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Which Diabetes Needs Insulin Shots

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Hi guys pls subscribe to my videos. This video shows you how to inject insulin!!!

Injecting Insulin

Tweet Injecting insulin is an essential part of the daily regime for many diabetics. Although insulin that can be inhaled is now available and approved, the reality is that most type 1 diabetics (and type 2 diabetics who require insulin) will have to continue injecting insulin until it is more common. Does injecting insulin hurt? Needle technology for insulin injection has become much better in recent years, meaning that the injection process, although not pain-free, does not hurt as much as it used to. Many patients still find injecting insulin to manage their diabetes an unpleasant process, however. Is injecting insulin and having diabetes going to change my life? Unfortunately, having diabetes does lead to lifestyle complications. For insulin therapy to be effective, it is necessary to make certain lifestyle changes. These should include: eating healthily exercising regularly testing blood glucose regularly and following a strict insulin regimen Although adhering to all these changes does influence your daily routine, the benefits for diabetics are enormous. Into what part of my body should I inject insulin to best help my diabetes? The abdomen is the most common site for inject Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Amy Anderson

    Hmmm...the first thing I thought of was your insulin supply. You may not have changed what kind of insulin, but have you changed where you purchase it or how? Perhaps the old seller did not store it properly and it lost efficacy. Or maybe you have changed where you keep your insulin and it is better preserved now.
    And even though you said 'no changes' are you certain...?
    type of infusion set
    location of infusion
    length of tubing
    pump software or hardware upgrade/change
    more activity (not necessarily planned exercise but this could mean a more active job or taking on more household chores on a regular basis, or even more sex)
    less stress or even being more happy (new relationships or shedding unhealthy ones)

    change in restaurants - did you stop at X restaurant on the way home to get a soda and they always gave you non-diet and you never caught on
    All of the above have influenced my blood sugar and/or someone I know.
    All in all, needing less insulin is a good thing. But one of the crappy things about this disease, as I know you are aware, is all those X factors that influence blood sugars. You can do the exact same thing two days in a row and have different BS results and insulin needs. Grrr!

  2. Tony Sangster

    TID 51 years: please note that the following is not to be taken as medical advice or treatment.
    Your question is best answered by your doctor. The following is about my experience which may not mirror yours.
    My experience as a teenager was of weeks of increasing insulin requirements ( interpreted by my doctor as due to a growth spurt, where hormones antagonistic to insulin were on ‘full throttle, as it were) followed by hypos because, it was explained, my growth spurt had ceased, growth hormones had eased back and now I needed less insulin, sometimes as much as 50% less. And this was in the days on Regular insulin and NPH, no pumps, no meters.
    A period of high stress and poor sleep leading to increased insulin resistance and requisite increase in insulin doses could be followed by an insulin dose reduction of 20 to 35 % on resolution of stress and return of normal sleep pattern. Studying and doing end of year exams was the usual cause of stress. Again my doctor and nurse educator helped with explanations and advice.
    I have had insulin dose reductions of 20% or so when changing from insulins like Actrapid and NHS to Novo rapid and determir apparently due to the more reliable absorption of the latter two insulins. Also when graduating in 2012 from six injections per day of Novo Rapid and determir to Novo Rapid via insulin pump my daily insulin dose requirement fell by about 10 to 15%.
    After I was diagnosed with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea in 2011 and receiving optimal treatment for that, my insulin dose decreased by about 15% on average compared to prior to diagnosis and treatment.
    For me, daily exercise on average seems to require about 20% reduction in insulin compared to if i maintained a couch potato status.

    Beyond that my reading suggested changes after giving birth, when lactating, weight loss ( i know you have excluded that), dietary changes and from kidney failure . Again this is an incomplete list and your doctor is the appropriate person to discuss your question with..

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Visit our website for text version of this Definition and app download. http://www.medicaldictionaryapps.com Subjects: medical terminology, medical dictionary, medical dictionary free download, medical terminology made easy, medical terminology song

Diabetes And Insulin

On this page: Diabetes mellitus (diabetes) is a chronic and potentially life-threatening condition where the body loses its ability to produce insulin, or begins to produce or use insulin less efficiently, resulting in blood glucose levels that are too high (hyperglycaemia). Blood glucose levels above the normal range , over time, can damage your eyes, kidneys and nerves, and can also cause heart disease and stroke. An estimated 280 Australians develop diabetes every day. Diabetes is Australia's fastest-growing chronic disease. The main types of diabetes are type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes develops when the cells of the pancreas stop producing insulin. Without insulin, glucose cannot enter the cells of the muscles for energy. Instead the glucose rises in the blood causing a person to become extremely unwell. Type 1 diabetes is life threatening if insulin is not replaced, and people need to inject insulin for the rest of their lives. Type 1 diabetes often occurs in children and people under 30 years of age, but it can occur at any age. This condition is not caused by lifestyle factors. Its exact cause is not known but research shows that som Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Amy Anderson

    Hmmm...the first thing I thought of was your insulin supply. You may not have changed what kind of insulin, but have you changed where you purchase it or how? Perhaps the old seller did not store it properly and it lost efficacy. Or maybe you have changed where you keep your insulin and it is better preserved now.
    And even though you said 'no changes' are you certain...?
    type of infusion set
    location of infusion
    length of tubing
    pump software or hardware upgrade/change
    more activity (not necessarily planned exercise but this could mean a more active job or taking on more household chores on a regular basis, or even more sex)
    less stress or even being more happy (new relationships or shedding unhealthy ones)

    change in restaurants - did you stop at X restaurant on the way home to get a soda and they always gave you non-diet and you never caught on
    All of the above have influenced my blood sugar and/or someone I know.
    All in all, needing less insulin is a good thing. But one of the crappy things about this disease, as I know you are aware, is all those X factors that influence blood sugars. You can do the exact same thing two days in a row and have different BS results and insulin needs. Grrr!

  2. Tony Sangster

    TID 51 years: please note that the following is not to be taken as medical advice or treatment.
    Your question is best answered by your doctor. The following is about my experience which may not mirror yours.
    My experience as a teenager was of weeks of increasing insulin requirements ( interpreted by my doctor as due to a growth spurt, where hormones antagonistic to insulin were on ‘full throttle, as it were) followed by hypos because, it was explained, my growth spurt had ceased, growth hormones had eased back and now I needed less insulin, sometimes as much as 50% less. And this was in the days on Regular insulin and NPH, no pumps, no meters.
    A period of high stress and poor sleep leading to increased insulin resistance and requisite increase in insulin doses could be followed by an insulin dose reduction of 20 to 35 % on resolution of stress and return of normal sleep pattern. Studying and doing end of year exams was the usual cause of stress. Again my doctor and nurse educator helped with explanations and advice.
    I have had insulin dose reductions of 20% or so when changing from insulins like Actrapid and NHS to Novo rapid and determir apparently due to the more reliable absorption of the latter two insulins. Also when graduating in 2012 from six injections per day of Novo Rapid and determir to Novo Rapid via insulin pump my daily insulin dose requirement fell by about 10 to 15%.
    After I was diagnosed with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea in 2011 and receiving optimal treatment for that, my insulin dose decreased by about 15% on average compared to prior to diagnosis and treatment.
    For me, daily exercise on average seems to require about 20% reduction in insulin compared to if i maintained a couch potato status.

    Beyond that my reading suggested changes after giving birth, when lactating, weight loss ( i know you have excluded that), dietary changes and from kidney failure . Again this is an incomplete list and your doctor is the appropriate person to discuss your question with..

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    Are you satisfied with this answer?

    Yes
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  3. -> Continue reading
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What is INSULIN? INSULIN meaning - INSULIN pronunciation - INSULIN explanation - INSULIN definition - How to pronounce INSULIN? Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license.

Insulin For Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Examples The different types of insulin are categorized according to how fast they start to work (onset) and how long they continue to work (duration). The types now available include rapid-, short-, intermediate-, and long-acting insulin. Rapid-acting Generic Name Brand Name insulin aspart NovoLog insulin glulisine Apidra insulin human (inhalation powder) Afrezza insulin lispro Humalog Short-acting Intermediate-acting Long-acting Generic Name Brand Name insulin detemir Levemir insulin glargine Lantus Mixtures Generic Name Brand Name 70% NPH and 30% regular Humulin 70/30, Novolin 70/30 50% lispro protamine and 50% lispro Humalog Mix 50/50 75% lispro protamine and 25% lispro Humalog Mix 75/25 70% aspart protamine and 30% aspart NovoLog Mix 70/30 50% NPH and 50% regular Humulin 50/50 Packaging Injectable insulin is packaged in small glass vials (bottles) and cartridges that hold more than one dose and are sealed with rubber lids. The cartridges are used in pen-shaped devices called insulin pens. Inhaled insulin is a powder that is packaged in a cartridge. Cartridges hold certain dosages of insulin, and more than one cartridge might be needed to take enough insulin. How insulin is tak Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Amy Anderson

    Hmmm...the first thing I thought of was your insulin supply. You may not have changed what kind of insulin, but have you changed where you purchase it or how? Perhaps the old seller did not store it properly and it lost efficacy. Or maybe you have changed where you keep your insulin and it is better preserved now.
    And even though you said 'no changes' are you certain...?
    type of infusion set
    location of infusion
    length of tubing
    pump software or hardware upgrade/change
    more activity (not necessarily planned exercise but this could mean a more active job or taking on more household chores on a regular basis, or even more sex)
    less stress or even being more happy (new relationships or shedding unhealthy ones)

    change in restaurants - did you stop at X restaurant on the way home to get a soda and they always gave you non-diet and you never caught on
    All of the above have influenced my blood sugar and/or someone I know.
    All in all, needing less insulin is a good thing. But one of the crappy things about this disease, as I know you are aware, is all those X factors that influence blood sugars. You can do the exact same thing two days in a row and have different BS results and insulin needs. Grrr!

  2. Tony Sangster

    TID 51 years: please note that the following is not to be taken as medical advice or treatment.
    Your question is best answered by your doctor. The following is about my experience which may not mirror yours.
    My experience as a teenager was of weeks of increasing insulin requirements ( interpreted by my doctor as due to a growth spurt, where hormones antagonistic to insulin were on ‘full throttle, as it were) followed by hypos because, it was explained, my growth spurt had ceased, growth hormones had eased back and now I needed less insulin, sometimes as much as 50% less. And this was in the days on Regular insulin and NPH, no pumps, no meters.
    A period of high stress and poor sleep leading to increased insulin resistance and requisite increase in insulin doses could be followed by an insulin dose reduction of 20 to 35 % on resolution of stress and return of normal sleep pattern. Studying and doing end of year exams was the usual cause of stress. Again my doctor and nurse educator helped with explanations and advice.
    I have had insulin dose reductions of 20% or so when changing from insulins like Actrapid and NHS to Novo rapid and determir apparently due to the more reliable absorption of the latter two insulins. Also when graduating in 2012 from six injections per day of Novo Rapid and determir to Novo Rapid via insulin pump my daily insulin dose requirement fell by about 10 to 15%.
    After I was diagnosed with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea in 2011 and receiving optimal treatment for that, my insulin dose decreased by about 15% on average compared to prior to diagnosis and treatment.
    For me, daily exercise on average seems to require about 20% reduction in insulin compared to if i maintained a couch potato status.

    Beyond that my reading suggested changes after giving birth, when lactating, weight loss ( i know you have excluded that), dietary changes and from kidney failure . Again this is an incomplete list and your doctor is the appropriate person to discuss your question with..

    76 Views






    Your response is private.



    Are you satisfied with this answer?

    Yes
    No

  3. -> Continue reading
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