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Which Diabetes Needs Insulin Shots

Insulin And Type 2 Diabetes: What You Should Know

Insulin And Type 2 Diabetes: What You Should Know

Insulin and Type 2 Diabetes If your health care provider offered you a medication to help you feel better and get your blood sugar under control, would you try it? If so, you might be ready to start taking insulin. Does insulin immediately make you think of type 1 diabetes? Think again. Between 30 and 40 percent of people with type 2 diabetes take insulin. In fact, there are more people with type 2 diabetes who take insulin than type 1 because of the much larger number of people with type 2. Experts believe even more people with type 2 should be taking insulin to control blood sugar -- and the earlier, the better. With an increase in people developing type 2 at a younger age and living longer, more and more people with type 2 will likely be taking insulin. "If you live long enough with type 2 diabetes, odds are good you'll eventually need insulin," says William Polonsky, Ph.D., CDE, associate clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego; founder and president of the Behavioral Diabetes Institute; and author of Diabetes Burnout: What to Do When You Can't Take It Anymore (American Diabetes Association, 1999). Producing Less Insulin Naturally Over Time Research has shown that type 2 diabetes progresses as the ability of the body’s pancreatic beta cells to produce insulin dwindles over time. Your beta cells -- the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin -- slowly lose function. Experts believe that by the time you're diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, you've already lost 50-80 percent of your beta cell function and perhaps the number of beta cells you had. And the loss continues over the years. "About six years after being diagnosed, most people have about a quarter of their beta cell function left," says Anthony McCall, M.D., Ph.D., endocri Continue reading >>

Insulin Therapy

Insulin Therapy

Why do I need to take insulin? When you digest food, your body changes most of the food you eat into glucose (a form of sugar). Insulin allows this glucose to enter all the cells of your body and be used as energy. When you have diabetes, your body doesn’t make enough insulin or can’t use it properly, so the glucose builds up in your blood instead of moving into the cells. Too much glucose in the blood can lead to serious health problems. All people who have type 1 diabetes and some people who have type 2 diabetes need to take insulin to help control their blood sugar levels. The goal of taking insulin is to keep your blood sugar level in a normal range as much as possible so you’ll stay healthy. Insulin can’t be taken by mouth. It is usually taken with injections (shots). It can also be taken with an insulin pen or an insulin pump. How often will I need to take insulin? You and your doctor will develop a schedule that is right for you. Most people who have diabetes and take insulin need at least 2 insulin shots a day for good blood sugar control. Some people need 3 or 4 shots a day. Do I need to monitor my blood sugar level? Yes. Monitoring and controlling your blood sugar is key to preventing the complications of diabetes. If you don’t already monitor your blood sugar level, you will need to learn how. Checking your blood sugar involves pricking your finger to get a small drop of blood that you put on a test strip. You can read the results yourself or insert the strip into a machine called an electronic glucose meter. The results will tell you whether or not your blood sugar is in a healthy range. Your doctor will give you additional information about monitoring your blood sugar. When should I take insulin? You and your doctor should discuss when and how you Continue reading >>

Insulin: Who Needs It And Who Doesn't?

Insulin: Who Needs It And Who Doesn't?

Does getting a diagnosis of diabetes automatically mean you will need to start taking insulin? The answer depends on the type of diabetes and how much your condition has progressed. People with type 1 diabetes require supplemental insulin because their bodies can no longer produce insulin themselves. However, type 2 diabetes is different. Less than one-third of those with type 2 diabetes take insulin. The CDC puts the number at about 28 percent. Some experts have long believed that more patients with type 2 diabetes should be on insulin in order to reach their blood glucose and lipid (cholesterol) targets. When you are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes you will probably wonder if, or when, you will need insulin. You may fear injections or you may believe that needing insulin represents a personal failure. So, you resist taking the drug, even when you need it. Whether or not a person with type 2 diabetes needs insulin is based on individual circumstances. The first step? Knowing the facts. Does Everyone With Diabetes Need Insulin? Type 1 and type 2 diabetes are conditions in which you don't have enough insulin or don't react to it well enough to remove glucose from the blood. This creates two problems: High blood glucose levels A lack of stored glucose, the body’s major fuel source The difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes lies in the cause of this condition. Beta cells, found in the pancreas, produce the body’s insulin. In type 1 diabetes, most of those beta cells have been destroyed, limiting the supply of insulin. As a result, individuals with type 1 diabetes must take insulin to control their blood glucose levels. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas may still produce insulin, but it either produces insufficient amounts or the body resists the insulin itself. Di Continue reading >>

Early Trials Show An Insulin Pill Can Lower Diabetics' Blood Sugar Levels

Early Trials Show An Insulin Pill Can Lower Diabetics' Blood Sugar Levels

Researchers have announced that an insulin pill has successfully reduced night-time blood glucose levels in 180 patients with type 2 diabetes. That's pretty exciting, because before this, it was assumed that insulin wouldn't survive the digestive juices of the stomach, so couldn't be delivered orally - hence the dependence on insulin injections. But this new mid-stage trial suggests for the first time that given the right dose, insulin tablets could really work. Most importantly, if these findings are verified and repeated in additional trials, it would mean that the insulin tablets could delay or potentially even replace injections for patients with type 2 diabetes. The research hasn't been published as yet, so we need to take these claims with a grain of salt for now. But the drugmakers behind the new treatment - a small Israeli company called Oramed Pharmaceuticals Inc - say they're now submitting their results for peer review. "It's been a long trip but it's finally at the point that it's beyond a doubt, the oral insulin works," chief executive of Oramed, Nadav Kidron, told Bill Berkrot for Reuters. The new tablets work by using a protective coating and a high-enough dose of insulin so that most of it can get destroyed in the digestive tract, and it will still deliver a beneficial amount of the hormone to the bloodstream. Type 2 diabetics struggle to regulate their own blood glucose levels because the beta cells in their pancreas are slowly stopping producing enough insulin following meals. The condition can be caused by a range of lifestyle and genetic factors, and it can often be managed without the need for insulin injections. But currently around 90 percent of the nearly 400 million people with diabetes worldwide have type 2 diabetes, and many of them rely on in Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus - Insulin Treatment In Dogs

Diabetes Mellitus - Insulin Treatment In Dogs

By Ernest Ward, DVM & Robin Downing, DVM, DAAPM, DACVSMR, CVPP Emergency Situations, Medical Conditions This handout provides detailed information on insulin administration. For more information about diabetes mellitus, see the fact sheets "Diabetes Mellitus - General Information", and "Diabetes Mellitus - Principles of Treatment". What is diabetes mellitus? In dogs, diabetes mellitus is caused by the failure of the pancreas to produce enough insulin to regulate blood sugar. This is Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (also called Type 1 Diabetes). This type of diabetes usually results from destruction of most or all of the beta-cells that produce insulin in the pancreas. As the name implies, dogs with this type of diabetes require insulin injections to stabilize blood sugar levels. What do I need to know about insulin treatment for diabetes mellitus? In diabetic dogs, the main treatment for regulating blood glucose is giving insulin by injection. Dogs with diabetes mellitus typically require two daily insulin injections as well as a dietary change. Although the dog can go a day or so without insulin and not have a crisis, this should not be a regular occurrence; treatment should be looked upon as part of the dog's daily routine. This means that you, as the dog's owner, must make both a financial commitment and a personal commitment to treat your dog. If are out of town or go on vacation, your dog must receive proper treatment in your absence. Initially, your dog may be hospitalized for a few days to deal with any immediate crisis and to begin the insulin regulation process. For instance, if your dog is so sick that he has quit eating and drinking for several days, he may be experiencing “diabetic ketoacidosis,” which may require a several days of intensive care. On Continue reading >>

Insulin For Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin For Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Examples The different types of insulin are categorized according to how fast they start to work (onset) and how long they continue to work (duration). The types now available include rapid-, short-, intermediate-, and long-acting insulin. Rapid-acting Generic Name Brand Name insulin aspart NovoLog insulin glulisine Apidra insulin human (inhalation powder) Afrezza insulin lispro Humalog Short-acting Intermediate-acting Long-acting Generic Name Brand Name insulin detemir Levemir insulin glargine Lantus Mixtures Generic Name Brand Name 70% NPH and 30% regular Humulin 70/30, Novolin 70/30 50% lispro protamine and 50% lispro Humalog Mix 50/50 75% lispro protamine and 25% lispro Humalog Mix 75/25 70% aspart protamine and 30% aspart NovoLog Mix 70/30 50% NPH and 50% regular Humulin 50/50 Packaging Injectable insulin is packaged in small glass vials (bottles) and cartridges that hold more than one dose and are sealed with rubber lids. The cartridges are used in pen-shaped devices called insulin pens. Inhaled insulin is a powder that is packaged in a cartridge. Cartridges hold certain dosages of insulin, and more than one cartridge might be needed to take enough insulin. How insulin is taken Insulin usually is given as an injection into the tissues under the skin (subcutaneous). It can also be given through an insulin pump, an insulin pen, or jet injector, a device that sprays the medicine into the skin. Some insulins can be given through a vein (only in a hospital). Powdered insulin is packaged in a cartridge, which fits into an inhaler. Using the inhaler, a person breathes in to take the insulin. How It Works Insulin lets sugar (glucose) in the blood enter cells, where it is used for energy. Without insulin, the blood sugar level rises above what is safe for the body. If the Continue reading >>

The Truth About Insulin And Type 2 Diabetes

The Truth About Insulin And Type 2 Diabetes

Most people associate taking insulin with type 1 diabetes. However, some people with type 2 diabetes also need to take insulin. We talked with Andrea Penney, RN, CDE, Joslin Diabetes Center, to find out the truth about insulin and type 2 diabetes. Why would someone with type 2 diabetes who has been controlling their diabetes with diet and exercise need to start taking insulin? There are several reasons why someone would require insulin, even if they hadn’t needed it before. Temporary insulin usage– Some people need to take insulin for a short amount of time, because of things like pregnancy, surgery, broken bones, cancer, or steroidal medicines (like Prednisone). Permanent insulin usage - Sometimes the pancreas becomes unable to produce enough insulin. This happens frequently with aging. People can also become insulin resistant due to weight gain or chronic emotional or physical stress. Simply put, pills can no longer control diabetes. So, it’s not usually “bad” behavior that would cause someone to start insulin? Correct. However, non adherence to diet and exercise might result in high blood glucose levels that only insulin can control. Is insulin dosage different for someone who has type 2 rather than type 1? The doses will vary; either type may require very little or a lot of medication. It depends on weight, eating habits, exercise levels, existence of other illnesses and level of insulin resistance. Can someone start taking insulin and then not need to take it anymore? Absolutely! But only for those with type 2 diabetes. Often weight reduction and /or exercise can allow insulin to be stopped. Also, if any of the temporary situations listed above resolve, insulin might be stopped. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Insulin

Type 2 Diabetes And Insulin

Getting Started When most people find out they have Type 2 diabetes, they are first instructed to make changes in their diet and lifestyle. These changes, which are likely to include routine exercise, more nutritious food choices, and often a lower calorie intake, are crucial to managing diabetes and may successfully lower blood glucose levels to an acceptable level. If they do not, a drug such as glyburide, glipizide, or metformin is often prescribed. But lifestyle changes and oral drugs for Type 2 diabetes are unlikely to be permanent solutions. This is because over time, the pancreas tends to produce less and less insulin until eventually it cannot meet the body’s needs. Ultimately, insulin (injected or infused) is the most effective treatment for Type 2 diabetes. There are many barriers to starting insulin therapy: Often they are psychological; sometimes they are physical or financial. But if insulin is begun early enough and is used appropriately, people who use it have a marked decrease in complications related to diabetes such as retinopathy (a diabetic eye disease), nephropathy (diabetic kidney disease), and neuropathy (nerve damage). The need for insulin should not be viewed as a personal failure, but rather as a largely inevitable part of the treatment of Type 2 diabetes. This article offers some practical guidance on starting insulin for people with Type 2 diabetes. When to start insulin Insulin is usually started when oral medicines (usually no more than two) and lifestyle changes (which should be maintained for life even if oral pills or insulin are later prescribed) have failed to lower a person’s HbA1c level to less than 7%. (HbA1c stands for glycosylated hemoglobin and is a measure of blood glucose control.) However, a recent consensus statement from Continue reading >>

Regulating & Monitoring A Diabetic Cat Using Insulin

Regulating & Monitoring A Diabetic Cat Using Insulin

Not all cats with diabetes will need to be treated with insulin (some cats with mild diabetes may respond to and dietary change), but a majority of them will. The goal of treatment is to resolve the signs of the disease, maintain proper body weight, eliminate or reduce the likelihood of any complications, and provide the cat with a good quality of life. This can be accomplished by maintaining the blood glucose at an acceptable level (100-290 mg/dL; normal is 55-160 mg/dL). In addition to treating the diabetes, any other concurrent diseases such as pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, hyperthyroidism, Cushing's disease, and infections need to be treated as well. What should an owner know before trying to 'regulate' a cat with diabetes? Before treatment is started, it is important that the owner be well-informed and have the time necessary to make the correct decision since regulating a diabetic cat requires commitment. Owners should know: The cat will need to be hospitalized for a number of days and one or more blood glucose profiles (described below) will need to be performed. The initial regulation of a cat on insulin generally takes 2-8 weeks. The process of getting a cat regulated can be costly. Insulin must usually be given twice a day, every day at specific times, probably for the life of the cat. Insulin must be handled properly (refrigerated, not shaken, etc). There is a proper technique for administering insulin to a cat that must be followed. The type of insulin and insulin syringe that are used should not be changed unless under guidance by the veterinarian. The type and amount of food and when it is fed must be consistent. In most cases, foods high in protein and low in carbohydrates are recommended. These are usually canned foods. The cat will need to be caref Continue reading >>

“do I Need Insulin For My Type 2 Diabetes?”

“do I Need Insulin For My Type 2 Diabetes?”

After a type 2 diabetes diagnosis, there are four treatment options that you can discuss with your doctor: Diet & Exercise: Learning how to reduce the carbohydrates and overall calories in your diet along with regular exercise for weight loss. Losing weight helps improve insulin sensitivity (gaining weight promotes insulin resistance). For some people with type 2 diabetes, these changes can be enough to achieve healthier blood sugar levels. Oral Medications: There are a variety of oral medications (pills) for improving blood sugars in people with type 2 diabetes. They each are classified by their make-up and the impact on the body. While some pills increase natural insulin production, other pills are designed to decrease the amount of glycogen (which is eventually converted to glucose) secreted by your liver. The 6 primary classifications of pills are, Sulfonylureas, Meglitinides, Biguanides, Thiazolidinediones, Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, and DPP-4 inhibitors. You may know some of the brand names, like Metformin, Avandia, or Januvia. Your diabetes healthcare team will help you determine the best fit for you. Injectable Medications: Known well as “Byetta” or “Symlin,” these medications are injected, but are very different than insulin. Symlin is known for helping with reducing blood sugars but also for promoting weight loss. Byetta works by increasing your own natural insulin production. Insulin: Lastly, there is insulin, which is administered with a syringe, pen, or pump. While most doctors will take you through the options above before prescribing insulin, this option might be exactly what you need. Insulin is the most powerful hormone in the body for regulating blood sugars, and as a person with type 2 diabetes, you either don’t produce enough to meet you Continue reading >>

Will Insulin Make You Gain Weight?

Will Insulin Make You Gain Weight?

No, insulin is a hormone secreted by your pancreas and insulin acts as a gateway between your blood glucose and living cells. Blood glucose is the preferred fuel for our body and our brain/nervous system runs solely on glucose unless we are keto adapted. Without insulin the glucose flowing in your blood stream can’t access your living cells for energy. Your living cells will starve to death without insulin and you can lose limbs, become blind or die. This is why diabetic patients need insulin shots to stay alive. You gain weight by consuming too many calories. Carb (glucose) contains 4 calories per gram, protein contains 4 calories per gram (protein does spike up your insulin a bit), fat contains 9 calories per gram (fat doesn’t spike up your insulin), alcohol contains 7 calories per gram (no effect on insulin). If you take in too many calories from carb, protein, fat, or alcohol, then you will gain body fat. There are various types of carbs, simple and complex carbs. Complex carbs slowly increase your blood sugar so you will get a more steady increase of insulin for gradual steady energy rather than a huge spike which always follows by huge crash. Simple carbs that cause huge insulin spike/crash can cause you to over eat on calories and gain weight. If you focus on eating complex carbs or take in simple carbs at right timing (around workout time) or portion control your calories from simple carbs, you won’t gain weight. Hopefully this helps and you can learn more below: Continue reading >>

Injecting Insulin

Injecting Insulin

Tweet Injecting insulin is an essential part of the daily regime for many diabetics. Although insulin that can be inhaled is now available and approved, the reality is that most type 1 diabetics (and type 2 diabetics who require insulin) will have to continue injecting insulin until it is more common. Does injecting insulin hurt? Needle technology for insulin injection has become much better in recent years, meaning that the injection process, although not pain-free, does not hurt as much as it used to. Many patients still find injecting insulin to manage their diabetes an unpleasant process, however. Is injecting insulin and having diabetes going to change my life? Unfortunately, having diabetes does lead to lifestyle complications. For insulin therapy to be effective, it is necessary to make certain lifestyle changes. These should include: eating healthily exercising regularly testing blood glucose regularly and following a strict insulin regimen Although adhering to all these changes does influence your daily routine, the benefits for diabetics are enormous. Into what part of my body should I inject insulin to best help my diabetes? The abdomen is the most common site for injecting insulin. For some people, this site is not suitable, and other sites must be used. These include the upper arms, the upper buttocks and the outside of the thigh. All of these sites are most effective because they have a layer of fat to absorb the insulin better. This process directly injects insulin into the subcutaneous tissue. These areas also have fewer nerve endings, meaning that they are the least painful areas in which to inject. Should I switch the site where I inject insulin? Your healthcare team should be able to help you to decided the best places to inject insulin, when you shou Continue reading >>

After Diabetes Has Developed, Can It Somehow Be Switched Back Off In The Human Body Over Time? If So, How?

After Diabetes Has Developed, Can It Somehow Be Switched Back Off In The Human Body Over Time? If So, How?

Clearly, type 2 diabetes can be reversed to the point that insulin and other medications are no longer needed and hemoglobin A1c levels brought down to a healthy level, below 6.5% or even lower. This was just demonstrated recently by Virta Health, a San Francisco start-up led by Steven Phinney, Jeff Volek and Sami Inkinen. Here’s the paper, which was published earlier this week. I think this is just the beginning and, as I tweeted at the time, I think it and Virta are going to play a major role in changing the nutrition/obesity/diabetes world. The intervention in this case is primarily a ketogenic diet — or a low-carb, high-fat diet — with the necessary coaching, social context and medical support to make compliance relatively easy. Now, reversing diabetes is different than switching it off. Diabetes can be thought of as a carbohydrate intolerance disorder. Indeed, until the discovery of insulin almost 100 years ago, that’s how it was perceived. (Once insulin was discovered, the clinicians started thinking of it as an insulin-deficiency disorder and so drug therapy became the order of the day and carbohydrates were now necessary to balance out ill-dosed insulin shots.) So if we go back to thinking of it as a carbohydrate intolerance disorder, as I think we should, then removing the carbohydrates from the diet solves the problem. Makes sense, too. If you can’t tolerate a food and you don’t need it, don’t eat it. Anyone with a food allergy would tell you the same thing. So removing the carbs and replacing them with fat solves the problem for type 2 diabetics (and might also do wonderful things for type 1s), but it doesn’t switch the diabetes off. It just removes the trigger. Bariatric surgery also shows remarkable effects on diabetes, but does it do it bec Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Therapy For Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin Pump Therapy For Type 2 Diabetes

The Simple Truth About Insulin Pump Therapy You have type 2 diabetes, but diabetes shouldn’t rule your life. You want to manage your sugar levels well, but with shots, you must deal with frequent challenges to keep your sugar levels under control. You wish there was an easier way to manage insulin dosing without compromising your health. You’re not alone. MiniMed insulin pump therapy helps you achieve better control by providing convenient insulin delivery that’s easy for you to manage. Only MiniMed insulin pump therapy is clinically proven to reduce A1C better than multiple daily shots for people with type 2 diabetes.4 Studies have shown that A1C reduction can significantly reduce the occurrence of long-term complications.5, 6 With MiniMed insulin pump therapy, you can worry less about your risk for long-term complications, such as: You are a candidate for MiniMed insulin pump therapy if: You are taking three or more insulin injections per day. You may be taking additional medications for your diabetes management, beyond just insulin. Your healthcare provider informed you that your A1C is elevated and your diabetes is not well controlled. You find it challenging to follow your prescribed insulin regimen for diabetes management. What is a pump and how does it work? The MiniMed insulin pump is an external device about the size of a cell phone that you can easily carry on a belt, place inside a pocket or wear under your clothes. The pump contains insulin and delivers it in a continuous and precise flow through a thin, flexible tube called an infusion set. The end of this tube sits comfortably under the skin and is replaced every two to three days. Basal rate You can program your insulin pump to continuously deliver tiny and precise amounts of insulin 24 hours a day. Continue reading >>

Insulin: The Holy Grail Of Diabetes Treatment

Insulin: The Holy Grail Of Diabetes Treatment

Insulin is a hormone made by beta cells in the pancreas. When we eat, insulin is released into the blood stream where it helps to move glucose from the food we have eaten into cells to be used as energy. In people with type 1 diabetes, the body produces little or no insulin as the cells that produce insulin have been destroyed by an autoimmune reaction in the body. Insulin replacement by daily injections is required. In people with type 2 diabetes the body produces insulin but the insulin does not work as well as it should. This is often referred to as insulin resistance. To compensate the body makes more but eventually cannot make enough to keep the balance right. Lifestyle changes can delay the need for tablets and/or insulin to stabilise blood glucose levels. When insulin is required, it is important to understand that this is just the natural progression of the condition. RMIT University have produced a short overview of insulin, a drug that keeps in excess of one million Australians alive. Watch the video to understand why insulin is important and why so many Australians rely on it to stay alive. Copyright © 2015 RMIT University, Prepared by the School of Applied Sciences (Discipline of Chemistry). At this stage, insulin can only be injected. Insulin cannot be given in tablet form as it would be destroyed in the stomach, meaning it would not be available to convert glucose into energy. Insulin is injected through the skin into the fatty tissue known as the subcutaneous layer. You do not inject it into muscle or directly into the blood. Absorption of insulin varies depending on the part of the body into which you inject. The tummy (abdomen) absorbs insulin the fastest and is the site used by most people. The buttocks and thighs are also used by some people. While i Continue reading >>

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