness. Insulin syringes range from 28 gauge to 31 gauge, and the larger the number the smaller the gauge. (An Ultra-Fine II brand needle is the smallest, and the Ultra-Fine is the next size up.) Smaller, thinner children may do well with the smaller gauge needle. Some older and larger children may prefer the larger needle. Needle length. Common needle lengths are 12.7 mm (1/2") and 8 mm (5/16"). The 8-mm needle is called "short" and is the length that most people prefer. Barrel size: The barrel size determines how much insulin the syringe can hold. Buy a barrel size that best matches your standard insulin dosage. For example, a 3/10-cc syringe is best for 30 units or less, 1/2-cc syringe is best for 30 to 50 units, and a 1-cc syringe is best for injections of 50 to 100 units. To make sure you have the size you need, always check the box before you leave the pharmacy. When you draw up insulin, look closely at the markings on the barrel, especially whenever you change syringe sizes. The markings will be different, and you need to make sure you're drawing up the right dose. Continue reading >>

Going Undercover To Investigate Selling Test Strips For Cash

Going Undercover To Investigate Selling Test Strips For Cash

Maybe you've seen the "Diabetic Strips" signs on the side of the road in your state and also wondered what actually happens when you call one of the numbers listed... We wrote about organizations dealing in test strips cheap-for-cash in our post "Test Strip Charities" last year, but without the extra bonus of having an undercover "secret shopper" to check the service out. Now our talented cartoonist, D-Advocate and correspondent Mike Lawson offered to make that happen by following up on one of these surprising road-side signs. Read on to discover what Mike found out! Special to the 'Mine by Mr. Mike Lawson I felt like Woodward. No...I felt like Bernstein. Wait. Which one did Robert Redford play in All The President's Men? That's the one I felt like. I was sitting in a McDonald's parking lot in Scottsdale, Arizona, waiting for a man named Marcus to meet me so I could sell a box of 50 test strips. I arranged this meeting by calling a phone number that I saw on a road-side sign in Phoenix that said "Ca$h Paid For Diabetic Strips." It is not illegal for companies to buy and sell test strips like this — although the companies are required to register with the FDA and many fail to do so — yet this transaction still felt a little shady. When I called the number, for example, I wasn't greeted with a company name but just by a woman who identified herself as "Stephanie." Stephanie told me that there was no physical building for me to drop off the strips, but rather a courier would be sent to me. Stephanie also told me that the price paid for strips varied based on the brand and the expiration date. So I could sell this box of One Touch strips that I purchased for $10 on my private insurance to this unnamed company for $20. And this same box of strips will sell for $40 or mor Continue reading >>

Do You Have Extra Diabetes Supplies You No Longer Need?

Do You Have Extra Diabetes Supplies You No Longer Need?

By Nicole Kofman and Kelly Close Twitter Summary: Learn how you can donate your unused diabetes supplies to help save peoples lives around the world: donate at this link. Before insulin was discovered in 1921, a diabetes diagnosis was often a death sentence. Nearly 100 years later, it still is in many places on our planet. This is particularly true in less developed parts of the world, where hundreds of thousands of people with diabetes don’t have access to the most basic life-saving resources that we often take for granted: insulin, strips, and meters. There are several organizations dedicated to bringing these resources to people across the world with diabetes – Life for a Child, Insulin for Life, Team Type 1 Foundation, and Marjorie’s Fund are just a few. We were fortunate to sit down recently with Dr. Mark and Carol Atkinson, President and Director of Insulin For Life USA (IFL USA), to learn more about their work and how people can get involved. We hugely support the work of IFL USA, which gathers unused diabetes supplies from the U.S. and sends them, free of charge, to people in need in disadvantaged regions. You can learn how to donate your unused supplies (insulin, strips, and more) at this link, and read below why and how IFL USA came to be. What amazing efforts the Atkinsons are making – and this is in addition to all that Dr. Atkinson is already doing at the University of Florida and with the nPOD Program. The Problem As Dr. Atkinson outlined in a recent highly praised piece published in the research journal The Lancet, there are several barriers to accessing diabetes supplies, including: High cost of insulin and blood glucose test strips; Insufficient health system resources applied to diabetes; Lack of diabetes education; and Lack of home refrigerati Continue reading >>

Selling Of Insulin Syringes?

Selling Of Insulin Syringes?

My aunt passed away recently, she was diabetic, so I have boxes and boxes or insulin syringes. Is there anywhere I can sell those? Or am I stuck throwing... show more My aunt passed away recently, she was diabetic, so I have boxes and boxes or insulin syringes. Is there anywhere I can sell those? Or am I stuck throwing them away or even maybe giving them away to someone who can use them? Does anyone know, thanks :) I don't believe you can legally sell them. But donating them is an option. If you don't find an organization then call an endocrinologists office. They usually have a diabetic program and can give them to patients that can't afford to buy them. I had that blessing when my insurance changed companies. But now Walmart sells them really cheap. Source(s): Secret To Destroy Diabetes : Source(s): 30 Days Diabetes Cure - Learn a little-known, but 100% scientifically-proven way to erase your diabetes in 3 short weeks... show more Learn a little-known, but 100% scientifically-proven way to erase your diabetes in 3 short weeks... If you or a loved one is suffering with type 1 or type 2 diabetes or even pre-diabetes you MUST watch this video! +) Video exposes a little known secret on how you can Reverse Diabetes in 3 weeks or less +) You can feel normal again, live a full and complete life, lower your blood sugar naturally and you can stop worrying about losing your vision or even your fingers, toes or limbs. +) There is a way to live without the symptoms, without the anxiety, without the pain, fear, and non-stop interruptions to a NORMAL life that diabetes causes. The video shows you exactly what you need to do every day to cleanse your pancreas, give it what it needs to heal and help put you on the fast track to a healthier life, mind and body in as little as 3 weeks Continue reading >>

Serving Suspected Addicts

Serving Suspected Addicts

America, along with the rest of the world, likes its recreational drugs. From the relatively benign cannabis to the soul-destroying, usually lethal in the long run, heroin, and everything in between, society is doing these drugs with gusto. Functional addicts are completely ignored. If they are bringing home a paycheck, and not destroying their families, everything is just fine. It's the stealing and overdosing that draws attention. In the community pharmacy branch of the profession, we deal with this on a daily basis in 1 form or another. Opiate and benzo abuse is 1 form of it, and we will get to that soon enough. In this column, I want to address the ethical dilemma of selling heroin needles. You can call them insulin syringes being sold 10 at a time all you want, but let's face it, the buyers with the itchy, sleeve-covered-on-a-90-degree day arms, horrible skin, and red eyes, are using them to inject heroin. More often than not, they'll shoot up right in the parking lot. Community pharmacies have become the new shooting galleries. Are pharmacists promoting drug abuse? Some would say yes. I respectfully disagree. In fact, I feel we are doing addicts a service by providing them with clean, disease-free needles. While I would rather talk to addicts about recovery options, I know the conversation is not going to go that way. Most of my staff is uncomfortable with the idea, so I am usually the go-to guy when someone asks for needles. I treat that customer with the same respect I give my most cherished patients. They are human beings after all. I always end the transaction the same way, by saying: "Good luck." I'm not being a wisenheimer when I say it either. I truly want the addict to survive the shoot up. I have a soft spot for addicts because I have been in their shoes Continue reading >>

Diabetic Denied Syringes At Walmart Pharmacy Calls 12

Diabetic Denied Syringes At Walmart Pharmacy Calls 12

RICHMOND, VA (WWBT) - A diabetic trying to buy syringes says a trip to the Brook Road Walmart turned into a nightmare that nearly jeopardized his life. Jacob Fleming says the pharmacist made assumptions about him and refused to sell him syringes he needed for insulin. NBC 12 On Your Side talked with both sides of the complaint. Fleming believes Walmart discriminated against him. Walmart corporate says its pharmacist could not verify the needles were for a legitimate purpose. You don't need a prescription to purchase syringes over-the-counter in Virginia, but you do have to show a history of your insulin dependency. "I showed him all of my vials," said Fleming. "I showed him my other prescriptions, my lisinopril. Did he ask for them? No, I just showed him to let him know, because all those things are associated with diabetes." Fleming says he was led to believe he was being taken care of, only to be denied after waiting twenty minutes. "I could have went into a coma or died. Really. It's that serious. I knew how my body was reacting, and I said all I need to do is just get some insulin," said Fleming. "Basically my legs, my thighs, my muscles were starting to tighten up. I was beginning to have acid reflux, which is a sign of ketoacidosis." Virginia law gives pharmacists leeway to make a professional call and deny over-the-counter sale of syringes, but Jacob thinks this particular pharmacist overstepped his authority and misjudged him based on persistent problems in the neighborhood. "He's saying, 'is this another guy in my area just trying to get needles to do drugs?' Yes, I had everything. I have a list of papers showing that I'm diabetic, and it's like the good people being punished for the bad people." After a week of reaching out to Walmart for its assessment of wha Continue reading >>

Guidelines For Buying And Using Diabetes Supplies

Guidelines For Buying And Using Diabetes Supplies

Diabetes is a lifelong condition. Because it is, you can have major health problems if you don't keep blood glucose under control. That's why fully understanding how to buy and properly use diabetes testing supplies as well as diabetes medications is so important. Learning to regularly test your blood glucose level with a glucose monitor and to take diabetes medications when you are supposed to will make living with the condition much easier. With a little practice, you can self-manage diabetes just as you manage other aspects of your life. When you do, your quality of life and ability to be active and do the things you want to do will greatly improve. Home blood sugar (glucose) testing is an essential part of controlling your blood sugar and self-managing diabetes. Your diabetes educator can guide you in terms of how often to check your blood glucose and how to do it properly. Make sure the diabetes educator watches you use the glucose meter several times. That way, you can be sure you're doing it correctly. At a minimum, you'll be checking your blood sugar every morning before you eat. It's also advisable to check it before lunch and dinner and at bedtime. Your doctor may also ask that you test your blood one hour after eating. Blood glucose levels checked with blood taken from the fingertips will show important changes faster than glucose levels checked with blood taken from other sites on the body. The usual way to check blood sugar levels is by: Pricking the fingertip with a lancing tool -- a small, sharp needle Putting the blood drop on a test strip Placing the test strip into a glucose meter Reading the blood glucose level displayed on the meter If you take insulin, you might change the dose, depending on the reading. Checking blood glucose frequently allows you Continue reading >>

The Donation Of Supplies Is Key To The Mission Of Ifl Usa

The Donation Of Supplies Is Key To The Mission Of Ifl Usa

Sharing what you no longer need will save lives…. The reasons underlying this tragic and unacceptable circumstance are numerous; the one common thread is that it occurs to each child through no fault of their own. 90,000 children with type 1 diabetes, from over 70 countries, suffer, sometimes even die, for lack of insulin. We collect in-date & unneeded insulin, test strips, as well as other diabetes supplies, and ship them to developing countries. They are then distributed, free of charge, to children and adults with diabetes who otherwise would go without these life saving medications. Continue reading >>

Do You Need A Prescription To Buy Diabetic Insulin Syringes?

Do You Need A Prescription To Buy Diabetic Insulin Syringes?

Diabetics use syringes to self-administer daily insulin injections. Each injection must be given with a new syringe for both safety from infection and for patient comfort. Syringes become dull and contaminated after a single use. A diabetic who uses insulin needs one or more new syringes per day, depending on her injection schedule. Prescription Requirements In the United States, prescription requirements for insulin syringes are set by each individual state. Some states require a prescription to buy insulin syringes, some don’t. In some states, notably Florida and Texas, individual counties may impose their own requirements. Laws regarding the purchase of syringes change from time to time, so check with the pharmacy you are planning to use. The pharmacist will know the local laws. Types of Syringes Diabetics use several types of syringes to prepare injections from bottled insulin. The most common is the U-100 insulin syringe. The notation U-100 refers to the number of units of insulin per ml of insulin. Diabetics also use mini pen needles, which are small needles that attach to insulin pens. When the mini pen needle is attached to the insulin pen, it is used to give an injection in the same manner as a traditional syringe. All types are subject to the same prescription laws. Buying Syringes Online When you buy syringes from an online pharmacy, the pharmacy will abide by the regulations of the state in which it is located. If you live in a state that requires a prescription for syringes and the online pharmacy is located in a state that does not require a prescription, you will be able to buy them without a prescription. Conversely, you will need to provide a prescription for syringes when you are buying from a state that requires them. Health Insurance Reimbursement Continue reading >>

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