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Where Is The Best Injection Site For Insulin?

Suitable Injection Sites

Suitable Injection Sites

Insulin is not absorbed at the same speed at all sites Abdomen and thighs are the most common injection sites.2 At least 1 cm distance from the navel for adults. At least 3 cm distance from the navel for children. Injection sites on the abdomen allow rapid insulin absorption. Injection sites on the thighs and buttocks allow slower insulin absorption for some insulins. The effect of analog insulins is less dependent on the injection site. Follow the recommendations given by your healthcare professional. Rotation principle for injection sites – Avoiding lipohypertrophy Change the injection site after every injection (rotation principle). For adults, the injection sites should be at least 1 cm away from each other to avoid frequent injections into so-called “favourite sites” and thus leading to tissue hardening (lipohypertrophy). Example 1 Example 2 Example 3 2 Upper arms as injection sites: injections into the upper arms should only be performed after training by your healthcare professional. The reason is a higher risk of injecting into the muscle as the subcutaneous fatty tissue is usually thin and injection sites are not easily accessible. Continue reading >>

Injection Sites

Injection Sites

Tweet If you inject insulin regularly, you will need to vary the areas of skin you inject your insulin into to ensure your insulin gets absorbed consistently. Also, by rotating your injection sites, you can avoid developing stiffer, lumpy skin helping you to feel happier. Which areas can be injected into? Ideal areas to inject into are parts of the body with a decent layer of fat. The belly, upper arms, thighs and buttocks are commonly used. Note that some parts of the body absorb insulin quicker than other parts. The quickest area to be absorbed from is the belly, followed by the upper arm, then the thighs and lastly the buttocks. [24] Charity Diabetes UK warn that the arm may not always be a suitable injection for people with less body fat [25] as there is a greater chance of injecting into a muscle which could lead to hypoglycemia. Injecting in the same general area for the same type of meal To have consistent absorption of insulin, it’s recommended to inject in the same general area of the body for the same type of meal. For example, for breakfast it may be a good idea to inject short term or bolus insulin into the belly. For long acting or basal insulin, it might be beneficial to inject into the legs or buttocks. You can discuss which injection site is best for each meal with your health team. Rotating your injection sites If you inject regularly, it’s recommended to ‘rotate’ your injection sites. Rotating your injection site means using a different spot to inject into to prevent injecting into the same place each time. For example, if you injected into the left side of your belly yesterday at breakfast, you could inject into the right side of your belly for the next day’s breakfast. You’ll soon need to inject into the left side of your belly again, but Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection Sites

Insulin Injection Sites

If you use insulin, you will have various injection sites for use in injecting exogenous insulin. The most common site for injecting insulin is the stomach or abdomen. Other common areas include the upper part of the arms, the upper aspect of the hips or buttocks, and the outer aspect of the thighs. These are the best places to inject insulin because: These are parts of the body that have the most fatty tissue beneath the skin. Insulin needs to be injected into fatty tissue and in areas of the body that don’t have that many nerves. Injecting insulin in areas of the body that don’t have many nerves means that you will have less pain during the injection. These are areas of the body that have the most subcutaneous tissue. Insulin is usually injected into the subcutaneous tissue located in the above-mentioned areas. The best areas to inject insulin are dependent upon your body type. Some people find that putting insulin into the abdomen is preferable because it seems to absorb better in that area. For those who cannot pinch up at least a half-inch of fat on their abdomen need to look elsewhere for areas to inject insulin. Your doctor can help you decide which areas of the body are best for injecting insulin. Both the degree of insulin absorption and the places you rotate for the injections will be considered. Rotating Insulin Injection Sites If you have type 1 diabetes and inject insulin at least three times daily, you will need to consider rotating injection sites as it is not a good idea to inject insulin into the same site every time. Doing so can cause lumps of hard tissue or extra fatty deposits to occur within the tissues. The lumps will look bad and will absorb insulin at a different rate when compared to normal fatty tissue so it will be harder to keep your blo Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection Areas

Insulin Injection Areas

Look at the dark pink areas on these pictures to find areas of the body where insulin is injected. Inject insulin into: The abdomen, but at least 2 in. (5.1 cm) inches from the belly button. The abdomen is the best place to inject insulin, because your abdomen area can absorb insulin most consistently. The top outer area of the thighs. Insulin usually is absorbed more slowly from this site, unless you exercise soon after injecting insulin into your legs. The upper outer area of the arms. The buttocks. Rotate the location of the injection, and slightly change the injection spot each time you inject insulin. Using the same spot every time can form bumps or pits in the skin. For example, inject your insulin above your belly button, then the next time use your upper thigh, then the next time below your belly button. Continue reading >>

Rotating Your Injection Sites

Rotating Your Injection Sites

If you inject insulin three or more times a day then it’s a good idea to rotate your injection sites. Injecting in the same place much of the time can cause hard lumps or extra fat deposits to develop. These lumps are not only unsightly; they can also change the way insulin is absorbed, making it more difficult to keep your blood glucose on target. Follow these two rules for proper site rotation: Same general location at the same time each day. Rotate within each injection site. Same Time, Same General Location Insulin is absorbed at different speeds depending on where you inject, so it's best to consistently use the same part of the body for each of your daily injections. For example, do not inject your lunch bolus dose in the abdomen on Monday and in the thigh on Tuesday. If you have picked the thigh for your evening injection, then continue to use the thigh for all of your evening injections. According to Eli Lilly, the leading manufacturer of insulin, most insulin enters the blood: Fastest from the abdomen (stomach) A little slower from the arms Even slower from the legs Slowest from the buttocks Unless your doctor has told you otherwise, it is a good idea to inject your breakfast and lunch bolus doses into the abdomen. Insulin is absorbed fastest when injected into this area. Fast absorption is needed at mealtimes to cover the carbohydrates you are about to eat. On the other hand, your supper or bedtime dose of long-acting insulin could be injected into the thigh, buttocks, or upper arm. That's because you want the long-acting insulin to take effect gradually and cover your needs throughout the night. If you mix two types of insulin in one shot, you can inject into the abdomen, arm, thigh, or buttocks. Rotate Within an Injection Site To avoid developing hard lump Continue reading >>

How To Give Injections To Cats

How To Give Injections To Cats

Daily injections of insulin for your cat? The thought may at seem daunting, but with practice the injecting of insulin in your cat will become second nature. These instructions will give you the information you need to perform injections of cat insulin with confidence. Pre-Injection Establish a pleasant routine: You should be injecting at about the same time every day. Begin with petting or grooming or maybe even a low-carb, high protein treat. (Or a tiny amount of anything they love.) At first, keep the syringe hidden or disguised. Cats do not have the clearest eyesight, so you have some leeway here. As long as the syringe is not initially in my hand ( I hold it sideways by the barrel in my mouth!), Austin is OK with my approach. After the cat becomes used to the routine, you probably won't have to do this. Many cats can be trained by verbal commands to come get their shots. If hiding the syringe while you play is too hard, consider using the CAPPED syringe to rub all over your cat. Austin liked to have his face scratched with it, but I do have a little trouble getting him to leave the syringe alone once I uncap it for the injection. Get on the same level as your cat: you down on the floor, cat up on a bed or counter, or in your lap. Do not assume a threatening posture (e.g. looming over the cat.) Make yourself comfortable:Get into a comfortable position, and make sure your body is in a position relative to the cat that makes injection easy. For example, if you plan to inject in the neck with your right hand, make sure the cat is facing toward your left or at a right angle to you. Performing the Injection Keep your movements smooth. Tent the cat's skin: Grasp the cat's skin between your thumb and index finger (fingers about an inch apart) and pinch firmly to tent the s Continue reading >>

Choosing Best Body Site For An Insulin Shot

Choosing Best Body Site For An Insulin Shot

In the past, doctors and nurses told patients to rotate their insulin shots to different sites on their bodies. Now we know that it's best to take insulin shots in the part of the body that matches the insulin action a person wants. See Illustration: Sites for Injecting Insulin Injection Areas and Action Insulin enters the bloodstream faster from some areas of the body than from others. Where you take your shot can affect your blood sugar levels. Generally, insulin enters the blood: Fastest from the abdomen (stomach area). A little slower from the arms. Even more slowly from the legs. Slowest from the buttocks. Exercising can also speed up the amount of time it takes for the insulin to enter your blood. You can figure out where to take your shot based on how quickly or slowly you want the insulin to enter your bloodstream. For example, if you're going to be exercising, such as walking or doing any kind of lifting, you probably don't want to take your shot in your leg or arm. Exercising those areas quickens the amount of time it takes for the insulin to get into your blood stream. This can cause your blood sugar to drop suddenly during or right after you exercise. If you plan to eat right after taking your shot, you might use a site on your stomach. That way the insulin will be available faster to handle the rise in your blood sugar after the meal. Rotate Sites in the Same Area Follow these guidelines when you choose a site to take your shot. Try to be consistent in where you take your shots. Always take your shot of fast-acting insulin in the stomach or arm. Take slower-acting insulin in the leg or buttocks. Try to avoid using the exact spot you used for your last shot. For example, space your next shot just an inch or so from your last previous shot. If you use the sam Continue reading >>

Best Practices For Injecting Insulin And Inserting Infusions

Best Practices For Injecting Insulin And Inserting Infusions

How you inject insulin or insert an infusion set can have a big impact on how insulin is absorbed in your body. A team of experts on injections and infusions have outlined new comprehensive recommendations on strategies for injecting and inserting infusions for people with diabetes. These recommendations have been published in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings. They were sparked by a large international survey of current practice and were then written and vetted by 183 diabetes experts from 54 countries at the FITTER workshop in Rome, Italy in 2015. Many people with diabetes rely on insulin, but something that is often overlooked yet, crucial are the factors involved in injecting insulin or inserting infusions. If the correct method isn’t used, insulin therapy may be negatively impacted which may prevent blood sugar management. Everyone can use a 4mm long needle. Children have slightly less thick skin as adults until they go through puberty. The 4-mm needle length for both injections and infusions work to get through the skin and access the subcutaneous fat where insulin needs to be delivered, even in obese persons. Needles shorter than 4-mm are not recommended. The safest currently available syringe needle for all patients is 6-mm needle. Children using a 5-mm pen needle should be switched to 4-mm pen needles and if they cannot, they should use a lifted skin fold to inject. Be careful not to inject into muscle. Care needs to be taken in children and thin individuals in order to avoid intramuscular injections since this can lead to unexpected low blood sugar episodes due to faster insulin absorption. Injections into muscle can also lead to unnecessary pain, bruising, and bleeding. Be sure to take inconsideration the amount of fat in an area, the length of a needle, and the Continue reading >>

The Dos And Don'ts Of Insulin Injections

The Dos And Don'ts Of Insulin Injections

When diet, exercise, and oral medications aren’t enough to manage type 2 diabetes, it may be time for insulin. The most important aspect of insulin therapy is using it exactly as prescribed. Still, remembering all the little details can be tricky, and certain mistakes are common. By following these dos and don’ts, you can avoid medication mishaps and keep insulin working as it should. DO: Rotate the insertion site (while keeping the body part consistent). “Insulin is absorbed at different speeds depending on where you inject it, so it’s best to consistently use the same part of the body for each of your daily injections,” says Doreen Riccelli, BSN, director of education at Lake Pointe Medical Center in Rowlett, Texas. “For example, don’t inject yourself in the abdomen on Saturday and in the thigh on Sunday,” she says. “If you choose the thigh for your evening injection, then use the thigh for all of your evening injections.” That said, within the specific body area, it’s important to move each injection site at least one finger’s width from the previous injection site to avoid the creation of hard lumps or extra fat deposits, which could change the way insulin is absorbed. DON’T: Store insulin incorrectly. Insulin can generally be stored at room temperature (59 to 86° F), either opened or unopened, for one month. When kept in the refrigerator, unopened bottles last until the expiration date printed on the bottle. Opened bottles stored in the refrigerator should be used or discarded after a month. Never store insulin in direct sunlight, in the freezer, or near heating or air conditioning vents, ovens, or radiators. It should also not be left in a very warm or cold car. Store it in an insulated case if needed. DO: Work closely with your doctor. Continue reading >>

How To Improve The Insulin Injection Experience

How To Improve The Insulin Injection Experience

If you have type 1 diabetes, or if you have type 2 and have recently begun injecting insulin, you may have a bit of trouble getting used to the process of preparing and administering your own insulin shots. Andrea Penney, RN, CDE, of the Joslin Diabetes Center, says that injection technique is important to master not only for accurate dosing, but for comfort, too. "With proper practice and good technique, you can avoid pain during an injection," she states. Penney sat down with us recently to answer some common questions about insulin injection. If after reading and practicing insulin injections you still find you’re having trouble, Penney suggests seeing a Certified Diabetes Educator for more assistance. Q: How do I decide where to inject? A: People often select injection sites based on many factors: accessibility, presence of fatty tissue, and rate of insulin absorption (which will be discussed shortly). As a result, popular sites for injection include the stomach, outer thigh, the back of the arm (between the shoulder and the elbow), or the upper outside "wallet" area of the buttock (but not into the lower buttock area). Q: Once I decide on a location for an injection, how do I pick the right "spot"? A: Here are some easy guidelines: -Stomach If you’re going to inject into the stomach, stay at least two inches away from the bellybutton and/or any scars you may already have when using the abdomen for injections. -Thigh For an injection in your thigh, inject at least four inches or about one hand’s width above the knee and at least four inches down from the top of the leg. Do not inject insulin into your inner thigh because of the large number of blood vessels and nerves in this area. - Arm The area between the shoulder and elbow on the outside of the arm is usua Continue reading >>

Where Is The Best Place To Give Yourself Insulin Shots?

Where Is The Best Place To Give Yourself Insulin Shots?

A: Insulin must be given into subcutaneous fatty tissue in order to absorb correctly. The preferred sites are the fatty tissue in the back of the upper arm, the abdomen (avoiding the belly button), the area on the top, middle outer aspect of the thigh, and the top of the buttock. Of these sites none is better than the others; it really depends on what is most convenient for you and the plan you have for rotating the injection sites. For instance, if you use the thigh for your morning Humalog before breakfast, then you may want to use the back of the arm for your lunchtime dose and your abdomen for your evening dose. Some people adjust their injection sites based upon how high their blood glucose level is, using the abdomen for quickest absorption and the buttock for slowest. However, with the newer insulins, injection site choice has less effect on absorption than was the case with NPH and regular insulin. Levemir is not approved for use in the buttock area, so this site should be avoided for your Levemir dose. Concerning how far apart to give Humalog and Levemir, we recommend injecting Humalog and Levemir at least 3 inches apart. Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection Sites: Where And How To Inject

Insulin Injection Sites: Where And How To Inject

Insulin is a hormone that helps cells use glucose (sugar) for energy. It works as a “key,” allowing the sugar to go from the blood and into the cell. In type 1 diabetes, the body doesn’t make insulin. In type 2 diabetes, the body doesn’t use insulin correctly, which can lead to the pancreas not being able to produce enough — or any, depending on the progression of the disease —insulin to meet your body’s needs. Diabetes is normally managed with diet and exercise, with medications, including insulin, added as needed. If you have type 1 diabetes, insulin is required for life. This may seem difficult at first, but you can learn to successfully administer insulin with the support of your healthcare team, determination, and a little practice. There are different ways to take insulin, including syringes, insulin pens, insulin pumps, and jet injectors. Your doctor will help you decide which technique is best for you. Syringes remain a common method of insulin delivery. They’re the least expensive option, and most insurance companies cover them. Syringes Syringes vary by the amount of insulin they hold and the size of the needle. They’re made of plastic and should be discarded after one use. Traditionally, needles used in insulin therapy were 12.7 millimeters (mm) in length. Recent research shows that smaller 8 mm, 6 mm, and 4 mm needles are just as effective, regardless of body mass. This means insulin injection is less painful than it was in the past. Insulin is injected subcutaneously, which means into the fat layer under the skin. In this type of injection, a short needle is used to inject insulin into the fatty layer between the skin and the muscle. Insulin should be injected into the fatty tissue just below your skin. If you inject the insulin deeper int Continue reading >>

Why A Change In Location Is Good… For Your Insulin Injections

Why A Change In Location Is Good… For Your Insulin Injections

We all know the health reasons behind changing your lancet and keeping sterile needles for insulin. But why should it matter where on your body you inject? In actuality, where you inject your insulin and how often you inject it there can have some considerable impacts on the rate of insulin absorption and changes in skin texture around the injection site. The best way to avoid complications from over-injecting in the same place is to constantly change where you inject and use a system of injection site rotation. One major motivator for alternating your insulin injection spots is to avoid lipohypertrophy – the accumulation of fat cells under the skin. When the tissue thickens, lumps of fat can form around the injection site and can slow the absorption of insulin into your blood stream by as much as 25%[1]. Another side effect is liposatrophy, where the fat beneath the skin’s surface becomes depleted and can give a dimpled appearance. While these conditions (collectively known as lypodystrophy) are not life threatening, they can result in less stable blood glucose levels since an increase of insulin resistance can occur at the injection site and may require higher doses of insulin over time. Where you inject also matters because different parts of your body intake the insulin differently. The most sensitive and fast absorbing area is your stomach and decreases in the rate of insulin uptake in the arms, then legs, and buttocks. When you are injecting for fast acting or slow release insulin you’ll want to take this into consideration. If you need an insulin dose before you hit the gym or take that evening jog, it is best to avoid injecting in the arm or thigh as the increase in blood flow to these areas can speed up the insulin absorption. Whether you are new to insul Continue reading >>

Best Insulin Injection Sites: Absorption Time And Rotation

Best Insulin Injection Sites: Absorption Time And Rotation

Insulin is a hormone that helps manage diabetes when it is injected into the body. It can't be taken as a pill or oral medication. This is because the enzymes in the stomach will break down the insulin before it reaches the bloodstream. Insulin injections are one of many ways to treat and manage diabetes. Others include dietary and lifestyle changes, and oral medications. For people who require insulin injections, there are different types of insulin available. It is important to understand and follow the instructions that the doctor provides about how and where to inject insulin. Common injection sites Insulin is injected into the layer of fat directly under this skin, known as subcutaneous tissue. It is injected with a small needle or a device that looks like a pen. There are several different sites where insulin can be injected, including: Abdomen The abdomen is a common site for insulin injection that many people with diabetes choose to use. To give an injection into the abdomen, take a pinch of the fatty tissue from either side between the waist and the hipbones. It should be about 2 inches away from the belly button. This site is easy to access and some people report that it causes less discomfort than other sites. Upper Arms The upper arm is another site where insulin injections can be given. The needle should be placed into the back of the arm (tricep area), about halfway between the elbow and the shoulder. The main disadvantage of this site is that it is very difficult to use for self-administration and may require somebody else to do it. It may be more comfortable to inject into the non-dominant arm. This means injecting into the left arm of a right-handed person or the right arm of a left-handed person. Thighs The thigh is also a very easy area for self-injec Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection

Insulin Injection

Insulin injection is used to control blood sugar in people who have type 1 diabetes (condition in which the body does not make insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) or in people who have type 2 diabetes (condition in which the blood sugar is too high because the body does not produce or use insulin normally) that cannot be controlled with oral medications alone. Insulin injection is in a class of medications called hormones. Insulin injection is used to take the place of insulin that is normally produced by the body. It works by helping move sugar from the blood into other body tissues where it is used for energy. It also stops the liver from producing more sugar. All of the types of insulin that are available work in this way. The types of insulin differ only in how quickly they begin to work and how long they continue to control blood sugar. Over time, people who have diabetes and high blood sugar can develop serious or life-threatening complications, including heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, nerve damage, and eye problems. Using medication(s), making lifestyle changes (e.g., diet, exercise, quitting smoking), and regularly checking your blood sugar may help to manage your diabetes and improve your health. This therapy may also decrease your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes-related complications such as kidney failure, nerve damage (numb, cold legs or feet; decreased sexual ability in men and women), eye problems, including changes or loss of vision, or gum disease. Your doctor and other healthcare providers will talk to you about the best way to manage your diabetes. Insulin comes as a solution (liquid) and a suspension (liquid with particles that will settle on standing) to be injected subcutaneousl Continue reading >>

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