diabetestalk.net

Which Of The Following Is Not A Complication Associated With Poorly Controlled Diabetes?

Diabetes - Long-term Effects

Diabetes - Long-term Effects

On this page: Diabetes is a condition in which there is too much glucose (a type of sugar) in the blood. Over time, high blood glucose levels can damage the body's organs. Possible complications include damage to large (macrovascular) and small (microvascular) blood vessels, which can lead to heart attack, stroke, and problems with the kidneys, eyes, gums, feet and nerves. Reducing risk of diabetes complications The good news is that the risk of most diabetes-related complications can be reduced by keeping blood pressure, blood glucose and cholesterol levels within recommended range. Also, being a healthy weight, eating healthily, reducing alcohol intake, and not smoking will help reduce your risk. Regular check-ups and screening are important to pick up any problems early Diabetes and healthy eating If you have diabetes it’s important to include a wide variety of nutritious and healthy foods in your diet, and to avoid snacking on sugary foods. Eating healthy foods can help control your blood glucose and cholesterol levels, and your blood pressure. Enjoy a variety of foods from each food group – be sure to include foods high in fibre and low in fat, and reduce your salt intake. It’s helpful to consult with a dietitian to review your current eating plan and provide a guide about food choices and food quantities. Alcohol intake and diabetes Limit alcohol intake. If you drink alcohol, have no more than two standard drinks per day. If you are pregnant or considering pregnancy or are breastfeeding, then zero alcohol intake is recommended. Diabetes and healthy weight If you are overweight, even losing a small amount of weight, especially round the abdomen, helps lower your blood pressure, blood glucose and cholesterol levels. It can be daunting trying to lose weight, so Continue reading >>

Nutrition Summative Quiz Ch.5

Nutrition Summative Quiz Ch.5

Which of the following is NOT true of type 1 diabetes? Which of these choices correctly ranks the foods from lowest to highest glycemic index? Black beans, sugar-sweetened soda, whole wheat bread Which of the following is a TRUE statement about glucagon? It stimulates the liver to increase glucose production Which of the following is UNLIKELY to occur in someone with type 2 diabetes? When an equal amount of carbohydrate is ingested, which of the following would cause blood glucose to increase most quickly and to the greatest extent? Which of the following is NOT true of type 2 diabetes? Which of the following about glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) is NOT true? GL is calculated by multiplying a foods GI by its weight in grams. Which of the following would NOT decrease the glycemic index of a food? Increasing the ripeness of a fruit (as fruits become more ripe, their glycemic index generally increases) As a meal planning technique in those with diabetes Which of the following is NOT true of insulin? Which of the following choices give the most complete listing of tissues that are stimulated by insulin to take up glucose? Which of the following is NOT a complication associated with poorly controlled diabetes? Continue reading >>

Complications Of Diabetes

Complications Of Diabetes

The lead section of this article may need to be rewritten. Please discuss this issue on the article's talk page . Use the lead layout guide to ensure the section follows Wikipedia's norms and to be inclusive of all essential details. The complications of diabetes mellitus are far less common and less severe in people who have well-controlled blood sugar levels. Acute complications include hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia , diabetic coma and nonketotic hyperosmolar coma .Chronic complications occur due to a mix of microangiopathy , macrovascular disease and immune dysfunction in the form of autoimmune disease or poor immune response, most of which are difficult to manage. Microangiopathy can affect all vital organs, kidneys , heart and brain, as well as eyes , nerves , lungs and locally gums and feet . Macrovascular problems can lead to cardiovascular disease including erectile dysfunction . Female infertility may be due to endocrine dysfunction with impaired signalling on a molecular level. Other health problems compound the chronic complications of diabetes such as smoking , obesity , high blood pressure , elevated cholesterol levels, and lack of regular exercise which are accessible to management as they are modifiable. Non-modifiable risk factors of diabetic complications are type of diabetes, age of onset, and genetic factors, both protective and predisposing have been found. Complications of diabetes mellitus are acute and chronic. Risk factors for them can be modifiable or not modifiable.Overall, complications are far less common and less severe in people with well-controlled blood sugar levels. [1] [2] [3] However, (non-modifiable) risk factors such as age at diabetes onset, type of diabetes, gender and genetics play a role. Some genes appear to provide protection Continue reading >>

Complications Of Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes

Complications Of Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes

To lower your risk of skin conditions, follow your recommended diabetes treatment plan and practice good skin care. A good skin care routine may include keeping your skin clean and moisturized, and checking for signs of injury. If you develop symptoms of a skin condition, make an appointment with your doctor. Uncontrolled diabetes increases your chances of developing several eye conditions, including: glaucoma , which happens when pressure builds up in your eye cataracts , which occur when the lens of your eye becomes cloudy retinopathy , which develops when blood vessels in the back of your eye become damaged Over time, these conditions can cause vision loss. Fortunately, early diagnosis and treatment can help you maintain your eyesight. In addition to following your recommended diabetes treatment plan, make sure to schedule regular eye exams. If you notice changes in your vision, make an appointment with your eye doctor. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA) , about half of people with diabetes have nerve damage, known as diabetic neuropathy . Several types of neuropathy can develop as a result of diabetes. Peripheral neuropathy can affect your feet and legs, as well as your hands and arms. Potential symptoms include: increased or decreased sensitivity to touch or temperature Other types of neuropathy can affect your joints, face, eyes, or torso. To lower your risk of neuropathy, keep your blood glucose levels under control. If you develop symptoms of neuropathy, make an appointment with your doctor. They might order tests to check your nerve function. They should also conduct regular foot exams to check for signs of neuropathy. High blood glucose levels increase the strain on your kidneys. Over time, this can lead to kidney disease. Early-stage kidney Continue reading >>

Fundamentals Of Nutrition- Nutrition For A Changing World - Ch. 5

Fundamentals Of Nutrition- Nutrition For A Changing World - Ch. 5

1. Which of the following choices give the most complete listing of tissues that are stimulated by insulin to take up glucose? a. muscle and adipose b. pancreas, muscle, and liver c. liver, muscle, and adipose d. Nearly all cells in the body take up glucose in response to insulin a. muscle and adipose insulin does not stimulate glucose uptake into at least one of these tissues 2. Which of the following is UNLIKELY to occur in someone with type 2 diabetes? a. elevated levels of insulin in blood b. ketoacidosis c. glucose excretion in urine d. extreme thirst b. ketoacidosis 3. Which of the following is NOT true of type 1 diabetes? a. It can result in ketoacidosis. b. It is an autoimmune disease. c. It is caused by insulin resistance. d. It results in excess glucose production by the liver. c. It is caused by insulin resistance. Correct; insulin resistance is the cause of type 2 diabetes. 4. Which of the following is NOT true of insulin? a. It is released into the blood when blood glucose is high. b. It is produced by the pancreas. c. It stimulates the synthesis of fat. d. It stimulates ketone body synthesis d. It stimulates ketone body synthesis insulin is an anabolic hormone, and as such, it stimulates fat synthesis. 5. Which of the following is a TRUE statement about glucagon? a. It stimulates the liver to increase glucose production.. b. It stimulates the synthesis of glycogen in the liver. c. It stimulates muscle protein breakdown to release amino acids. d. Its concentrations in blood will be low after an overnight fast. a. It stimulates the liver to increase glucose production. Correct; glucagon increases blood glucose concentrations by stimulating the liver to release glucose. 6. Which of the following is NOT true of insulin resistance? a. It results in elevated lev Continue reading >>

Complications From Diabetes

Complications From Diabetes

If you experience any of these symptoms, contact your doctor immediately. The sooner a stroke is detected and treated, the less damage it will do to your brain. Keeping your blood sugar in check with exercise and a well-balanced diet, and adhering to your treatment plan can help lower your risk of getting a stroke. Kidney disease is another complication that can result from not managing your diabetes properly. If your blood glucose levels are too high, your kidneys may struggle to filter your blood, causing your body to lose important proteins. Symptoms of kidney disease include fluid buildup, weakness, nausea, loss of sleep, and trouble concentrating. However, because these symptoms typically dont show up until kidney function is almost gone, kidney disease is often difficult to detect. If you have diabetes, its important that you see your doctor regularly to get tested for kidney-related problems on a regular basis. High blood pressure, also known as hypertension, is one of the most common health complications in people with diabetes, affecting between 20 to 60 percent . If left untreated, high blood pressure increases your risk of heart attack, stroke, vision problems, and kidney disease. If youre living with diabetes, you're likely always aware of your blood pressure since its checked during every healthcare visit. The best way to lower your blood pressure is with healthy dietary and lifestyle choices. Try your best to reduce your sodium intake, eat whole grains, and avoid tobacco and alcohol. People with diabetes have a higher chance of developing eye problems like glaucoma and cataracts. Poorly managed diabetes can also lead to retinopathy, a condition where high blood sugar levels damage the blood vessels in your retina. If left untreated, retinopathy in its mos Continue reading >>

Diabetes Complications

Diabetes Complications

Search the A-Z of complications: Uncontrolled diabetes can lead to a number of short and long-term health complications, including hypoglycemia, heart disease, nerve damage and amputation, and vision problems. The majority of these diabetes-related conditions occur as a result of uncontrolled blood glucose levels, particularly elevated blood sugar over a prolonged period of time. It is essential that diabetics are aware of the complications that can occur as a result of diabetes to ensure that the first symptoms of any possible illness are spotted before they develop. In this section, you'll find information on all of the diseases, illnesses and disorders that are linked to diabetes, including the different causes, symptoms and treatments for each condition. How common are complications of diabetes? It is common for most people with diabetes to begin to develop complications after having diabetes for a number of years. With good diabetes control and living a healthy, active lifestyle, it is possible for people to go a number of decades complication free. However, if you have had less well controlled diabetes, have led a less healthy lifestyle, or had undiagnosed diabetes for a number of years, the complications of diabetes are more likely to develop earlier. Why do complications occur? Scientists still do not fully understand how complications develop. What is known, however, is that high blood glucose levels cause damage to the blood vessels and nerves which supply our organs and therefore result in impaired functioning of any affected organs. How do I prevent complications? The risk of developing complications can be reduced by following a number of healthy lifestyle steps: Reducing your HbA1c Large scale research studies have shown that the chances of developing the Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Wikipedia

Diabetes - Wikipedia

Not to be confused with Diabetes insipidus . a disease characterized by long-term high blood sugar Universal blue circle symbol for diabetes. [1] Diabetes mellitus (DM), commonly known as diabetes, is a group of metabolic disorders characterized by high blood sugar levels over a prolonged period. [10] Symptoms of high blood sugar include frequent urination , increased thirst , and increased hunger . [2] If left untreated, diabetes can cause many complications . [2] Acute complications can include diabetic ketoacidosis , hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state , or death. [3] Serious long-term complications include cardiovascular disease , stroke , chronic kidney disease , foot ulcers , and damage to the eyes . [2] Diabetes is due to either the pancreas not producing enough insulin , or the cells of the body not responding properly to the insulin produced. [11] There are three main types of diabetes mellitus: [2] Type 1 diabetes results from the pancreas's failure to produce enough insulin due to loss of beta cells . [2] This form was previously referred to as "insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus" (IDDM) or "juvenile diabetes". [2] The cause is unknown. [2] Type 2 diabetes begins with insulin resistance , a condition in which cells fail to respond to insulin properly. [2] As the disease progresses, a lack of insulin may also develop. [12] This form was previously referred to as "non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus" (NIDDM) or "adult-onset diabetes". [2] The most common cause is a combination of excessive body weight and insufficient exercise . [2] Gestational diabetes is the third main form, and occurs when pregnant women without a previous history of diabetes develop high blood sugar levels. [2] Prevention and treatment involve maintaining a healthy diet , regular physica Continue reading >>

Complications

Complications

If diabetes isn't treated, it can lead to a number of different health problems. High glucose levels can damage blood vessels, nerves and organs. Even a mildly raised glucose level that doesn't cause any symptoms can have damaging effects in the long term. Heart disease and stroke If you have diabetes, you're up to five times more likely to develop coronary heart disease (CHD) or have a stroke. Prolonged, poorly controlled blood glucose levels increase the likelihood of developing atherosclerosis (furring and narrowing of your blood vessels). This may result in a poor blood supply to your heart, causing angina (a dull, heavy or tight pain in the chest). It also increases the chance that a blood vessel in your heart or brain will become completely blocked, leading to a heart attack or stroke. Nerve damage High blood glucose levels can damage the tiny blood vessels of your nerves. This can cause a tingling or burning pain that spreads from your fingers and toes up through your limbs. It can also cause numbness, which can lead to ulceration of the feet. Damage to the peripheral nervous system (the nervous system outside the brain and spinal cord) is known as peripheral neuropathy. If the nerves in your digestive system are affected, you may experience nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea or constipation. Diabetic retinopathy Diabetic retinopathy is where the retina, the light-sensitive layer of tissue at the back of the eye, becomes damaged. The retina needs a constant supply of blood, which it receives through a network of tiny blood vessels. Over time, a persistently high blood sugar level can damage these blood vessels and affect your vision. Annual eye checks are usually organised by a regional photographic unit. If significant damage is detected, you may be referred to a docto Continue reading >>

Complications Of Diabetes Mellitus

Complications Of Diabetes Mellitus

The complications of diabetes mellitus are far less common and less severe in people who have well-controlled blood sugar levels. Acute complications include hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, diabetic coma and nonketotic hyperosmolar coma. Chronic complications occur due to a mix of microangiopathy, macrovascular disease and immune dysfunction in the form of autoimmune disease or poor immune response, most of which are difficult to manage. Microangiopathy can affect all vital organs, kidneys, heart and brain, as well as eyes, nerves, lungs and locally gums and feet. Macrovascular problems can lead to cardiovascular disease including erectile dysfunction. Female infertility may be due to endocrine dysfunction with impaired signalling on a molecular level. Other health problems compound the chronic complications of diabetes such as smoking, obesity, high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol levels, and lack of regular exercise which are accessible to management as they are modifiable. Non-modifiable risk factors of diabetic complications are type of diabetes, age of onset, and genetic factors, both protective and predisposing have been found. Overview[edit] Complications of diabetes mellitus are acute and chronic. Risk factors for them can be modifiable or not modifiable. Overall, complications are far less common and less severe in people with well-controlled blood sugar levels.[1][2][3] However, (non-modifiable) risk factors such as age at diabetes onset, type of diabetes, gender and genetics play a role. Some genes appear to provide protection against diabetic complications, as seen in a subset of long-term diabetes type 1 survivors without complications .[4][5] Statistics[edit] As of 2010, there were about 675,000 diabetes-related emergency department (ED) visits in the Continue reading >>

Which Of The Following Correctly Matches The

Which Of The Following Correctly Matches The

Which of the following correctly matches the diagnostic threshold with the Which of the following correctly matches the 100% (23) 23 out of 23 people found this document helpful This preview shows page 2 - 4 out of 4 pages. 8. Which of the following correctly matches the diagnostic threshold with the appropriate test and condition?a. prediabetesOGTT, 200 mg/dl blood glucoseb. prediabetesfasting, 100 mg/dl blood glucosec. diabetesOGTT, 180 mg/dl blood glucosed. diabetesfasting, 140 mg/dl blood glucose Incorrect; the threshold for a diagnosis of diabetes is not 140 mg/dl fasting bloodglucose.Score: 0 of 19. Which of the following is NOT a complication associated with poorly controlled diabetes?Score: 1 of 110. Which of the following is NOT true of gestational diabetes?Score: 1 of 1 You've reached the end of your free preview. As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students. Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business 17, Course Hero Intern I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. Its truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero. Dana University of Pennsylvania 17, Course Hero Intern The ability to access any universitys resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLAs materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time. Jill Tulane University 16, Course Hero Intern Continue reading >>

Complications Of Diabetes

Complications Of Diabetes

Over time persistent high blood glucose levels (BGLs) can damage the body's organs. This damage is referred to as 'diabetes-related complications'. While these complications are serious and can be life-threatening, with appropriate lifestyle changes and attention to blood glucose control, people with diabetes can greatly reduce the risk of these complications. Heart disease and stroke People with diabetes are at increased risk of heart disease and stroke due to raised BGLs, in association with high blood pressure and cholesterol. You should discuss your individual risk factors and how to reduce them with your doctor or diabetes educator. In general terms, the risk of heart disease in diabetes can be reduced by: losing weight if you are overweight managing blood fats managing high blood pressure taking medication as prescribed. For more information speak to your doctor or specialist or contact the Australian Diabetes Council Customer Care Line on 1300 DIABETES or 1300 342 238 and ask to speak to a Diabetes Educator. High Blood Pressure As well as being a risk factor for developing diabetes, high blood pressure can also be a complication of diabetes. Diabetes changes the body chemistry to increase the risk of high blood pressure. As having high blood pressure in diabetes further increases the risk of other complications of diabetes, it is important that it is adequately monitored and, if necessary, controlled. You should get your blood pressure checked every time you go to the doctor, and at least: every 6 months for people with normal blood pressure 3 months for people with high blood pressure every 4-8 weeks if your blood pressure medication is being changed. Skin Damage to the small blood vessels and nerves common in people with diabetes can cause very dry skin. This c Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Complications

Type 2 Diabetes Complications

With type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus), if you don’t work hard to keep your blood glucose level under control, there are short- and long-term complications to contend with. However, by watching the amount and types of food you eat (your meal plan), exercising, and taking any necessary medications, you may be able to prevent these complications. And even if you have some of the long-term, more serious complications discussed below when you’re first diagnosed, getting tight control of your blood glucose will help prevent the complications from becoming worse. (It is possible with type 2 diabetes to already have some of these complications when you’re first diagnosed. That’s because type 2 develops gradually, and you may not realize that you have high blood glucose for quite some time. Over time, high blood glucose can cause serious damage. You can learn more about that in this article on the symptoms of type 2 diabetes.) Short-term Diabetes Complications Hypoglycemia is low blood glucose (blood sugar). It is possible for your blood glucose to drop, especially if you’re taking insulin or a sulfonylurea drug (those make your body produce insulin throughout the day). With these medications, if you eat less than usual or were more active, your blood glucose may dip too much. Other possible causes of hypoglycemia include certain medications (aspirin, for example, lowers the blood glucose level if you take a dose of more than 81mg) and too much alcohol (alcohol keeps the liver from releasing glucose). Rapid heartbeat Sweating Whiteness of skin Anxiety Numbness in fingers, toes, and lips Sleepiness Confusion Headache Slurred speech Mild cases of hypoglycemia can be treated by drinking orange juice or eating a glucose tablet—those will quickly rai Continue reading >>

Complications Of Diabetes Mellitus

Complications Of Diabetes Mellitus

Autophagy and Diabetes Complications Complications of diabetes represent the major causes of morbidity and mortality that are associated with this chronic metabolic disorder84. Specifically, cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in subjects with diabetes, which represents the major cause of end stage renal disease, blindness and limb amputations in developed and many developing societies. Broadly speaking, diabetes complications can be categorized as macrovascular, which are those affecting large and medium size blood vessels and microvascular complications, which involve small blood vessels such as small arterioles. Macrovascular complications include accelerated atherosclerosis, leading to increased coronary artery disease, increased cerebrovascular disease and stroke, and increased peripheral arterial disease that contributes to critical limb ischemia. There is also strong evidence that diabetes leads to direct adverse effects in the heart that leads to diabetic cardiomyopathy85. Microvascular impairment leads to the complications of diabetic retinopathy, diabetic nephropathy and diabetic neuropathy. The pathogenesis of these diverse complications of diabetes is complex, is only partially understood and has been the subject of many reviews. Only recently has attention turned to the potential contribution of changes in autophagy due to the complications of diabetes. As reviewed in other chapters, autophagy may serve a protective role in cells where it promotes cellular survival by removing damaged organelles such as mitochondria. Therefore in these contexts, a decrease in autophagy could contribute to cellular dysfunction that occurs on the basis of accumulation of dysfunctional organelles or irreversibly damaged cellular substructures. Conversely, Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Overview Type 2 diabetes, once known as adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition that affects the way your body metabolizes sugar (glucose), your body's important source of fuel. With type 2 diabetes, your body either resists the effects of insulin — a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into your cells — or doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain a normal glucose level. More common in adults, type 2 diabetes increasingly affects children as childhood obesity increases. There's no cure for type 2 diabetes, but you may be able to manage the condition by eating well, exercising and maintaining a healthy weight. If diet and exercise aren't enough to manage your blood sugar well, you also may need diabetes medications or insulin therapy. Symptoms Signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly. In fact, you can have type 2 diabetes for years and not know it. Look for: Increased thirst and frequent urination. Excess sugar building up in your bloodstream causes fluid to be pulled from the tissues. This may leave you thirsty. As a result, you may drink — and urinate — more than usual. Increased hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your cells, your muscles and organs become depleted of energy. This triggers intense hunger. Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, you may lose weight. Without the ability to metabolize glucose, the body uses alternative fuels stored in muscle and fat. Calories are lost as excess glucose is released in the urine. Fatigue. If your cells are deprived of sugar, you may become tired and irritable. Blurred vision. If your blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your eyes. This may affect your ability to focus. Slow-healing sores o Continue reading >>

More in insulin