diabetestalk.net

Which Is The Fastest Acting Insulin?

Share on facebook

A Newer, Faster-acting Insulin? (faster Than Novolog!)

New findings from phase 3a trials show that a faster-acting insulin aspart by Novo Nordisk reduced A1c levels and improved after meal blood sugars in people with type 1 and 2 diabetes compared with NovoLog. These findings were presented at the 76th annual Scientific Sessions of the American Diabetes Association (ADA) in New Orleans. Novolog (also marketed as Novorapid) is a fast-acting insulin aspart. The trial involves 2,100 people with type 1 and 2 diabetes and an even faster-acting insulin aspart. The trial consisted of 26 weeks of randomized therapy using a faster-acting insulin aspart which showed statistically significantly improved A1c in adults with type 1 diabetes when dosed at mealtime compared with Novolog. A similar result in A1c improvement was found when the insulin aspart was dosed 20 minutes after a meal compared with Novolog. What is Faster-Acting Insulin Aspart? Faster-acting insulin aspart is a fast acting bolus or mealtime insulin in investigation stages developed by Novo Nordisk. It is also insulin aspart like Novolog (or Novorapid) but in a new formulation which includes a vitamin and an amino acid intended to increase the initial absorption rate and provide a Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. Havis1938

    Friend of mine had family visit from USA and their daughter has diabetes so we were talking lot about it and I was really shocked when they told me they pay for insulin Humalog 100 units/mL 10ml vial almost 250USD without insurance.
    Well here in Slovakia I can have it for free - paid from public healthcare. I can also get all other diabetes supplies like pump, cartridges etc expect CGM for free.
    However the price that is public insurance paying instead of me for the same vial of Humalog is only 19€.
    You can even check it on this page: https://www.adc.sk/databazy/produkty/detail/humalog-100-u-ml-228842.html, where are all registered drugs here in Slovakia and on right side there is "Maximálna cena" which is maximum price for that vial.
    So I talked with few friends from other EU countries and in the most cases they have same final price +- 10€. And this is very big difference 250USD (228€) and 19€ for same vial.
    How can diabetics without insurance even afford to live in USA? I need at least 52-53 of these vials per year, so that would cost me 13000€ in USA and knowing your average wage, that would be 1/4 of your yearly average income just for insulin and not talking about other supplies.
    What is the reason behind this price difference?

  2. KerooSeta

    My opinion as an American and a U.S. history professor and not a medical or economics expert is that it's a result of a convergence of 1) Americans' general belief in free market capitalism, 2) a tradition of self-sufficiency that you can trace back to the Puritans, 3) long-standing rejection of socialism due to the 1920s Red Scare and the 1950s and onward Cold War, 4) relative economic prosperity following World War II, which meant that the people currently in charge of our country came of age at a time when things were very, very easy for most white people in our country, 5) a surge of power for the Republican Party that started in 1968 due to them making a pivot toward neoconservative politics, and 6) systemic discrimination and disenfranchisement of the poor along with a corporate media that keeps them uninformed and distracted.
    When you combine those things together, you get a country where the people in charge and a substantial number of voters lack empathy for anyone whose situation is worse than their own. If you have a good job like I do, your insulin might be as cheap as $10 a vial. These people have a hard time feeling sorry for someone who isn't so fortunate because our culture has taught them that they earned it all themselves. They don't understand how their tax dollars funded the schools and universities that helped them to get that job that gives them that insurance that makes that insulin so cheap or any of the other ways that the socialist side of our economy and government has been benefiting them their entire lives. To them, they are that rugged pioneer who carved out a bit of America through sheer hard work, and anyone who hasn't been able to do the same is just lazy.
    So, then companies can charge outrageous prices for drugs for the uninsured, because the insured will mostly not come to their defense. It's very frustrating...

  3. DeleteFromUsers

    Thanks for that description. Nice to hear something more in depth. It's as though America is currently riding its own coattails.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more close
Share on facebook

The Scoop On Novo's New Faster-acting Fiasp Insulin

There's a new ultra fast-acting insulin on the market internationally, and hopefully before long it will become available to us here in the U.S. too. You may have heard mention of FIASP, or Faster-Acting Insulin Aspart, that recently hit the market overseas and in Canada -- and been wondering what the deal is with this new super-fasting insulin. We put our ears to the ground to learn more about it, what PWDs (people with diabetes) who've started on this med are saying online, as well as what its manufacturer Novo Nordisk has to say about this new product that was just recently re-submitted to the FDA for consideration as a new type of medication. Here's what we've heard: Getting to Know FIASP What exactly is Faster-Acting Insulin Aspart? Remember, insulin aspart is the official scientific name for the synthetic insulin analog that sells under the brand Novolog here in the States and NovoRapid internationally. What's in a Name? OK, so maybe FIASP is not the most creative branding (sounds like a variety of wasps?), but the name certainly fits. Whether it will carry a new brand name here States when launched remains TBD. By Vial or Pen? Internationally, FIASP is available by vial, Pen Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. ChiGuy

    Insulin Pump Cost and ongoing expenses?

    My endo has been recommending I go on an insulin pump and I told him I would consider in the near future once I find better control first thru MDI. I started researching the different pump options and I am a shocked on the cost of a pump and ongoing expense of infusion sets. I realize everyone has different insurance coverage to offset these expenses, but it appears a lot more than I anticipated. I have BCBS Gold PPO plan that appears will require I first meet my deductible and then pay 20% for in network supplied pump. I am finding pumps range from $6,000-12,000. It also appears that the infusion sets will run another $120-170/month. Not sure what portion of infusion sets will be covered? My insurance co-pays on test strips and pen needles make coverage non-existent. It is much cheaper for me to use Relion meter and test strips purchased solely at my expense then it is to buy branded meter & test strips. Same thing with needles, cheaper online then what my co-pay is. Do most of you shop out infusion sets online and pay for this completely out of pocket or does insurance pick up big portion of this? I also seem a lot of the pumps work with specific meters which would also add to monthly expense.

  2. CalgaryDiabetic

    Can you move to Canada and become a resident for health care purposes ? Bring a warm parka. Yes capital and operating costs are staggering. Will be pumping soon instead of MDI. Read my post re lantus, this is why MDI not that practical for me lantus is useless or harmful in my case.

  3. PeterPumper

    I can only speak of my experience, but it may be typical.
    Yes, the initial pump was covered as a "durable medical device", and subject to deductible and then copay. But the year I first went on the pump I had already met my deductible. In fact, I'd also met my annual out-of-pocket max, so the pump cost me Zero.
    My insurer (and most) also cover infusion sets and reservoirs as DME rather than prescriptions (even though scripts are required), so again, annual deductibles, co-pays (in my case 20%), and annual out-of-pocket maxes apply.
    Does using a pump cost more than needles and vials? Yes. But I make an effort to make the most of the insurance plans and such.
    I've never sourced the infusion sets anywhere other than the manufacturer site, and I don't think there's the same 3rd party market for them as there is for test strips, since they are script-only DME.
    As far as meters, you can use any meter. Using one that "links" to your pump offers convenience, but is not mandatory. But also keep in mind that once you buy the pump and supplies, you've surely met your annual deductible, and in some cases your out-of-pocket max, and that sometimes means getting test strips through insurance ends up cheaper if not free.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more close
Share on facebook

Fda Approves Novo Nordisk Fast-acting Insulin Fiasp

(Reuters) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday approved Novo Nordisk’s fast-acting insulin to treat diabetes. The product, known as Fiasp, is designed to help diabetics control post-meal spikes in blood sugar. It is already approved in Canada and Europe. Fiasp, or faster acting insulin asparte, is designed to work faster than existing fast-acting insulin such as Eli Lilly and Co’s Humalog and Novo Nordisk’s own NovoLog, known as NovoRapid outside the United States. Last year the FDA declined to approve the product and requested additional information. Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. VThokies09

    Implications of high human insulin antibodies

    Hi there,
    I was put on a Medtronic pump about 4 months ago. Before I got put on, they obviously had to do a bunch of blood work. I was unaware that I could review it online until now, which sparked my question. Currently I am on Novolog with my pump. Before I started pumping, I was on a Lantus/Novolog combination. Anyway, as I was looking through my lab results, I noticed that my human insulin antibody was high. It was 4.4 when it's supposed to be <0.4.
    My question is...what are the implications of this high antibody response? I'm assuming it means that my body isn't responding to the Novolog like it should. Could this be the reason I feel I am developing insulin resistance? While my basal rate isn't that high (0.925 u/hr), I feel my I:C is pretty high at 1:8 and I also feel that my body sometimes doesn't respond to my bolus does when I have a high BG.
    Any thoughts would be much appreciated (the implications of the high Ab result and any ways to help fix the issue). I'm heading back to the endo next week for a follow up and have a lot of questions I need to ask her.

  2. bsc

    Originally Posted by VThokies09
    Hi there,
    I was put on a Medtronic pump about 4 months ago. Before I got put on, they obviously had to do a bunch of blood work. I was unaware that I could review it online until now, which sparked my question. Currently I am on Novolog with my pump. Before I started pumping, I was on a Lantus/Novolog combination. Anyway, as I was looking through my lab results, I noticed that my human insulin antibody was high. It was 4.4 when it's supposed to be <0.4.
    My question is...what are the implications of this high antibody response? I'm assuming it means that my body isn't responding to the Novolog like it should. Could this be the reason I feel I am developing insulin resistance? While my basal rate isn't that high (0.925 u/hr), I feel my I:C is pretty high at 1:8 and I also feel that my body sometimes doesn't respond to my bolus does when I have a high BG.
    Any thoughts would be much appreciated (the implications of the high Ab result and any ways to help fix the issue). I'm heading back to the endo next week for a follow up and have a lot of questions I need to ask her. Anti-Insulin Antibodies are an immune response against a foreign insulin (Novolog). But your body does not have a human insulin antibody response, it considers human insulin to be "ok." Normally, when you are tested for LADA/T1, you are given a penl of three antibody tests; Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), Islet cell antibodies (ICA) and Insulin AutoAntibodies (IAA). But IAA is different than insulin antibodies which are triggered by external insulin. It is not clear that reducing antibody levels has any real effect on diabetes progression and even if it did, I am not aware of any approved methods for suppressing the levels.

  3. ToniLee

    I found this posting about insulin antibodies on Tudiabetes. It's a little old but you may find it interesting.
    http://www.tudiabetes.org/forum/topi...age=1#comments

  4. -> Continue reading
read more close

No more pages to load

Related Articles

  • Which Is The Fastest Acting Insulin?

    You may take rapid acting or fast acting insulin (also known as insulin analogues) for your diabetes, either through injections prior to your meals, or in your insulin pump. You may use it alone, or in combination with other insulins and diabetes medications, including injections and pills. In a person without diabetes, the pancreas puts out small amounts of insulin, continuously bringing down blood sugars to a normal level with no difficulty. Wh ...

    insulin Apr 1, 2018
  • What Is The Fastest Acting Insulin

    Tweet Rapid acting insulins are usually taken just before or with a meal. They act very quickly to minimise the rise in blood sugar which follows eating. Rapid acting insulins are commonly prescribed to people with type 1 diabetes, however, there may be times when they can be prescribed for type 2 diabetes as well. As rapid acting insulins act very quickly, they can lead to an increased chance of hypoglycemia. Care should be therefore taken when ...

    insulin Apr 28, 2018
  • Long Acting And Short Acting Insulin

    What’s the difference between the different types of insulin? Long-acting, short-acting, premixed, learn more about all three. You may have a lot of questions as you begin insulin therapy. What are the different types of insulin available? Which should I be using and when? Insulins differ based on 3 key factors: 1 how quickly they work when they peak how long they last (duration) This table compares these factors in the types of insulin availab ...

    insulin Jan 20, 2018
  • Fastest Acting Insulin

    Elizabeth Blair, A.N.P., at Joslin Diabetes Center, helps break down the different types of insulin and how they work for people with diabetes. Types of Insulin for People with Diabetes Rapid-acting: Usually taken before a meal to cover the blood glucose elevation from eating. This type of insulin is used with longer-acting insulin. Short-acting: Usually taken about 30 minutes before a meal to cover the blood glucose elevation from eating. This t ...

    insulin Jan 26, 2018
  • Which Insulin Has The Fastest Onset Of Action?

    A good way to improve your glucose levels is to track the peaks and drops in your glucose , so you can figure out why they happened and how to correct them. Once you identify glucose patterns (they ARE there!), you also want to understand when each of your insulins is active and when they typically stop lowering your glucose. This helps you adjust your doses or food intake to stop unwanted ups and downs in your readings. The table below shows th ...

    diabetes Oct 21, 2018
  • Which Rat Had The Fastest Basal Metabolic Rate (bmr)?

    Which of the following statements is true? The hypothalamus primarily secretes tropic hormones that stimulate the secretion of other hormones. How would you treat a thyroidectomized animal so that it functions like a "normal" animal? As a result of the missing hormone(s) in the hypophysectimized rat, what would be some expected symptoms? An injection of thyroxine to an otherwise normal rat will cause which of the following? Why didn't any of the ...

    insulin Sep 7, 2018

Popular Articles

More in insulin