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Which Insulins Are Cloudy In Appearance

Diabetes Treatment: Insulin And Other Medications

Diabetes Treatment: Insulin And Other Medications

People with type 1 diabetes mellitus need insulin therapy to replace the insulin that the body can no longer produce. People with type 2 diabetes may also need insulin. People with type 1 diabetes mellitus need insulin therapy to replace the insulin that the body can no longer produce. People with type 2 diabetes may also need insulin. You can give insulin by injection via a syringe or a pen device or via an insulin pump into the layer of fat under the skin (called the subcutaneous layer). You need a healthy food plan and regular intake of carbohydrate to balance with insulin that is given by injection or insulin pump. Types of insulin Insulin action and duration varies according to insulin type. Rapid acting insulin (Novorapid/Humalog/Apidra) You need food within 15 minutes of an injection of rapid acting insulin (Novorapid/Humalog/Apidra). Rapid acting insulins have a peak action at between 0 and 3 hours. They tend to last between 2 and 4 hours. They are clear in appearance. Short acting insulin (Actrapid/Humulin R) You need food 20 – 30 minutes after an injection of short acting insulin (Actrapid/Humulin R). Short acting insulins have a peak action of 2 - 4 hours and can last for up to 8 hours. They are also clear in appearance. Intermediate acting insulin (Protophane/Humulin NPH) You usually take intermediate acting insulin (Protophane/Humulin NPH) once or twice a day to provide background insulin combined with either rapid or short acting insulin. Their peak activity is between 4 and 12 hours but can last up to 24 hours. They are cloudy in appearance. Long acting insulin analogues (Lantus [Glargine Solostar]/Levermir [Detemir]) You take long acting insulin analogues (Lantus [Glargine Solostar]/Levermir [Detemir]) either once or twice a day to provide background ' Continue reading >>

Insulin: The Holy Grail Of Diabetes Treatment

Insulin: The Holy Grail Of Diabetes Treatment

Insulin is a hormone made by beta cells in the pancreas. When we eat, insulin is released into the blood stream where it helps to move glucose from the food we have eaten into cells to be used as energy. In people with type 1 diabetes, the body produces little or no insulin as the cells that produce insulin have been destroyed by an autoimmune reaction in the body. Insulin replacement by daily injections is required. In people with type 2 diabetes the body produces insulin but the insulin does not work as well as it should. This is often referred to as insulin resistance. To compensate the body makes more but eventually cannot make enough to keep the balance right. Lifestyle changes can delay the need for tablets and/or insulin to stabilise blood glucose levels. When insulin is required, it is important to understand that this is just the natural progression of the condition. RMIT University have produced a short overview of insulin, a drug that keeps in excess of one million Australians alive. Watch the video to understand why insulin is important and why so many Australians rely on it to stay alive. Copyright © 2015 RMIT University, Prepared by the School of Applied Sciences (Discipline of Chemistry). At this stage, insulin can only be injected. Insulin cannot be given in tablet form as it would be destroyed in the stomach, meaning it would not be available to convert glucose into energy. Insulin is injected through the skin into the fatty tissue known as the subcutaneous layer. You do not inject it into muscle or directly into the blood. Absorption of insulin varies depending on the part of the body into which you inject. The tummy (abdomen) absorbs insulin the fastest and is the site used by most people. The buttocks and thighs are also used by some people. While i Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin

Types Of Insulin

Topic Overview Insulin is used to treat people who have diabetes. Each type of insulin acts over a specific amount of time. The amount of time can be affected by exercise, diet, illness, some medicines, stress, the dose, and where the insulin has been injected. Insulin strength is usually U-100, or 100 units of insulin in one milliliter of fluid. Short-acting (regular) insulin is also available in U-500, or 500 units of insulin in one milliliter of fluid. This is five times more concentrated than U-100 regular insulin. Insulin is made by different companies. Make sure you use the same type of insulin consistently. Types of insulin Type Examples Appearance When it starts to work (onset) The time of greatest effect (peak) How long it lasts (duration) Rapid-acting Apidra (insulin glulisine) Clear 5–15 minutes 30–60 minutes 3–5 hours Humalog (insulin lispro) Clear 5–15 minutes 30–90 minutes 3–5 hours NovoLog (insulin aspart) Clear 5–15 minutes 40–50 minutes 3–5 hours Short-acting Humulin R, Novolin R (insulin regular) Clear 30 minutes 1½–2 hours 6–8 hours Intermediate-acting Humulin N, Novolin N (insulin NPH) Cloudy 1–4 hours 4–12 hours 14–24 hours Long-acting Lantus (insulin glargine) Clear 1–2 hours Minimal peak Up to 24 hours Levemir (insulin detemir) Clear 2 hours Minimal peak Up to 24 hours Rapid-acting insulins work over a narrow, more predictable range of time. The insulin Humalog is a quick-acting insulin with a short length (duration) of action. Rapid- and short-acting types of insulin take effect and wear off more quickly than long-acting insulins. The liquid insulins are clear and do not settle out when the bottle (vial) sits for a while. Rapid-acting insulin acts most like insulin produced by the human pancreas. It quickly drops th Continue reading >>

Insulins

Insulins

Insulins There are three groups of insulin: Animal – this was the first type of insulin to be given to humans. Pork and bovine insulins have now been mainly replaced by human and analogue insulins Human – identical to human insulin but produced in a laboratory Analogues – these are modified or chemically altered versions of human insulin, altered to make them either more rapid or more smooth acting There are six main types of insulin Rapid acting analogue insulin – are clear in appearance and are given just before, with or just after food and have a peak action of 0 to 3 hours. They last between 2 and 5 hours, working for the meal it has been taken for. Long acting analogues – are clear in appearance and are injected once a day to give a background insulin lasting around 24 hours. They do not have a peak of action so do not need to be taken with food. Mixed analogues – this insulin is a combination of short and long acting insulins. If there is a number in the name this is usually the percentage of the mixture that is short acting insulin Short acting insulins – are clear in appearance and should be given 15 to 20 minutes before a meal. The peak action is 2 to 6 hours and can last for up to 8 hours Medium and long-acting insulin – are cloudy in appearance, their peak action is 4 to 12 hours and can last up to 30 hours. They are sometimes given with tablets or in combination with a short /rapid acting insulin. Mixed insulins – are cloudy in appearance and are a mixture of short and long-acting insulin. Injecting insulin How does it work? Insulin is injected just under the skin (subcutaneously) with very fine short needles. It is not injected into the muscles or veins. Once the insulin has been injected under the skin, small vessels absorb it into the bl Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Insulin

Diabetes And Insulin

On this page: Diabetes mellitus (diabetes) is a chronic and potentially life-threatening condition where the body loses its ability to produce insulin, or begins to produce or use insulin less efficiently, resulting in blood glucose levels that are too high (hyperglycaemia). Blood glucose levels above the normal range , over time, can damage your eyes, kidneys and nerves, and can also cause heart disease and stroke. An estimated 280 Australians develop diabetes every day. Diabetes is Australia's fastest-growing chronic disease. The main types of diabetes are type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes develops when the cells of the pancreas stop producing insulin. Without insulin, glucose cannot enter the cells of the muscles for energy. Instead the glucose rises in the blood causing a person to become extremely unwell. Type 1 diabetes is life threatening if insulin is not replaced, and people need to inject insulin for the rest of their lives. Type 1 diabetes often occurs in children and people under 30 years of age, but it can occur at any age. This condition is not caused by lifestyle factors. Its exact cause is not known but research shows that something in the environment such as the rubella virus can trigger it in a person that has a genetic risk. The body’s immune system attacks and destroys the beta cells of the pancreas after the person gets a virus because it sees the cells as foreign. Most people diagnosed with type 1 diabetes do not have family members with this condition. For more information about symptoms, visit the Diabetes type 1 fact sheet. Type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes develops when the pancreas does not make enough insulin and the insulin that is made does not work as well as it should (also known as insulin resistan Continue reading >>

Patient Information Humalog® (hu-ma-log) Insulin Lispro Injection, Usp (rdna Origin)

Patient Information Humalog® (hu-ma-log) Insulin Lispro Injection, Usp (rdna Origin)

Read the User Manual that comes with your Humalog prefilled pen and the manufacturer's instructions that comes with your external insulin pump. Use Humalog exactly as prescribed by your healthcare provider. If you have type 1 diabetes, you need to take a longer-acting insulin in addition to Humalog (except when using an external insulin pump). If you have type 2 diabetes, you may be taking diabetes pills and/or a longer-acting insulin in addition to Humalog. Humalog starts working faster than other insulins that contain regular human insulin. Inject Humalog within fifteen minutes before eating or right after eating a meal. Check your blood sugar levels as told by your healthcare provider. Look at your Humalog before using. Humalog should be clear, have no color and look like water. If your Humalog is cloudy, thickened, even slightly colored, or has solid particles or clumps in it, do not use. Return it to your pharmacy for new Humalog. Humalog can be mixed with a longer-acting human insulin, but only if you are told to do so by your healthcare provider. If you are mixing two types of insulin, always draw Humalog into the syringe first. Talk with your healthcare provider about how to properly mix Humalog with a different insulin. Humalog can be used in an external insulin pump either by withdrawing Humalog from a vial or using a 3 mL Humalog cartridge that is inserted into the pump. Humalog was tested with MiniMed®1 Models 506, 507, and 508 insulin pumps using MiniMed Polyfin®1 infusion sets. Humalog was also tested with the Disetronic®2 H-TRONplus®2 V100 insulin pump (with plastic 3.15 mL insulin reservoir), using the Disetronic Rapid®2 infusion set. A Humalog cartridge used in the D-TRON2 or D-TRONplus2 pump, may be used for up to 7 days. Humalog in the external i Continue reading >>

Insulin Types

Insulin Types

What Are the Different Insulin Types? Insulin Types are hormones normally made in the pancreas that stimulates the flow of sugar – glucose – from the blood into the cells of the body. Glucose provides the cells with the energy they need to function. There are two main groups of insulins used in the treatment of diabetes: human insulins and analog insulins, made by recombinant DNA technology. The concentration of most insulins available in the United States is 100 units per milliliter. A milliliter is equal to a cubic centimeter. All insulin syringes are graduated to match this insulin concentration. There are four categories of insulins depending on how quickly they start to work in the body after injection: Very rapid acting insulin, Regular, or Rapid acting insulins, Intermediate acting insulins, Long acting insulin. In addition, some insulins are marketed mixed together in different proportions to provide both rapid and long acting effects. Certain insulins can also be mixed together in the same syringe immediately prior to injection. Rapid Acting Insulins A very rapid acting form of insulin called Lispro insulin is marketed under the trade name of Humalog. A second form of very rapid acting insulin is called Aspart and is marketed under the trade name Novolog. Humalog and Novolog are clear liquids that begin to work 10 minutes after injection and peak at 1 hour after injection, lasting for 3-4 hours in the body. However, most patients also need a longer-acting insulin to maintain good control of their blood sugar. Humalog and Novolog can be mixed with NPH insulin and are used as “bolus” insulins to be given 15 minutes before a meal. Note: Check blood sugar level before giving Humalog or Novalog. Your doctor or diabetes educator will instruct you in determini Continue reading >>

Difference Between Nph And Regular Insulin

Difference Between Nph And Regular Insulin

NPH vs Regular Insulin Diabetes mellitus is a long-term condition linked with irregularly high levels of glucose or sugar within the blood. It is a cluster of metabolic disorders exemplified by abnormal blood sugar levels due to deficient secretion of insulin and action or both. This disease is typically called diabetes and was first discovered as a disorder linked with sugary urine and an extreme loss of muscle tone way back in the past decades. Increased blood glucose levels, or hyperglycemia, can result in the seeping out of glucose within the urine, thus the expression “sweet urine.” Regularly, blood sugar levels are strictly managed by insulin. Insulin is the hormone secreted by the pancreas which is responsible for lowering the levels of blood glucose. The increase of blood sugar levels are commonly noted as the patient eats. Insulin is then liberated from the pancreas to put the blood sugar levels on a normal level. The patients with diabetes mellitus, with insufficient or absent manufacture of insulin, may have hyperglycemia. The two types of diabetes mellitus are the insulin-dependent type and the non-insulin-dependent type. The characteristic of these two types is described by the terms used to identify them. The non-insulin-dependent types are the patients with minimal insulin production that are augmented by taking oral hyperglycemic agents. On the other hand, the insulin-dependent types are the patients that have the inability to produce insulin with more than 100 mg/dl blood sugar level. The development of such circumstances entails an enduring medical intervention such as insulin administration. Insulin concentrations have different characteristics which gives the patient choices on what to use. Two of these concentrations are the regular and NPH insu Continue reading >>

Humalog Kwikpens

Humalog Kwikpens

NOTICE: This Consumer Medicine Information (CMI) is intended for persons living in Australia. What is in this leaflet This leaflet is designed to provide you with answers to some common questions about these medicines. It does not contain all the available information and does not take the place of talking with your doctor. The information in this leaflet was last updated on the date shown on the final page. More recent information on this medicine may be available. Make sure you speak to your pharmacist, nurse or doctor to obtain the most up to date information on this medicine. You can also download the most up to date leaflet from www.lilly.com.au. The updated leaflet may contain important information about HUMALOG and its use that you should be aware of. All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has more information about these medicines than is contained in this leaflet. Also, your doctor has had the benefit of taking a full and detailed history from you and is in the best position to make an expert judgement to meet your individual needs. If you have any concerns about using these medicines, talk to your doctor or pharmacist. What the HUMALOG insulins are used for HUMALOG insulins are used to reduce high blood sugar (glucose) levels in insulin dependent diabetic patients. Diabetes is a condition in which your pancreas does not produce enough insulin to control your blood sugar level. Extra insulin is therefore needed. Type 1 diabetes - also called Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (IDDM). Patients with type 1 diabetes always need insulin to control their blood sugar levels. Type 2 diabetes - also called Non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Some patients with type 2 diabetes may also need insulin after initial treatment with diet, exercise an Continue reading >>

Insulins - Brand Names

Insulins - Brand Names

Sort Which types of insulin are clear? Which types are cloudy? Three CLEAR (1) rapid-acting (2) short-acting (3) long-acting Three CLOUDY (1) intermediate-acting (2) human mixture (3) analog mixture Which insulin mixtures include insulin analogs? Are they cloudy or clear? (1) insulin lispro protamine 75% / insulin lispro (Humalog Mix 75/25) (2) insulin lispro protamine 50% / insulin lispro 50% (Humalog 50/50) (3) insulin aspart protamine 70% / insulin aspart 30% (NovoLog Mix 70/30) CLOUDY Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin

Types Of Insulin

Topic Overview Insulin is used to treat people who have diabetes. Each type of insulin acts over a specific amount of time. The amount of time can be affected by exercise, diet, illness, some medicines, stress, the dose, how you take it, or where you inject it. The table below is a general guide. Your results may be different. Insulin strength is usually U-100 (or 100 units of insulin in one milliliter of fluid). Short-acting (regular) insulin is also available in U-500. This is five times more concentrated than U-100 regular insulin. Long-acting insulin (glargine) is also available in U-300. This is three times more concentrated than U-100 long-acting insulin. Be sure to check the concentration of your insulin so you take the right amount. Insulin is made by different companies. Make sure you use the same type of insulin consistently. Types of insulin Type Examples Appearance When it starts to work (onset) The time of greatest effect (peak) How long it lasts (duration) Rapid-acting insulins work over a narrow, more predictable range of time. Because they work quickly, they are used most often at the start of a meal. Rapid-acting insulin acts most like insulin that is produced by the human pancreas. It quickly drops the blood sugar level and works for a short time. If a rapid-acting insulin is used instead of a short-acting insulin at the start of dinner, it may prevent severe drops in blood sugar level in the middle of the night. Apidra (glulisine), Humalog (lispro), Novolog (aspart) Clear 5–30 minutes 30 minutes–3 hours 3–5 hours Rapid-acting insulin also comes in a form that can be inhaled through the mouth. Afrezza (insulin human, inhaled) Contained in a cartridge 10–15 minutes 30–90 minutes 2½–3 hours Short-acting insulins take effect and wear off more Continue reading >>

Insulin Treatment For Diabetes

Insulin Treatment For Diabetes

People with type 1 diabetes are unable to produce enough insulin to regulate the glucose (sugar) levels within their blood, so they need to take insulin to manage their diabetes. Some people with type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes (diabetes that develops during pregnancy) may also need insulin to control their blood sugar levels. There are a variety of types of insulin and ways to give it, including injections, pens and pumps. Your doctor and diabetes educator can recommend the most suitable type of insulin and delivery device for you. Types of insulin There are different types of insulin available to manage diabetes. These days, most types of insulin are synthetic (created in a laboratory), but there are some that are extracted from the pancreas of animals. Types of insulin vary, according to: how quickly they take effect; how long their effect lasts; and when they reach their peak, in terms of ability to lower blood-glucose levels. Ultra-short-acting insulin Ultra-short-acting (also called very-short-acting or rapid-acting) insulin starts to work about 15 minutes after being injected, peaks after about 1-2 hours, and lasts for about 4-5 hours. This type of insulin is injected immediately before meal times and is also used in insulin pumps. Types of ultra-short-acting insulin include: insulin glulisine (brand name Apidra); insulin lispro (Humalog); and insulin aspart (NovoRapid). These are all synthetic copies (analogues) of human insulin and are clear in appearance. Short-acting insulin Short-acting insulin (insulin neutral) starts to work about half an hour after being injected, peaks from between 3 and 5 hours, and lasts for about 6-8 hours. Short-acting insulin is given 20-30 minutes before a meal. It is clear in appearance. Types of short-acting neutral insu Continue reading >>

Keeping An Eye On Your Insulin

Keeping An Eye On Your Insulin

For millions of people with diabetes, technology has supplied us with wonderful, helpful aids to help control blood sugar. While some of these medications come in pill form and remain stable when stored out of light and at moderate temperatures, people with diabetes who use insulin need to depend on more than technology to make sure their insulin is in top form. As associate dean and professor of pharmacy at Washington State University, a certified diabetes educator and a person with diabetes for more than 50 years, Keith Campbell knows the importance of keeping an eye on insulin. Campbell believes that establishing a routine surrounding insulin use helps ensure the product stays potent and stable. Step One: Check the Label Campbell advises that the first thing a person with diabetes should do is check the insulin’s expiration date, even before leaving the pharmacy. “Drug companies and the FDA are very conservative with the dates,” says Campbell. This means they tend set expiration date at the earliest time the insulin could possibly go bad, and sometimes even earlier. Sofia Iqbal, RPh, a drug information scientist with Novo Nordisk Pharmaceuticals, confirms this. “Expiration dates and storage guidelines are based on stability data obtained for batches of each formulation of insulin,” Iqbal says. She adds that the dates are valid as long as the insulin is kept stored under the correct conditions. “Never use insulin after the expiration date printed on the label and carton,” Iqbal warns. If you get your insulin home and discover the expiration date has passed, what should you do? Campbell advises that you return it to the pharmacy immediately for replacement. Step Two: Examine the Insulin Eli Lilly and Company’s Kara Appell, RPh, a medical information adm Continue reading >>

Intermediate-acting Insulins

Intermediate-acting Insulins

Rapid-Acting Analogues Short-Acting Insulins Intermediate-Acting Insulins Long-Acting Insulins Combination Insulins Onset: 1- 2 hours Peak: 4-12 hours Duration: 14 - 24 hours (up to 24 hours) Solution: Cloudy Comments: Human Insulin Isophane Suspension. Cloudy/ milky suspension of human insulin with protamine and zinc. Mixing NPH + Aspart (Novolog ®): Compatible - NovoLog should be drawn into the syringe first. The injection should be made immediately after mixing. NPH + Lispro (Humalog ®): Compatible - Humalog should be drawn into the syringe first. The injection should be made immediately after mixing. NPH +Regular insulin: Always draw the Regular (clear) insulin into the syringe first. Phosphate-buffered insulins ( NPH insulin) should NOT be mixed with lente insulins. Zinc phosphate may precipitate, and the longer-acting insulin will convert to a short-acting insulin to an unpredictable extent. Currently available NPH and short-acting insulin formulations when mixed may be used immediately or stored for future use. NPH HUMAN INSULIN Description Humulin N [Human insulin (rDNA origin) isophane suspension] is a crystalline suspension of human insulin with protamine and zinc providing an intermediate-acting insulin with a slower onset of action and a longer duration of activity (up to 24 hours) than that of Regular human insulin. The time course of action of any insulin may vary considerably in different individuals or at different times in the same individual. As with all insulin preparations, the duration of action of Humulin N is dependent on dose, site of injection, blood supply, temperature, and physical activity. Humulin N is a sterile suspension and is for subcutaneous injection only. It should not be used intravenously or intramuscularly. The concentration of H Continue reading >>

What Does Cloudy Insulin Mean?

What Does Cloudy Insulin Mean?

Insulin can change when stored, says the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Many factors speed up the change, including warm temperatures and shaking the insulin bottle. That’s why the ADA recommends that you avoid carrying your insulin in your pocket, especially if you are an active person. Keep it in a refrigerator, cupboard, purse, briefcase or backpack, and protect it from heat and motion. If regular insulin becomes cloudy, throw it away, says the ADA. It has lost its effectiveness, and won’t keep your blood sugar from getting too high. If your insulin is a mix of regular and NPH or ultralente insulins, you may be getting NPH or ultralente in the bottle of regular insulin. This, too, will make it cloudy. If in doubt, discard the old bottle and replace it with a new one. Reprinted from 101 Tips for Improving Your Blood Sugar by the University of New Mexico Diabetes Care Team. Copyright by the American Diabetes Association. Used by permission. All rights reserved. Play Video Play Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Remaining Time -0:00 This is a modal window. Foreground --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Opaque Background --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Window --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Font Size 50% 75% 100% 125% 150% 175% 200% 300% 400% Text Edge Style None Raised Depressed Uniform Dropshadow Font Family Default Monospace Serif Proportional Serif Monospace Sans-Serif Proportional Sans-Serif Casual Script Small Caps Defaults Done Connect with Us Get more healthy food for thought – check out our posts on Health Bistro and Lifescript TV videos on YouTube. Plus, join the fun and conversation on Google+, Facebook, Twitter, Continue reading >>

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