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Where To Donate Used Diabetic Supplies

The Murky World Of Secondhand Diabetic Test Strips

The Murky World Of Secondhand Diabetic Test Strips

Chelsea Arnold was getting into debt over tiny pieces of plastic: diabetic test strips. When Arnold was first diagnosed with diabetes she needed to test her blood sugar 10 times a day. She went to Wal-Mart and found that one box, which contained only a five-day supply of test strips, was $80. Arnold called her parents and told them she didn't know what to do. She didn't have the money. Arnold then did what a lot of people do when they need help: She searched on Google. She typed in the words "cheap test strips," and Craigslist came up. She bought eight boxes for less than $100. At Wal-Mart, she would have paid $640. Arnold said, "it was like having a life sentence and then realizing that there's a cure." With this Google search, Arnold stumbled into an underground economy for diabetic supplies. It's a market that offers a lower-cost option for test strips, though it is hard for customers to know where the boxes come from. Some boxes may be repackaged and unsafe to use, and some boxes are sold by diabetics who are desperate for cash. But many of them come from people who have health insurance and have accumulated extra test strips. Trey falls into this category. (He asked us not to use his last name, because he fears retribution from his insurance company, even though he feels he hasn't broken any laws.) He moved from one type of blood sugar monitoring system to another type of monitoring system and ended up with 20 extra test strip boxes. At that point, Trey began researching. He said, "Obviously No. 1: Is it legal to be able to sell test strips?" Trey realized that it is legal, with a caveat. "It's kind of a gray market as long as you don't get them from Medicare and Medicaid," he said. Trey then found a local buyer on Craigslist. It starts to look a little seedy here. Continue reading >>

Donations Of Medical Supplies

Donations Of Medical Supplies

Community Connections Free Clinic will accept the medications and medical supply items listed below. All medications must be sealed. Sealed containers have a foil cover, are in a blister pack, or otherwise packaged in an anti-tamper proof container. All donations should be clean and in excellent shape. Dirty or worn donations will not be accepted. Before use, any identifying information will be removed. The following supplies and medications will be accepted: Insulin vials, pens, or pen refills (refrigerated). Mediations for chronic medical conditions such as diabetes, high blood pressure, asthma, etc. (sealed inhalers, nasal sprays, and nebulizer medications). Non-narcotic pain medications such as Metamucil, Lamisil Cream, etc. Samples from an official pharmaceutical representative or practitioner volunteer. The following supplies and medications will not be accepted: Opened medications or expired medications (call the Iowa County Health Department, 608-935-2810, to learn how to safely dispose of unneeded medications.) Syringes pre-loaded with medication (i.e., Lovenox) Blood testing machines or the strips used in these machines; we bulk order these products. Sleep apnea machines (can be donated to Upland Hills Health Sleep Center). Nutritional drinks such as Ensure, Osmolite, or Carnation Instant Breakfast. Large medical supply items such as beds, etc., will not be accepted. Contact the Aging and Disability Resource Center (608-935-0389) about these and other items in this list. Continue reading >>

How To Donate Diabetes Supplies In Harveys Aftermath

How To Donate Diabetes Supplies In Harveys Aftermath

How to Donate Diabetes Supplies in Harveys Aftermath Insulin For Life USA is mounting a rare domestic relief effort to help people with diabetes in Texas. Update: 8/28/2017 9:00 p.m. JDRF and the ADA have announced a joint partnership with the American Red Cross and FEMA to bring in diabetes supplies to areas affected by Harvey. Information on this effort will be regularly given at this site: www.diabetes.org/hurricaneharvey Many in the diabetes community are eager to help those with diabetes affected by Tropical Storm Harvey, and some have written Facebook posts urging others to donate to Insulin For Life USA, which typically focuses on donating diabetes supplies after international disasters. While the reputation of Insulin For Life USA as an international medical aid organization is solid, I called to double-check that the organization was mounting a domestic relief effort to help those in the path of the storm in Texas. Director Carol Atkinson confirmed by phone that the organization has a 800-pound pallet of diabetes supplies assembled to send to Texas. This will be the first domestic relief effort by Insulin For Life USA that will include insulin, she said. The organization has undertaken many similar post-hurricane efforts abroad and has donated diabetes supplies without insulin after domestic disasters. We are poised and ready to react, Atkinson said. Getting those supplies physically to Texas still requires overcoming a few hurdles, however. Insulin For Life USAs legal team is still working on getting regulatory sign-off on the shipment. There is more red tape involved in domestic relief shipments than international ones, and Atkinson said that if this were an international shipment, it would already be on the road. Insulin For Life USA is also still working t Continue reading >>

Where To Donate Lancets?

Where To Donate Lancets?

Husband has been using an accu check lancet device. This particular one has been replaced in their line with a newer one, which uses different lancets. (The lancets are in a drum and a drum is inserted into the device - they are not standard lancets.) The device broke yesterday. He contacted the company and they are going to send him one of the newer, replacement devices. They do not want the lancets he has back. He has several still sealed boxes of them. We were thinking of donating them - but are not sure where to do so. I don't think Goodwill will take them. Any thoughts on where to donate them? Thank you. Life is short, and art long; the crisis fleeting; experience perilous and decision difficult. Lancets are the cheapest part of testing. One box of lancets lasts me s verbal years or more since I only change them once every few months. If you really want to donate them ask your doctor or local free clinic. 115 pounds, Breast Cancer dx'd 6/16, 6 months of chemo and 6 weeks of radiation 2000 metformin ER, 100 mg Januvia,Glimperide, Prolia, Gabapentin, Meloxicam, Probiotic with a Prebiotic, , Lisinopril, B-12, B-6, Tumeric, Magnesium, Calcium, Vit D, and Occuvite mostly vegan diet, low fat and around 125 carbs a day, walk 5-6 miles every other day and 1 hour of yoga and light weights. If you find a nice place, let us know. I know I have more than a life time supply of the little prickers. Continue reading >>

Helping Developing Countries

Helping Developing Countries

Home » Here to Help » Helping Developing Countries IDDT helps poor children and young people with diabetes Have you any unwanted, in-date insulin in your fridge? IDDT is the UK arm of an Australian organisation, ‘Insulin for Life’ [IFL]. IFL is a not-for-profit organisation which collects unwanted, unopened, in-date insulin and test strips to send to developing countries as part of a humanitarian aid programme. Details of IFL can be found by visiting www.insulinforlife.org Here is a true story: “Kilpana was a 5 year old little girl with diabetes who visited the Nagpur clinic regularly with her parents. One day she was brought into the clinic in a coma and ketoacidosis. Her parents had stopped giving her insulin because they simply could not afford it any longer. In desperation they had resorted to alternative medicine. Kilpana died!” If children with diabetes have adequate daily doses of insulin, they grow normally and can do things that children without diabetes can do. But if the dose is inadequate, then their growth is impaired and their quality of life is adversely affected. If insulin injections are stopped, they go into coma and this can be fatal. In developing countries the cost of insulin for one person can be as much as 50% of a family’s income, so one of the main problems for poor families is that find it extremely difficult to afford the insulin and medical treatment for just one child in the family. Under agreed protocols, IDDT collects and sends unwanted insulin and other diabetes supplies to clinics in developing countries for distribution to children and adults with diabetes who cannot afford insulin and treatment they need to stay alive. IDDT ensures that any insulin and supplies you donate will reach the developing countries in need of our h Continue reading >>

Where Do Expired Test Strips I Donate Go?

Where Do Expired Test Strips I Donate Go?

You may wonder what is going to happen to the expired test strips you donate. Don’t worry, we put them to good use. The expired test strips you donate will be donated to the Pet Diabetes Program or the Diabetes Art Center. These are wonderful programs that help support both humans and animals with diabetes. The Pet Diabetes Program gets expired test strips that have been expired for less than 1 year It is not only people that are affected by diabetes, but animals can get diabetes too. Treating diabetes in an animal is just as costly as treating it in a human. Since most pets do not have health insurance their owners must pay out of pocket for their testing supplies and medication. Many owners do not test their pets regularly because of the costs associated with it. This leads to poor control and increases the risk of diabetic complications. We donate expired test strips that have been expired for less than a year to families with a diabetic pet. Control solution is also provided at no cost to ensure that the results are accurate. This program has improved the lives of several diabetic pets who would have otherwise suffered from poorly controlled diabetes. The Diabetes Art Center gets expired test strips that have been expired for more than 1 year Expired test strips that have been expired for more than one year are donated to the Diabetes Art Center. Diabetic artists of all ages create masterpieces made of old diabetic supplies and The Diabetes Art Center auctions them off to the highest bidder. All proceeds from the auctions go to help the uninsured/underinsured pay for their antidiabetic medications and diabetes testing supplies. This is a great way to recycle those expired test strips and help out a diabetic in need. Continue reading >>

Recycling Old Meters & Equipment

Recycling Old Meters & Equipment

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I've amassed quite a ridiculous number of blood glucose meters (fully working) over the years and was wondering if someone has recent knowledge of charities that might be interested in such? Same with lancet devices, boxes of pen needles...? Thank you. Some they can use, others they can't, but what you can give is immensely useful to them Unused in date insulin is always welcome too. Not sure how true this is, but I read that meters cannot be recycled, due to the fact that they may have come into contact with blood. So... If anyone else is wondering what to do with a surplus of d paraphernalia: IDDT is happy to get unused meters & lancets, unfortunately they cannot take used ones. Bit of a shame as this rules out quite a few of mine (why do I have 4 contours...?), but no can do. Pen needles they can use as well, a fine new home for my pre-pump stash. Enclave Type 2 (in remission!) Moderator If you gather enough items ( thinking outside the box .. So the wife says ) could you not make an art installation demonstrating what diabetes means to you ..using the meters and everything .. Maybe a calibration of some of the arty ones here ... How cool would that be ( yes the wife is standing over me to write this Hah! I kinda did that for a BA project (film, photography, & digital media) a long time ago and got a really shit score. Admittedly, it was a last minute divine inspiration (desperation) sort of thing but Damien Hirst has nothing on me... Try emailing IDDT and listing what you have to see if they can use it in their help for developing countries : Some they can use, others they can't, but what you can give is immensely useful to them Unused in date ins Continue reading >>

Better Health : How To Help : Donate : Equipment And Supplies

Better Health : How To Help : Donate : Equipment And Supplies

Have some extra supplies or medical equipment? We have an immediate need for One Touch diabetic testing strips Medical equipment in good condition, such as wheelchairs and bath assistance equipment, especially need larger sizes/heavy duty Housekeeping supplies, such as paper towels, toilet tissue, cleaning supplies Medical supplies, liquid nutritional supplements (such as Ensure, Boost, Glucerna), diabetes testing strips (unexpired), and adult incontinence supplies (disposable briefs and bed pads) Office supplies, such as copy paper and mailing labels (5160) Visit our Amazon Wish List to order directly online! Thank you for your support! What Information Do We Collect?When you visit our website you may provide us with two types of information: personal information you knowingly choose to disclose that is collected on an individual basis and website use information collected on an aggregate basis as you and others browse our website. Personal Information You Choose to ProvideWe may request that you voluntarily supply us with personal information, including your email address, postal address, home or work telephone number and other personal information for such purposes as correspondence, placing an order, requesting an estimate, or participating in online surveys.If you choose to correspond with us through email, we may retain the content of your email messages together with your email address and our responses. We provide the same protections for these electronic communications that we employ in the maintenance of information received by mail and telephone. Website Use InformationSimilar to other websites, our site may utilize a standard technology called "cookies" (see explanation below, "What Are Cookies?") and web server logs to collect information about how our web Continue reading >>

Spring Cleaning With Diabetes Supplies

Spring Cleaning With Diabetes Supplies

Like me, you probably have a diabetes supply drawer (unofficially) labeled with “I have no idea what to do with these.” We recently asked a question to our Facebook community that read, “Spring is almost here! Are you planning to do some spring cleaning with your diabetes supplies?” and it sounded like the community had some of the same questions I had about best practices for disposing of these supplies. So what are you supposed to do with different diabetes supplies? When it comes to spring cleaning with diabetes supplies there are a few key things to keep in mind. Recycling Keep an eye on the symbols that appear on packages as these may provide guidance on whether or not you can recycle something. If there is a recycling symbol found on the package you should be able to recycle it. You may not have realized that there are many diabetes products that you can recycle such as test strip or infusion set boxes, infusion set cartons, protective plastic needles caps, and paper instructions for use, just to name a few. Check out this website to find a recycling center and local guidelines in your area. Disposing of Needles Most importantly, and possibly most common for people with diabetes, you need to be aware of how to properly dispose of needles. Needles should always be disposed of in a sharps container or container that can’t be easily punctured like a sealed milk carton or laundry detergent bottle (although this might not be allowed where you live, so make sure to confirm what’s allowed in your area first). To learn about your local regulations on throwing away needles, check out this website. Disposing of Electronic Waste Electronic waste can range from an out of warranty MiniLink® transmitter to a blood glucose meter that you don’t use anymore. As a ru Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medical Supplies Program

Diabetes Medical Supplies Program

Diabetes is an expensive disease even when you are lucky enough to have good health insurance! One of the single largest requests we receive each year is for assistance obtaining diabetes medical supplies. i have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. i am a veteran and the VA will give me a meter and 30 test strips. is there anyplace that helps with the cost of these strips as i have been unemployed now for almost a year. Regular testing is very important for the successful management of diabetes. Defeat Diabetes Foundation is pleased to offer medical supplies to those who request them. If you are having difficulties affording supplies you may request: glucometer, lancing device, lancets and test strips (100 max.) Be sure to double check the brand you use. Our supplies change regularly so it is possible we may be out of the brand you regularly use. Please note we also only ship supplies to US postal mailing locations. Continue reading >>

North Carolina Group Gets Diabetes Supplies To Financially Challenged

North Carolina Group Gets Diabetes Supplies To Financially Challenged

North Carolina group gets diabetes supplies to financially challenged The CR3 Diabetes Association gets diabetes supplies to the financially challenged Charles Ray, III knows firsthand what it's like to be diabetic and unable to afford crucial medical supplies. Fortunately, that struggle was years ago and is no longer an issue for him. But, he knows others aren't as lucky. That's what prompted him to found the CR3 Diabetes Association, which helps provides medical devices and supplies to those unable to afford the cost. "Basically, it's for the under-insured or uninsured individuals, diabetics who need assistance. They're either in the loop where their co-pays are unattainable or they just don't have any insurance at all," explained Ray. Some of the products offered include free glucose meters and testing strips, along with insulin pumps and insulin pump supplies sold at heavily discounted prices. It's a service that really helped out Raleigh mom Denise Alexander. "We got our supplies from a place that was online, and we were spending upwards of $400 a month," Alexander recalled. Alexander's 8-year-old son Max is a type one diabetic, and needs at least a dozen items on a weekly basis, but their insurance didn't cover all of it. When she mentioned the financial struggle to her son's endocrinologist, that doctor referred her to the CR3 Diabetes Association. "They've helped us tremendously, because the prices are discounted much more than they would be through our insurance. So, it saves us a lot of money," said Alexander. The organization provides these services thanks to donations from the public, corporate sponsorship, and various fundraisers throughout the year. They're also getting help from Seattle Seahawks standout Russell Wilson who is their national ambassador. H Continue reading >>

How To Dispose Of Needles, Lancets And Blood Strips Properly

How To Dispose Of Needles, Lancets And Blood Strips Properly

Some people with diabetes use supplies such as needles, lancets and blood strips which become medical waste. Learn the importance of disposing of them safely and properly. Find out the right type of containers to use for getting rid of sharps. Discover ways to dispose of medical waste in accordance with the law. Never share or reuse lancets, pen needles or syringes. Cleaning needles or lancets with alcohol will remove the protective coating that helps them slide into your skin and allows them to be so thin. After the first stick this coating is removed and they will become dull. A dull stick is more painful and offers less blood. You may then waste expensive strips. Insulin Needle Disposal Dispose of insulin needles when they are bent, dull or unsanitary. Do not bother to clip the needle. It could fly off, hurt you, someone or get lost. The entire syringe should be placed in an sealed container (no need to recap) that will not allow the needle to break through. Lancet Disposal Lancets used to collect small blood samples also need to be disposed of in a sanitary manner. Suitable containers for disposing of needles and lancets include a heavy plastic bottle with a screw cap or a metal or plastic box that closes securely. Never use glass or clear plastic. Puncture-proof containers should be sealed with heavy duty tape and labeled, “USED SHARPS. DO NOT RECYCLE” and put in the regular trash. There are also store bought containers that can be purchased and returned to the original company with the dirty needles. Look on diabetic product web sites for these specific containers. Test Strip Disposal Typically people with diabetes dispose of their blood strips in the same waste container as their sharps. Some keep them in a sealed bag and then place them in the sharps contain Continue reading >>

Do You Have Extra Diabetes Supplies You No Longer Need?

Do You Have Extra Diabetes Supplies You No Longer Need?

By Nicole Kofman and Kelly Close Twitter Summary: Learn how you can donate your unused diabetes supplies to help save peoples lives around the world: donate at this link. Before insulin was discovered in 1921, a diabetes diagnosis was often a death sentence. Nearly 100 years later, it still is in many places on our planet. This is particularly true in less developed parts of the world, where hundreds of thousands of people with diabetes don’t have access to the most basic life-saving resources that we often take for granted: insulin, strips, and meters. There are several organizations dedicated to bringing these resources to people across the world with diabetes – Life for a Child, Insulin for Life, Team Type 1 Foundation, and Marjorie’s Fund are just a few. We were fortunate to sit down recently with Dr. Mark and Carol Atkinson, President and Director of Insulin For Life USA (IFL USA), to learn more about their work and how people can get involved. We hugely support the work of IFL USA, which gathers unused diabetes supplies from the U.S. and sends them, free of charge, to people in need in disadvantaged regions. You can learn how to donate your unused supplies (insulin, strips, and more) at this link, and read below why and how IFL USA came to be. What amazing efforts the Atkinsons are making – and this is in addition to all that Dr. Atkinson is already doing at the University of Florida and with the nPOD Program. The Problem As Dr. Atkinson outlined in a recent highly praised piece published in the research journal The Lancet, there are several barriers to accessing diabetes supplies, including: High cost of insulin and blood glucose test strips; Insufficient health system resources applied to diabetes; Lack of diabetes education; and Lack of home refrigerati Continue reading >>

American Diabetes Association, Jdrf And Insulin For Life Respond To Catastrophic Flooding Due To Hurricane Harvey In Texas

American Diabetes Association, Jdrf And Insulin For Life Respond To Catastrophic Flooding Due To Hurricane Harvey In Texas

American Diabetes Association, JDRF and Insulin for Life Respond to Catastrophic Flooding Due to Hurricane Harvey in Texas More than 3,750 pounds of supplies, to serve the Houston, Galveston, Harris County and Corpus Christi communities, will arrive by this Friday, and 1-800-DIABETES to have extended phone hours this week and weekend In a landmark partnership, the American Diabetes Association (ADA), JDRF and Insulin for Life (IFL USA) have secured and shipped more than 3,750 pounds of donated diabetes supplies to people with diabetes affected by Hurricane Harvey. Five pallets, each of which includes 200,000 syringes, 50,000 pen needles and 20,000 alcohol pads, are already en route to the Houston area. Accompanying each pallet are separate packages containing dozens of blood glucose meters along with thousands of glucose test strips and lancets, which will allow an individual to test his or her blood glucose three times per day for nearly two months. More than 25,000 units of analogue and human insulins, in both vial and pen forms, will also be delivered for each pallet, pending safe delivery and temperature control conditions at the locations. One pallet is for immediate distribution by the Houston Health Department to evacuees with diabetes who are sheltered at the George R. Brown Convention Center. The second pallet will be distributed by Sen. Larry Taylors office to the Galveston communities of Clear Creek, Friendswood, League City and Victory Lakes. Two pallets are being delivered to the Harris County Health Department. And the fifth pallet is going to the City of Corpus Christi Health Department. The ADAs Center for Information, 1-800-DIABETES, will have extended phone hours this week to assist anyone in need: - 8:30 a.m. ET to 10:00 p.m. ET, Tuesday, August 29 t Continue reading >>

The Donation Of Supplies Is Key To The Mission Of Ifl Usa

The Donation Of Supplies Is Key To The Mission Of Ifl Usa

Sharing what you no longer need will save lives…. The reasons underlying this tragic and unacceptable circumstance are numerous; the one common thread is that it occurs to each child through no fault of their own. 90,000 children with type 1 diabetes, from over 70 countries, suffer, sometimes even die, for lack of insulin. We collect in-date & unneeded insulin, test strips, as well as other diabetes supplies, and ship them to developing countries. They are then distributed, free of charge, to children and adults with diabetes who otherwise would go without these life saving medications. Continue reading >>

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